The Richmond Family

Adam Richmond

Adam Richmond
Brigadier-General Adam Richmond on 5 June 1945 in London, England. Adam was a member of the U.S. delegation to War Crimes Conference, convened to weigh the mass of evidence on war crimes and determine who would stand trial.
(click to see full photograph)
photo from the Jim Sobery Family Papers posted at theBreman Museum
Birth: 24 September 1889, in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa, United States

Father: William Richmond

Mother: Anna (Fulton) Richmond

Education: University of Wisconsin, graduating B.A. in 1912 and LL.B in 1914.
The University of Wisconsin alumni directory, 1849-1919 p278 (1921)
Richmond, Adam, B.A. 12, LL.B. 14

Married: Anna May Pagenstecher on 22 August 1917

Gravestone of Anna (Pagenstecher) Richmond
Gravestone of Anna (Pagenstecher) Richmond in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia
photo by John Evans posted at findagrave.com
Anna was born on 24 September 1890, in Elsie, Nebraska, the daughter of Louis and Etta Pagenstecher. She is listed on the report of the Elsie School in 1898. Anna and her family moved to Iowa about this time. In the 1910 census, her occupation is listed as a school teacher. Anna attended Hiram College in Hiram, Ohio, in 1914 (Hiram College Alumni Directory 1850-1945 p162). Anna died on 22 December 1983 in Maryland, aged 93, and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, section 34, site 74-A.
Census & Addresses:
1900: 366 Lincoln Avenue, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1910: 817 East Pierce Street, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1920: 4719 West 29th Street, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1930: 125 Sanitary District, Bethesda, Montgomery county, Maryland
1935: Canal Zone, Panama   (1940 census)
1940: Wheaton Road, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Bexar county, Texas
1945: 302 Bushnell apts, San Antonio, Texas   (Hiram College Alumni Directory 1850-1945 p301)
1983: Virginia   (United States Social Security Death Index)

Occupation: Salesman, then army officer, serving in the Judge Advocate General's Department
In 1917, Adam's occupation is listed as a salesman for the Cudahy Packing Co. of Omaha, Nebraska, despite having earned his LL.B. in 1914. During the war he joined the army as a second lieutenant infantryman, and at the time of his mother's death in 1927, Adam held the rank of captain. He was stationed in Washington D.C. in 1930, the Panama Canal Zone in 1935 and San Antonio, Texas in 1940 where he served as the Judge Advocate General of the Third Army.

During World War II, Adam served as General Eisenhower's staff judge advocate. In 1943, General Eisenhower requested that the War Department establish a branch of the Office of The Judge Advocate General, which acts as an appellate of couts-martial in North Africa, to more efficiently review local cases, and Adam was appointed to establish this branch office.
The Judge Advocate Journal vol 2 no, 1 (March 1945) p46
   The North African Theater Theater of Operations, United States Army, was established on 4 February 1943. Command was assumed by General (then Lieutenant General) Dwight D. Eisenhower. Shortly thereafter, on 10 February 1943, General Eisenhower requested the War Department to establish in the theater, pursuant to Article of War 50½, a branch of the Office of The Judge Advocate General and a Board of Review. On 22 February 1913, the President, in a letter to the Secretary of War, directed The Judge Advocate General to comply with General Eisenhower's request. After this short pe­riod of gestation, BOJAG was born, a Branch Office and a Board of Review being established in the North Afri­can Theater by an order of 8 March 1943.
  Brigadier General (then Colonel) Adam Richmond, J.A.G.D., who was General Eisenhower's staff judge advocate, was detailed as Assistant Judge Advocate Gen­eral in charge of the new Branch Office.
  From its inception the new organization was a lusty infant. General Richmond and Lieutenant Colonel G. B. Chapman III were already in the Theater, but be­fore the remainder of the officer complement and the enlisted personnel could arrive from other assignments, the press of work required the prompt, though tempo­rary, establishment of a Board of Review, composed of officers immediately available.
  By 24 April 1943 the entire commissioned complement had arrived, but the enlisted personnel, consisting of ten WAC's, were still en route. Pending their arrival reli­ance was had upon the Judge Advocate Section of the Theater Headquarters for clerical and stenographic services. Procurement of the supplies needed by the Branch Office presented no small problem, and necessity dic­tated a development of technique, not entirely unnecessary even today, which would have done credit to a front line outfit. Typewriters formed the scarcest item of indispensable supply. There did not appear to be any available, and all usual methods of procurement failed. Finally, in a subtly worded memorandum, General Rich­mond pointed out to the lords of supply, "It so happens that it is the mission of this office to fight the war with typewriters. Our enlisted personnel, consisting of ten WAC's, will arrive in a few days. If the requested type­writers are not furnished, the WAC's will be without arms or ammunition." Where all else had failed this ap­peal produced results. Their arms and ammunition were delivered the day before the WAC's arrived. The WAC's have used them well.
...
In practice the Branch Office operates as an autonomous War Department unit. The Board of Review functions as prescribed by Article of War 50½, and the Military Justice Division examines general court­-martial records not required to be examined by the Board of Review. The relationship between the Assistant Judge Advocate General in charge and the Branch Office on the one hand and the Commanding General of the Theater and Theater installations and units on the other is analagous to the relationship The Judge Advocate Gen­eral bears to the President, the War Department and the Army in general in military justice matters.
  Because of the legal relationship between the Branch Office and the Theater Commander General Richmond shortly reverted to his former assignment as General Eisenhower's staff judge advocate. On 18 July 1943 Colonel Hubert D. Hoover arrived in the theater and on 20 July assumed the duties of Assistant Judge Advo­cate General in charge of the Branch Office.

Adam Richmond in Ann Arbor
Brigadier-General Adam Richmond at the Judge Advocate General's Department Conference in March 1944 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Left to right are Col. Young, Maj.-Gen. Cramer, Nrig. Gen. Weir, Brig. Gen. Richmond, Brig. Gen. Hedrick.
Adam also served in the Mediterranean before a car accident in Naples in 1945 effectively ended his Army career. In 1945, Adam was part of the U.S. delegation to War Crimes Conference, convened in London, England, to weigh the mass of evidence on war crimes and determine who would stand trial. He was awarded the Legion of Merit for his service in World War II. Adam retired with the rank of Brigadier-General.

After his retirement in 1947, Adam served as a defense attorney in a famous trial involving Dorothy Smith, the daughter of General Walter Kreuger, who had at one time been Adam's commanding officer in the army. Dorothy had murdered her husband, Colonel Aubry Dewitt Smith, when they were stationed in Japan. Dorothy was found guilty in a court-martial, which rejected her insanity defense, and sentenced to life in prison. A defense appeal argued that Dorothy had the right, as an American citizen, to a trial in a civilian court, where her insanity plea could be considered on less strict grounds, and that that right could not be overridden by the Uniform Code of Military Justice which claimed military jurisdiction over military dependents, as it is for soldiers, simply because she married a soldier. Adam argued the case all the way to the Supreme Court, initially being denied in a close decision in Kinsella v. Krueger in 1956, but in an extremely rare Supreme Court proceeding, a justice, John M. Harlan II, changed his mind and in the next session the case was consolidated with Reid vs. Covert and re-heard, this time resulting in a favorable decision for Dorothy (who was released from prison) and legal precedent that limited the ability of the Army to court-martial civilian dependents accompanying members of the armed forces overseas. This is the only time the Supreme Court has changed its mind as the result of a petition for rehearing.

Military Law Review vol 212 p156 (2012)
Brigadier General Adam Richmond was, like General Krueger, a career soldier. A native of Council Bluffs, Iowa, he received both his undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Wisconsin. He entered the Army as a second lieutenant infantryman in World War I; in the interwar years he was stationed in Washington, D.C., the Panama Canal Zone, and finally, San Antonio, where he served as the Judge Advocate General of the Third Army under General Krueger. He spent World War II in North Africa and the Mediterranean before a car accident in Naples in 1945 ended his Army career. A devoted husband and father to three girls, Brigadier General Richmond moved to Bethesda, Maryland, and became very active in the community. This loyalty and civic-mindedness would serve him well when General Krueger, his former boss at Third Army, requested that he go to Japan to defend Dorothy in her murder trial. General Krueger could not go himself—Grace, his wife, was seriously ill. As Dorothy had a contingent of defense lawyers headed up by Lieutenant Colonel Levie, referred to in some reports as Chief Defense Counsel, it is likely that Richmond served in large part as General Krueger’s eyes and ears on the ground. After Dorothy’s conviction, Brigadier General Richmond vowed to take the case “all the way to the President” if necessary.

Southwestern Wisconsin: Old Crawford County pp 392-396
Imbued with the martial spirit of his paternal uncles, who fought in the Civil war, he took all the military training possible in his school and college life. His law studies were completed at the University of Wisconsin, and at the time this nation entered the World war he enlisted, becoming a lieutenant in the United States Army. Due to his knowledge of military law and tactics, he was assigned a position of large responsibility in Washington, DC, proving so competent that he has since been retained in that capacity.

Notes: On his World War I registration card, Adam is described as being of medium height and medium build, with gray eyes and dark brown hair. Adam applied for an exemption from the draft due to his dependent mother.

Adam and Anna are recorded on the manifest of the City of Havre which sailed from Hamburg on 14 May 1932, arriving in Baltimore on 25 May 1932, at which time their address in the United States is simply given as "War Department, Washington,, D.C.". Anna and children are recorded on the manifest of the U.S.A.T. St Miriel sailing from the Panama Canal Zone on 13 July 1935, arriving ion Brooklyn, New York, on 19 July 1935. Her address in the United States is given as Bethesda, Maryland.

Gravestone of Adam Richmond
Gravestone of Adam Richmond in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia
photo by A. Horan posted at findagrave.com
Death: 1 December 1959, at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C., United States, of cancer
Washington Post 3 December 1959
Brig. Gen. Adam Richmond, 70, a retired ranking Army Advocate and a leader in Montgomery County civic life died Tuesday at Walter Reed Army Hospital. He had been hospitalized a month with cancer.

Buried: Section 34, Site 73-A, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, United States

Census & Addresses:
1900: 719 Mynster St, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1905: 495 Graham Ave, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1910: 495 Graham Ave., Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1917: 3021 Ave D, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa   (World War I registration card)
1920: Mynster Street, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1927: Washington, DC   (death notice of mother)
1930: 125 Sanitary District, Bethesda, Montgomery county, Maryland
1935: Canal Zone, Panama   (1940 census)
1940: Wheaton Road, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Bexar county, Texas
1959: Bethesda, Maryland   (funeral notice of brother Thomas)

Sources:

Charlotte Elizabeth Richmond

Birth: 2 April 1857, in Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond

Occupation: School principal. Charlotte first gained prominence in educational circles of Madison as the founder and head of a private school, conducted under her name at the corner of State and Gilman streets. When her elder sister, Jane, a teacher in Iowa, returned to join Charlotte in Madison, the school became accredited and was known as Wisconsin Academy. To this institution young people desiring to enter the University of Wisconsin came for their preparatory credits, or as university students they attended the academy to make up work. The school became so popular that two prominent business men, Fred Schmitz, and his father-in-law, Mr. Hess, proprietors of the Hub Clothing Store, had erected for its home a fine building at the corner of State and Gilman streets. Organized in 1887, this splendid educational center for Wisconsin young people was successfully directed by Susan and Charlotte for a quarter of a century. In 1912 it was taken over by the State University and has since been known as the Wisconsin High School. Charlotte continued as a teacher under the new management for several years.
Gravestone of Charlotte Elizabeth Richmond
Gravestone of Charlotte Elizabeth Richmond in Forest Hills Cemetery, Madison, Wisconsin

Death: 12 December 1924, in Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin, United States.

Buried: 14 December 1924, in Sec 34, Lot 046, Gr 4 of Forest Hills Cemetery, Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin, United States

Census:
1870: York, Green county, Wisconsin
1900: Madison Town (excluding Madison city), Dane county, Wisconsin
1905: Madison town, Dane county, Wisconsin

Sources:

Charlotte M. Richmond

Birth: 12 July 1880

Father: William Richmond

Mother: Anna (Fulton) Richmond

Death: 21 April 1891

Buried: in Fairview Cemetery, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa, United States

Sources:

Daniel Rufus Richmond

Birth: 18 August 1884 in West Point township, Butler county, Iowa, United States, a twin of Fanny

Father:
John Francis Richmond

Mother: Harriet Ann (Munn) Richmond

Married: Helen Root about 1913. Helen was born in November 1888, in Wisconsin, the daughter of William Henry Root and Dora M. Vandervort. She died on 2 February 1974.

Death: 10 February 1954, in Des Moines, Polk county, Iowa, United States.

Census:
1900: Washington township, Grundy county, Iowa
1920: Washington township, Grundy county, Iowa
1930: Washington township, Grundy county, Iowa

Sources:

Dorothy Washburn Richmond

Birth: 1 March 1897, in Evansville, Rock county, Wisconsin, United States

Father: Robert Moore Richmond

Mother: Lona (Washburn) Richmond

Education: Milwaukee-Downer College

Occupation: In 1948, Dorothy held the position of treasurer of Evansville (WI)  city council.

Death: January 1977, in Evansville, Rock county, Wisconsin, United States

Census & Addresses:
1900: Second Street, Evansville, Rock county, Wisconsin
1905: Evansville, Rock county, Wisconsin

Sources:

Fanny Richmond

Birth: 18 August 1884 in West Point township, Butler county, Iowa, United States, a twin of Daniel

Father:
John Francis Richmond

Mother: Harriet Ann (Munn) Richmond

Census:
1900: Washington township, Grundy county, Iowa

Sources:

Frances (Richmond) Girton

Birth: 10 May 1852, in Belturbet, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond

Married: William Wallace Girton on 1 August 1877

Children:
Death: 8 December 1936, in Sioux Falls, Minnehaha county, South Dakota, United States, aged 84

Buried: 10 December 1936, in Woodlawn cemetery, Sioux Falls, Minnehaha county, South Dakota, United States

From the Sioux Falls Argus Leader, Sioux Falls South Dakota (Thursday, December 10, 1936)
MRS. W. W. GIRTONS SERVICES CONDUCTED
Many old residents today turned out to honor Mrs. W. W. Girton, Who died Tuesday at the home of her daughter Mrs. S. G. Howlett, 1122 South Second Ave. Dean E. B. Woodruff rector of Calvary cathedral conducted the services which were held at the Miller chapel. Pallbearers were Leonard F. Boyce, Allan S. Graham, Max L. Kuehn, Rolla Dickenson , D. P. Lemen, and Jay B. Allen. Burial was in the Woodlawn cemetery. Mrs. Girton was the mother of Lee R. and William T. Girton, local businessmen.

Census & Addresses:
1870: York, Green county, Wisconsin
1880: Lincoln, Shelby county, Iowa
1900: 1118 Washington Ave. Madison, Lake county, South Dakota
1915: Madison, Lake county, South Dakota
1920: Los Angeles, Los Angeles county, California
1922: 1016 South Phillips Avenue, Sioux Falls, Minnehaha county, South Dakota (manifest of the S.S. Vauban 19 August 1922)

Sources:

Frances Helen (Richmond) Lambert

Birth: October 1891, in Iowa, United States

Father:
 George H. Richmond

Mother: Theresa _____

Married: Harry P. Lambert. Harry was born in 1882/3, in Minnesota.

Notes:
Frances died shortly after her marriage. The Report of the Proceedings of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee in 1909 mentions Helen F. Richmond as a daughter (and successor) of Captain George H. Richmond.

Census & Addresses:
1900: 333 Avenue E, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1920: Musselshell county, Montana

Sources:

Francis Richmond

Birth: 1805-9, in county Cavan, Ireland

Married: Susan Moore on 22 December 1840, in Urney parish, county Cavan, Ireland

Children:
Occupation: Farmer

Gravestone of Francis Richmond
Gravestone of Francis Richmond in Forest Hills Cemetery, Madison, Wisconsin
Death: 6 January 1879, in Monticello, Green county, Wisconsin, United States, aged 73, of kidney trouble

Buried: Francis was buried initially in Monticello, Green county, Wisconsin, but after the death of his wife Susan in 1908, his children had his remains brought to Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin, where they were placed next to his wife in Forest Hill cemetery (Sec 34 Lot 046 Grave 2) on 15 June 1908.

Notes: Francis, his wife Susan, and their nine living children (the youngest a mere six months) emigrated from their home in Belturbet, county Cavan to Wisconsin in 1861. The family settled on a farm three miles from Postville, Green county, Wisconsin. Several years later they moved to the nearby town of Monticello. In 1870, Francis valued his real estate at $6000 and his personal property at $1520.

Census:
1870: York, Green county, Wisconsin

Sources:

George H. Richmond

Title: Captain

Birth: 5 December 1841, in Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond

Married: Theresa _____ in 1889/90. Theresa was born in August 1861, in Iowa.

Children:
Death: 29 December 1928 in Hot Springs, Fall River county, South Dakota, United States, of influenza, aged 87
George Richmond
Notice was received here Saturday of the death of Maj. GEORGE RICHMOND, 87, at Hot Springs, South Dakota, where he went six months ago for treatment. Death was caused from influenza.
The body will arrive in Council Bluffs Sunday.
He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Theresa Richmond, 906 Fourth Avenue; a brother, R.M. Richmond of Evansville, Wisconsin, two sisters, Mrs. W.W. Girton of Los Angeles, California and Susan Richmond of Madison, Wisconsin.
(source: Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil, Saturday, December 29, 1928, p5)

Notes:
George served in the Civil War, enlisting in the Union army in Green county, Wisconsin. Later references to George show him as "Major Richmond" although sometimes we see it as "Major" Richmond, insinuating perhaps that the rank was not entirely legitimate. A curious entry in the Report of the Proceedings of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee has members referring to George as Major Richmond while the minutes refer to his replies as coming from Captain Richmond.

George landed  up in Council Bluffs, Iowa, where his brother William was a well known merchant. He became Chief of Police by at least 1904, and City Marshal. In 1904 he was noted for starting the Boy Police program. On 17 May 1910, George was removed from office by Judge Woodruff of the District Court. He was accused of "remissness in his duties" during the operations of the Mabray gang of swindlers, and accepting bribes from prostitutes, madams and the owners of illegal saloons and gambling houses. The district court found that Richmond permitted illegal gambling houses, houses of prostitution and illegal saloons to operate if those involved paid monthly "fines." Some police officers were paid "fees" out of this money. Richmond would then turn remaining funds over to the City Clerk each month but Richmond never profited. He testified that this had been going on for years under prior administrations and that he was only acting under the orders of those higher up. There was speculation that the city needed the money because the revenues from normal taxation weren't enough.

Census & Addresses:
1900: 333 Avenue E, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1903: 333 Avenue E, Council Bluffs, Iowa (death notice of his brother William)
1920: Musselshell county, Montana

Sources:

Ida Pearl (Richmond) Hamilton

Birth: 19 May 1875 in Grundy Center, Grundy county, Iowa, United States

Father:
John Francis Richmond

Mother: Harriet Ann (Munn) Richmond

Education: Ida graduated from the University of Wisonsin in 1901.

Married: Elmer William Hamilton on 30 August 1905

Children:
Occupation: Teacher

Death:
3 February 1961

Burial: Forest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin

Census & Addresses:
1880: Cold Water, Butler county, Iowa
1900: Washington township, Grundy county, Iowa
1906: Avoca Block, cnr Kennedy & Sargent, Winnipeg, Manitoba
1907: Winnipeg, Manitoba (birth of daughter Charlotte)
1925: Madison, Wisconsin (noted in obituary of daughter Charlotte)

Sources:

John Francis Richmond

Birth: February 1847, in Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond

Married: Harriet Ann Munn on 3 July 1874 in Iowa, United States. Harriet was born on 14 July 1855, in New York, the daughter of Daniel and Minerva Munn. Hattie died in 1945, in Guthrie Center, Iowa
1860: Palermo township, Grundy county, Iowa
1870: Palermo township, Grundy county, Iowa

Children:
Occupation: Farmer

Death:
11 November 1910, in Guthrie Center, Guthrie county, Iowa, United States

Buried: Guthrie Center cemetery, Guthrie Center, Guthrie county, Iowa, United States

Notes:
John served in the Civil War. He went to Iowa as a young man, at the close of the Civil War.

Census & Addresses:
1880: Cold Water, Butler county, Iowa
1900: Washington township, Grundy county, Iowa
1903: Morrison, Grundy county, Iowa (funeral notice of his brother William)

Sources:

Mark Moore Richmond

Birth: 1844, in Belturbet, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond

Notes:
Mark died in infancy. He was third in order of birth, so he must have been born in 1844 (Mary Jane was born in mid-1843, William in mid-1845) unless he was a twin to Mary Jane or William.

Sources:

Mary Jane (Richmond) Benston

Birth: 9 August 1843, in Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond

Married: James Benston on 22 November 1864, in Green county, Wisconsin, United States.

Children:
Death: November 1921, in Madison, Wisconsin, Unintes States
Evansville Review 10 November 1921 p. 4, col. 2 (Evansville, Wisconsin)
MRS. JAMES BENSTON DIES AT MADISON

R. M. Richmond last Thursday received the news that a sister of his, Mrs. James BENSTON, of Darlington, had died at MADISON, where she had been visiting. Mr. Richmond left on the first train and accompanied the body to the home of the deceased at Darlington.
Mrs. Benston died in her seventy-ninth year and leaves six children to mourn her loss, her husband having preceded her to the future world several years ago. Mr. Richmond returned from Darlington the first of the week.
Census:
1870: Waumandee, Buffalo county, Wisconsin
1880: York, Green county, Wisconsin
1900: Darlington city, Lafayette county, Wisconsin
1905: Darlington city, Lafayette county, Wisconsin
1910: Darlington, Lafayette county, Wisconsin

Sources:

Robert Moore Richmond

Birth: 22 December 1861, in Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond

Education: University of Wisconsin, A.B., B.S., L.L.B.

Married: Lona Washburn on 17 July 1894 in La Porte, La Porte county, Indiana, United States.
from The Tribune (Evansville, Wisconsin) July 1894
Marriage - We are in receipt of a very pretty announcement which reads as follows:
Robert M. RICHMOND, Lona WASHBURN, married Tuesday July 17, 1894, LaPorte, Indiana. At home, Evansville, Wis. after August 10.

Lona was born in January 1865, near Greenville, Bond county, Illinois. She died on 16 February 1914, probably in Evansville, Wisconsin, and was buried on 19 February 1914 at the Maple Hill cemetery in Evansville.
from the Evansville Review of Evansville, Wisconsin (23 February 1911, p. 5, col. 4):
OBITUARY
Mrs. Lona Washburn Richmond
The death of Mrs. Richmond which occurred last Thursday, while not unlooked for, brought inexpressible sadness to the wide circle of residents who claimed her as a friend.

She was a native of Southern Illinois, being born on her father's farm near Greenville. In her infancy she removed with the family to Platteville and was educated at the Normal school of that city, where she afterward taught. She also taught in the Darlington and Viroqua high schools and subsequently in River Falls normal school. She won a statewide reputation as institute conductor and years after she gave up her profession she would be occasionally pressed into service during the summer months.

Upon July 17, 1894 she was married to Mr. R. M. Richmond and since that time has made Evansville her home. Here also she worked along the lines of education, being for years one of the public school directors and was an active promoter of the free library movement.

One of the places where she will be most missed will be in the Woman's Literary club of which she was secretary. With that organization she has worked for the past fifteen years, and her leadership was graciously conceded by all.

Mrs. Richmond was a model home maker as she blended with her intellectual gifts a technical knowledge of the arts of housekeeping. No home boasts a better library of classics and few houses contain such a collection of fine pictures and cuts.

Her home was the center of a true hospitality where her charming personality shown at its best. Those who enjoyed her friendship can never forget their loss.

The funeral services were held from the home last Sunday afternoon, the Rev. Myron G. Argus of Lancaster reading the prayers for the dead, while Archdeacon Willmann of Janesville sang the burial chant and the hymns.

A brother, Mr. Louis Washburn, of East St. Louis, and a sister, Mrs. S. W. Johns of Grand Island, Nebraska, together with Mr. T. C. Richmond and the Misses Richmond of Madison, accompanied by two nephews and several cousins, were present at the obsequies.

Mrs. Richmond is survived by one child, Dorothy Washburn, aged fourteen. The interment took place at Maple Hill cemetery.

Children:
Occupation: Lawyer. Admitted to the bar, Robert practiced at Omaha, Nebraska, for some time, and with his return to Wisconsin opened a law office in Evansville.

Death: 14 December 1934, in Evansville, Rock county, Wisconsin, United States.

Buried: 17 December 1934, in Maple Hill cemetery, Evansville, Rock county, Wisconsin, United States

Census & Addresses:
1870: York, Green county, Wisconsin
1880: Platteville, Grant county, Wisconsin
1900: Second Street, Evansville, Rock county, Wisconsin
1905: Evansville, Rock county, Wisconsin
1921: Evansville, Rock county, Wisconsin (death notice of sister Mary Jane (Richmond) Benston)

Sources:

Susan Richmond

Birth: 9 December 1854, in Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond

Occupation: School teacher
Susan was first educated at Miss Little's private school in Belturbet, Ireland. After immigrating to the United States at six years old, she attended a private school conducted by a Mr. Daily Green county, Wisconsin, and was next a pupil in the Richmond Private School for Boys and Girls, established at Monroe by her brother, Thomas Charles. Her higher education was acquired at Platteville, Wisconsin, where she was a student at the State Normal School. She began her teaching career as an instructor at Harlan, Iowa, where she spent five years, afterward teaching in Atlantic, Iowa, for two years, and then returned to Wisconsin to join her younger sister, Charlotte, who had founded a private school in Madison.

When the two sisters joined forces the school became accredited and was known as Wisconsin Academy. To this institution young people desiring to enter the University of Wisconsin came for their preparatory credits, or as university students they attended the academy to make up work. The school became so popular that two prominent business men, Fred Schmitz, and his father-in-law, Mr. Hess, proprietors of the Hub Clothing Store, had erected for its home a fine building at the corner of State and Gilman streets. Organized in 1887, this splendid educational center for Wisconsin young people was successfully directed by Susan and Charlotte for a quarter of a century. In 1912 it was taken over by the State University and has since been known as the Wisconsin High School.

Gravestone of Susan Richmond
Gravestone of Susan Richmond in Forest Hills Cemetery, Madison, Wisconsin
Death: 7 July 1936, in Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin, United States.

Buried: 9 July 1936, in Sec 34, Lot 046, Gr 5 of Forest Hills Cemetery, Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin, United States (Although the gravestone reads 1854 - 1937, the cemetery index has 1936)

Census & Addresses:
1870: York, Green county, Wisconsin
1900: Madison Town (excluding Madison city), Dane county, Wisconsin
1905: Madison town, Dane county, Wisconsin
1917: 1317 E. Johnson St., Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin (manual of the Alliance of Unitarian and Other Liberal Christian Women p169)

Sources:

Susan Richmond

Birth: 1876/7, in Dubuque county, Iowa, United States

Father:
John Francis Richmond

Mother: Harriet Ann (Munn) Richmond

Census:
1880: Cold Water, Butler county, Iowa

Sources:

Susie Richmond

Birth: 10 July 1884

Father: William Richmond

Mother: Anna (Fulton) Richmond

Death: 15 August 1885

Buried: in Fairview Cemetery, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa, United States

Sources:

Thomas Charles Richmond

Birth: 30 November 1848, in Belturbet, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond
Gravestone of Alice Hawkins Richmond
Gravestone of Alice Hawkins Richmond in Forest Hills Cemetery, Madison, Wisconsin

Married: Alice Hawkins. Alice was born on 13 January 1870, in Prairie du Chien, Crawford county, Wisconsin, the daughter of Albert and Amy (Evans) Hawkins. Alice died on 6 April 1945, and is buried in Sec 34, Lot 046, grave 6 in the Forest Hills cemetery in Madison, Wisconsin.

Occupation: School superintendent and principal; Lawyer. Thomas graduated from the University of Wisconsin law school. He became the senior member of the law firm of Richmond, Jackman & Swanson in Madison, Wisconsin.

A biographical entry on Thomas is found in Proceedings of the State Bar Association of Wisconsin (1921) pp 434-4:
  Thomas C. Richmond was born at Belturbet, Ireland, in 1848. He came with his parents to Wisconsin in 1861. He was county superintendent of schools for Green County for two terms, principal of the Brodhead high school until he graduated from our law school in 1882. From 1884 to 1920 he was  an active practitioner at Madison, Wisconsin. As a boy of sixteen he enlisted in the 16th Wisconsin Infantry and served until the end of the war. He was one of the old and brilliant school of Wisconsin lawyers. I read from the memorial of Dane County Bar Association:
  "
No client, however humble, ever came to his office without receiving a hearing. Intensely partisan, their troubles and cares became his troubles and cares. He gave as much effort and time to the business of the poor and lowly as to the client of wealth and power. He believed that the duty of the lawyer was to aid and protect. Money meant nothing to him. If he did not believe that his client was in the right no hope of emolument would tempt him to enlist his services. Honest, upright, clean, he was always ready to take up the cause which he believed to be for the best interests of a client or friend. However forlorn the outlook he was never daunted. For years, at a time when its advocates were jeered and ridituled, he gave lavishly both of his time and money to the Prohibition cause. From the Atlantic to the Pacific, and from North to South, he lectured and preached the doctrines of temperance and woman suffrage. One of the greatest gratifications of the closing years of his life was to see the principles which he had so staunchly supported written into the constitution of his country."
  Mr. Richmond was without doubt when at the height of his powers one of the ablest, if not the ablest, platform speakers in the state of Wisconsin. His patriotism was of the highest order and even in his last days he gave up his practice and journeyed throughout the state urging support of the Government in the world war. His love for Ireland in no way caused him to join hands with the supporters of Pro-Germanism in our state. In addition to his large and active practice and his public services, he gave much aid to students and much friendly advice to young lawyers entering upon the practice of their profession. Quoting again from the memorial of the Dane County Bar Association :
  "
His family life was ideal. The portals of his home were always open. From the broad acres of his beloved 'Belle Colleen' on the shores of Lake Monona he derived his greatest pleasure; there he was the charming host and courteous gentleman; there with his beloved wife, his friends and books after the strenuous daily labor he obtained his relaxation and rest. With his passing the bar has lost a most honored member, and the state a loyal patriot and upright citizen."

An entry in The American Bar - Contemporary Lawyers of the United States and Canada by James Clark Fifield (1918) p720 reads:
RICHMOND, JACKMAN, WILKIE & TOEBAAS
   General practice. Firm consists of: Thomas C. Richmond, Ralph W. Jackman, Harold M. Wilke, Oscar T. Toebaas.
   Thomas C. Richmond, b. Ireland, Nov. 30, 1848; a. to bar, 1882, Wisc.; ed. Episcopal Sch., Ireland, pub. schs., Green Co., Wisc.; legal ed. Univ. of Wisc., Boston Law Sch., LL.B., 1882. Mem. Phi Alpha Delta fraternity; Dane Co., Wisc. State, and American Bar Ass'ns.
... (bios of Jacman, Wilkie and Toebaas)...
   Firm s counsel for:  Fairbanks Morse Co., Capital City Bank, Savings Loan & Trust Co., Pullman Co., Chicago, Northwestern R. R. Co., National Surety Co.


Gravestone of Thomas Charles Richmond
Gravestone of Thomas Charles Richmond in Forest Hills Cemetery, Madison, Wisconsin
Death: 3 August 1920, in Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin, United States. Thomas died suddenly of heart failure. He had been confined to the hospital for about ten days and was believed to be recovering.

Buried: 8 September 1920, in Sec 34, Lot 046, Gr 3 of Forest Hills Cemetery, Madison, Dane county, Wisconsin, United States (Although the gravestone reads OCT 30 1849 - SEP 4 1920, the cemetery index has 1846 - 3 August 1920)

Obituary: from Southwestern Wisconsin: Old Crawford County pp 392-396
At his death the following tribute to his worth appeared in a
local paper:
"Thomas Charles Richmond, whose sudden death was a sharp reminder that the shaft of death seeks a shining mark, was a man of strong character and native ability who would have been one of distinction and an important factor in Community affairs, even if he had lacked the erudition and extensive mental acquirements which were his in a remarkable degree. On any given subject - and he was interested intensely in every question of public import - his first demand was for all the pertinent facts, and these he marshaled in logical connection with clearness and in argument presented with a power of expression, which easily won him a well deserved reputation as one of the very ablest of public speakers.

"His fellow citizens esteemed him as a neighbor, his brothers of the bar respected him as a lawyer. His is the life story of a good citizen. And in a generation far removed from the great Civil war, it is meet that his epitaph shall also recite that he was one of the now rapidly dwindling band of patriots who were soldiers of the Union nearly three score years ago."

and from The Wisconsin alumni magazine volume 22 no. 1 (Nov 1920)
T. C. RICHMOND, '82, pioneer Madison attorney and prohibition worker, died suddenly, Sept. 4, of heart failure. He had been confined to the hospital for about ten days and was believed to be recovering. He was a member of the law firm of Richmond, Jackman, Wilkie and Toebaas.
 Mr. Richmond was born in Ireland in 1846 and came to this country with his parents when about eight years of age, settling in Green County. At the age of sixteen he ran away from home and enlisted in the Army to serve in the Civil war. After graduating from the University he attended the Boston law school, and started the practice of law in Madison. At one time Mr. Richmond was prohibition candidate for governor of Wisconsin. He is survived by his wife formerly Miss Alice Hawkins of Madison, and by two sisters.

Notes:
At age 16, Thomas ran away from home to serve in the Civil War in the 16th Wisconsin Infantry. In 1877, Thomas is listed as a county superintendent in Madison, Wisconsin. He was for many years a member of the Prohibition party, and ran for Governor of Wisconsin on the Prohibitionist ticket in 1890, but was defeated by George W. Peck. Thomas wrote a book entitled The Issue of '88, Or, Prohibition a Political Question (published by Nelson & North, 1888). In 1910, Thomas donated five deer to the city of Madison, which gift started the Vilas Park Zoo in Madison.

Census:
1870: York, Green county, Wisconsin
1880: Mt. Pleasant, Green county, Wisconsin
1900: Madison Town (excluding Madison city), Dane county, Wisconsin
1905: Madison town, Dane county, Wisconsin

Sources:

Thomas C. Richmond

Birth: 4 August 1885, in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa, United States

Father: William Richmond

Mother: Anna (Fulton) Richmond

Occupation: Businessman.
In the 1910 census, Thomas is listed as a tanner. In the 1920 census, Thomas is recorded as a clerk. At his retirement, Thomas was an employee of Paxton and Gallagher Co. of Omaha, Nebraska.

Death: 9 October 1959, in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa, United States
Thomas C. Richmond
THOMAS C. RICHMOND, 73, resident of a local rest home died Friday at a hospital. He was admitted earlier in the day. Survivors include: a brother, William of Englewood, Missouri. Cutler Funeral Home is in charge.
(source: Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil, Saturday, October 10, 1959, page 3)

Burial: 13 October 1959 in Fairview Cemetery, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa, United States
Funeral Services
Funeral services for Thomas Richmond, 74, Council Bluffs, will be at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Cutler Chapel. The rev. Robert C. Bowman, pastor of First United Presbyterian Church, will officiate. Interment will be at Fairview Cemetery.
Mr. Richmond, a lifelong resident of Council Bluffs, died Friday at a local hospital following a short illness. He was a retired employee of the Paxton and Gallagher Co. in Omaha.
Survivors include: two brothers: W.F. Richmond of Englewood, Colorado and Gen. Adam Richmond, retired, of Bethesda, Maryland.
(source: Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil, Monday, October 12, 1959, page 11)

Census & Addresses:
1900: 719 Mynster St, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1903: Council Bluffs, Iowa (death notice of father)
1905: 495 Graham Ave, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1910: 495 Graham Ave., Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1920: Mynster Street, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1927: Council Bluffs, Iowa (death notice of mother)
1959: Council Bluffs, Iowa (funeral notice)

Sources:

William Richmond

Birth: 12 July 1845, in county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Francis Richmond

Mother: Susan (Moore) Richmond

Married: Anna Fulton in 1879/80. Anna was born on 20 July 1847, in Ireland, and emigrated to the United States in 1852. She died on 12 September 1927, in Council Bluffs, Iowa. She was buried on 15 September 1927 in Fairview cemetery in Council Bluffs, Iowa.
Anna Richmond
Mrs. ANNA RICHMOND, 719 Mynster Street, widow of William Richmond, died Monday afternoon at her home. She had lived in Council Bluffs for forty-eight years.
She is survived by: three sons: William F. Richmond of Chicago, Capt. Adam Richmond of the United States Army, stationed at Washington, and Thomas Richmond of this city. She leaves also four grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at Cutler's Chapel, with burial in Fairview Cemetery. Rev. J. R. Perkins will officiate.
(source: Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil, Wednesday, September 14, 1927, p7)
Census:
1900: 719 Mynster St, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1905: 495 Graham Ave, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1910: 495 Graham Ave., Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1920: Mynster Street, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa

Children:
Occupation: Wholesale and retail grocer. The 1883 biography notes that he "followed farming" for four years in his youth and then entered the hotel business in Manchester, Iowa, for three years before finding his place in the grocery business. Old Crawford County notes that he was "was a teacher in the district schools of Wisconsin" before going to Iowa. Perhaps his teaching was contemporaneous with his "following farming". A william Richmond, aged 24, born in Ireland is recorded in the 1870 census as farming in Oneida, Delaware county, Iowa who is possibly this William. In 1900, William is listed as a commercial traveller.

William and his business partner, George W. Fulton, presumably a relative of his wife Anna Fulton, were involved in a lawsuit that was appealed as far as the Iowa Supreme Court, The case involved the legality of a deed transferred by the father of an employee of Richmond who had been accused of embezzlement. The Iowa Supreme Court upheld the district court decision to void the transfer. The case is found in The Northwestern Reporter, vol 57 p613:
LEE v. RICHMOND et al.
(Supreme Court of Iowa, Jan. 26, 1894.)
Deed?Delivery.

  Where a deed is executed for the purpose of settling a charge of embezzlement from a firm against the grantor's son, and given to one member of such firm, who agrees to submit it to his partner, and, if not satisfactory to him, to return it, but, if satisfactory, to stop the prosecution of such son, and it appears that such prosecution was not stopped, there was no delivery of the deed.
  Appeal from district court, Cass county; N. W. Macy, Judge.
  Action in equity for the cancellation of a conveyance of real estate. There was a hearing on the merits, and a decree in favor of plaintiff. The defendants appeal.
  Geo. A. Holmes and L. L. De Lano, for appellants. J. F. Smith, for appellee.

  ROBINSON, J. The defendants, William Richmond and George W. Fulton, for some years carried on a commercial business at Council Bluffs under the name of the Boston Tea Company. James T. Lee, a son of the plaintiff, was employed by them as clerk for about three years. In July, 1888, and while he was so employed, the defendants caused him to be arrested on a preliminary information which charged him with the crime of embezzlement. While he was under arrest, and before the examination was held, he had an interview with Richmond, in which he admitted that he was guilty of the offense charged, but expressed a desire to settle the matter, and agreed to telegraph to his father, who resided at Keokuk, to come to Council Bluffs. On the next day, Saturday, July 14th, he learned that his father could not come, and informed Richmond of the fact. On Sunday, the defendants visited him at his home, and spent several hours there. On the same day, Richmond, James T. Lee, and his wife started for the home of plaintiff, where they arrived Monday. An interview was there had, at which the plaintiff and his wife, the son and his wife, and Richmond were present during all or a part of the time. It resulted in the execution by the plaintiff and his wife to Richmond of a deed for three lots in the town of Atlantic for the specified consideration of $2,000. The deed was given to Richmond, and was recorded in the office of the recorder of Cass county. The plaintiff asks that the deed be canceled, and for general equitable relief. The district court decreed the deed to be void, and that the title to the lots was vested in plaintiff.
  The plaintiff alleges that the deed was executed in consequence of the representations of Richmond, for himself and Fulton, that James T. Lee had embezzled a large sum of money; that they had filed an information against him, in which he was charged with the embezzlement of money and goods to the value of $5,000; that the embezzlement had been confessed by him; that defendants were his friends, and that for the sum of $3,000 they would dismiss the information, and restore him to his employment, and he would have no further trouble; that, if the sum of $3,000 was not paid at once, the prosecution would be carried on, and he would be sent to the penitentiary. The plaintiff further claims that at that time he and his wife, who is the mother of James T. Lee, were old and feeble; that he was sick; that both were much disturbed and frightened by what was said to them, and not knowing the facts, and having no knowledge of such matters, they believed what Richmond said to them; that, when the deed was executed, Richmond agreed to submit it to Fulton, and, if it was not satisfactory to him, to return it to plaintiff, but that, if it was satisfactory, the criminal prosecution of his son would be dropped and ended. Some of these claims are denied by the defendants, but the preponderance of the evidence shows the following facts: Until James T. Lee and wife and Richmond arrived at the house of plaintiff, he did not know of the charges against his son. He was then about 70 years of age, had been in poor health for several years, and was confined to the house. He was subject to attacks of nervousness, and had been suffering from one for several days. Richmond told him that the amount of the embezzlement was $6,000, but defendants would drop the prosecution for $3,000; that the preliminary hearing was set for the next day, and would be prosecuted, unless a settlement was effected. The son was present, but did not deny the charge of embezzlement which Richmond made. The father and mother were much frightened, and desiring to protect their son, and avoid the scandal of a criminal prosecution, finally consented to give the deed in question, if it would end the prosecution and, with notes of defendants to the amount of about $900, which the son held and proposed to surrender, would effect a complete settlement of the matter in controversy. The deed was delivered under an agreement to that effect, and on condition that, if it was not satisfactory to Fulton, it was to be returned to plaintiff.  The notes held by the son were surrendered to the defendants, but the prosecution of the son was not stopped, although after the case reached the district court, and after an indictment had been returned, it was dismissed on motion of the county attorney for want of sufficient evidence to convict. The deed was retained by the defendants, but they insisted that plaintiff should give his promissory notes for the sum of $1,000, which were sent to him repeatedly for his signature. It is said that, if the claims of plaintiff be well founded, he conveyed his property for the purpose of compromising a criminal prosecution, and that, as that object was illegal, the law will leave all parties to the transaction where it finds them. We should hesitate long before refusing plaintiff relief on that ground, in view of the weakness of his body and mind, the threats made, and the fear he was under when the deed was given. Meech v. Lee, (Mich.) 46 N. W. 397. But we prefer to place our conclusion upon the ground that the condition on which the deed was given to Richmond was never complied with, and that the deed was not in law delivered, and therefore has not taken effect as a conveyance. We refer to the condition that the deed and the notes surrendered by the son should be received in full settlement of the claims made against the son of defendants. Conceding that some of the provisions of the agreement were illegal, yet the deed was not to be regarded as delivered, unless the settlement attempted was approved by Fulton, and, as it was not approved by him, there was never, in law, any delivery, and the deed is without effect. Steel v. Miller, 40 Iowa, 406; Bershire v. Peterson, 83 Iowa, 198, 48 N. W. 1035; Head v. Thompson, 77 Iowa, 207, 42 N. W. 188; Deere v. Nelson, 73 Iowa, 187, 34 N. W. 809. The fact that some portions of the agreement were illegal would not operate to annul the conditions and make the delivery complete. Since the deed was never delivered, nothing can be claimed under it. The decree of the district court is in harmony with our conclusions, and is affirmed.

Death: 8 October 1903 in Denver, Colorado, United States
William Richmond
WILLIAM RICHMOND, a well known traveling man, residing at 495 Graham Avenue, died Thursday afternoon at Denver, after a short illness with pneumonia. The report of Mr. Richmond's death was a surprise to relatives here, nothing being known of his illness.
His son, William F. Richmond, and his brother, Major Richmond, left yesterday to bring the body to this city. The remains will be taken to the residence of Major Richmond, 333 Avenue E, upon arrival.
Mr. Richmond was a member of the Episcopal Church. He leaves a wife and three sons: William F., Thomas and Adam Richmond.
(source: Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil, Saturday, October 10, 1903, p3)

Buried: 11 October 1903 in Fairview Cemetery, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa, United States
Funeral
The funeral of WILLIAM RICHMOND will occur this afternoon at 3:30 from the residence of Major Richmond, 333 Avenue E, Rev. George Edward Walk officiating. The interment will be at Fairview Cemetery.
R.M. Richmond of Evansville, Wisconsin, J.F. Richmond of Morrison and Hon. T.C. Richmond of Madison, Wisconsin, will arrive in time to attend the funeral.
The pallbearers will be Congressman W.I. Smith, D.W. Bushnell, E.A. Troutman, Charles Beno, A.T. Elwell and John Mulqueen.
(source:
Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil, Sunday, October 11, 1903, p5)

Notes:

The 1883 Biography of William Richmond
William Richmond, wholesale and retail grocer, Council Bluffs, was born in County Cavan, Ireland, July 12, 1845, and at the age of sixteen years emigrated to the United States with his parents and settled in Green County, Wis. He received his education in his native country. He followed farming for four years, and then engaged in the hotel business in Manchester, Iowa, for three years. He then traveled for the grocery house of Harper Bros., Chicago, until he came to Council Bluffs in October, 1880, and began business at No. 14 Pearl Street, where he has remained. His store occupies two stories 90 feet long and 20 feet wide, the lower floor containing the retail department of the business, the upper floor containing teas, spices, etc., and the cellar is stocked with syrups, oils, vinegar, etc. He began business with about $2,000 worth of stock, his annual sales then amounting to about $50,000. He now carries about $5,000 worth of stock, and from present prospects his annual sales for the present year will amount to about $100,000. He employs three men in his establishment and keeps nine men on the road, and expects soon to increase his force of traveling men. Mr. Richmond is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Census & Addresses:
1900: 719 Mynster St, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1903: 495 Graham Avenue, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa (death notice)

Sources:

William F. Richmond

Birth: May 1882, in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa, United States

Father: William Richmond

Mother: Anna (Fulton) Richmond

Married: Fanny _____. Fanny was born in 1884/5, in Iowa.

Occupation: Businessman.

Census & Addresses:
1900: 719 Mynster St, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie county, Iowa
1903: Council Bluffs, Iowa (death notice of father)
1920: Chicago city ward 25, Cook county, Illinois
1927: Chicago, Illinois (death notice of mother)
1959: Englewood, Colorado (funeral notice of brother Thomas)

Sources:
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