The Barrows Family

Charles Edwin Barrows

Birth: 29 December 1881, in Battle Creek, Michigan, United States

Father: George F.  Barrows

Mother: Cora B. (Culver) Barrows

Married: Eileen Moore Elliott on 28 August 1907 in St. Simon Episcopal church, Chicago, Cook county, Illinois, United States
Charles E. Barrows is recorded as aged 25, born in 1882. Eileen M. Elliott is recorded as aged 24, born in 1883.
Chicago Daily Tribune 28 August 1907 p9
The marriage of Miss Eileen Moore Elliott. daughter of Mr. and Ms. John D. Eliott, 220 Winthrop avenue to Mr. Charles Edwin Barrows will take place this evening at 8 o'clock at St. Simon Episcopal church, Leland and Pemberton avenues. The Rev. Herbert B. Gwyn will perform the ceremony. Miss Genevieve Elliott will be the maid of honor and Mr. James ???  will be best man. The ushers will be Mr. James Elliott and Mr. Ernest J. Elliott. A small reception will be held at the home of the bride's parents following the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. Barrows will be at home at 1422 Windsor avenue after Oct. 15
.

Children:

Occupation: Clerk Brassworks (1900); Salesman Plumbers Supplies (1910); Department Manager Crane Company (1918); Manager Steele Co (1920); Manager Plumbing Heating Supplies (1930); General Manager "Whlse Plumbing Mfg Co" (1940)

Notes: On his WWI registration card, Charles is described as being of tall height and slender build, with dark eyes and dark brown hair. Charles is found on the manifest of the Contessa which sailed form Cristobal on 26 February1936, arriving in New Orleans on 2 March 1936.

Death: 10 May 1962, in Evanston, Cook county, Illinois, United States

Burial: Graceland cemetery, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Charles is buried in Maplewood section, sub lot 18N.W. Pt. grave 14

Census & Addresses:
1900: 500 Rear 2, Seminary Avenue, Lakeview, Cook county, Illinois
1910: 4548 Clarendon Ave, Chicago, Illinois
1918: 4514 Dover Street, Chicago, Cook county, Illinois   (WWI registration card)
1920: 1433 Leland Ave, Chicago, Illinois
1930: 1041 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois
1935: 1041 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois   (1940 census)
1936: 1041 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois   (manifest of the Contessa)
1940: 1041 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois
1942: Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois   (Chicago Tribune 25 April 1942 p15)

Sources:

Eileen Kilroy (Barrows, Greenough, Callison) Beaton

Eileen Kilroy Barrows
Eileen Kilroy Barrows (1933)
Birth: 15 April 1911, in Chicago, Cook county, Illinois, United States
Betty Barrows was born on 15 April 1911 in Chicago, Cook county, Illinois, the daughter of Charles E Barrows, aged 28, born in Battle Creek, Michigan, and Eileen Moore Elliott, aged 28, born in Dublin, Ireland. The birth was registered on 6 November 1941.

Father: Charles E. Barrows

Mother: Eileen Moore (Elliott) Barrows

Education: Smith College (Northampton, Massachusetts), the Sorbonne (Paris), Oxford University and the University of Chicago.

Married (1st): Thomas Olney (Crawford) Greenough on 15 September 1934 in in the Lady chapel of St. Luke's church, Evanston, Illinois, United States
Chicago Tribune 11 September 1934 p1
     ENGAGEMENTS
From Evanston this morning come two engagement announcements of interest. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ellsworth Barrows of 1041 Ridge avenue are announcing the betrothal of their daughter, Eileen Kilroy, better known as Betty, to Thomas Olney Greenough, son of Mrs. Henry Wadsworth Greenough of Proffit, Va. ...
   Miss Barrows' engagement will be followed closely by her wedding, for she and Mr. Greenough are to be married at 10:30 o'clock next Saturday morning by Dean Gerald Moore in the Lady chapel of St. Luke's church, Evanston. The ceremony will terminate a college romance, for it was while Miss Barrows was a student at Smith and Mr. Greenough a student at Amherst that their friendship developed. Mr. Greenough prepared for Amherst at Andover.
  Miss Barrows and Mr. Greenough are not certain now whether they will be making their home in the east or in England. Last year Mr. Greenough spent in study at Cambridge university and he may return for further study this winter.

Eileen and Thomas were divorced by at least 1938, when Thomas lists that as his marital status on the manifest of the Rex.

Thomas Olney Greenough
Thomas Olney Greenough
Thomas was born on 16 August 1910, in Keswick, Virginia, the son of Robert Blakely Crawford III and Elizabeth Florence Olney. Robert and Florence separated in 1918 and divorced in 1919. Thomas took the surname Greenough on Florence's marriage to Henry Waldo Greenough. He was educated at Andover, Amherst College (graduating in the class of 1933) and Cambridge University. Henry Greenough had banking interests in Italy and became a temporary resident there in 1919 (US Passport Applications 1919#127005 and 1921 #17432), and so the family traveled back and forth between the United States and Europe throughout the 1920s. Thomas is found, with his twin brother and parents, on the manifest of the Giulio Cesare which sailed from Naples on 5 September 1925, arriving in New York on 18 September, as well as on the manifest of the Conte Rosso which sailed from Naples on 4 September 1926, arriving in New York on 14 September, the manifest of the Duilio which sailed from Genoa on 2 September 1927, arriving in New York on 12 September, the manifest of the Saturnia which sailed from Marseilles on 8 September 1928, arriving in New York on 17 September and the manifest of the Augustus which sailed from Genoa on 6 September 1929, arriving in New York on 17 September. In the 1930's Thomas continued his European travels although we now see him independent of his family. He is on the manifest of the Saturnia which sailed from Marseilles on 6 September 1930, arriving in New York on 15 September, and with his mother on the manifest of the Saturnia which sailed from Trieste on 8 September 1931, arriving in New York on 22 September. He is on the manifest of the Roma which sailed from Villefranche sur Mer, France on 17 August 1932, arriving in New York on 27 August, the manifest of the Aquitana which sailed from Cherbourg, France on 1 September 1934, arriving in New York on 7 September, and the manifest of the Berengaria which sailed from Southampton, England on 20 March 1935, arriving in New York on 27 March. He traveled with his new wife Eileen on the manifest of the Britannic which sailed from Southampton, on 13 July 1935, arriving in New York on 21 July. Thomas is found with his mother on the manifest of the Gripsholm which sailed from Gothenburg, Sweden on 11 November 1936, arriving in New York on 20 November, and with his brother on the manifest of the Monarch of Bermuda which sailed from Hamilton, Bermuda on 30 June 1937, arriving in New York on 2 July. On both of these last two manifests, Thomas lists his martial status as single. Thomas is also on the manifest of the Rex which sailed from Cannes, France, on 31 August 1938, arriving in New York on 8 September, and here he lists his marital status as divorced. The 1940 census finds Thomas as a teacher at Lakemont Academy in Starkey, New York, and we find him again on the manifest of the Excalibur which sailed from Lisbon on 18 July 1941, arriving in New York on 28 July (again stating himself to be single). Thomas served in World War II as an ambulance driver, reaching the rank of captain. He returned to the United States on the Indochinois which sailed from Marseille on 4 August 1945, arriving in New York on 21 August.
Thomas Olney Greenough
Headstone of Thomas Olney Greenough in the University of Virginia cemetery and columbarium, Charlottesville, Virginia
photo from findagrave.com
Thomas died on 23 November 1951, and is buried in the University of Virginia cemetery and columbarium, Charlottesville, Virginia.
Census & Addresses:
1925: Proffit, Albemarle county, Virginia    (manifest of the Giulio Cesare 18 September 1925)
1927: Clifton House, Proffit, Albemarle county, Virginia   (manifest of the Duilio 12 September 1927)
1930: Stoney Point Road, Rivanna, Albemarle county, Virginia
1935: Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England   (1940 census)
1940: Lakemont Academy, Starkey, Yates county, New York

Married (2nd): William Andrew Callison Jr. on 25 April 1942 in the chapel of the Fourth Presbyterian Church, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Chicago Tribune 25 April 1942 p15
  Only members of the families and close friends will see Mrs. Barrows Greenough and William Andrew Callison repeat their wedding vows at 4 o'clock this afternoon in the Exmoor club. A reception will be given at 4:30 o'clock by the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ellsworth Barrows of Lake Shore drive.
  Mr. Callison's mother, Mrs. William Andrew Callison, and his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. John Jamieson, have come from Lafayette, Ind., for the ceremony, and Mr. and Mrs. Dana Smith are here from Charleston, W. Va. There will be only two attendants, Mrs. Picher Purcell as matron of honor, and Charles Callison as his brother's best man.

William Andrew Callison headstone
Headstone of William Andrew Callison in Grand View cemetery, West Lafayette, Indiana
photo from findagrave.com
William was born in 1905, in West Virginia, the son of William Andrew Callison and Wilma Olga Fredeking. In 1930 his occupation is stated as sales engineering at a locomotive plant. He died in 1973 and is buried in Grand View cemetery, West Lafayette, Indiana.
Census:
1910: 1624 Fairview, Wichita City, Sedgwick county, Kansas
1920: 509 North Eight Street, Lafayette, Tippecanoe county, Indiana
1930: 922 State Street, Schenectady, Schenectady county, New York

Married (3rd): Lindsay Eugene Beaton on 28 June 1962 in Silver City, New Mexico, United States
Tucson Daily Citizen 3 July 1962 p11
Beaton-Callison Wedding
  Temporarily at home at 2152 N. Country Club Road are Dr. and Mrs. Lindsay E. Beaton who were married Thursday in Silver City, N.M. The bride, the former Mrs. Eileen Barrows Callison, attended Smith College, Northampton, Mass., the Sorbonne in Paris, Oxford University, England, and the University of Chicago. Both Dr. Beaton and his bride were originally from Evanston, Ill. Dr. Beaton's affiliations include the Old Pueblo Club and Tucson Country Club.

Chicago Tribune 5 July 1962 p47
Beaton-Callison
  Coming as a surprise to all but their closest friends is news of the marriage June 28 in Silver City, N.M., of Mrs. Betty Barrows Greenough Callison of Barrington and Chicago to Dr. Lindsay E. Beaton of Tucson, Ariz. Dr. Beaton, son of David Beaton Jr. of Evanston, and his bride will live in his Tucson home where her children, Billy, Timmy, and Carol Callison, will join them after a summer at camps and traveling. Their father is William M. Callison of Barrington.

Lindsay was born on 25 January 1911, in Cleveland, Cook county, Illinois, the son of David Beaton Jr. and Vera De Lipkau. Lindsay was married firstly to Suzanne Lord in 1937. He graduated from Dartmouth College and earned his Master of Science and Doctor of Medicine degrees at Northwestern University Medical School. He continued at Northwestern's Institute of Neurology as a medical fellow of the National Research Council from 1940-1942. Lindsay published a paper, with joint authors S. W. Ranson and H. W. Magoun, titled "Neurogenic hyperthermia and its treatment with nembutal in monkey" published in the Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons February, 1943 and "Neurogenic hyperthermia and its treatment with soluble pentobarbital in monkey" published in the Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry in April 1943. He also published, with Major Jess D. Herrman a paper titled "Hyperthermia following injury of the preoptic region" in the Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry in February 1945. Lindsay served in the Army Medical Corps during World War II, becoming clinical director of psychiatry for the Tenth Army and a member of the Pacific Ocean Areas psychiatry team, with the rank of major. He wrote a letter from Okinawa in 1945:
Quarterly Bulletin N.U.M.S. p243
The Medical School at War
          Okinawa Shima, April 21, 1945
. . . You censure me for being my own censor. Is that a pun? Well, you want to know how the hospital looks. It is muddy. In fact it is the muddiest joint I ever saw. When it is dry, it is dusty. This is terraced farming land, meticulously drained, and when we came in we did the drainage system strictly no good. You ask what I eat. Anything. Tonight it happened to be three pieces of chocolate pie. We do have very good bakers in this outfit, to which incidentally I am only temporarily attached. But the food. Mostly lately I have eaten C-ration. Take my advice and don't. Some Congressman once ate some and said publicly that it was good. Maybe it would be with a half-dozen martinis beforehand. I haven't even any torpedo alcohol.
  . . . I am sorry that I can neither be literary nor spin out news. You'll have to be content with the fact that this comes from our latest Pacific conquest. And it ain't quite conquested yet. It is cold, incidentally, and muddy, and I have fleas. The latter were not included in the cultural pattern of the Athens of America, but I find I can freeze them out at night, though I have to watch out for frost-bite of the plumbing when I do.
  Not much more. It is close to dusk, which is air raid time . . . There is really so little to write. My work is terribly interesting, but most of it manages to be hush-hush. Pardon typographical errors; this typewriter has its erratic moments and so has the light. It goes out occasionally, not liking the air raids. Neither do I.
    Major Lindsay E. Beaton, M.C., A.U.S. Class of 1940.

Lindsay testified as the physician of the defendant in a car accident case in Tucson in 1951 (Tucson Daily Citizen 15 June 1951 p10). Lindsay was the vice chairman of the Council on Mental Health of the American Medical Association and read a paper before the Annual Congress on Medical Education, Chicago, on 9 February 1964. The paper was irreverently titled A Doc Ain't Never Thru. Dr. Beaton was chief of neuropsychiatry at the Tucson community hospitals and chief of staff at Tucson Medical Center.
Lindsay Eugene Beaton headstone
Headstone of Lindsay Eugene Beaton in South Lawn cemetery, Tucson, Pima county, Arizona
photo by David Fawcett at findagrave.com
Lindsay died on 8 February 1967, in Tucson, Pima county, Arizona, of heart failure. Lindsay is buried in South Lawn cemetery, Tucson, Pima county, Arizona.
Illinois Medical Journal March 1967 p373
Dr. Lindsay E. Beaton, former Chicago physician, died Feb. 8 in Arizona where he has been living for several years. He was 56. A former chairman of the Mental Health Council of the American Medical Association, he was past president of the Arizona State Medical Association and a psychiatric consultant to the Social Security Administration.

Census:
1930: 628 Colfax Street, Evanston, Cook county, Illinois
1940: 914B Main Street, Evanston, Cook county, Illinois

Occupation:  Social Service Worker (1940).

Notes:  Eileen is listed on manifest of the Pennland which sailed from Le Havre, France, on 2 July 1932, arriving in New York on 11 July, and on the manifest of the New York which sailed from Cherbourg, France, on 10 August 1934, and arrived in New York on 17 August. She and her first husband, Thomas Greenough, are also listed on the manifest of the Britannic which sailed from Southampton, England, on 13 July 1935, arriving in New York on 21 July 1935.

Census & Addresses:
1920: 1433 Leland Ave, Chicago, Illinois
1930: 1041 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois
1932: 1041 Ridge Road, Evanston, Illinois   (manifest of the Pennland 11 July 1932)
1933: 1041 Ridge Road, Evanston, Illinois   (Smith College Year Book Class of 1933 p44)
1934: 1041 Ridge Road, Evanston, Illinois   (manifest of the New York 17 August 1934)
1935: 1041 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois   (1940 census)
1940: 1041 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois
1971: Chicago, Illinois   (Chicago Tribune 25 August 1971 p40)

Sources:
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