The Mackender Family

Henry Mackender

Birth: 1876, in Staunton, Nottinghamshire, England

Father:
Robert Mackender

Mother: Emma Eliza (Cock) Mackender

Census:

1881: Private House; Staunton, Nottingham, England

Sources:

Herbert Mackender

Birth: 1878, in Staunton, Nottinghamshire, England

Father:
Robert Mackender

Mother: Emma Eliza (Cock) Mackender

Census:

1881: Private House; Staunton, Nottingham, England

Sources:

Lucy Mackender

Birth: 1875, in Felsham, Suffolk, England

Father:
Robert Mackender

Mother: Emma Eliza (Cock) Mackender

Census:

1881: Private House; Staunton, Nottingham, England

Sources:

Robert Mackender
Robert Mackender
photo from The British Bee Journal 18 february 1932

Robert Mackender

Birth: 1849, in West Row, near Mildenhall, Suffolk, England

Married:
Emma Eliza Cock in 1874, in Bromley district, Kent, England

Children:

Occupation: Gardener (1881); Nurseyman and Seedman (1901); Beekeeper
Robert was for many years head gardener at Staunton Hall, near Newark. He then carried on a seeds and bee appliance business for 40 years, his shop at 43, Northgate, Newark, being well known to all bee-keepers and gardeners within a wide radius.

Death: 1 February 1932, in Newark district, Nottinghamshire, England, aged 82

Obituary:
The British Bee Journal 18 February 1932
Obituary Notice
MR. R. MACKENDER.
There is naturally always a feeling of sad­ness and a sense of loss when we have to record the passing of our friends, especially those who have, been of the brotherhood of bee-keeping. This feeling is multiplied a hun­dred-fold in announcing the death on Monday, February 1, of the guide, philosopher and friend of our early bee-keeping days, Mr. Robert Mackender, of Newark. Whatever success we and our brother, Mr. W. Herrod-Hempsall, have attained in the pursuit of bee­keeping is due to our feet having been firmly planted in the right path from the beginning by Mr. Mackender, and to the kindly help and advice he was always willing to give in the following years.
It is over forty years since we first met Mr. Mackender, when he came as gardener to the Manor House at Sutton-on-Trent. A warm friendship was struck between our two families from our first acquaintance, which has continued unbroken up to the present day.
  Mr. Mackender, who was 82 years of age, was born at Mildenhall, in Suffolk, and was for many years head gardener at Staunton Hall, near Newark, from whence he went to Sutton-on-Trent, and on leaving there he went to Newark where for 40 years he has carried on a seeds and bee appliance business, his shop at 43, Northgate being well known to all bee-keepers and gardeners within a wide radius. As one of the oldest members of the Notts Bee-keepers' Association, he was probably known to the majority of bee­keepers, not only in the county but beyond its borders. He has been on the Notts B.K.A. Committee for many years <?> ren­dered valuable assistance at shows, lectures, etc. No bee-keeper who went to him for help and advice was sent empty away. A man of kindly and generous disposition, a <?> Christian gentleman, it is safe to say he had not an enemy, but all those who knew him at all intimately held him in the highest esteem. "A man he was to all the country dear"
  He was wonderfully hale and vigorous for his age, and took a keen interest in all bee­keeping matters, the last important function in which he took part being at a gathering of Notts and Derbyshire bee-keepers at the house of Mrs. Huse at Stanton-by-Dale, Derbyshire, where he gave an address.
  Mr. Mackender was an elder of the Baptist Church, and at a memorial service the minister spoke in the highest terms of his worth and services. His life was a model and example of what a true Christian's should be, and as one of his sons said: "He died as he had lived - nobly."
  Although Mr. Mackender kept his methods and practical bee-keeping up-to-date, he evi­dently had a kindly feeling for at least one old superstition, for we read in a local paper he desired that at his death the old Custom of "telling the bees" should be observed, and soon after he had passed away this cere­mony was performed by his grandson, Mr.R. Mackender, "telling the bees" in the six hives in the garden at his home that their master had passed away.
  "Bees, sing softly; bees, sing low; He is dead who loved you so."
We are sure all our readers will join us in expressing our deepest sympathy with Mrs. Mackender and the family in their bereavement.


Census:

1881: Private House; Staunton, Nottingham, England
1901: Newark, Nottinghamshire: Robert Mackender is aged 51, born in Wildenshall, Suffolk. Occupation: Nurserymand + Seedman
1911: Newark, Nottinghamshire: Robert Mackender is aged 61

Sources:

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