The Brinkley Family

Anna Isabella (Brinkley) Elrington-Bisset

Birth: 1858, in Knockmaroon House, Castleknock, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: Walter Stephens Brinkley

Mother: Susanna Caroline (Turner) Brinkley

Married: Maurice Elrington-Bisset on 3 December 1884, in Bath, Somerset, England
The Irish law times 13 December 1884 p638
MARRIAGES.
ELRINGTON-BISSET and BRINKLEY—December 3, at the Abbey Church, Bath, by the Rev. M. Turner, M.A , Rector of Cotton, Suffolk, assisted by the Rev. Charles Elrington-Bisset, and the Rev. Canon Brooke, Rector of Bath, Maurice Elrington-Bisset, Lieutenant Royal Engineers, second son of the late Joseph Faviere Elrington, Q.C., L.L.D., Recorder of Londonderry, to Anna Isabella, second daughter of the late Walter Stephens Brinkley, formerly of 11th (Prince Albert's Own) Hussars, and of Knockmanor House, County Dublin.

Children:
Death: 20 July 1930 in Huntly, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Census:

1881: 94 Sydney Place, Bathwick, Somerset

Sources:

Charles Michael Edgeworth Brinkley

Birth: 6 May 1861, at Knockmaroon, Castleknock, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: Walter Stephens Brinkley

Mother: Susanna Caroline (Turner) Brinkley

Education: Clifton College, Clifton, Bristol, Jesus College, Cambridge University, and Sandhurst
Clifton College annals and register p118 (1887)
BRINKLEY, C. M. E. Son of W. F. BRINKLEY, Knockmaroon house, Castleknock, Dublin. (Poole. J-S. IIIIVβ; left December, 1874.) 

Alumni Cantabrigienses (transcribed at A Cambridge Alumni Database)
BRINKLEY, Charles Michael [Edgeworth]
Adm. pens. (age 19) at JESUS, Oct. 1, 1880.
S. of Walter Stephens, Esq. B. at Knockmaroon House, Co. Dublin.
School, Clifton College; afterwards at Sandhurst.
Matric. Michs. 1880, as C. M. Edgeworth.
Major, late 4th Dragoon Guards.
Chief Constable of Lincolnshire.
Died July, 1903.
Brother of John T. (1874) and Walter F. B. (1878).
(Clifton Coll. Reg.)

Married: Evelyn Everard Hutton on 3 March 1892, in St George Hanover Square district, London, England

Evelyn was born in 1860 in Cefn, St Asaph, Denbighshire, the daughter of Thomas Hutton and Maria Georgina Everard. Thomas was one of "The Six Hundred" who participated in the famous Charge of the Light Brigade during the Crimean War. He was shot through the right thigh during the advance of the Light Cavalry Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava, and on returning from the guns he was again severely wounded through the left thigh. He assumed the name Thomas Everard Hutton in 1864. Evelyn died on 17 July 1937, in St Asaph district, Denbighshire and Flintshire, aged 77.
Census:
1881: 9 Circus, Walcot, Somerset
1891: Bath, Somerset: Eveline E. Hutton, daughter, is aged 30, born in St Asaph, Flintshire
1901: Weston, Somerset: Evelyn Brinkley, wife, is aged 40, born in Denbighshire, Wales
1911: St Asaph, Denbighshire: Evelyn E Brinkley is aged 50, born in Cefn, Denbighshire

Children:
Occupation: Army Officer and Police Officer
Charles was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 6th West York on 15 March 1879 (London Gazette 14 March 1879 p2140) and promoted to lieutenant on 20 September 1879 (London Gazette 19 September 1879 p5550). On 29 July 1882 Charles transferred from the 3rd Battalion the Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) to the 4th Dragoon Guards (London Gazette 28 July 1882 p3515). Charles was promoted to captain on 7 March 1888 (London Gazette 23 March 1888 p1779). He was seconded for service with the Ordnance Store Department on 5 March 1891 (London Gazette 24 March 1891 p1665) and made deputy-assistant commissary-general of ordinance on 13 July 1891 (London Gazette 18 August 1891 p4439). Charles was promoted to major in the 4th Dragoon Guards on 16 February 1898 (London Gazette 1 April 1898 p2089). He retired on 19 February 1902 (London Gazette 18 February 1902 p1038).
Charles also served as the Chief Constable for Lincolnshire.

Notes: Some letters from Charles Brinkley are held in the Denbighshire Record Office. DD/PR/69vi has a letter from Charles M.E. Brinkley in Queenstown, to his future wife, Evelyn Hutton, Bath, regarding voyage to Ireland in April 1891 and DD/PR/69(xxxix-lxiii) has letters from Charles M.E. Brinkley to his wife in Bath, relating to his voyage on SS Arabia from India in 1900, and a voyage to Madeira in 1903.

Death: 31 July 1903 in St Marylebone district, London, England, aged 42

Memorial plaque to Charles Michael Edgeworth Brinkley
Memorial plaque in honour of Charles Michael Edgeworth Brinkley in Lincoln Cathedral
image from findagrave.com
Burial: 4 August 1903, in Holy Trinity, Abbots Leigh, Somerset, England, aged 42
A memorial plaque in Michael's honour has been placed in Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire. The plaque reads:
IN MEMORY OF
CHARLES MICHAEL EDGEWORTH BRINKLEY
CHIEF CONSTABLE OF LINCOLNSHIRE
FORMERLY
MAJOR ???
BORN MAY 6 1861
DIED JULY 31 1903
ERECTED BY THE MEMBERS OF THE
LINCOLNSHIRE CONSTABULARY
AS A MARK OF THEIR ESTEEM AND REGARD


Census:

1881: 94 Sydney Place, Bathwick, Somerset
1891: Abbots Leigh, Somerset: Charles M. Brinkley, brother (of Walter F. B. Brinkley), is aged 29, born in Dublin

Sources:

John Brinkley

Birth: 1793, in county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Brinkley

Mother: Esther (Weld) Brinkley

Education: Trinity College Dublin
John was educated by Mr. Gwynne, and entered Trinity College Dublin on 2 November 1807, aged 14. He graduated B.A. in 1812 and M.A. in 1816.

Married: Anne Stephens on 17 July 1824 in St Peter, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland
The marriage was witnessed by Nicholas Gifford and Charles Gifford. John is recorded as being a reverend, of Clontibret, and Anne is recorded as being of the parish.

Children:
Occupation: Clergyman
John was ordained deacon in 1817 and priest in 1818. He was curate of Clontibret, county Managhan from 1817 until 1828 when he was appointed prebendary of Glanworth which post held until his death in 1847.

Clogher clergy and parishes p147 (James B. Leslie, 1929)
CLONTIBRET. Curates.
1817. - John Brlnkley (Erck.), eldest son of John B., Bp. of Cloyne (who as Archdeacon, was his Rector here) b.in Co.Dub., ed. by Mr. Gwynne, ent. T.C.D. Nov. 2, 1807, aged 14, B.A. 1812, M.A. 1816, ord. D. 1817, P. 1818, Clogher, C. Clontibret 1817-28, Preb. Glanworth, Cloyne, 1828-47, m. Anna, dau. and co-heir of Rev. Walter Stephens, of Dub. (M.L. 1824) and had issue, John, 9th Lancers, d. in India, unm., Walter Stephens, of Knockmaroon Ho., Co. Dub., late of 4th Hussars, m. and had issue; and Sarah, who d. unm. He d. 14 Feb., 1847, and was bur, at Cloyne.

Clerical and parochial records of Cork, Cloyne, and Ross vol 2 pp218-9 (William Maziere Brady, 1863):
GLANWORTH.
1828. December 31. JOHN BRINKLEY, P. Glanore, [F.F.] per mort. Woodward.
  1830. Protestant population of Glanore, 100; of Kilgulane, 8; of Ballyloghy, 10;
  1837. Glanworth union: 6 miles long by 5½ broad, with cure, consisting of - 1. Glanworth rectory, 6 miles long by 2 broad. 2. Derryvillane vicarage, 2¾ miles long by 1
½ broad. 3. Killgullane rectory and vicarage, 1¼ mile long by 1¼ broad. 4. Ballylough vicarage, 1½ mile long by 1¼ broad. The union contains 16,436A. 2R. 32P. Gross population, 7,135. One Curate employed at a yearly stipend of £69 4s. 7½d., British. Tithe composition of Glanworth parish, £729 16s. 11¼d. 29A. 25P. of glebe in said parish, valued at £3 per plan. acre. £54. Composition for the vicarial tithes of Derryvillane parish, £66 11s. 10¼d. Tithe composition of Killgullane parish, £221 8s. 6½d. 9A. 2R. 35P. of glebe in said parish, valued at 40s. per plan. acre, £12. From composition for the vicarial tithes of Ballylough parish, £89 16s. 6½d. Subject to visitation fees, £1 15s.; diocesan schoolmaster, £2 10s. Glanworth glebe-house built in 1809, under the new Acts, at the cost of £3,046 3s. 1d., Brit. whereof £923 1s. 6½d. was granted in way of loan, and £92 6s. 1¾d. in that of gift, by the late Board of First Fruits, and the residue of £2,030 15s. 4¾d. was supplied out of the private funds of the builder, to whom the present Incumbent is next in succession; and having paid his predecessor the whole of the sum last named, he will be entitled to receive £1,523 1s. 6½d. from his successor on account thereof. Of the loan aforesaid, there remained £165 8s. 5d. chargeable on the benefice in 1832, repayable by annual instalments of £10 6s. 9d. Incumbent resides in the glebe-house. One church, situate in Glanworth parish, capable of accommodating 150 persons, but when, or at what cost, built, unknown. No charge on the union in 1832 on account of the church. Divine service is celebrated twice on Sundays in summer, and once in winter, and on the principal festivals. The sacrament is administered eight times a-year. The rectorial tithes of Derryvillane and Ballylough parishes, and a small portion of the tithes in Killgullane parish, are impropriate, and belong to Lord Donoughmore, and are compounded as follow:- those of Derryvillane for £98 0s. 3d.; of Ballylough, for £69 19s. 5½d.; and Killgullane portion, for £7 8s. per annum. [Parl. Rep.]
  J. Brinkley (eldest son of John Brinkley, Bp. of Cloyne) was in 1825 Curate of Clontibret, Clogher. From 1828 to his death, on 14th February, 1847, he was P. Glanworth.
  He married Anna, daughter and co-heir of Rev. Walter Stephens, of Dublin, and had issue (besides an elder son, John, of the 9th Lancers, who died in India, unmarried, and a daughter, Sarah, unm.) a son, Walter Stephens Brinkley, esq. of Knockmaroon House, county Dublin, and late of the 11th Hussars; who married Susanna-Caroline, dau. of Major Turner, of Ipswich, and has issue.
  The Rev. John Brinkley was buried at Cloyne, on 19th February, 1847.


Notes: John is mentioned in A topographical dictionary of Ireland vol 1 p655 (Samuel Lewis, 1837) as living in Glanworth Glebe described as "a large and handsome mansion adjoining the village, and commanding a picturesque view of the bridge and ruined castle."

Death: 14 February 1847 at Glanworth Glebe, Glanworth, county Cork, Ireland, aged 54
The gentleman's magazine June 1847 p669
    Clergy Deceased.
  Feb. 14. At Glanworth glebe, co. Cork, Rev. John Brinkley, eldest son of the late Lord Bishop of Cloyne.


The Cork Examiner 17 February 1847
DEATHS.
On Sunday, at Glanworth Glebe, the Rev. John Brinkley, elder son of the late Bishop of Cloyne, aged 54 years.


Buried: 19 February 1847 in Cloyne, county Cork, Ireland

Obituary:
The Patrician vol 3 p297 (1847)
Brinkley, the Rev. John, A.M. Prebendary of Glanworth, co. Cork, in his 54th year, 14th Feb. This gentleman was elder son of the late Dr. Brinkley, Bishop of Cloyne, the distinguished Astronomer; and was little behind his father in the extent and variety of his mental gifts. His knowledge of medicine, botany, mechanics and geometry was so profound that he seemed to have made each branch the study of his life, instead of its forming a portion only of his acquisitions Astronomy and floriculture were favourite pursuits, and in both he excelled. He was besides an admirable clergyman, and his charities to the poor were princely in their nature.
Sources:

John Brinkley

Birth:
At John's death in 1851 his age is given as 23, which would give a birthdate range of 1827-8, but this does not correspond with the statements (e.g. in Clerical and parochial records of Cork, Cloyne, and Ross vol 2 pp218-9) that he was the eldest son, and so would have been born before Walter Stephens Brinkley in 1826.

Father: John Brinkley

Mother: Anne (Stephens) Brinkley

Occupation: Army Officer
John was commissioned a cornet in the 9th Royal Lancers, by purchase, on 15 February 1850 (London Gazette 15 February 1850 p424).

Notes: Letters from John Brinkley written during his posting with the army in India are held in the Denbighshire Record Office (Brinkley MSS ref GB 0209 DD/PR). DD/PR/43v has letters of John Brinkley to his sister Sarah, with news of his voyage on board the Minden from England to India in 1850.

Death: 16 May 1851 in Kussowlie, Bengal, India, of typhus fever, aged 23
The United service magazine September 1851 p157
  May 16th, at Kussowlie, of fever, John Brinkley, Esq., 9th Royal Lancers, eldest son of the late Rev. John Brinkley, rector of Glanworth, county of Cork.


Allen's Indian mail 19 August 1851 p479
BRINKLEY, Cornet J. H.M.'s 9th lancers, at Kussowlie, May 18.


Launceston Examiner (Tasmania) 16 August 1851 p5
Cornet John Brinkley, H. M. 9th Lancers, died at Kusowlie on 18th May, of typus fever.


Buried: 17 May 1851 in Kussowlie, Bengal, India

Sources:

John Turner Brinkley

Birth: 23 October 1855, in Castleknock, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: Walter Stephens Brinkley

Mother: Susanna Caroline (Turner) Brinkley

Education: Clifton College, Clifton, Bristol and Pembroke College, Cambridge University
Clifton College annals and register p62 (1887)
Brinkley, J. T. Son of W. S. BRINKLEY, Castleknock, Co. Dublin. S.H. IIIß - IIIa : left Dec., 1871. Capt. late N. Staffordshire Regt. Chief Constable of Warwickshire.

Alumni Cantabrigienses (transcribed at A Cambridge Alumni Database)
Brinkley, John Turner.
Adm. pens. (age 19) at PEMBROKE, May 23, 1874.
S. and h. of Walter Stephens, Capt. (11th Hussars), of Knockmaroon, near Dublin, Ireland.
B. Oct. 23, 1855.
School, Clifton College.
Matric. Michs. 1874.
Capt., Prince of Wales's North Staffs.
Regt.
Of Wasperton House, near Warwick.
Chief Constable of Warwickshire, 1892-1928.
O.B.E., 1925.
Married and had issue.
Died suddenly Dec. 14, 1928, aged 73.
Brother of the next and of Charles M. E. (1880).
(The Times, Dec. 15, 1928.)


Married: Mary Carleton on 3 November 1885, in Bath, Somerset, England

Mary was born on 4 November 1856 in Dundrum, county Down, Ireland, the daughter of Henry Alexander Carleton and Elizabeth Boyle. She died on 23 May 1923 in Warwick district, Warwickshire, aged 66.
Census:
1901: Warwick St Mary, Warwickshire: Mary Brinkley, wife, is aged 43, born in Ireland
1911: Warwick, Warwickshire: Mary Brinkley is aged 54, born in Dundrum, county Down, Ireland

Children:
Occupation: Army Officer and Police Constable
John was commissioned a sub-lieutenant (supernumerary) in the South Cork militia on 20 January 1875 (London Gazette 19 January 1875 p204) and promoted to lieutenant effective 20 January 1875 (London Gazette 3 October 1876 p5299). John transferred to the 98th Regiment of Foot on 29 November 1876 (London Gazette 28 November 1876 p6531). The 98th Foot became the Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire) Regiment in 1881. John was appointed Instructor of Musketry on 6 September 1881 (London Gazette 29 November 1881 p6214) and promoted to captain on 3 November 1884 (London Gazette 13 January 1885 p186). On 23 April 1888 John was seconded for service as adjutant of the regiment's 2nd Volunteer Battalion (London Gazette 1 June 1888 p3071). John retired on 9 March 1892 (London Gazette 8 March 1892 p1352).

John was appointed Chief Constable of Warwickshire on 18 January 1892 (The Times law reports vol 13 p42) and held the post for thirty six years until his death in 1928. He was appointed an Officer of the Civil Division of the Order of the British Empire (O.B.E.) on 3 June 1925 (London Gazette 2 June 1925 p3776).

Notes:
Armorial families p43 (Arthur Charles Fox-Davies, 1905)
John Turner Brinkley, Esq., Chief Constable co. Warwick, late Capt. P. of W. N. Staffs. Regt., b. 1855; m. 1885, Mary, eld. d. of late Gen. H. A. Carleton, C.B., R.A. ; and has surv. issue — Sheila Mary. Res. — Wasperton House, Warwick. Club— Naval and Military.


Wasperton House
Wasperton House
Wasperton Chronicle p129 (Victor Oubridge)
Then in [1905] Mary Brinkley purchased the house for her own occupation from Charles and Evelyn Williams for £3,000 and at the same time purchased from Fullerton for
£300 the small triangle of ground on which the drive stood. Mary Brinkley was the wife of Captain John Brinkley of the 98th North Staffordshire Regiment and Chief Constable of Warwickshire for thirty six years. It was not until 1919 that the rest of the ground sold to Fullerton in 1904 was purchased by Mary Brinkley from Fullerton's daughter Myra for £600. The complete estate remained in the possession and occupation of Mary Brinkley and her husband until she died in 1923, aged sixty six, when ownership descended to her daughter Sheila Mary. Capt. Brinkley, however, continued in occupation of the house after his wife's death until his own in 1928 at the age of seventy two.

After Capt. Brinkley died a Mr. Francis Roughhead took up tenancy for a while and then for a time the house was unoccupied. In 1938 Geoffrey Burton (afterwards Sir Geoffrey) purchased the property from Sheila Brinkley for
£3,800 and considerably improved the house and gardens.

Death: 14 December 1928 in Warwick district, Warwickshire, England, aged 73, of a heart attack. John collapsed and died on his way to attend a police committee meeting in Shire Hall.

Crest of John Turner Brinkley
Crest of John Turner Brinkley
Arms:
Crest: A cross potence engrailed gu., surmounted of an estoile arg.
Motto: Mutabimur  ("we will be changed")

Census & Addresses:

1901: Warwick St Mary, Warwickshire: John Turner Brinkley, head, is aged 45, born in Ireland. He is Constable of Warwickshire.
1905: Wasperton House, Warwick, Warwickshire   (Armorial families p43 )
1911: Warwick, Warwickshire: John Turner Brinkley is aged 55, born in Castleknock parish, county Dublin

Sources:

John Carleton Brinkley

Birth: 16 August 1886, in Mhow, Bengal, India

Baptism: 16 September 1886, in Mhow, Bengal, India

Father: John Turner Brinkley

Mother: Mary (Carleton) Brinkley

Death: 1887 in Bath district, Somerset, England, aged 0.

Sources:

Julia Katharine Brinkley

Birth: 1853/4, in Castleknock, county Dublin, Ireland

Baptism: 10 January 1855, in St Matthew, Ipswich, Suffolk, England

Father: Walter Stephens Brinkley

Mother: Susanna Caroline (Turner) Brinkley

Notes: Nature notes: the Selborne Society's magazine September 1901 p176
   Habits of Cuckoos. - Is it likely that a cuckoo will visit the same district year after year when it returns to this country? The following fact leads me to conclude that such is the case. In April, 1899, two or three cuckoos were daily seen in the trees about my garden. One had a very peculiar note, the second syllable of which was very hoarse, just as if it had a bad cold. The effect was somewhat ludicrous. The following year, April, 1900, the cuckoos arrived as usual. I had forgotten about the bird of the previous year until the maid said one morning that there was a very strange cuckoo in the garden, it seemed as if it had a bad cold. I went out of doors to listen and instantly recognised my hoarse friend of the year before. I am awaiting the arrival of the cuckoos this spring with interest.
    West Monkton, Somerset.           JULIAN K. BRINKLEY.

Nature notes: the Selborne Society's magazine October 1901 p191
  The following, will I think, answer W. F. Collins' query in last month's NATURE NOTES regarding house martins. The side of my house requiring painting this summer, I directed the painter not to interfere with four martins' nests under the eaves. He replied, "I won't touch them if martins are in them; but I will if sparrows are." The latter proved to be the case.
    West Monkton, Somerset.           JULIA K. BRINKLEY.


Death: 22 October 1911 in Taunton district, Somerset, England, aged 57

Will: Probate was granted on 22 December 1911 to Captain John Turner Brinkley and the Reverend Walter Frederick Brownlow Brinkley, the executors.

Census:
1881: 94 Sydney Place, Bathwick, Somerset
1891: Abbots Leigh, Somerset: Julia K. Brinkley, sister, is aged 36, born in Dublin
1901: West Monkton, Somerset: Julia K. Brinkly, head, is aged 38, born in Ireland. She is Living On Own Means.
1911: West Monkton, Somerset: Julia K. Brinkley, head, is aged 48, born in Castleknock, county Dublin
1911: Waterleaze Lodge, West Monkton, Somerset   (London Gazette 19 January 1912 p488)

Sources:

Kathleen Sophia Brinkley

Birth: 1899, in Abbots Leigh, Somerset, England

Baptised: 13 August 1899 in Holy Trinity, Abbots Leigh, Somerset, England

Father: Walter Frederick Brownlow Brinkley

Mother: Emmeline Lydia (Brooke, Miles) Brinkley

Death: 10 March 1964 in Tysoe, Warwickshire, England

Census:

1901: The Vicarage, Abbots Leigh, Somerset
1911: Abbots Leigh, Somerset: Kathleen Brinkley, is aged 11, born in Abbots Leigh, Somerset

Sources:

Maud Agneta Brinkley

Birth: 29 January 1893, in Queenstown, county Cork, Ireland

Father: Charles Michael Edgeworth Brinkley

Mother: Evelyn Everard (Hutton) Brinkley

Notes: Maud was awarded the British Empire Medal (Civil Division) on 14 June 1969 for her work as "Officer-in-Charge of Storage and Issue of Medical Loan Stores, St. Asaph Detachment, Flintshire Branch, British Red Cross Society" (London Gazette 6 June 1969 p5986).

Death: 12 September 1969 in St Asaph, Denbighshire,Wales

Census:

1901: Weston, Somerset: Maud Brinkley, daughter, is aged 8, born in Ireland
1911: St Asaph, Denbighshire: Maud Augusta Brinkley is aged 18, born in Queenstower, county Cork, Ireland

Sources:


Norah Julia (Brinkley) Row

Birth: 1900, in Bath, Somerset, England

Father: Charles Michael Edgeworth Brinkley

Mother: Evelyn Everard (Hutton) Brinkley

Married: Arthur Walter White Row in 1943 in St Asaph district, Denbighshire and Flintshire, Wales.

Arthur Walter White Row
Arthur Walter White Row from the class photo of the LSE Army Class 1928-2
(click to see complete photo)
image from LSE Library
Arthur was born in 1892, in West Drayton, Middlesex, the son of Arthur William Septimus Albert Row and Jane White. He married firstly Kathleen A. G. Lidiard in 1916 in Paddington district, London, who died in 1942. Arthur was an army officer, commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment) on 20 September 1911 (London Gazette 19 September 1911 p6882) and promoted to lieutenant on 30 December 1913 (London Gazette 6 February 1914 p985). He was appointed adjutant on 14 June 1915 (London Gazette 29 October 1915 p10744). Arthur was evidently promoted to captain and seconded to the Deputy Inspector-General of Communications and on 7 December 1917 he was "graded for purposes of pay as Staff Capt whilst Co. Comdr., Officer Cadet Unit" (London Gazette 4 December 1917 p12768). On 15 January 1919 he was appointed as an officer of a company of gentleman cadets at the Royal Military College (London Gazette 24 January 1919 p1334). Arthur was restored to his regiment on 28 January 1920 (London Gazette 6 February 1920 p1647). He transferred as captain to the Essex Regiment on 20 January 1923 (with seniority from 1 October 1915) (London Gazette 19 January 1923 p454), and was seconded for service on the staff and appointed assistant provost marshal class FF (overseeing military police) at the War Office on 30 September 1924 (London Gazette 10 October 1924 p7329), relinquishing the appointment on 30 September 1928 (London Gazette 9 October 1928 p6494). Arthur was promoted to major on 26 September 1931 (London Gazette 25 September 1931 p6167), and retired on 2 January 1937 (London Gazette 1 January 1937 p13), ceasing to belong to the reserve of officers on 26 May 1945 (London Gazette 28 September 1945 p4844).
Census:
1901: West Drayton, Middlesex: Arthur W. W. Row, son, is aged 9, born in West Drayton, Middlesex (RG13/1176 fol 25 p6)
1911: Crowthorne, Berkshire: Arthur Walter White Row is aged 19, born in West Drayton, Middlesex

Census:

1901: Weston, Somerset: Norah Brinkley, daughter, is aged 0, born in Bath, Somerset
1911: St Asaph, Denbighshire: Norah Julia Brinkley is aged 10, born in Bath, Somerset

Sources:

Patrick John Brinkley

Birth: 1895, in Warwick district, Warwickshire, England

Baptism: 19 July 1895, in St Mary, Warwick, Warwickshire, England

Father: John Turner Brinkley

Mother: Mary (Carleton) Brinkley

Death: 1895 in Warwick district, Warwickshire, England, aged 0

Sources:

Sarah Brinkley

Birth: 1828

Father: John Brinkley

Mother: Anne (Stephens) Brinkley

Notes: Sarah did not marry.

Death: 30 August 1890, in Bournemouth, Hampshire, England

Sources:

Sheila Mary Brinkley

Birth: 1893, in Northgate, Warwick, Warwickshire, England

Baptism: 19 July 1893, in St Mary, Warwick, Warwickshire, England

Father: John Turner Brinkley

Mother: Mary (Carleton) Brinkley

Notes: Sheila served in World War II in the Auxiliary Territorial Service, appointed to the rank of Company Commander (equivalent to a captain in the army) on 14 November 1938 (London Gazette 26 March 1940 p1836).

Sheila inherited Wasperton House in Warwick from her mother in 1923, although her father continued to reside there until his death in 1928. After Capt. Brinkley died a Mr. Francis Roughhead took up tenancy for a while and then for a time the house was unoccupied. In 1938 Geoffrey Burton (afterwards Sir Geoffrey) purchased the property from Sheila for £3,800.

Death: 15 January 1972 in Tysoe, Warwickshire, England

Census:
1901: Warwick St Mary, Warwickshire: Sheila Mary Brinkley, daughter, is aged 7, born in Warwick, Warwickshire
1911: Warwick district, Warwickshire: Sheila Mary Brinkley is aged 17, born in Northgate, Warwick, Warwickshire

Sources:

Susannah Kathleen Brinkley

Birth: 7 May 1865, in Castleknock, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: Walter Stephens Brinkley

Mother: Susanna Caroline (Turner) Brinkley

Notes: Some letters from Susannah to her mother while on her trip to South Africa are held in the Denbighshire Record Office (Brinkley MSS ref GB 0209 DD/PR)

SS Drummond Castle
S.S. Drummond Castle
Death: 16 June 1896 in the wreck of the Drummond Castle near Ushant off the coast of Brittany, France

South Australian Register (Adelaide) 22 June 1896  p4
THE WRECK OF THE DRUMMOND CASTLE.
  The piecemeal fashion in which particulars of the wreck of the Drummond Castle have been doled out by means of the cable brings home most forcibly the exceptional circumstances attending that dire calamity. Unfortunately it is no unusual thing for ships to founder at sea. In some instances they vanish from sight, and the manner of their disappearance for ever remains shrouded in mystery. At other times, while falling victims to one of the many perils so graphically enumerated by old Shylock in the "Merchant of   Venice," and still more frequently to collisions at sea — a danger practically unknown to ancient voyagers — they leave behind them survivors by whom details of their fate can be promptly communicated to a sympathetic public. In this case the doomed ship came very near to being included in the first-mentioned category. By some terrible mischance the captain appears to have got off his course, the consequence being that he fell foul of a rock at the entrance to the British Channel, probably the most crowded marine highway in the world. It is not surprising that the first tidings conveyed to Lloyd's, and thence flashed to all the centres of commerce throughout the civilized world, represented the appalling occurrence as having been due to contact with a passing steamer. Such an explanation of the mishap was far more credible than the one which all too soon for the credit of those in charge of the noble vessel, with its precious freight of human lives, was announced to be the correct one. How a steamer which regularly plies between Great Britain and South Africa, which enjoys the reputation of being one of the finest passenger-carriers afloat, and which was in charge of experienced men, possessing the full confidence of their employers and of the public, can have got so far astray is one of those puzzling things which occasionally happen in connection with navigation. Whose was the blame, if blame there was, will presumably never be known. If it rested with the officers, they have paid a fearful penalty for their mistake, for so far as can be learned from the telegrams every one of them in common with some 240 others on board have found a watery grave. Up to this point tho narrative of one of the survivors, Mr. Marquart, is the only authentic record of the catastrophe. From him we learn that the ship was hurrying homeward at the rate of fourteen knots an hour. The passengers in high hope of reaching the end of their voyage in a few hours' time had been celebrating, by means of a concert, the approaching close of a few weeks of agreeable association together. The pleasant entertainment had just ended when the fatal collision took place. The shock was not so violent as might have been expected, but it was sufficiently severe to spread consternation among those on board, and its awful significance was clearly not lost upon the captain and the officers. Instantly the order was given for launching the boats, but the fearful rent made in the steamer's hull rendered all such attempts at providing for the safety of the passengers and crew hopeless. With great presence of mind the engineers had let off steam to avert an explosion, but ere three minutes had elapsed the Drummond Castle, which had apparently rebounded from the rock, had sunk bows foremost and settled down in twenty fathoms of water. The horrible experiences of those who so soon after taking part in a scene of merriment and festivity found themselves battling with the waves can be more easily imagined than described. How many of them were able to cling to spars and floating wreckage in the struggle for life will never be known, but for these the prospect of having to spend many weary hours on their precarious supports must have been gloomy indeed. There was no hope of immediate rescue, and it was not until some time after sunrise that fishermen wero on the spot to pick up those who had outlived the horrors of the night. The messages do not make it quite clear how many were saved, but evidently the number does not exceed three. The rest, including nearly the whole of the ship's company, half a score persons belonging to the Royal Navy, and more than 130 other passengers, men, women and children were drowned. The captain of H.M.S. Sybille, which happened to be in the neighbourhood, sent out his boats so soon as he obtained intelligence of the wreck, but, they evidently were on the scene too late to be of service. Mr. Marquart, alone of the four individuals who had seized a friendly rail, was able to retain his hold during the twelve hours of exposure and suspense which preceded the appearance of his deliverers. To the honour of the Breton women it is recorded that they unaided launched a lifeboat and wenr, out to assist in the search for survivors. There is nothing to indicate that the sea was even rough at the time of the disaster, but it is plain that the night was sufficiently foggy to render special precautions necessary. Such weather, however, is so common in the Channel that this goes a very short way towards accounting for the catastrophe. Still, no useful purpose is to be served by dwelling upon this aspect of the deplorable event. That an enquiry will be held may be taken for granted, but it is unlikely that much light can be thrown upon the occurrence. What is known is that a splendid ship has been sacrificed, and that nearly 250 lives have perished owing to an error, which in the circumstances may or may not have been avoidable. The gravity and awful suddenness of the disaster have not unnaturally created a profound sensation throughout every part of the British Empire, and have called forth from Her Majesty the Queen, who many a time and oft has proved how much she is moved by the sorrows and sufferings of her subjects, an expression of deepest sympathy.


Census:

1881: 94 Sydney Place, Bathwick, Somerset
1891: Abbots Leigh, Somerset: Susanna K. Brinkley, sister (of Walter F. B. Brinkley), is aged 25, born in Dublin

Sources:

Violet Kathleen (Brinkley) Graham

Birth: 1895, in Tongham, Farnham, Surrey, England

Father: Charles Michael Edgeworth Brinkley

Mother: Evelyn Everard (Hutton) Brinkley

Married: Joseph Crosland Graham in 1929 in St Asaph district, Denbighshire and Flintshire, Wales.

Grave of Joseph Crosland Graham
Bronze memorial to Sir Joseph Crosland Graham in Llanychan Churchyard, Denbighshire
Joseph was born in 1866, in Huddersfield, West Riding of Yorkshire, the son of Joseph Graham. He was a sugar merchant. Joseph married firstly Marah Bond Robinson in 1895 in Dunstable, Bedfordshire, who died in 1927. Joseph Crosland Graham was knighted on 10 March 1929 (London Gazette 16 July 1929 p4700) "for public, political and charitable services in Denbighshire" (London Gazette 31 May 1929 p3666). He died on 30 April 1946, aged 80, and is buried in Llanychan Churchyard, Denbighshire.
Census & Addresses:
1881: 122 Upper Canning Street, Liverpool, Lancashire
1891: West Derby, Lancashire: Joseph C. Graham, son, is aged 25, born in Huddersfield, Yorkshire
1901: Liverpool, Lancashire: Joseph Croslond Graham, head, is aged 35, born in Huddersfield, Lancashire. His occupation is Sugar Merchant.
1911: Hoylake cum West Kirby, Cheshire: Joseph Gosland Graham is aged 45, born in Huddersfield
1927: Clwyd Hall, Ruthin, Denbighshire   (Justice of the peace and local government review vol 91 p576)
1946: Clwyd Hall, Ruthin, Denbighshire   (London Gazette 25 June 1946 p3252)

Census:

1901: Weston, Somerset: Violet Brinkley, daughter, is aged 6, born in Tongham, Surrey
1911: St Asaph, Denbighshire: Violet Kathleen Brinkley is aged 16, born in Longham, Surrey

Sources:

Walter Stephens Brinkley

Birth: 12 December 1826, in Ireland

Father: John Brinkley

Mother: Anne (Stephens) Brinkley

Married: Susanna Caroline Turner on 24 July 1851, in St Matthews, Ipswich, Suffolk, England

Susanna was born in St Mary at the Key, Ipswich, Suffolk and baptised on 11 December 1822 in Suffolk, the daughter of Michael Turner and Susanna Tong. She died on 2 March 1908, in Taunton, Somerset, aged 87.
Census:
1901: West Monkton, Somersetshire: Susanna C. Brinkly, mother (of Julia K. Brinkly), is aged 80, born in Ireland. She is Living On Own Means.

Children:
Occupation: Army Officer
Walter was commissioned a cornet in the 11th Light Dragoons, by purchase, on 24 September 1847 (London Gazette 24 September 1847 p3406) and promoted to lieutenant, by purchase, on 10 November 1848 (London Gazette 10 November 1848 p4020). He retired in 1853 (The historical records of the Eleventh Hussars p332). Walter was also a Justice of the Peace (Landed gentry of Great Britain & Ireland vol 1 p214 (Burke, 1894)).

The historical records of the Eleventh Hussars p332 (Godfrey Trevelyan Williams, 1908)
BRINKLEY, WALTER STEPHENS. - Cornet, 11TH Hussars, Sept 24, 1847; Lieut., Nov. 10, 1848. Retired in 1853. Of Knockmaroon House, co. Dublin, J.P. Died March 31, 1884, aged 58. (Burke's Landed Gentry - BRINKLEY of Fortland.)


Notes: Walter was treasurer to the Church Ecclesiastical Commissioners (The Andrews Professors of Astronomy and Dunsink Observatory, 1785-1985 by Wayman, P.A. in Irish Astronomical Journal, vol. 17(3), p172)

Death: 31 March 1884 in Westminster district, Middlesex, England, aged 57

Census & Addresses:
1859: Knockmaroon house, Castleknock, county Dublin   (Thomas Almanac for 1859 p1183)
1881: 94 Sydney Place, Bathwick, Somerset
1883: 93 Sydney place (new), Bath, Somerset   (Kelly's directory of Somersetshire p73)

Sources:

Walter Frederick Brownlow Brinkley

Birth: 29 July 1859, at Knockmaroon, Castleknock, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: Walter Stephens Brinkley

Mother: Susanna Caroline (Turner) Brinkley

Education: Clifton College, Clifton, Bristol, and Pembroke College, Cambridge University where he graduated B.A in 1883 and M.A. in 1899.
Clifton College annals and register p87 (1887)
Brinkley, W. F. Son of W. F. BRINKLEY, Castleknock. (Poole. J-S. IIɑMod. IIIβ; left April, 1874. Pembroke Coll. Cambridge.) 

Alumni Cantabrigienses (transcribed at A Cambridge Alumni Database)
Brinkley, Walter Frederick Brownlow.
Adm. pens. (age 19) at PEMBROKE, Oct. 1, 1878.
S. of Walter Stephens, Capt. (11th Hussars), of Knockmaroon, near Dublin.
B. there.
School, Clifton College.
Matric. Michs. 1879; B.A. 1883; M.A. 1899.
Ord. deacon, 1883; priest (Gloucester and Bristol) 1884; C. of St Mark's, Cheltenham, 1883-6. C. of Kippington, Kent, 1886-8. V. of Abbot's Leigh, Bristol, 1888-1923.
Died 1923.
Brother of the above, etc.
(Clifton Coll. Reg.)

Married: Emmeline Lydia (Brooke) Miles on 26 January 1897, in Paddington district, London, England

Emmeline was born in 1858 and baptised on 6 August 1858, in Boulogne, France, the daughter of John Cheap Brooke and Emma Caroline Smith. She married, firstly, Thomas William Miles on 6 December 1884 in Ajmir, Bengal, with whom she had three daughters, Dorothy, Eda and Emmeline. Thomas died on 11 June 1895, in London. Emmeline (the mother) died on 14 March 1902, in Abbots Leigh, Somerset, aged 43, and was buried on 18 March 1902, in Holy Trinity, Abbots Leigh, Somerset.

Children:
Occupation: Clergyman
Walter was ordained deacon in 1883 and priest in 1884. He was curate of St Mark's, Cheltenham from 1883 until 1886, then curate of Kippington, Kent, from 1886 until 1888 and vicar of Abbots Leigh, Bristol from 1888 until his death in 1923.

Notes:
The Selborne Magazine January 1902 p37
   Lizards in Ireland.—I am glad to be able to give “F. P. C.” information about lizards in Ireland, and, if possible, to convince the shades of Darwin. Some thirty years ago I used occasionally to find lizards at Knockmaroon, co. Dublin. Unlike the one F. P. C. mentions, they were brown in colour and difficult to catch, being very quiet in their movements and soon lost to sight in the long grass. They were about seven inches long, and their tails easily broke off if not caught carefully. I well remember catching, or assisting to catch one at Coolmaine, co. Cork, about twenty-five years ago, which is still, for all I know, where I left it-–preserved in a bottle in Coolmaine Castle.
    Abbots Leigh Vicarage, Bristol,                                                   WALTER F. B. BRINKLEY
         December 16, 1901.


Death: 3 February 1923 in Abbots Leigh, Somerset, England, aged 63

Burial: 7 February 1923, in Holy Trinity, Abbots Leigh, Somerset, England, aged 63

Census & Addresses:

1881: Pembroke College, Trumpington St, Cambridge St Mary The Less, Cambridgeshire
1891: Abbots Leigh, Somerset: Walter F. B. Brinkley, head, is aged 31, born in Dublin
1901: The Vicarage, Abbots Leigh, Somerset
1911: Abbots Leigh, Somerset: Walter Brinkley is aged 51, born in Castle Knock, county Dublin
1916: Vicarage, Abbots Leigh, Somerset   (www.abbotsleigh.org.uk)
1921: Vicarage, Abbots Leigh, Somerset   (www.abbotsleigh.org.uk)

Sources:

Walter Everard Brinkley

Birth: 18 September 1898, in Rawalpindi, Bengal, India

Baptism: 23 November 1898, in Rawalpindi, Bengal, India

Father: Charles Michael Edgeworth Brinkley

Mother: Evelyn Everard (Hutton) Brinkley

Married: Marjorie Jeanne Shepherd-Cross in 1931 in St Marylebone district, London, England.

Marjorie was born in 1902 in Bolton, Lancashire, the daughter of Thomas Aubrey Shepherd Shepherd-Cross and Edith Constance Fair. She died on 23 September 1951 in Spilsby district, Lincolnshire, aged 49.
Census:
1911: Halstead, Essex: Marjorie Jeanne Shepherd-Cross, daughter (of Thomas Aubrey Shepherd Shepherd-Cross) is aged 8. born in Bolton, Lancashire

Occupation: Army Officer, and later branch manager of a petroleum company
Walter was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the King's Royal Rifle Corps special reserve of officers on 29 August 1917 (London Gazette 25 September 1917 p9961). Lieutenant W. E. Brinkley relinquished his commission in the 6th King's Royal Rifle Corps on 1 April 1920, retaining the rank of lieutenant (London Gazette 18 May 1920 p5698). Walter rejoined the army on 28 April 1926, transferring into the 5th Battalion of the Royal Welch Fusiliers as a second lieutenant, relinquishing the rank of lieutenant (London Gazette 27 April 1926 p2863). He was promoted to lieutenant on 28 April 1929 (London Gazette 3 May 1929 p2927). Walter transferred from the active list to the Reserve of Officers on 28 January 1933 (London Gazette 27 January 1933 p595), but was recalled as a lieutenant in the Royal Artillery on 28 February 1940 (London Gazette 16 April 1940 p2311) and promoted to captain back in the Reserve on 1 January 1949 (London Gazette 2 March 1951 p1163). On 17 June 1953 Walter reached the age limit of liability to recall and ceased to belong to the reserve of officers, and was granted the honorary rank of major (London Gazette 12 June 1953 p3342).

Death: 7 May 1967

Notes: Walter's residence, Old Mill House in Hundleby, Lincolnshire, and its contents were sold at auction in August 1967.
Lincolnshire Life July 1967
By Direction of the Trustees of the late Mr. W. E. Brinkley
Hundleby near Spilsby
The Attractive and Charming
SMALL COUNTRY RESIDENCE
known as the "Old Mill House"
containing: Front and Back Entrance Halls, three Reception Rooms, usual Domestic Offices on the ground floor, three Bedrooms, Bathroom, Linen Room with handbasin, together with two large rooms on the second floor. Good Garage and Outbuildings, the whole standing in about an acre of easily maintained grounds forming a virtual bird sanctuary in a
Delightful Old World Garden
To be sold by AUCTION
at the WHITE HART HOTEL, SPILSBY, on
Monday, 7th August, 1967, at 2.30 p.m.
Full particulars on application to the Chartered Auctioneers.
The sale will be preceded by the sale of
THE MAIN CONTENTS OF THE RESIDENCE
comprising
ANTIQUE and MODERN FURNISHINGS
inc. fine Set of 6-Arm Chairs in the Hepplewhite design.
850 ozs. of SILVER
inc. Superb George III Epergne, London, 1766.
SHEFFIELD and OTHER PLATE
BRASS and COPPER WARE
Pair Hammerless Guns, Seven Salmon and Fly Rods
and a large quantity of Sporting Equipment.
Sporting Pictures, Prints and Engravings Pewter
ORIENTAL and OTHER CHINA and PORCELAIN
Quantity of Cut Glass Books
Austin A55 Countryman Motor Car
To be Sold by AUCTION by
WOODROFFE WALTER & SON
in a Marquee on the premises on
Wednesday, 2nd August, 1967
at 10 a.m. promptly.
VIEW DAY
Tuesday, 1st August, 11.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m., by Catalogue admitting two persons. Catalogues 2/- each.
Particulars of both sales from the Chartered Auctioneers, 5 South Street, Horncastle (Tel. 2305) or at Woodhall Spa (Tel. 3181 and.2314)


Census:

1901: Weston, Somerset: Walter Brinkley, son, is aged 2, born in India
1911: St Asaph, Denbighshire: Walter Everard Brinckley is aged 12, born in Rawl Pindas, India
1967: Old Mill House, Hundleby, Lincolnshire   (London Gazette 19 December 1967 p14042)

Sources:

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