The Byerley Family

Alice (Byerley) Osborn

Birth: 12 September 1887, in Barberton, South African Republic

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Married: Alexander Algernon Osborn on 26 April 1941
St Michael's Chronicle December 1941 p94
All good fortune to A. A. Osborn, of Gwanda, Southern Rhodesia, and Alice Byerley, of Barberton, who were married on April 26th.

Alexander was born in 1886/7, the son of Alexander Algernon Osborne and Jessie McFarlane. He was educated at Michaelhouse, Natal until 1904. He played for the 1st XV rugby team (then called the football team) in 1903 where his play is critiqued:
St Michael's Chronicle February 1904 p21
  Osborn, A. A.-Defends well at centre-threequarter, but is uncertain in giving and taking passes. Apt to lie too long on the ball, when stopping a rush. A poor kick.
St Michael's Chronicle October 1904 p21
          VALETE.
A. A. Osborn, Prefect V. Modern, 1st. XV., Gone to Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, (Glo.).


Osborn then attended the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester in 1905 (St Michael's Chronicle May 1905 p15).

Alexander married, firstly, Mabel Elizabeth Gage on 20 August 1917, in Newcastle, Natal, South Africa. Mabel died on 25 October 1918, of complications of influenza. Alexander was a farmer.

Addresses:
1907: Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, Gloucestershire (St Michael's Chronicle June 1907 p23)
1907: The Mount, Newcastle, Natal (St Michael's Chronicle December 1907 p17)
1917: Balmoral, Bethlehem, Orange Free State   (Natal Civil Records 1917 Marriages Newcastle DGS 004236646 image 1961)
1941: Gwanda, Southern Rhodesia   (St Michael's Chronicle December 1941 p94)

Death: about 1982, in Margate, Natal, South Africa

Sources:

Ann Elizabeth Byerley

Birth: 1876

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Death: 1878

Sources:

Christian Byerley

Birth: 1869, in Pietermaritzburg, Natal

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Married: Mabel (Mills) Brydges on 27 October 1908 in Barberton, South African Republic
Christian Byerley is recorded as a bachelor, aged 39, born in Pietermaritzburg, Natal. He is resident at Bushbuck Ridge District Lydenburg Transvaal. Mabel Brydges (born Mills) is recorded as a divorceé, aged 32, born in Stowmarket, Suffolk, England. She is resident in Barberton, Transvaal. The marriage was witnessed by R. L. Caughey and E. W. Byerley.

Mabel was born in 1874, in Stowmarket, Suffolk, the daughter of John Coe Mills and Amelia Alderton. She was married firstly to Harry Brydges in Stow district, Suffolk, in 1901, and had a daughter, Gladys Muriel. Harry and Muriel were divorced in 1908.
London Standard 5 March 1908 p10
        DIVORCE DIVISION.
£1500 DAMAGES TO HOTEL-KEEPER.
  Alleging the misconduct of his wife, Mr. Harry Brydges, proprietor of the Clarendon Hotel, Watford, petitioned for the dissolution of his marriage.
  William Cecil Wood, a man of independent means, who was cited as the co-respondent, and against whom damages were claimed, denied the charge against him. He had been a paying guest at the Clarendon Hotel.
  Mr. Brydges, an elderly gentleman, said he was a widower when he married the respondent. After Wood came to the hotel he had to complain of his wife being too much in the society of that person. Her explanation was that "it was purely business," and that there was nothing in their conversations but "what the whole world might know."
  After hearing other evidence, the jury awarded £1500 damages.
  His lordship granted the petitioner a decree nisi, with costs, and the custody of the child of the marriage.

Poverty Bay Herald 28 April 1908 p3
    £1500 DIVORCE DAMAGES.
  Mr Harry Brydges, proprietor of the Clarendon hotel, Watford was granted a divorce and awarded £1500 damages against the co-respondent, William Cecil Wood, a man of independent means. Mr Brydges is an ex-captain of Volunteers, a member of the local council, and president of the Licensed Victuallers' Association. Counsel said Mr Wood stayed at the hotel as a paying guest. When Mr Brydges was away his wife discharged some of the hotel servants, who had become suspicious. Mrs Brydges afterwards went to South Africa.

Mabel was married secondly to Christian Byerley and thirdly to George Whittingham.
Census:
1881: Bury St, Stowmarket, Suffolk
1901: Station Road, Watford Urban, Hertfordshire

Occupation: Storekeeper and farmer
In 1917, Christian gave evidence to a committee studying the question of native lands in the area.
Minutes of evidence of the Eastern Transvaal Natives land committee p43 (1918)
   Farm Maviljan, Bushbuck Ridge, District Lydenburg, 24th October, 1917
        PRESENT:
      CHAIRMAN and Commandant OPPERMAN.
CHRISTIAN BYERLEY: Examined by Chairman.
  I am a farmer and trader, and live on the farm Maviljan, I have two trading stations, one here and one on the farm Champagne. I have been in this part of the country for 15 years, but have only farmed for the last few years. I have been trading principally—all native trade. I have a fairly wide experience of this part of the country. My farm was a Government farm. I took it up from the Government, and it was valued at 7s. 6d. per morgen. The majority of Government farms about here are valued at 5s. per morgen, and sold at that price. My ground is not better than the others. A man was sent down to value it, and I heard afterwards that he valued it at 4s. They were not satisfied with that valuation, and sent another man down. He never came here, but fixed the value at 7s. 6d., which I am paying.
  The farms on Bushbuck Ridge lying to the west are fairly well watered in the sense of having several rivers, but the rivers are low lying, and cannot be used to any great extent for irrigation. The river here only goes through a small portion of the farm. I can only irrigate 10 morgen. The other farms through which the river runs don't, I think, get any more than that. They seem to be lower lying there than here. The character of the country is such that the streams are not capable of being applied to any expensive use for irrigation purposes. In the area immediately below the Berg the following farms are occupied, viz., Maviljan, Waterfall, Injaka, Marits, Diepdrift, Beestekraalspruit, and Versailles. These farms are being seriously worked as farming propositions. Diepdrift, however, has only just started. Occupation is comparatively recent, and averages about eight years. I could not give the rainfall in the area referred to. The farms are occupied to a large extent by natives. They are labour tenants on the farms occupied by Europeans, rent-payers on the others. These farms belong chiefly to companies. The companies let the farms to the natives.
  I have never been beyond the Sand River, and do not know the area beyond. I could not say what the value is of the farms Champagne, Rooiboklaagte, Kasteel and Arthur's Seat. I do not know the rainfall on Bushbuck Ridge, or i the neighbourhood of Champagne.
  The country between the railway line and the Beaumont line is largely occupied by natives—that is between the yellow lines marked on the map. The natives were here before I came here. I came here first in 1897, and the natives had been here then for some considerable time. A lot were brought out of the game reserve. 

Notes: "Kit" Byerley was remembered by Kathleen Florence Allen in
Klaserie Chronicle December 2016 p32
Tales from a Forgotten Era Part 1
The recollections of Kathleen Florence Allen (1895 – 1978)
Our first stop was at the home of Mr and Mrs MacIndoe on Beestekraalspruit. They were extremely kind to us. On our way again, we were overtaken by a Cape-cart and four mules, owned by Mr and Mrs Kit Byerley of Maviljan, who had come to meet us at the home we had just left and had missed us. I was handed a very beautiful bouquet of gorgeous carnations from their garden. My heart just glowed with pleasure at their gracious and friendly gesture.

Klaserie Chronicle June 2017 p33
Tales from a Forgotten Era Part 3
The prospect of the one and only show in Graskop lit up a feverish and intense eagerness to enter into competition with neighbouring farmers. ... The prize for the best oranges was won by Mr Byerley. Years back he had blasted holes in the rock under the soil to start his orchard – the holes had to be big enough to accommodate the size of the roots when fully grown. A proper mixing and handling of manures and earth was the foundation of his prize-winning orchard.

Death: 13 July 1922 at his residence on the farm Maviljan, Bushbuckridge, Transvaal, South Africa

Will: dated 2 February 1914, filed 31 July 1922
Transvaal Probate Records 1922 #49362 DGS 007818079 images 1460-1461
    LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT
KNOWN ALL MEN WHOM IT MAY CONCERN that on this the 2nd day of February 1914 before the undersigned two witnesses, personally came and appeared CHRISTIAN BYERLEY of Pilgrims Rest and his wife MABEL BYERLEY, to whom he is married out of community of property.
And the Appearers declared their wish to make and execute their last will and testament; wherefore hereby revoking all previous wills and testaments made by them or either of them, the testators declared their will to be as follows:-
(1) In the event of the testators dying within a short period of each other, in such manner that the dispositions mentioned in the next succeeding paragraphs cannot be carried out, then they nominate constitute and appoint their minor daughter GLADYS MURIEL to be the heiress of one half of all their estate and effects which may be left at such their deaths, movable and immovable, of what nature and kind soever, and wheresoever situate, nothing excepted, and the other half of such their estate and effects shall devolve upon the brother of the testator namely, EDWARD WORSLEY BYERLEY of Barberton, whom the testators wish to be the guardian of the said minor child GLADYS MURIEL abovementioned.
(2) The testator declared to nominate constitute and appoint his wife the said MABEL BYERLEY to be the sole heiress of all his estate and effects which may be left at his death, movable and immovable, wheresoever situate, nothing excepted, the testatrix similarly nominates constitutes and appoints her husband the said CHRISTIAN BYERLEY to be the sole heir of all her estate and effects, movable and immovable, wheresover situate, nothing excepted.
(3) With regard to paragraph (1) hereof the Testators wish it to be understood that it has only to take effect should they both die from the result of some accident, the intention being that if one dies from natural causes, the survivor shall be heir or heiress as the case may be, but should they both die practically together, then the terms of paragraph (1) shall apply, that is, that their estates shall be equally divided between the minor child GLADYS MURIEL, and the testators brother EDWARD WORSLEY BYERLEY, who shall become the guardian of the said minor child.
(4) The first dying declared to nominate and appoint the survivor as executor or executrix of this their will with all such powers as are allowed in Law.
The testators reserved to themselves the right to make all such alterations in or additions to this their will as they may think fit, either by separate act or at the foot hereof, desiring that all such alterations or additions made in their own handwriting shall be considered as valid as if inserted herein.
  The foregoing the testators declared to contain their last will and testament, desiring that it may have effect as such or as a codicil, or otherwise as may be consistent with law.
  Thus done and signed at Pilgrims Rest the day month and year aforewritten in the presence of the undersigned witnesses.
  C. BYERLEY
  M. BYERLEY
AS WITNESSES%-
P.J.M. Munro
H.E. Cormack


Addresses:
1917: Farm "Maviljan", Bushbuck Ridge, Lydenburg district, Transvaal   (Minutes of evidence of the Eastern Transvaal Natives land committee p43)
1922: Bushbuckridge, Pilgrim's Rest district, Transvaal   (Transvaal Probate Records 1922 #49362 DGS 007818079 image 1458)

Sources:

Edward Worsley Byerley

Birth: 3 February 1880

Baptism: 20 January 1883, in St Albans, Pretoria, Transvaal
The baptism was sponsored by F. A. Worsley, S. Byerley and Christiana Byerley

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Barberton Railway Accident 1902
Scene of the railway accident in Barberton (1902)
photograph posted by The South African
Military History Society
, original courtesy of the Barberton Museum
Notes: Edward was involved in a railway accident in Barberton. He was accompanying his sister-in-law Charlotte and her two daughters on a return trip from Lourenço Marques. One of his nieces was thrown from the train and Charlotte and the other were pinned underneath an overturned carriage, but all survived. Presumably this accident was the one that occurred on 30 March 1902 in which 49 people died. Most of the dead were British soldiers.
Poverty Bay Herald 15 May 1902 p4
THE BARBERTON RAILWAY FATALITY.
  BARBERTON, April 3 (Reuter).—In connection with the railway accident, the detachment of the Hants Regiment in the train comprised 36 men of the Volunteer Company, under Captain Grant and Lieutenant Holbrooke. Of these, ten men were killed and 25 wounded; 30 men of E Company, under Lieutenant Parker, of whom 24 were killed and four wounded; 31 of G Company, of whom six were killed and nine wounded. One man each was killed from B and D Companies, making a total of 80 killed and wounded out of 102 starting.
No officers were injured.
  Corporals Childs and Henty were the only non-commissioned officers killed; all the others were privates.
  The engine-driver, named Rankin, was killed on the spot, while the stoker, a Mauritian, died unconscious on the way to the hospital.
  A civilian named White jumped from the carriage, and was killed against the bridge. One Dutch child has since died. The accident occurred four miles from Barberton, at the sharp curve leading on to the bridge, over a donga forty feet deep.
  At the end of the three miles down incline the train had attained a speed of over eighty miles per hour. The engine first left the rails, turning completely over, and then the boiler burst. Six trucks, containing soldiers, were hurled with terrific force 20 to 30 yards from the line and smashed to matchwood, three lying all in a heap. One caught the corner of the bridge and fell into the donga. Twenty-two dead bodies were taken from here. The passenger coach, with several women, children, and men, had a most miraculous escape. The wheels left the rails, and the coach ran across the bridge on the girders, within three inches of the edge. All must have been killed had it followed the soldiers' trucks into the donga. This would have happened had not the guard (Ross) kept the brake down, after the engine and front trucks left the rails. With the exception of the Dutch child and a passenger badly cut about the head, all the passengers escaped with a severe shaking, although the carriage was completely smashed.
There are now in hospital two dangerous and six serious cases. Thirty others are doing well. The regiment was very popular during its year's stay here, and deep sympathy is felt by the whole community over the terrible calamity. The cause of the engine getting out of control is still unknown.


Barberton c1900
Barberton, Transvaal c. 1900
Photograph taken by Edward Worsely Byerley
photograph held at the Australian War Memorial Research Centre donated by T. Collins
18th Brigade Field Hospital near Barberton c.1900
18th Brigade Field Hospital near Barberton c. 1900
Photograph taken by Edward Worsely Byerley
photograph held at the Australian War Memorial Research Centre donated by T. Collins
Edward was a photographer. In addition the portrait of his mother, two photographs of his taken at Barberton during the Anglo-Boer War are held at the Australian War Memorial Research Centre.

Sources:

Edward William Byerley

Birth: 28 February 1903, in Barberton, Transvaal

Baptism: 28 March 1903 in the Wesleyan-Methodist Chapel, Barberton, Transvaal
Edward William was baptised by M. J. Goodwin. He is recorded as born on 28 February 1903, the son of George F. Byerley and Charlotte D. Byerley. The parents's abode is recorded as Barberton.

Father: George Ford Byerley

Mother: Charlotte Dingwall (Harper) Byerley

Isabella Annie Leggett
Isabella Annie Leggett
photograph from geni.com
Married: Isabella Annie Leggett

Isabella was born on 21 April 1906, the daughter of John James Leggett and Isabella Smith. She died on 26 November 1978 and is buried in Stellawood cemetery, Durban.

Notes: Edward was known as "Ted"

Death: 3 July 1970

Grave of Edward William Byerley
Gravestone of Edward William Byerley in Stellawood cemetery, Durban, Natal
photograph by Colin Garvie at eGGSA
Buried: Stellawood cemetery, Durban, Natal, South Africa, with his wife
Their headstone reads:
In Loving Memory of
Edward William Byerley
28 · 2 · 1903  - 3 · 7 · 1970
Isabella Annie Byerley
21 · 4 · 1906  - 26 · 11 · 1978

Sources:

Emily Byerley

Birth: 8 February 1872, in Pietermaritzburg, Natal

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Death: 23 March 1872 at Church Street, Pietermaritzburg, Natal, aged 7 weeks
The cause of death is listed as enlargement of the liver.

Sources:

Ernest Byerley

Birth: 24 January 1873, in Pietermaritzburg, Natal

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Death: 1878, in Pilgrim's Rest, South African Republic
Ernest is presumed to have died during the whooping cough epidemic.

Sources:

Florence Amy Byerley

Birth: 1878

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Death: 1878

Sources:

Francis Alexander Byerley

Father: George Ford Byerley

Mother: Charlotte Dingwall (Harper) Byerley

Notes: Francis is names as "Francis Alexander Byerley" in his mother's death notice, and as "Frank Alexander Byerley" in that of his father. I think it more likely that he was actually Francis and called Frank than the other way around.

Sources:

George Alexander Byerley

George Alexander Byerley
George Alexander Byerley
photograph scan courtesy of Alan Fitz-Patrick 
George Byerley and Selina (Ford) Byerley
George Alexander Byerley and Selina Ford
taken in Verulam, Natal, 1867 - thought to be taken on their wedding day
photograph scan courtesy of Alan Fitz-Patrick
Birth: 20 November 1843, in Aldersgate, London, England

Baptism: 5 February 1854 in Old Church, Saint Pancras, London, England

Father: William Byerley

Mother: Christiana (Burclay) Byerley

Married: Selina Ford on 18 February 1867, in Mission House, Verulam, Natal
George Byerley is recorded as a bachelor, aged 23. He is a clerk, resident in Pietermaritzburg. Selina Ford is recorded as a spinster, aged 21, resident in Riverton. The wedding was performed by Thomas Kirkby and witnessed by G. Andrews and M. A. Andrews.

Children: Occupation: Clerk (1867); Hotelier (1877); Law Agent

Notes: George Byerley emigrated to the Cape Colony, arriving in Algoa Bay with his mother and 5 siblings on the Schah Jehan on 8 July 1859 to join his father, a pastry chef, who had set up a bakery there. George is recorded as aged 14.

In 1877 George and Selina were operating a canteen at Sptitzkop in the eastern Transvaal where one of the early gold rushes was taking place. They were encountered there by Rowland Atcherley, an Englishman on a year-long adventure in Natal and the Transvaal.
A Trip to Böerland p110 (Rowland J. Atcherley, 1879)
We had a farewell evening at a canvas canteen, dignified by the name of Byerley's Hotel. There was a goodly troop in attendance, a fairish supper on the board, and Byerley's Kafir cook had triumphed in his art. The “feast of reason” being over, the table was cleared for the “flow of soul;” a banjo, tambourine, and bones were dug out of some obscure old chest, and a case of French brandy having been opened, songs were sung, healths were drunk, and speeches made. I had been elected to the chair, and as I had to fairly bellow every time I wanted to be heard, the scene may be better imagined than described. Midnight came on, but no cessation—more speeches, now a little disjointed, more songs, and more hygienic wishes. 
pp127-8
On the occasion of one of these storms, I happened to be at Byerley's “Spitzkop hotel,” gradually eating out, in the shape of an occasional meal, a small debt he owed me for money lent. There were present but myself, Mrs. Byerley (a delicate young Englishwoman, little fitted for the rough life of the gold-diggings), and her three little children, Byerley himself being away at another creek, endeavouring to get in some outstanding accounts. We had just finished dinner when the storm came. A new fly had been stretched over the roof, and the wind, catching this, ripped it off with a report like that of a cannon, and left it to leeward, flapping and cracking like a gigantic whip-thong. The rain descended with terrible force, beating through the thin canvas, and wetting everything within. A large stock of mealie flour, which when once wetted becomes useless, was utterly ruined and the poor woman began to grow very much alarmed at the course the unruly elements were taking. Her screaming children clinging to her added to her distraction; and what with the thunder, the children, and the destruction, I think she came very nigh being frightened out of her wits. But the culminating point had yet to come. The door opened, and Byerley himself was seen standing like a water-sprite dripping in the opening. The next moment and the “Spitzkop hotel” was in the air, and crockery, pots, pans, men, woman, and children were floundering about in the mud together, entangled in the folds of the flapping and torn canvas. With some difficulty we got out, Mrs. Byerley and the children taking refuge in a neighbouring iron store; while Byerley, with the assistance of myself and a few others, collected his scattered household gods and put them in a place of safety. But the “Spitzkop hotel” never rose again: poor Byerley was played out; he could neither get debts nor customers, and a few days afterwards departed, with his wife and children, on the weary journey in search of better luck, but with the bitter sickness in their hearts of “hope deferred.”

George seems to have moved a few miles north to Pilgrim's Rest, site of another gold rush, where his eldest daughter, Selina, died in 1878.

Death: 6 March 1893, at Te Kaapsche Hoop, South African Republic, aged 51

Census:
1851: West Street, Saint Pancras, Middlesex

Sources:

George Ford Byerley

Birth: 4 November 1874 in Lydenburg, South African Republic

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Married: Charlotte Dingwall Harper on 14 May 1898 at Mrs. Harper's house, Barberton, South African Republic
George Ford Byerley is recorded as a bachelor, aged 23, the son of George Alexander Byerley, a law agent. George is a compositor, resident in Barberton. Charlotte Dingwall Harper is recorded as a spinster, aged 20, the daughter of Robert Harper, a contractor. Charlotte is resident in Barberton. The marriage was performed by L. H. Hardy and witnessed by William Harper and J. C. Dallov.

Charlotte was born in 1877/8 in Natal, the daughter of Robert Harper. She died on 9 April 1949 at Grey's Hospital, Pietermaritzburg, aged 71. The cause of death is listed as gangrene of both feet of duration one month, a result of arteriosclerosis. Charlotte is buried in Mountain Rise cemetery, Pietermaritzburg.
Addresses:
1898: Barberton, South African Republic   (South African Methodist Marriage Registers Barberton 1898 #64)
1939: 20 Slatter Street, Pietermaritzburg, Natal   (Pietermaritzburg Estate Files 1939 #28395 GS film 007867891 image 1055)
1949: 475 Prince Alfred Street, Pietermaritzburg, Natal   (Natal Civil Records Deaths Pietermaritzburg 1949 DGS 007751212 image 2054)

Children: Occupation: Compositor in a printing works
A compositor is a person that sets written material into type.

Barberton Railway Accident 1902
Scene of the railway accident in Barberton (1902)
photograph posted by The South African
Military History Society
, original courtesy of the Barberton Museum
Notes: Charlotte and her daughters were involved in a railway accident in Barberton. She was returning from Lourenço Marques with her two daughters and her brother-in-law, Edward Byerley. One of daughters was thrown from the train and Charlotte and the other daughter were pinned underneath an overturned carriage, but all survived. Presumably this accident was the one that occurred on 30 March 1902 in which 49 people died. Most of the dead were British soldiers.
Poverty Bay Herald 15 May 1902 p4
THE BARBERTON RAILWAY FATALITY.
  BARBERTON, April 3 (Reuter).—In connection with the railway accident, the detachment of the Hants Regiment in the train comprised 36 men of the Volunteer Company, under Captain Grant and Lieutenant Holbrooke. Of these, ten men were killed and 25 wounded; 30 men of E Company, under Lieutenant Parker, of whom 24 were killed and four wounded; 31 of G Company, of whom six were killed and nine wounded. One man each was killed from B and D Companies, making a total of 80 killed and wounded out of 102 starting.
No officers were injured.
  Corporals Childs and Henty were the only non-commissioned officers killed; all the others were privates.
  The engine-driver, named Rankin, was killed on the spot, while the stoker, a Mauritian, died unconscious on the way to the hospital.
  A civilian named White jumped from the carriage, and was killed against the bridge. One Dutch child has since died. The accident occurred four miles from Barberton, at the sharp curve leading on to the bridge, over a donga forty feet deep.
  At the end of the three miles down incline the train had attained a speed of over eighty miles per hour. The engine first left the rails, turning completely over, and then the boiler burst. Six trucks, containing soldiers, were hurled with terrific force 20 to 30 yards from the line and smashed to matchwood, three lying all in a heap. One caught the corner of the bridge and fell into the donga. Twenty-two dead bodies were taken from here. The passenger coach, with several women, children, and men, had a most miraculous escape. The wheels left the rails, and the coach ran across the bridge on the girders, within three inches of the edge. All must have been killed had it followed the soldiers' trucks into the donga. This would have happened had not the guard (Ross) kept the brake down, after the engine and front trucks left the rails. With the exception of the Dutch child and a passenger badly cut about the head, all the passengers escaped with a severe shaking, although the carriage was completely smashed.
There are now in hospital two dangerous and six serious cases. Thirty others are doing well. The regiment was very popular during its year's stay here, and deep sympathy is felt by the whole community over the terrible calamity. The cause of the engine getting out of control is still unknown.


Death: 26 January 1939, at Grey's Hospital, Pietermaritzburg, Natal, South Africa, aged 64
The cause of death is listed as general peritonitis from perforated appendicitis, of duration 5 days.

Buried: Mountain Rise cemetery, Pietermaritzburg, Natal, South Africa

Will: dated 11 August 1937, filed 30 January 1939
Pietermaritzburg Estate Files 1939 #28395 GS film 007867891 image 1056
THIS IS THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT of me GEORGE FORD BYERLEY of 20, Slatter Street in the County of Pietermaritzburg, Natal.
I hereby revoke all wills and testamentary instruments heretofore by me made. I appoint C.D. BYERLEY of Pietermaritzburg, and ... of ... to be the exectutrix of this my Will. I direct my Executors to pay my just debts and Funeral and Testamentary Expenses.
  I give and bequeath All I possess to my wife Charlotte, Dingwall Byerley, born Harper, absolutely.
Witness my hand this Eleventh day of August 1937.
  (Testator to sign here) .. G. F. Byerley ...
  Signed by the above-named Testator as his last Will in the presence of us both, being present at the same time, who in his presence and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses.
Witnesses to sign here, with their address and occupation.
  R.J.King, 104 Chapel Street, Maritzburg; linotype operator.
  E.E.Beckett..244 Berg Street Maritzburg Lithographic Printer

Addresses:

1898: Barberton, South African Republic   (South African Methodist Marriage Registers Barberton 1898 #64)
1939: 20 Slatter Street, Pietermaritzburg, Natal   (Natal Civil Records Deaths Pietermaritzburg 1939 DGS 007751160  image 2477)

Sources:

Harold James Byerley

Father: George Ford Byerley

Mother: Charlotte Dingwall (Harper) Byerley

Sources:

Hilda (Byerley) Fitz-Patrick

Birth: 16 November 1883, in Barberton, South African Republic

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Married: Bernard John Gowran Fitz-Patrick in 1908, in Durban, Natal

Children: Death: 30 August 1963 in Lourenço Marques, Mozambique

Addresses:
1938: Lourenço Marques, Mozambique   (Cape Province Probate Records 1938 #59099 DGS 007735715 image 144)

Sources:

Lorna Selina (Byerley) Leggott

Birth: 17 May 1901

Baptism: 6 July 1901 in the Wesleyan-Methodist Circuit, Durban, Natal
Lorna Selina was baptised by Frederick Mason. She is recorded as the daughter of George Ford Byerley and Charlotte Dingwall Byerley. The parents's abode is recorded as "Barberton, presently in Durban".

Father: George Ford Byerley

Mother: Charlotte Dingwall (Harper) Byerley

Married: Albert Henry Leggott on 8 July 1920 in the Irish Presbyterian Church, Pietermaritzburg, Natal, South Africa
Albert Henry Leggott is recorded as a bachelor, aged 29. He is a carpenter and joiner, resident at 4 Bateman Avenue, P. M. Burg. Lorna Selina Byerley is recorded as a spinster, aged 19. She is a typist, resident at 4 Bateman Avenue, P. M. Burg. The marriage was performed by Hedley Vicars Taylor, Presbyterian minister, and witnessed by John Coulson Ashley and Mildred Olive Byerley.

Albert was born in  1890/1, in England. He died on 10 December 1956, aged 66, and is buried in Stellawood cemetery, Durban.
Addresses:
1921: 3 Forest Road, Bulwer Park, Durban, Natal   (Parish records of Durban St Paul 1921 p62)

Occupation: Typist

Barberton Railway Accident 1902
Scene of the railway accident in Barberton (1902)
photograph posted by The South African
Military History Society
, original courtesy of the Barberton Museum
Notes: As an infant, Lorna was involved in a railway accident in Barberton. Her mother was returning from Lourenço Marques with her, her sister and her uncle, Edward Byerley. One of daughters was thrown from the train and Charlotte and the other daughter were pinned underneath an overturned carriage, but all survived. Presumably this accident was the one that occurred on 30 March 1902 in which 49 people died.

Death: 8 August 1981, aged 80

Headstone of Albert Henry Leggott and Lorna Seline (Byerley) Leggott
Headstone of Albert Henry Leggott and Lorna Selina (Byerley) Leggott in Stellawood cemetery, Durban, Natal
photograph by Maureen Schnittker posted at eGGSA
Buried: Stellawood cemetery and crematorium, Durban, Natal, South Africa
The headstone reads:
In Treasured Memory of
Darling Husband, our dear Dad and Grandpa
Albert Henry Leggott
who passed away 10th December 1956 aged 66 years
"In God's keeping"
our dear Mom and Gran
Lorna Selina Leggott
who passed away 8th August 1981 aged 80 years
Re United


Sources:

Mildred Olive (Byerley) Tavares

Birth: 1906/7

Father: George Ford Byerley

Mother: Charlotte Dingwall (Harper) Byerley

Memorial to Herminio Tavares
Memorial to Herminio Tavares in Stellawood cemetery and crematorium, Durban, Natal
photograph by Maureen Schnittker at eGGSA
Married: Herminio Tavares

Herminio was born on 22 April 1904, and died on 22 November 1978. He was cremated at Stellawood cemetery and crematorium, Durban, Natal.
The memorial reads:
In loving memory of a devoted father and grandfather
HERMINIO TAVARES
22. 4. 04 - 20. 7. 1978
United now in peace


Death: 20 July 1978

Memorial to Mildred Olive (Byerley) Tavares
Memorial to Mildred Olive (Byerley) Tavares in Stellawood cemetery and crematorium, Durban, Natal
photograph by Maureen Schnittker at eGGSA
Cremated: Stellawood cemetery and crematorium, Durban, Natal, South Africa
The memorial reads:
In loving memory of my dear wife
MILDRED OLIVE TAVARES
Mother of Ted
who passed away on 20. 7. 1978
aged 71 years
Always loved and remembered

Sources:

Nellie Caroline (Byerley) Caughey

Birth: 18 November 1881, in Pretoria, South African Republic

Baptism: 20 January 1883, in St Albans, Pretoria, South African Republic
The baptism was sponsored by William Bales, Sarah James and Clara Bancroft

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Married: Robert Lloyd Caughey on 24 October 1906 in Barberton, Transvaal
Robert Lloyd Caughey is recorded as a bachelor, aged 33, born in Holywood, Ireland and resident in Barberton. Nellie Caroline Byerley is recorded as a spinster, aged 24, born in Pretoria, Transvaal and resident in Barberton. The marriage was witnessed by W.J.McClelland and G.J.G. ???.

Robert was born on 3 July 1873 at Bath Cottage, Holywood, Belfast, Ireland, the son of William Bowden Caughey and Anna McClelland. He died in March 1925.

Death: 27 December 1961 at Princess Nursing Home, Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa
The cause of death is listed as cerebro vascular accident, contributing cause arterio sclerosis, of duration 2-3 weeks.

Headstone of Nellie Caroline (Byerley) Caughey
Headstone of Nellie Caroline (Byerley) Caughey in West Park cemetery, JTransvaalohannesburg, 
photograph by Riana le Roux posted at eGGSA
Buried: West Park cemetery, Montgomery Park, Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa

Sources:

Selina Byerley

Birth: 12 April 1868

Father: George Alexander Byerley

Mother: Selina (Ford) Byerley

Death: 24 April 1878, aged 10

Gravestone of Selina Byerley
Gravestone of Selina Byerley in Main cemetery, Pilgrim's Rest, Transvaal
photograph by Tian Schutte posted at eGGSA 
Buried: in Main cemetery, Pilgrim's Rest, South African Republic

Sources:

Winifred Annie (Byerley) Leggott

Birth: 18 September 1898

Baptism: 30 October 1898 in the Wesleyan-Methodist Chapel, Barberton, South African Republic
Winifred Annie was baptised by J. H. Hardy. She is recorded as the daughter of George Ford Byerley and Charlotte Dingwall Byerley. The parents's abode is recorded as Barberton.

Father: George Ford Byerley

Mother: Charlotte Dingwall (Harper) Byerley

Married: Frank Howard Leggott on 12 October 1918 in the Irish Presbyterian Church, Pietermaritzburg, Natal, South Africa
Frank Howard Leggott is recorded as a bachelor, aged 23. He is an engineer, resident in Empangeni, Zululand. Winifred Annie Byerley is recorded as a spinster, aged 20, resident in P. M. Burg. The marriage was performed by George Grieve and witnessed by Charles Lancelot Little and Lorna Selina Byerley.

Frank was born on 13 August 1896, in Barberton, South African Republic. He died in 1964.

Barberton Railway Accident 1902
Scene of the railway accident in Barberton (1902)
photograph posted by The South African
Military History Society
, original courtesy of the Barberton Museum
Notes: As a child, Winifred was involved in a railway accident in Barberton. Her mother was returning from Lourenço Marques with her, her sister and her uncle, Edward Byerley. One of daughters was thrown from the train and Charlotte and the other daughter were pinned underneath an overturned carriage, but all survived. Presumably this accident was the one that occurred on 30 March 1902 in which 49 people died.

Death: 1948

Sources:
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