The Short Family

Alfred Valentine Short

Birth: 14 February 1871 in Natal

Baptism: 18 April 1878, in St Pauls, Durban, Natal
The baptism was sponsored by Ellen Short, John A. McKay and Martin Short.

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Married: Annie Louise Cooper on 3 August 1895 in Kilburn St Mary, Hampstead, London

Annie was born in 1873/4, in Kilburn, London.
Census & Addresses:
1911: Willesden, Middlesex: Annie Louise Short is aged 37, born in Kilburn, London
1917: 6 Richmond Avenue, Cliftonville, Margate, Kent   (Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Children:
Occupation: Clerk (1891), Stockbroker
London Daily Mail 30 November 1911
It is officially announced that Mr. Alfred Valentine Short (trading as Martin Short and Co.) was yesterday declared a defaulter on the Stock Exchange.

Death: 1912, in Willesden district, Middlesex, England, aged 41

Census:
1881: Durban Lodge, St John Hampstead, Middlesex
1891: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1911: Willesden, Middlesex: Alfred Valentine Short is aged 39, born in Natal, South Africa

Sources:

Alice Short

Birth: 30 April 1866, in Pietermaritzburg, Natal

Baptism: 18 April 1878, in St Pauls, Durban, Natal
The baptism was sponsored by Ann Charlotte Wood, Ellen Short and Martin Short.

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Census:
1881: Durban Lodge, St John Hampstead, Middlesex
1891: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1901: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1911: Hampstead, London: Alice Short is aged 44, born in South Africa

Sources:

Charles Ernest Short

Birth: 1879 in Kilburn, Middlesex, England

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Married: Daisy Emily Laverton in 1945, in Bournemouth district, Hampshire, England

Daisy was born in 1898, in Frome, Somerset, the daughter of Francis George Laverton and Mary Newbury.
Census:
1901: Kilmersdon, Somerset: Daisy Laverton, daughter, is aged 2, born in Frome, Somerset
1911: Frome, Somerset: Daisy Laverton is aged 12, born in Frome, Somerset

Census:
1881: Durban Lodge, St John Hampstead, Middlesex
1891: Margate, Kent: Chas Short, pupil, is aged 12, born in London

Sources:

Clifford Harry Short

Birth: 1901 in Cricklewood, Middlesex, England

Father: Alfred Valentine Short

Mother: Annie Louise (Cooper) Short

Married: Ruth Elizabeth Hurrell in 1936, in Wirral district, Cheshire, England

Ruth was born in 1908 in Birkenhead, Cheshire, the daughter of James Ross Hurrell and Sarah Catherine Lloyd. She died in 1999.
Census:
1911: Birkenhead, Cheshire: Ruth Elizabeth Hurrell, daughter, is aged 3, born in Birkenhead, Cheshire

Death: 1997, in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England

Census:
1911: Fairfield, Derbyshire: Clifford Harry Short, boarder, is aged 10, born in Cricklewood, Middlesex

Sources:

Ellen Margaret Terry (Short) Coullie

Birth: 4 August 1890 in Kilburn, Middlesex, England

Baptism: 21 September 1890 in Kilburn St Mary, London, England

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Married: Kenneth Ruthven Coullie on 12 December 1914, in the English Church, Batavia, Dutch East Indies
The Straits Times 22 December 1914 p8
  COULLIE—SHORT.—At Batavia, on December12, by W. R. D. Beckett, Esq, C.M.G., H. B. M's Consul-General, and afterwards at the English Church, by Rev. P. N. Hunter, Kenneth Ruthven Coullie, of the Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, to Ellen Margaret Terry, daughter of the late Martin Short, Esq., D'Urban Lodge, West Hampstead.

Kenneth was born on 9 February 1883, in Midlothian, Scotland, the son of James Coullie and Margaret Alice Brodie. He was a banker, working for the Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China in the East Indies. In 1905 he is listed working for that bank in Singapore (Journal of the Institute of Bankers 1905 p64), then Kuala Lampur and Manila, transferring to Calcutta in 1911 (The Straits Times 20 November 1911 p6). He was at Sourabaya, Java, in 1917 (The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser 18 October 1917 p241), at Cebu, Phillipines in 1923 (The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser 14 August 1923 p6) and in 1925 Kenneth went to Ipoh in the Federated Malay States, aboard the Karmala to take charge of that branch of the Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China (The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser 16 March 1925 p12). Kenneth and Ellen returned to England from Ipoh in 1929.
The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser 17 December 1928 p5
  Mr. K. R. Coullie, Agent in Ipoh for the Chartered Bank, is leaving by the Malwa with Mrs. Coullie this week and will break the journey Home by spending Christmas at Newara Eliya. Both will be greatly missed in Perak, where they have been connected with much public charitable work. Mr. Coullie's place is being taken by Mr. T. P. Nailer, who was for several years in Kuala Lampur.

Kenneth died in 1956, in Cheltenham district, Gloucestershire, England, aged 72
Census:
1891: Pencaitland, East Lothian: Kenneth Ruthven Coullie is aged 8, born in Midlothian

Death: 4 May 1977

Census:
1891: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1901: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1911: Hampstead, London: Ellen Margaret Terry Short is aged 20, born in Hampstead, London

Sources:

Elsie Constance Grosvenor Short

Birth: 1881 in Kilburn, Middlesex, England

Baptism: 6 May 1891 in Kilburn St Mary, London, England

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Married: John Maw Hall in 17 February 1906, in Kilburn St Mary, London, England

Children:
Death: 1960, in Scarborough district, Yorkshire North Riding, England, aged 79

Census:
1881: Durban Lodge, St John Hampstead, Middlesex
1891: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1901: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1911: East Layton, Forcett and Carkin, Yorkshire North Riding: Elsie Hall is aged 29, born in Hampstead, London

Sources:

Frank Everest Short

Birth: 1883 in West Hampstead, Middlesex, England

Baptism: 6 May 1891 in Kilburn St Mary, London, England

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Married (1st): Elizabeth Irvine-Smith on 7 October 1908, in Southfields St Michael and All Angels, Wandsworth, London, England
Frank Everest Short is recorded as a bachelor, aged 25, a stockbroker's clerk, resident at Montnessing, Essex. He is the son of Martin Short, stockbroker. Elizabeth Irvine-Smith is recorded as a spinster, aged 28, resident at 27 Wimbledon Park Road. She is the daughter of Robert Douglas Irvine-Smith, gentleman.

Elizabeth was born in 1879/80, in St Giles, Edinburgh, Scotland, the daughter of Robert Douglas Irvine-Smith.
Census:
1911: Ingatestone & Fryerning, Essex: Elizabeth Short is aged 30, born in St Giles, Edinburgh

Children:
Gusti Pichler
Gusti Pichler as "Abendstern" in "Bal Costumé", Redoutensaal (1925)
photograph by Atelier Setzer, posted at Kunst Historisches Museum Wien
Gusti Pichler
Gusti Pichler
photograph by Edith Glogau, posted at Kunst Historisches Museum Wien
Gusti Pichler Gravestone
The gravestone of Gusti Pichler in Zentralfriedhof, Vienna, Austria
photograph from Kunst und Kultur in Wien
Married (2nd): Augusta Rosa "Gusti" Pichler

Auguste was born on 10 October 1893, in Vienna, Austria-Hungary. She was a ballerina, known by her professional name "Gusti Pichler". Gusti trained at the Ballettschule der Wiener Hofoper starting when she was only ten years old. She was picked for tuition at La Scala in Milan, at that time the world's premier ballet school, but declined due to her young age, remaining in Vienna. She joined the Vienna company in 1908, becoming a soloist in 1913 and ballerina in 1920. From 1924 until 1935 she was the principal, or prima, ballerina, at the Vienna State Opera. Among her most important roles were Swanilda in Coppélia, Darinka in Die roten Schuhe, the title role in Die Prinzessin von Tragant, Princess Praliné in Schlagobers and the title role in Fanny Elßler. Gusti also appeared in silent era films, notably playing Gräfin Esterhazy in Franz Schuberts letzte Liebe in 1926. A video of Gusti dancing The Blue Danube at the Vienna Opera House in 1935 can be viewed at British Pathé TV. George Jackson describes the dancing seen in the clip:
The first shot shows her and the female corps doing small changements that culminate in a forward kick. It is a finely nuanced sequence rhythmically. Then, when Pichler is partnered in arabesques, attitudes and pirouettes, she seems tight in the upper torso. Her best passage is unfurling from a forward bend while gliding backwards in bourrees. The climax is a big leap into her partner’s arms during which Gusti Pichler keeps her posture neatly.

George Jackson describes meeting Gusti in 1969 at the 100th anniversary of the Vienna Opera House:
Three Dancers from the Day before Yesterday (11 December 2011)
I spotted a lady with silver hair, wearing a dark blue tailored skirt suit and carrying herself erectly. A bit of turn-out showed in her steps. Surely this woman had been a ballet dancer. As she approached, her features were unmistakably those in photographs from Gusti Pichler’s career, although of course it was an older face now. Following greetings and introductions, the three of us repaired to the restaurant Mme. Pichler habitually had patronized after performances – the Goesserstube. Its head waiter recognized her instantly. She ordered Tafelspitz as her main course and when it arrived sent back that first serving as being overdone.
...
A family friend of mine, the Viennese poet and sculptor Hedwig Peitlschmidt, had known Gusti Pichler when they were girls in the same primary school class. My friend said that Gusti came from very poor circumstances. Their teacher used to ask for donations of clothing from those in the class who could afford to give; Gusti had been a recipient. One would never have guessed it about the elegant lady with whom Hope and I were dining. Ballet served not only as her art but also as the staircase in life on which she had ascended. No question but that Gusti Pichler, ballerina, had achieved style and class. She spent her last days not in London but again in Vienna.

Gusti died on 13 April 1978, in Vienna, Austria, and is buried in Zentralfriedhof, Vienna (Gruppe 40, Nr. 56). Her address at the time of her death was Starhemberggasse, 1040, Vienna.
Occupation: Frank was a stockbroker's clerk at the time of his marriage in 1908Frank served in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps in World War I. He was appointed temporary lieutenant on 6 October 1914 (London Gazette 2 October 1914 p7901) and promoted to temporary captain while holding a special appointment on 26 May 1915 (London Gazette 2 November 1915 p10900), reverting to temporary lieutenant on 22 October 1915 (London Gazette 12 November 1915 p11208). On 22 June 1917 he was a temporary lieutenant and promoted to the rank of acting captain (London Gazette 2 November 1917 p11455). Frank remained in the reserve of officers, reaching the rank of major, until 25 June 1938 when he reached the age limit of liability to recall (London Gazette 28 June 1938 p4171).

Frank became a businessman, managing the interests in Vienna of Bickford & Co., a manufacturer of fuses for explosives. In 1939 he and Gusti escaped to Cairo with the help of Albert Goering, the brother of Hermann Goering. That help formed part of Albert's defence at the Nuremburg trials following the war.
Goering and Goering: Hitler's Henchman and His Anti-Nazi Brother p75
  Albert [Goering] also made a close connection with two English businessmen, Leonard Bickford-Smith and his second-in-command, Major Frank Short mbe. Leonard had moved to Austria to oversee factories run by his company, a family firm stretching back to the 1830s which was based on the inventions of William Bickford. He had designed a ‘safety’ fuse for explosive charges that would burn at a uniform rate. The fuse became the global standard. In 1844 the company built a factory in Austria at Weiner-Neustadt.
 ...
 Albert knew Leonard well, but his constant travelling meant that Albert was closer to his man in Vienna, Major Frank Short.
  The major was married to the Austrian ballet star, Gusti Pichler, a prima ballerina at the world famous Vienna Opera who had appeared in several films. By 1939 the climate of Nazi terror was too hot to handle. The major was English, his wife was Jewish, her celebrity as a dancer offering no protection. Albert stepped in, sorted out the necessary travel documents, visas and tickets, and got them out of Europe to Cairo, where the major enlisted in the Royal Engineers. He appears as the twenty-ninth name on Albert's Nuremberg list.
  By 1940 the factories in Austria and Bratislava had been taken over by Dynamit AG, and therefore, IG Farben. What was left of Bickford's firm was salvaged by Albert: ‘I received 1,000 marks per month from a British company, whose President I was. The name ... was Bickford and Co Ltd, of Vienna ... This was headed by a Major Frank Short, who left Vienna for Cairo when all this Nazi trouble came up, and he asked me to take over the company for him and take care of his interests until after the war’
  
Death: 3 February 1953 in Paddington district, London, England, aged 69

Census:
1891: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1911: Ingatestone & Fryerning, Essex: Frank Everist Short is aged 28, born in West Hampstead, Middlesex

Sources:

Frederick Martin Short

Birth: 15 July 1874 in Pietermaritzburg, Natal

Baptism: 18 April 1878, in St Pauls, Durban, Natal
The baptism was sponsored by Robert Patrick NcNair, Martin Short and Ellen Short.

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Married: Ellen Gwendoline Murray on 11 March 1911 in Calcutta, Bengal, India
Frederick Martin Short is recorded as single, aged 36, the son of Martin Short. Ellen Gwendoline Murray is recorded as single, aged 19, the daughter of Victor Joseph Alexander Murray.

Ellen was born on 23 January 1892 and baptised on 5 March 1892, in Poona, Bombay, India, the daughter of Joseph Alexander Victor Emmanuel Murray and Khuple Drury Tamy Illustua.

Occupation: Electrical Engineer and Ship and Insurance Broker.
Frederick was awarded a United Kingdom patent for a rheostat in 1904. In 1906, Frederick was working for Balmer, Lawrie and Co., at 103 Clive Street, Calcutta (Journal and Record of Transactions - Junior Institution of Engineers 1906 pxlvi).

Western Electrician 1 April 1899 p187
Electrical Development in Burma.
[From the Rangoon Gazette]
  At the works of the Burma Ruby Mines, Limited, Mogok, there has just been successfully set to work a large electrical power and light installation, and as this is the first of its kind to be introduced into Burma, a short description will be of interest.
  Owing to scarcity of wood and other causes, the annual fuel bill at the mines has always been a very important consideration, and it was in order to reduce this heavy item of cost as much as possible that Mr. A. H. Morgan, the company's able engineer, first directed his attention some two years ago to the feasibility of utilizing some of the water power which abounds in the vicinity for working the mines. After an inspection of some of the leading mines in South Africa which have adopted electricity as a form of power, an order was placed with Messrs. Johnson and Phillips of London for a complete plant, comprising turbine, dynamo, transformers, line material, motors, pumps, arc lamps, etc., and the whole of this has now been erected and is working with the greatest satisfaction.
  Power is taken from a neighboring river at some falls about a mile and a half from the mines. A strongly built house has been erected on the river bank, and in this the turbine and dynamo are placed which are capable of delivering 130 brake or useful horse power at the mines. The turbine is of the Pelton wheel class and runs at a speed of 110 revolutions per minute, under a head of water of 60 feet. It is provided with a large grooved fly-wheel for rope driving. The dynamo is a two-phase, alternating-current machine of special design for power work, and runs at a speed of 450 revolutions per minute.
  From this power house the current, at a pressure of 2,200 volts, is taken overhead (long bare copper wires, supported on large porcelain insulators, fixed to poles placed at suitable distances apart) to another building known as the transformer house, erected in a convenient position at the mines, where it is transformed down to a lower and safe pressure for working the motors. These motors are employed in driving pumps and other machinery about the mines, and owing to the highly increased economy attained by this system, it is expected that steam power will shortly be done away with altogether and electricity substituted in its place.
  Several arc lamps, each of 2,000 candle power, are used for lighting the mines and are found to be a great improvement over the old method of oil lighting, while a telephone service connects the power and transformer houses, so that communication between the two can be readily established at any time.
  Mr H. Shaw Dunn, the assistant engineer, was responsible for the erection of the plant, which was finally supervised and started at work by Mr. F. M. Short, who is a member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, and is the electrical engineer for Balmer, Lawrie & Co. of Calcutta, who are the sole agents out here for Johnson & Phillips.


The Electrical Engineer 31 March 1899 p394
   Electric Lighting in India.—We gather from Indian Engineering that a scheme is under consideration for lighting Calcutta Government House and its grounds by electricity. Plans are being drawn up and estimates prepared, and it is expected that work will be completed before the return of the Viceroy from the hills next cold season. In the same issue of our contemporary there is a description of a private installation recently laid down in Calcutta, in which machinery supplied by Messrs. Johnson and Phillips has been used. It provides current for some 200 lamps, and comprises everything required, from the boilers, engines, dynamos, and accumulators to the lamps themselves. Mr. F. M. Short, who also put down the plant at the Burma ruby mines, has been responsible for the carrying out of the work.

Frederick also worked on a project to provide electrical light to the city of Lashkar in Gwalior, central India in 1905.

London Gazette 3 August 1923 p5384
Notice is hereby given, that the partnership heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned, Alexander Cassels Berryman and Frederick Martin Short, carrying on business as Ship and Insurance Brokers, at Australia House, Strand, in the county of London, under the style or firm of  “BERRYMAN & SHORT,” has been dissolved by mutual consent, and as from the 31st day of July, 1923. All debts owing to or owing by the late firm will be received and paid by the said Alexander Cassels Berryman, by whom the said business will in future be carried on, at Australia House, aforesaid, as heretofore, under the name or style of Berryman & Short.—As witness our hands this 30th day of July, 1923.
A. C. BERRYMAN


Notes: Frederick arrived in New York on 27 August 1908 aboard the Carmania. He is recorded as 34 years old, an electrical engineer of British nationality and resident in Calcutta, India. His nearest relative is his father, Martin Short, of D'Urban Lodge, West Hampstead and Frederick is staying at the Manhattan Hotel in New York. He is described as 5'8½" tall, of clear complexion with light hair and brown eyes. He was born in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.

Census & Addresses:
1881: Durban Lodge, St John Hampstead, Middlesex
1891: Charlton next Woolwich, London: Frederick M. Short, boarder, is aged 16, born in Cape Colony
1906: 235 Lower Circular Road, Calcutta, Bengal and D'Urban Lodge, Woodchurch Road, West Hampstead
1908: Calcutta, India   (manifest of the Carmania 27 August 1908)

Sources:

Frederick Valentine Short

Birth: 1896 in Cricklewood, Middlesex, England

Father: Alfred Valentine Short

Mother: Annie Louise (Cooper) Short

Occupation: Frederick served in World War I as a private in No. 1 Company of the 3rd Battalion of the Grenadier Guards.

Death: 27 November 1917, in France, during the Battle of Cambrai, aged 21
Frederick name is memorialised on Panel 2 of the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France

Census:

1911: Fairfield, Derbyshire: Frederick Valentine Short, boarder, is aged 14, born in Cricklewood, Middlesex

Sources:

Herbert Clifford Short

Birth: 4 May 1877 in Durban, Natal

Baptism: 18 April 1878, in St Pauls, Durban, Natal
The baptism was sponsored by Ellen Short, Arthur ? and Martin Short.

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Married: Alice Maude Cotchin in 1914, in Hampstead district, London, England

Alice was born in 1889, in Ashford, Kent, the daughter of William Arthur Cotchin and Elizabeth Ellen Simson.
Census:
1891: St Mary At the Walls, Essex: Alice M. Cotchin, daughter, is aged 1, born in Ashford, Kent
1901: Saffron Walden, Essex: Alice Maude Cotchin, daughter, is aged 11, born in Ashford, Kent
1911: Hampstead, London: Alice Maud Cotchin is aged 21, born in Ashford, Kent

Occupation: Stock Exchange Clerk (1901)

Census:
1881: Durban Lodge, St John Hampstead, Middlesex
1891: Margate, Kent: Herbert Short, pupil, is aged 14, born in Durban, Africa (British Subject)
1901: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1911: Hampstead, London: Herbert Clifford Short is aged 34, born in South Africa

Sources:

Hilda Norman Short

Birth: 1886 in West Hampstead, Middlesex, England

Baptism: 8 August 1886 in Kilburn St Mary, London, England

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Census:
1891: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1901: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1911: Hampstead, London: Hilda Norman Short is aged 24, born in Hampstead, London

Sources:

Martin Short

Birth: 1835/6 in Lewes, Sussex, England

Married: Ellen Ford on 18 April 1863, at the house of Mr. Edward Ford, Pietermaritzburg, Natal
Martin Short is recorded as a bachelor, aged 27. He is a store-keeper, resident in P.M.Burg. Ellen Ford is recorded as a spinster, aged 21, resident in P.M.Burg. The marriage was performed by George Blencowe, and witnessed by W. Johnson, Selina Ford, Lucy ?? and ?? Ford.

Children: Occupation: Store-keeper (1863), Income from Dividends (1881), Stockbroker (1891, 1901). In 1881 Martin was a director of the Mulhausen Steam Tramways Company, named in this advertisement offering shares to raise capital for construction of the railway.

Death: 30 October 1909, in West Hampstead, London, England, aged 73
South Africa Magazine 6 November 1909
SHORT - On October 30, West Hampstead, Martin Short, aged 73.

Census & Addresses:
1878: West Street, Durban, Natal   (baptism record of children)
1881: Durban Lodge, St John Hampstead, Middlesex
1891: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1901: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London

Sources:

Martin Short

Martin Short
Martin Short
Birth: 30 July 1909 in Mountnessing, Essex, England

Father: Frank Everist Short

Mother: Elizabeth Irvine (Smith) Short

Death: 2 August 1996, in Cape Town, South Africa

Census:
1911: Ingatestone & Fryerning, Essex: Martin Short is aged 1, born in Mountnessing, Essex

Sources:

Nellie Short

Birth: 4 July 1864, in Pietermaritzburg, Natal

Baptism: 18 April 1878, in St Pauls, Durban, Natal
The baptism was sponsored by Kate Spring, Ellen Short and Martin Short.

Father: Martin Short

Mother: Ellen (Ford) Short

Census:
1881: Durban Lodge, St John Hampstead, Middlesex
1891: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1901: Woodchurch Road, Hampstead, London
1911: Hampstead, London: Nellie Short is aged 46, born in South Africa

Sources:
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