The Langmead Family

Arthur Frederick Langmead

Birth: 1908 in Climping, West Sussex, England

Father: John Langmead

Mother: Mary (Loveys) Langmead

Death: 1961, in Chichester district, West Sussex, aged 52

Census:
1911: Climping, West Sussex: John Herbert Langmead is aged 2, born in Climping, Sussex

Sources:

Doris Mary (Langmead) Pitts

Birth: 26 June 1899 in Climping, West Sussex, England

Baptised: 22 July 1899 in Climping, West Sussex, England

Father: John Langmead

Mother: Mary (Loveys) Langmead

Married: William Henry Pitts on 25 April 1922, in Westhampnett district, West Sussex, England

William was born on 23 May 1885 at Woodhorn, Oving, Sussex, and baptised on 18 June 1885 in Oving, the son of Frederick Pitts and Annie. William was a sheep farmer, and the Woodhorn stud was well known. He died on 2 February 1964 in Chichester district, West Sussex, aged 78.

Advocate (Burnie, Tasmania) 20 September 1939
  LAROONA SALES.
The Laroona Southdown stud was founded by Mr. Frank Hallam, of Piper's River, in 1930, when he imported a ram and a number of ewes from the Shripney stud of Mr. E. H. Hobgen, of England. Rams and ewes have since been imported from the Woodhorn stud of Mr. W. H. Pitts and the Head Hone stud of Mrs. V. G. Stride. The stud to-day numbers approximately 100 ewes, and is almost pure English blood. Messrs. E. and A. Little, of Piper's River, selected 20 ewes from the Laroona flock that were all mated to Laroona rams. Mr. E. H. Murfet, of Hagley, selected 15 ewes, and they also were mated, six of them being in lamb to the imported ram. Head Hone Opponent.


Census:
1891: Woodhorn, Oving, West Sussex
1901: Littlehampton, West Sussex: William Pitts, boarder, is aged 15 born in Oving, Sussex. His occupation is listed as Scholar.
1911: Oving, West Sussex: William Henry Pitts is aged 25, born in Oving Sussex

Death: 7 February 1980

Census:
1901: Climping, West Sussex: Doris M. Langmead, daughter, is aged 1, born in Climping, Sussex
1911: Climping, West Sussex: Doris Mary Langmead is aged 11, born in Climping, Sussex

Sources:

Frederick Samuel Langmead

Birth: 17 March 1879 in Bovey Tracey, Devon, England

Father: William Langmead

Mother: Nancy Hamlyn (Hannaford) Langmead

Married: Olive Gertrude Mary Gray on 3 July 1913, in London City district, London, England

Olive was born on 21 January 1880, in Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland, and baptised on 3 March 1880 in the parish of St George, county Dublin, the daughter of Thomas Thompson Gray and Ellen Hariette Barton. Olive obtained the degrees of Bachelor of Surgery (B.S.) and Bachelor of Medicine (M.B.). She died on 8 October 1956, in Paddington district, London, aged 76.
Census:
1911: Holborn district, London: Olive Gray is aged 31, born in Dublin

Occupation: Doctor. Frederick qualified as an M.D. from the University of London in 1902, and acquired membership of the Royal College of Physicians (M.R.C.P.) in 1906 (St. Mary's Hospital Gazette May 1906 p49) and the Royal College of Surgeons (M.R.C.S.). Later he became a Fellow of the Royal Colleges of Physicians (F.R.C.P.). Frederick worked as House Physician and Obstetrics Officer, Medical Registrar, Medical Doctor, Casualty Physician and Assistant Physician at St Mary's Hospital in London, House Physician, Medical Registrar and Physician to Outpatients at the Hospital for Sick Children on Great Ormond Street in London, Assistant Physician at Paddington Green Children's Hospital, Assistant Physician and Pathologist at the Royal Free Hospital and Assistant Physician at the Seaman's Hospital. He was appointed Professor of Medicine at the University of London and St Mary's Hospital on 31 August 1921. Frederick was the co-author, along with Malcolm Alexander Morris and Sir Gordon Holes, of The Dictionary of Practical Medicine. He also published numerous papers in medical journals, primarily on pediatric issues.

Notes: Frederick served in the Royal Army Medical Corps in World War I. He was appointed to the rank of temporary major on 4 June 1917 (London Gazette 29 June 1917 p6526), and relinquished his commission on 18 January 1919, retaining the rank of major (London Gazette 4 March 1919 p3111).

Death: 29 October 1969

Census:
1881: Whitstone, Bovey Tracey, Devon
1891: Kents Farm, Climping, West Sussex
1911: Paddington, London: Frederick Samuel Langmead is aged 32, born in Bosey Tracey, Devon

Sources:

Greta Nancy Langmead

Birth: 1902 in Climping, West Sussex, England

Baptised: 21 January 1902 in Climping, West Sussex, England

Father: John Langmead

Mother: Mary (Loveys) Langmead

Occupation: Poultry Farmer, at the Northwood Farm in Ford, West Sussex.

London Gazette 23 March 1934 p1974
NOTICE is hereby given that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us, the undersigned, Greta Nancy Langmead and Evelyn Muriel Woollons, carrying on business as Poultry and General Farmers, at Ford, in the county of Sussex, under the style or firm of "The NORTHWOOD POULTRY FARM," has been dissolved by mutual consent as from the twentieth day of December, 1933. All debts due to and owing by the said late firm will be received and paid by the said Greta Nancy Langmead.—Dated this 16th day of March, 1934.
          GRETA N. LANGMEAD.
          E. M. WOOLLONS.


Census:
1911: Climping, West Sussex: Greta Nancy Langmead is aged 9, born in Climping, Sussex

Sources:

John Langmead

Birth: 13 May 1871 in Bovey Tracey, Devon, England

Father: William Langmead

Mother: Nancy Hamlyn (Hannaford) Langmead

Married: Mary Loveys on 21 October 1897, in Yapton, West Sussex, England

Mary and John were first cousins - they shared the grandparents John Hannaford and Elizabeth Dolling.

Children:
Occupation: Farmer. John and his brother Walter divided the farms that their father had acquired at Kent's, Brookpit and Atherington farms. John later bought Northwood farm in Arundel, West Sussex, around 1914, which was to become a world famous sheep stud. Details of John's sheep flock in 1908 can be found in the The Southdown Flock Book: Volume 17 p102.

A History of the County of Sussex: vol 5 part 1 pp126-147 (T.P. Hudson ed., 1997)
CLIMPING
  Christ's Hospital by 1914 had added other farms, so that most of the parish, except for the south-east corner, then belonged to it. Church and Kent's farms were sold to the Dennis Estates Ltd. of Lincolnshire in 1914, and Northwood farm was bought then or soon afterwards by John Langmead (d. 1950). In 1929 Church farm passed to Thomas Edward Dennis (d. 1940), whose executors sold it in 1941, when it had 154 a., to the tenant W. H. May. After his death in 1982 his nephew K. H. May sold most of the land (118 a.) in 1984 to West Sussex county council. Northwood farm, of 435 a. in Climping and other parishes, belonged in 1991 to the descendants of John Langmead.
...
  During the 19th and early 20th centuries the parish was divided into large farms, mostly rented. The Christ's Hospital estate was in excellent condition in 1832, with established tenants, notably the Cootes, who had been at Church farm since 1759, and the Bonifaces, who had had Kent's farm since 1799. In 1843 the two families dominated the parish. Leases on the Christ's Hospital estate in the period were of between 10 and 14 years. The Cootes and Bonifaces were still the chief farmers in the 1860s and 70s, but from 1881 they were gradually replaced by the Langmead family, immigrants from Devon. William Langmead (d. 1919) first farmed at Bailiffscourt, and later at Kent's, Brookpit, and Atherington farms; his sons John (d. 1950) and Walter (d. 1971) divided those farms between them, John later adding Northwood farm.
...
   In the early 20th century sheep were brought for fattening from West Dean north of Chichester. In 1914 the Langmead farms were specially noted: Kent's with Hobb's for its Southdown flock, and Atherington with Bailiffscourt for sheep, cattle, and prize-winning crops. The Atherington flock was later moved to Northwood farm.


John and Walter are brought into evidence as examples of successful farmers in the examination of W. J. Passmore, before the 1919 Royal Commission on Agriculture which was established "to enquire into the economic prospects of the agricultural industry in Great Britain". W. J. Passmore, of the West Sussex Farmers' Union, had introduced the accounts of several less prosperous farms in West Sussex.
Papers by command volume 9 p30-31
  16,879. (To Mr Passmore): I think you, Mr. Passmore, know Mr. Langmead, of Yapton?—(Mr. Passmore): Yes.
  16,880. I suggest to both you gentlemen that Mr. Langmead keeps very good accounts?—I could not tell you; I do not know anything at all about his accounts.
  16,881. He is a man who started in a small way, I believe, and now he owns a considerable stretch of land round about Yapton. Not only has he been able to buy his land, but he has also bought the aerodrome as well?—You are confounding the two brothers.
  16,882. I know there are two of them. There is John and there is Walter Langmead. They are both farmers, and both of them keep accounts, do they not? Do you not think it would be a good thing for this Commission to have accounts from one or other of these two brothers?—It strikes me very forcibly that the important thing is to have accounts from the larger acreage of the land, and by far the larger acreage of the land in West Sussex is represented by the accounts you have had put before you. The piece of land running down by the coast is a very little part of West Sussex.
  16,883. Yes, but it is a very important part of West Sussex?
Quite so.
  16,884, Can you tell us the average yield of wheat on that particular land?
I should say the average over a number of years would run about 40 to 44 bushels or something like that. I am not speaking from actual knowledge but from my observation.
  16,885. Would you not say it was quite a common experience for farmers to get a yield of six quarters to the acre on that land?
Yes I should say it was a common experience, but I might say that occasionally on the very poor land you will get six quarters in one year, but in another year you get an entire failure, which balances the two considerably.
  16,886. Yes, but it is a common experience in that part of the country to get a yield of six quarters to the acre, whereas the accounts which have been presented to us here would lead the Commission to suppose
unless the eyes of the Commission were openedthat the farmers in West Sussex were living upon their losses?No, I do not see that.
  16,887. You seem to have selected dairy farms and poultry farms and farms on the Weald clay. I daresay you have seen the farmers driving into market at Chichester, have you not?
Yes.
  16,888. When they are driving in their motor-cars and their smart dogcarts, it does not look as if they were men who were living upon their losses, does it?
No, I do not think that they do live upon their losses.
  16,889. Do you not think that farmers such as Mr. Harris and Mr. Harrison and Mr. Langmead and others are doing pretty well?
Is it not the fact that the very best land of England all over the country really has shown a fair profit, and is it not the fact that it is as cheap to go to market in a respectable cart as it is in a dirty one?
  16,890. Yes, of course, but I want to point out to you that your Union in West Sussex have not quite played the game with us in presenting to the Commission these eight cases as typical of Welt Sussex farming?
I cannot agree with that.
  Mr. Wyllie: May I say a word?
  16,891. Yes?
(Mr. Wyllie): I have here the details of each of the accounts. I find as a matter of fact that there were three accounts sent in from other districts in Sussex, and that each of those three accounts shows a very handsome profit. Those three accounts are included in the general summary which you have there apart from these eight.
  16,892. Do you not think it would have been fairer to put them on to this page which deals with West Sussex?
—(Mr. Wyllie): That was a special investigation carried out by a Special Committee.
  16,893. You admit, Mr. Passmore, that the accounts on the most profitable part of the farm land of the county are omitted here?
(Mr. Passmore): Yes.
  16,894. Now to take the weald clay parts. I suppose you will admit that the district round about Wisborough Green is rather poor clay land?
Some occasional pieces are very good soil.
  16,895. Do you happen to know that certain farmers there have quite voluntarily bought their farms?
I have no knowledge of any farmers in Wisborough Green who have been buying their farms.
  16,896. I happen to know one or two?
Of course it is quite easy to buy a farm and borrow the money to do so.
  16,897. I am speaking of farmers who came to Wisborough Green during the agricultural depression, like, I believe, Mr Langmead did in the southern part of the county, and who held on and have consistently made money, and who have been able now to buy their farms?
I have known people buy a farm when they had not got much money to do it with, and when, probably, it was against their own interest to do so.

Western Mail (Perth, Western Australia) 23 September 1937
  Stud Stock Importations.
Of outstanding interest in recent arrivals of stud stock was the high class Southdown ram imported by Mr. R. E. Burges, of Hunting Lodge, Meckering, from England. Mr. Burges made his purchase from Messrs. John Langmead and Son's celebrated Northwood stud at Arundel, Sussex.


Death: 25 August 1950, in Chichester district, West Sussex, England, aged 79

Census & Addresses:
1881: Whitstone, Bovey Tracey, Devon
1891: Kents Farm, Climping, West Sussex
1901: Climping, West Sussex: John Langmead, head, is aged 29, born in Bovey Tracey, Devon. He is a Farmer.
1908: The Court, Climping, West Sussex   (The Southdown Flock Book: Volume 17 p102)
1911: Climping, West Sussex: John Langmead is aged 39, born in Bovey Tracey, Devon

Sources:

John Herbert Langmead

John Herbert Langmead
John Herbert Langmead
Cranleigh School 1st XI Hockey 1921
Birth: 12 June 1905 in Climping, West Sussex, England

Father: John Langmead

Mother: Mary (Loveys) Langmead

Education: John attended Cranleigh School for whom he played wicket-keeper in cricket in 1921 and 1922, as well as hockey.

Death: 1978, in Chichester district, West Sussex

Census:
1911: Climping, West Sussex: John Herbert Langmead is aged 5, born in Climping, Sussex

Sources:

Joyce Hilda (Langmead) Robinson

Birth: 1904 in Climping, West Sussex, England

Father: John Langmead

Mother: Mary (Loveys) Langmead

Married: James H. Robinson in 1925, in Westhampnett district, West Sussex, England

Census:
1911: Climping, West Sussex: Joyce Hilda Langmead is aged 7, born in Climping, Sussex

Sources:

Leslie Langmead

Birth: 1910, in Climping, West Sussex, England

Father: Walter James Langmead

Mother: Elizabeth Jane (Peeke) Langmead

Notes: Leslie was nominated for High Sheriff of West Sussex in 1977 (London Gazette 18 November 1977 p14511) and 1978 (London Gazette 30 November 1978 p14347) and then successfully in 1979 (London Gazette 30 November 1979 p15091), the actual appointment being made on 19 March 1980 (London Gazette 21 March 1980 p4412)

Leslie was a judge of dairy cattle and in 1965 was the dairy cattle judge in the Burke contect at the Royal Show (The Glasgow Herald 12 February 1965 p8)

Census & Addresses:
1911: Climping, West Sussex: Leslie Langmead is aged 1, born in Clymping, West Sussex
1965: Merston House, Merston, Chichester, West Sussex   (The Glasgow Herald 12 February 1965 p8)
1980: Merston House, Merston, Chichester, West Sussex   (London Gazette 21 March 1980 p4412)

Sources:

Nancy Hewett (Langmead) Poulett

Birth: 1898 in Walberton, West Sussex, England

Baptism: 24 April 1898 in Walberton, West Sussex, England

Father: William Herbert Langmead

Mother: Sarah (Hewett) Langmead

Married: Frank James Poulett in 1934, in Westhampnett district, West Sussex, England

Frank was born in 1901, in Loughton, Essex, the son of James Poulett and Ellen.
Census:
1901: Loughton, Essex: Frank J. Poulett, son, is aged 0, born in Loughton, Essex
1911: Loughton, Essex: Frank James Poulett is aged 10, born in Loughton, Essex

Census:
1901: Walberton, West Sussex: Nancy H. Langmead, daughter, is aged 3, born in Walberton, Sussex
1911: Bognor, West Sussex: Nancy Hewitt Langmead is aged 13, born in Tapton, Sussex

Sources:

Walter James Langmead

Birth: 9 March 1874 in Bovey Tracey, Devon, England

Father: William Langmead

Mother: Nancy Hamlyn (Hannaford) Langmead

Married: Elizabeth Jane Peeke on 13 November 1903, in Harbertonford, Harberton, Devon, England

Elizabeth was born on 9 June 1880, at Hernaford, Harbertonford, Harberton, Devon, the daughter of John Mitchelmore Peeke and Mary Jane Whiteway. She died on 24 March 1971.
Census:
1881: Hernaford, Harberton, Devon
1891: 2 Brook Villas, Harberton, Devon
1901: Ashprington, Devon: Elizabeth Jane Peeke, sister, is aged 20, born in Harbertonford, Devon. Her occupation is listed as House Keeper Domestic.
1911: Climping, West Sussex: Elizabeth Langmead is aged 30, born in Harbertonford, Devon

Children:
Occupation: Farmer. John and his brother Walter divided the farms that their father had acquired at Kent's, Brookpit and Atherington farms. Details of Walter's sheep flock in 1908 can be found in the The Southdown Flock Book: Volume 17 p102.

A History of the County of Sussex: vol 5 part 1 pp126-147 (T.P. Hudson ed., 1997)
CLIMPING
   During the 19th and early 20th centuries the parish was divided into large farms, mostly rented. The Christ's Hospital estate was in excellent condition in 1832, with established tenants, notably the Cootes, who had been at Church farm since 1759, and the Bonifaces, who had had Kent's farm since 1799. In 1843 the two families dominated the parish. Leases on the Christ's Hospital estate in the period were of between 10 and 14 years. The Cootes and Bonifaces were still the chief farmers in the 1860s and 70s, but from 1881 they were gradually replaced by the Langmead family, immigrants from Devon. William Langmead (d. 1919) first farmed at Bailiffscourt, and later at Kent's, Brookpit, and Atherington farms; his sons John (d. 1950) and Walter (d. 1971) divided those farms between them, John later adding Northwood farm.
...
   In the early 20th century sheep were brought for fattening from West Dean north of Chichester. In 1914 the Langmead farms were specially noted: Kent's with Hobb's for its Southdown flock, and Atherington with Bailiffscourt for sheep, cattle, and prize-winning crops. The Atherington flock was later moved to Northwood farm.

A History of the County of Sussex: vol 5 part 1 pp245-261 (T.P. Hudson ed., 1997)
YAPTON
From the early 20th century a field northeast of the church and Church Farmhouse was used as a recreation ground by permission of the owner Walter Langmead.
...
About 1840 the estate comprised 563 a. including Wicks farm (260 a.) in the east part of the parish. By c. 1910 most of the land had passed to John Metters, who owned Wicks Farmhouse and 320 a., and who was called lord of the manor in 1913. Wicks farm was bought by the tenant Walter Langmead c. 1916, descending to his grandson Andrew.

London Gazette 13 December 1946 p6068
  NOTICE is hereby given that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned Walter James Langmead and Peter Langmead carrying  on the business of Farmers at Wicks Farm Yapton near Arundel Preston Place Farm East Preston and Court Wick near Littlehampton all in Sussex under the style or firm of W. LANGMEAD & SON has been dissolved by mutual consent as from the 12th day of April 1946.—Dated this 9th
day of December, 1946.
      WALTER JAMES LANGMEAD.
      PETER LANGMEAD.


Notes:
Walter is mentioned as a fine marksman in a book related to West Dean House, where Walter would join pheasant shooting parties:
So Many Secrets, Memoirs by Ben Dunk
  Up to the Second World War the park’s main function was to produce large numbers of pheasants of heavy weight for the annual slaughter at the pheasant shooting season during the autumn. For example, as park legend had it; one pheasant shooting season in the 1920’s, King George the Fifth joined the shoot and he and his fellow shooters killed 1500 birds on a Saturday, and the next Saturday no less than 1400 were similarly dispatched. The bodies of the game were mostly sold to Chichester butchers, Shippams, South Street was one of these, a subsidiary of the paste factory, where, in fact some of the ‘beaters’ for beating the forests etc. were hired from. Some pheasants were sent by train to a London market. I understood they were considered the best pheasants for large size, flavour and tenderness from over the whole of England. During the 1930’s the pheasant shoots diminished but were maintained at a fairly high level. I don’t believe royalty came to shoot but very wealthy local landowners and aristocrats bought their way in for days of ‘blood sport’. I remember Mr. Walter Langmead, local farmer and landowner, was a regular shooter and considered a very fine marksman. I remember him especially because he generously ‘tipped’ us beaters in addition to our days pay. Even during the 1930s the pheasant shoots resulted in several hundred kills a day.


Death: 13 January 1971

Census & Addresses:
1881: Whitstone, Bovey Tracey, Devon
1891: Kents Farm, Climping, West Sussex
1901: Climping, West Sussex: Walter J. Langmead, head, is aged 27, born in Bovey Tracey, Devon. He is a Farmer.
1908: Clymping House, Littlehampton, West Sussex   (The Southdown Flock Book: Volume 17 p102)
1911: Climping, West Sussex: Walter Langmead is aged 37, born in Bovey Tracey, Devon

Sources:

Walter Langmead

Birth: 26 November 1905 in Climping, West Sussex, England

Father: Walter James Langmead

Mother: Elizabeth Jane (Peeke) Langmead

Married: Thelma Mollie Mason on 22 July 1931, in Westhampnett district, West Sussex, England

Thelma, known as Mollie, was born on 10 August 1909, in West Itchenor, West Sussex, the daughter of Arthur George Mason and Bessie Louisa Savage. She died in 1996 and her ashes are laid to rest in a standalone memorial on South Downs Way, Steyning, West Sussex, overlooking the South Downs hills.
Memorial to Thelma Mollie (Mason) Langmead
Close-up of the memorial plaque to Thelma Mollie (Mason) Langmead
Memorial to Walter Langmead and Thelma Mollie (Mason) Langmead
Memorial to Walter Langmead and Thelma Mollie (Mason) Langmead
photo by Jason McDonald from Jason McDonald's Travel and Walking Pages
Memorial to Walter Langmead
Close-up of the memorial plaque to Walter Langmead
The plaque on the memorial reads:
THELMA MOLLIE LANGMEAD
1909-1996
Loving wife of Walter Langmead
A gentle and devoted mother.
Remembered with great love
Her ashes laid to rest by her sons
Census:
1911: Westhampnett district, West Sussex: Thelma Mollie Mason is aged 1, born in Itchenor, Sussex

Occupation: Farmer

Death: 1989

Buried: South Downs Way, South Downs National Park, Steyning, West Sussex, England. The ashes of Walter and his wife are laid to rest in a standalone memorial overlooking the South Downs hills. The plaque on the memorial reads:
In loving memory of a Sussex farmer
WALTER LANGMEAD
1905-1989
His ashes laid to rest by his dear wife Mollie and sons on his cherished Downs
.

Census:
1911: Climping, West Sussex: Walter Langmead is aged 5, born in Clymping, West Sussex

Sources:

William Langmead

Birth: 23 February 1835 in Bovey Tracey, Devon, England

Baptism: 19 March 1835 in Bovey Tracey, Devon, England

Father: John Langmead

Mother: Maria (Powlesland) Langmead

Married: Nancy Hamlyn Hannaford on 14 April 1870, in Widecombe in the Moor, Devon, England

Children:
Occupation: Farmer. In 1881 William was farming the Whitstone farm in Bovey Tracey which is listed at 480 acres, employing 10 men and 2 boys. William then moved to Sussex where he farmed at Bailiffscourt and later at the Kent's, Brookpit and Atherington farms.

A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 5 Part 1 pp126-147 (T.P. Hudson ed., 1997)
CLIMPING
   During the 19th and early 20th centuries the parish was divided into large farms, mostly rented. The Christ's Hospital estate was in excellent condition in 1832, with established tenants, notably the Cootes, who had been at Church farm since 1759, and the Bonifaces, who had had Kent's farm since 1799. In 1843 the two families dominated the parish. Leases on the Christ's Hospital estate in the period were of between 10 and 14 years. The Cootes and Bonifaces were still the chief farmers in the 1860s and 70s, but from 1881 they were gradually replaced by the Langmead family, immigrants from Devon. William Langmead (d. 1919) first farmed at Bailiffscourt, and later at Kent's, Brookpit, and Atherington farms; his sons John (d. 1950) and Walter (d. 1971) divided those farms between them, John later adding Northwood farm.
  ... In the early 20th century sheep were brought for fattening from West Dean north of Chichester. In 1914 the Langmead farms were specially noted: Kent's with Hobb's for its Southdown flock, and Atherington with Bailiffscourt for sheep, cattle, and prize-winning crops. The Atherington flock was later moved to Northwood farm.


Death: 1919, in East Preston district, West Sussex, England, aged 84

Census:
1841: Bovey Tracey, Devon: William Langmead is aged 6, born in Devon
1851: Whitstone Farm, Bovey Tracey, Devon
1861: Whitstone Farm, Bovey Tracey, Devon
1871: Bovey Tracey, Devon
1881: Whitstone, Bovey Tracey, Devon
1891: Kents Farm, Climping, West Sussex
1901: Littlehampton, West Sussex: William Langmead, head, is aged 66, born in Bovey Tracey, Devon. He is a Retired Farmer.
1911: Littlehampton, West Sussex: William Langmead is aged 76, born in Bovey Tracey, Devon

Sources:

William Herbert Langmead

Birth: 13 June 1872 in Bovey Tracey, Devon, England

Father: William Langmead

Mother: Nancy Hamlyn (Hannaford) Langmead

Married: Sarah Hewett on 4 November 1896, in Seal, Surrey, England

Sarah was born in 1871, in Seal, Surrey, and baptised on 10 December 1871, in Seal, the daughter of Edward Henry Hewett and Ruth Belgrove. She died in 1940, in Chichester district, West Sussex, aged 67.
Census:
1881: White Farm Lane, Seal, Surrey
1891: Seal, Surrey: Sarah B. Hewett, daughter, is aged 19, born in Seale, Surrey
1901: Walberton, West Sussex: Sarah Langmead, wife, is aged 29, born in Seale, Surrey
1911: Walberton, West Sussex: Sarah Langmead is aged 39, born in Lesle, Surrey

Children:
Occupation: Farmer

Death: 23 March 1920, in Westhampnett district, West Sussex, England, aged 47

Census & Addresses:
1881: Whitstone, Bovey Tracey, Devon
1891: Kents Farm, Climping, West Sussex
1901: Walberton, West Sussex: W. H. Langmead, head, is aged 28, born in Bovey Tracey, Devon. He is a Farmer.
1911: Walberton, West Sussex: William Herbert Langmead is aged 38, born in Brey Gracey, Devon

Sources:

William James Langmead

Birth: 24 August 1904 in Climping, West Sussex, England

Father: Walter James Langmead

Mother: Elizabeth Jane (Peeke) Langmead

Death: 30 June 1929, in Westhampnett district, West Sussex, England, aged 24

Census:
1911: Climping, West Sussex: William Langmead is aged 6, born in Clymping, West Sussex

Sources:

William Edward Langmead

Birth: 9 May 1906 in Walberton, West Sussex, England

Baptism: 2 June 1906 in Walberton, West Sussex, England

Father: William Herbert Langmead

Mother: Sarah (Hewett) Langmead

Married: Effie Ruthena Reid in 1964

Effie was born on 16 October 1901 in Mersea, Essex county, Ontario, the daughter of Orick G. Reid and Lola Alexandra Jansen. She was the art supervisor for the city schools in Lethbridge, Alberta. Effie died in 1971 and is buried in Murrayville Pioneer cemetery, Langley, British Columbia.

Lethbridge Herald 3 February 1967 p10
Mrs Co-Ordinates Ideas Playlet By Each City School Planned Centennial Project By PHYLLIS SWITZER Herald Staff Writer
  Each city school will produce a historic playlet to be formed around Easter as an exchange project in every city school The 21 different plays each on one aspect of Canadian history are being planned as one of the major Centennial projects for the public and separate city schools .They will be under the supervision and advice of Mrs Effie Langmead says she is 100 per cent Canadian...To be a Canadian it is sary to know your own country I'm very proud of being a For tins reason others Mrs Langmead took the job as coordinator of nial projects in the city Her name was presented to the Lethbridge Public board in this connection by the local city Alberta Teachers sociation recently The board agreed to have Mrs do the job Mrs Langmead may be ter known to Lethbridge dents as Effie Reid art supervisor in the elementary public schools for 18 years She ried two years ago Born in the Vulcan district Mrs Langmead said there is a district called Reid Hil near Vulcan which was named after her father She says she is thrilled with the prospect of instilling through music art aod drama the history of the nation to the city school children Now Mrs move to the city she has quired a LRSM in music and a bachelor of education from the University of Alberta She had a teacher's certificate from gary teachers college when she began her career To implement the program of playlets by each of the city's schools Mrs Langmead has suggested the teachers submit ideas for themes NO OVERLAPS I'm so excited about the ideas coming in from the is no two alike Each teacher has submitted ideas on what part of the history they would like to enact Explaining how an school children will benefit from the exchange of playlets she said they will learn the drama of the country through story Some of the teachers have plans to perform historical enactment in a shadow play others in pantomime There will also be choral speech she said None win be encouraged to rely on stage settings because the plays must be prepared to move from one school to another only what they can carry in their hands we'll make use of costumes much like Shakespearean she explained Plans are for elementary school children to concentrate on Canada's political development from British Colonial times to Confederation Junior high win have the era Confederation to the Statute of Westminster and high school from men to the present It j hoped afl the school children may culminate the Centennial a school children's parade It would be lovely for said The parade plans still ire tentative Mrs Langmead said the major overall plan for nial would not displace any of the individual school Centennial dans now being developed The school plans wQl continue aod there are many very exciting dx said


Census:
1906: Alberta: District 18 subdistrict 25
1911: MacLeod district, Alberta
1916: Vulcan, Alberta

Occupation: Quantity Surveyor
Lethbridge Herald 30 April 1969 p17
W. Langmead Retires Soon As Inspector
  William Langmead retires June 1 after 15 years as city building inspector.
  He resigned Tuesday for health reasons He was due to retire in another couple a years.
  Loula has been acting building inspector since Mr Langmead went into hospital in November He was off work four months Stan has been assistant building inspector.
  Mr Langmead has been member of the Canadian tite f Quantity Surveyors for 36 years and is a dorter ber of the Canadian Building Officials Association an organization of building inspectors Tom across Canada which he became associated with in 1335 Mr Langmead was an tive member of the association representing Alberta One the amis of the association is to aid in the continued ment of the National Building Code.
  Before joining the city on Hay 24 1954 Mr Langmead spent seven years with me federal de- of public works as clerk of works Prior to that he worked in private industry as a quantity surveyor.
  Born and educated in England Mr Langmead moved to Canada in 1923 his quantity surveyor's training the University of British bia In 1964 he married Effi Reid art supervisor for city schools
  This fan Mr and Mrs mead plan to take a trip to EOT ope for at least six months On their return Mr plans to work as a quantity surveyor on a limita basis


Notes: William emigrated to Canada in 1923.

Death: 10 November 1982, in Langley, British Columbia, Canada, aged 76

Census:
1911: Bognor, West Sussex: Nancy Hewitt Langmead is aged 13, born in Tapton, Sussex

Sources:

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