The Havens Family

Agnes Emmaretta Constance H. Havens

Birth: 1885 in St James Palace, Strand district, Middlesex, England

Father: Edward John Havens Havens

Mother: Caroline Louisa Constance (Jennings) Havens

Notes:
In 1898, Agnes's father, Edward was charged with attempting to drown her from a quay in Harwich, Essex, but he was acquitted. Agnes herself denied in court that her father had attempted to harm her.
The Times 5 October 1898 p7
  THE CHARGE AGAINST MR. HAVENS. - At Harwich Police-court, yesterday, Mr. Edward John Havens, M.R.C.S., Lord of the Manor of East Donyland, was charged on remand with attempting to murder his little daughter, Henrietta Constance, at Harwich, on September 18. It was alleged in evidence that the accused, who was separated from his wife, took the child to Harwich pier in the evening after dinner and was seen struggling with her near the water. For the defence the child was called and said that the accused did not force her down the steps to the pier or attempt to throw her into the water.


When Edward and Caroline separated later that year, Agnes remained with Edward, while her younger sister was put in the custody of her mother. Caroline's allegations against Edward included that he illtreated her on the ground that she "had bewitched their eldest girl by putting powder, made from ancient relics, on the stairs" and also that he "incited this daughter to slap her mother's face" (Auckland Star (Auckland, New Zealand) 29 October 1898 p3)

Death: 1949, in Colchester district, Essex, England, aged 64

Census:
1891: Horley, Surrey: Agnes C. Havens, daughter, is aged 8, born in London
1901: Great Clacton, Essex: Agnes M. C. H. Havens, daughter, is aged 13
1911: Wivenhoe, Essex: Agnes Emmarotta Canstance H. Havens is aged 21, born in London St James's Palace S W, London

Sources:

Albert Edward Havens

Birth: 1901 in Stockbridge Hampshire, England

Father: Rawdon Havens Havens

Mother: Ellen Rabnott

Married: Mildred C. Tyler in 1929, in Rochford district, Essex, England

Havens Department Store
Havens Department Store
image from squidoo.com
Occupation: Department Store owner. Edward took over the family department store on Hamlet Court Road, Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, founded by his father.
Southend Evening Echo 26 July 2000
Edward worked for Gillette and sold razor blades, but decided to quit the company in 1920 and join the family business. "Eddie, my grandfather, was a bubbly character with a lot of bright ideas and ran the business for nearly 40 years," says Nigel. "He expanded the store, designed the present building and ran the show.


Notes: Known as Edward or Eddie

Census & Addresses:
1911: Prittlewell, Essex: Edward Havens is aged 10, born in Stockbridge, Hampshire
1945: 138-140 Hamlet Court Road, Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex   (London Gazette 27 July 1935 p3893)

Sources:

Alicia Havens

Birth: 30 March 1800

Baptised: 29 June 1800, in Rowhedge, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Mary Anne (Sage) Havens

Death: 29 August 1816, at Donyland Hall, East Donyland, Essex, England, aged 16
The New Monthly Magazine October 1816 p369
ESSEX.
Died
] At Donyland Hall, Alicia, second daughter of Philip Havens, esq. 16.

Sources:

Ann Havens

Birth: 21 January 1722/3 (OS/NS), in Colchester, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Ann (Lowe) Havens

Buried: 1 November 1732, in Colchester, Essex, England

Sources:

Edward John Havens Havens

Birth: 1855 in Colchester, Essex, England

Baptism: 6 June 1862 in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
Edward John, of Wivenhoe was baptised on 6 June 1862, the son of Philip Havens, surgeon, and Elizabeth. He was baptised on the same day as six of his siblings.

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Elizabeth (Elsworthy) Havens

Education: Epsom College, Epsom, Surrey, which Edward left in 1874. Epsom College was founded in 1853 to provide support for poor members of the medical profession such as pensioners and orphans.
Epsom College Register p72 (1905)
Havens, Edward John [Mrs. Havens, Donyland Hall, Colchester]; b. 1855, 1. 1874.
  XV., M.R.C.S and L.S.A. 1879 (Lond. Hosp.). (Travelling).

Married: Caroline Louisa Constance Jennings on 6 November 1884, in St Martin in the Fields, Westminster, Middlesex, England.
Edward John Havens Havens is recorded as single, aged 29, the son of Philip Havens. Caroline Louisa Constance Jennings is recorded as single, aged 32, the daughter of Frederic Waterloo Jennings.
The Times 8 November 1884 p1 col A
On the 6th inst., at the Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, by the Rev. the Sub-Dean of Her Majesty's Chapels Royal, EDWARD J. HAVENS HAVENS, Esq., son of the late Philip Havens, of Donyland Hall, Essex, and Wenham, Suffolk, Esquire, and of Elizabeth Havens, Lady of the Manor, to CONSTANCE, only daughter of FREDERIC W. JENNINGS, Esq., of Ambassadors' Court, St. James's Palace.

Caroline was granted a separation order against Edward in 1898, allowed 50 a year, and given custody of their youngest child, after alleging to a magistrate that he had beat and imprisoned her. Earlier that year, Edward had been acquitted of a charge of attempting to drown his daughter.
Auckland Star (Auckland, New Zealand) 29 October 1898 p3
THE EVIL EYE.
      ASTOUNDING CHARGE AGAINST A HUSBAND.
  An amazing story was told before the county magistrates at Colchester, on September 3rd, by the wife of Doctor John Edward Havens, lord of the manor of East Donyland. The complainant, whose is the daughter of an official in the Queen's household, has been married to Dr. Havens for some years. She deposed that for a period of six years he has illtreated her persistently on the ground that she had touched him for evil, cast an evil eye on the people of the village where they lived, and had bewitched their eldest girl by putting powder, made from ancient relics, on the stairs. He had incited this daughter to slap her mother's face; had himself blackened his wife's eyes, pulled out her hair, and beaten her on the arms and shoulders, besides flourishing a revolver and threatening to 'shoot her like a convict' if she left him. He kept her shut up in her bedroom for months at a time, and did not allow her to see or communicate with friends. She only managed to escape by claiming the protection of two policemen who happened to pass the house. The husband pleaded 'Not Guilty,' but made no defence, and the magistrate made a separation order requiring him to allow his wife 50 a year. Mrs Havens was also given the custody of the youngest child.

Caroline was born in 1852, in Ryde, Hampshire, and baptised on 10 September 1852 in St Thomas, Ryde, the daughter of Frederick Waterloo Jennings and Elizabeth Gaine. Frederick was Chief Clerk of the Lord Chamberlain's Office. Caroline died on 2 May 1927 in Staines district, Middlesex, aged 74.
Census:
1861: Marylebone, Middlesex: Caroline L. G. Jennings, daughter, is aged 8, born in London, Middlesex
1881: 2 Alfred Place, Dover St James, Kent
1891: Horley, Surrey: Caroline L. Havens, wife, is aged 38, born in Ryde, Hampshire
1901: Paddington, Middlesex: Constance Havens, boarder, is aged 43, born in Isle of Wight. Living On Own Means
1911: Eastbourne, Sussex: Caroline Louisa Constance Havens is aged 58, born in Ryde Isle of Wight, Hampshire
1927: The Rosary, Charlton Lane, Shepperton, Middlesex (formerly of 11 Spencer Terrace, Sunbury-on-Thames, Middlesex)   London Gazette 9 August 1927 p5209

Children:
Occupation: Medical Doctor. M.R.C.S. 1879 and L.S.A. 1879 (Supplement to the British Medical Journal 30 November 1907 pp310-311). The 1881 census states that he is not practising.

Donyland Hall c1900
Donyland Hall c1900
image from Daniel Simons
Notes:
On 22 April 1884, an earthquake struck East Anglia, damaging East Donyland Hall, where Edward was Lord of the Manor.
Report on the East Anglian earthquake of April 22nd, 1884 p80 (Raphael Meldola, William White, 1885)
East Donyland Hall Mr Havens had all its chimneys but one thrown down the roof much damaged and the walls cracked both inside and out the front of the house was left insecure and had to be shored up Time of shock given as about 9.20

In 1898, Edward was charged with attempting to drown his daughter, Agnes, but the charge was dismissed after a preliminary hearing. Edward was, however, found guilty over the years of a number of separate assaults, obstructing a highway, disorderly behaviour while drunk, and took part in other eccentric behaviours, such as living in a shepherd's van on the estate of which he was lord of the manor.
New York Times 20 September 1898
A Lord of the Manor Remanded.
LONDON, Sept. 19. - Edward Havens, Lord of the Manor of East Denyland, near Colchester, was remanded at Harwich to-day on the charge of attempting to drown his twelve-year-old daughter from a quay yesterday evening.

The Times 5 October 1898 p7 col F
  THE CHARGE AGAINST MR. HAVENS. - At Harwich Police-court, yesterday, Mr. Edward John Havens, M.R.C.S., Lord of the Manor of East Donyland, was charged on remand with attempting to murder his little daughter, Henrietta Constance, at Harwich, on September 18. It was alleged in evidence that the accused, who was separated from his wife, took the child to Harwich pier in the evening after dinner and was seen struggling with her near the water. For the defence the child was called and said that the accused did not force her down the steps to the pier or attempt to throw her into the water. They were going on her Majesty's ship Alarm and were waiting on the pier steps for a boat, but as it was cold she objected to go on the water without a jacket at that time of night. James Howard Ince, architect, of Lincoln's-inn-fields, stated that he was on the pier at the time, but saw no attempt made by the accused to throw his daughter into the water. He would have interfered has=d such an attempt been made. When he saw the newspaper report of Mr. Havens's arrest he thought some mistake had been made and came voluntarily to give evidence. Similar evidence was given by some sailors who were in a storm launch at the bottom of the steps. At 9 o'clock last night, the case having occupied nine hours, the chairman of the Bench said that the magistrates had given the case long and anxious consideration, and the majority of them were of opinion that the evidence was so conflicting that no jury would convict. The case would therefore be dismissed. An outbreak of loud applause was immediately suppressed by the Bench.

Thames Star (Thames, New Zealand) 23 August 1907 p4
An Eccentric Medico.
FIERCE STRUGGLE ON A CLIFF-TOP.
  At Mistley Petty Sessions Edward John Havens, a retired medical man, living at Clacton-on-Sea, was sentenced to a month's imprisonment for assaulting Robert Darcy Brennan, a professor of physical culture. He was also bound over to keep the peace for twelve months, and the sureties found by him in December, when he was also charged with assault, were estreated. Several years ago Dr Havens was charged with attempting to drown his daughter at Harwich, but was acquitted. He had been on several occasions charged with assault, and seven years ago he had to be evicted from a house which the War Office had purchased, and which was in the danger zone of the Government rifle ranges at Colchester. He defied the authorities, but when a party of Royal Engineers removed the roof and windows of the house he remarked, "I yield to superior numbers," and he then went and lived with his daughter in a movable shepherd's van upon an estate of which he was then lord of the manor. In the latest case the evidence showed that Dr. Havens ran after Mr Brennan's dog on the top of a cliff, and when remonstrated with threw a spade at Mr Brennan, whose wife and daughter were near. He then tried to strike Mr Brennan with the spade, and a fierce struggle on the cliff-top took place.

Supplement to the British Medical Journal 30 November 1907 pp310-311
GENERAL MEDICAL COUNCIL
Wednesday, November 27th, 1907.
DISCIPLINARY CASES.
...
The Council proceeded to consider the case, adjourned from the May session, of Edward John Havens, registered as of East Donyland, Colchester, M.R.C.S.Eng. 1879, L.S.A.Lond. 1879, who had been summoned to appear before the Council on the following charges:
  That you were on November 5th, 1906, convicted of the following misdemeanour at Thorpe Petty Session, Thorpe-le-Soken, Essex, namely, of obstructing the highway; also that you were on December 17th, 1906, convicted at the like Session of disorderly behaviour whilst drunk; and also that you were on April 8th, 1907, convicted of the following misdemeanour at Mistley Petty Session, namely, of common assault.
  At the conclusion of the proceedings on May 29th, 1907, the PRESIDENT, addressing Mr. Havens, said:
  Mr. Edward John Havens,-The Council have deliberated carefully on the convictions which have been proved against you, but they have adjourned the further consideration of your case till the November session, when you should be present to hear the result of their final deliberations.
  Mr. HAVENS appeared in person.
  Mr. WINTERBOTHAM read the notice which had been served on Mr. Havens.
  Mr. HAVENS, in answer to the PRESIDENT, stated that he was not now in practice, and had not been for about fifteen years.
  [Strangers and parties were directed to withdraw. On their readmission,]
  The PRESIDENT said: "Mr. Edward John Havens, the Council, having further considered the convictions proved against you, does not direct the Registrar to remove your name from the Medical Register."

Death: 1917, in Colchester district, Essex, England, aged 61

Census:
1861: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex
1881: Donyland Hall, East Donyland, Essex
1891: Horley, Surrey: Edward J. Havens, head, is aged 35, born in Colchester, Essex
1901: Great Clacton, Essex: E. P. H. Havens, head, is aged 48. Occupation: M R C S Emg & T S A Lond
1911: Wivenhoe, Essex: Edward John H. Havens is aged 55, born in Colchester, Essex

Sources:

Eithne Gabrielle H. Havens

Birth: 1878 in Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England

Father: Robert Havens Havens

Mother: Charlotte Miriam (Gentry) Havens

Census:
1881: 44 Broad Street, Canterbury St. Mary Northgate, Kent
1891: Beach Street, Deal, Kent

Sources:

Elizabeth Havens

Birth: 28 June 1724, in Colchester, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Ann (Lowe) Havens

Buried: 6 December 1728, in Colchester, Essex, England

Sources:

Elizabeth (Havens) Brett

Birth: 20 September 1802, in East Donyland, Essex, England

Baptised: 25 December 1802, in Rowhedge, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Mary Anne (Sage) Havens

Married: Edward Brett on 4 September 1823, at Rowhedge, Essex, England.

Children:
Census:
1841: Wakes Colne, Essex
1861: Elizabeth Brett is aged 58, born in East Donyland, Essex
1871: Wakes Colne, Essex
1881: Colne Place, Wakes Colne, Essex

Sources:

Elizabeth Constance Havens

Birth: 1884 in Lexden, Essex, England

Father: William Havens

Mother: Rosa (Belles) Havens

Census:
1891: Churchford Hall Farm, Capel St Mary, Suffolk
1901: St Thomas, Oxfordshire: Elizabeth C. Havens, visitor, is aged 16, born in Colchester, Essex. Occupation: None Own Means
1911: Kensington, London: Elizabeth G. Havens is aged 26, born in Lexden, Essex

Sources:

Elizabeth Rawdon Havens

Birth: 1887 in Great Bentley, Essex, England

Father: Hugh Havens

Mother: Mary Esther (Went) Havens

Death: 1972

Census:
1891: The Brewery, Littlebourn, Kent: Elizth R. Havens, daughter, is aged 4, born in Great Bentley, Essex
1901: 65 Westow Hill, Gypsy Hill, Lambeth, London: Elizabeth R. Havens, daughter, is aged 14, born in Great Bentley, Essex
1911: Bradfield, Essex: Elizabeth Rawdon Havens, niece, is aged 24, born in Gt Dentley, Essex

Sources:

Emmaretta Havens Havens

Birth: 1849 in Wivenhoe, Essex, England

Baptism: 6 June 1862 in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
Emmaretta, of Wivenhoe was baptised on 6 June 1862, the son of Philip Havens, surgeon, and Elizabeth. She was baptised on the same day as six of her brothers.

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Elizabeth (Elsworthy) Havens

Death: 1877, in Lexden district, Essex, England, aged 28

Buried: 2 August 1877, in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England.
Emmaretta Havens Havens of Donyland Hall was buried on 2 August 1877, aged 28.

Census:
1851: Emmaretta Havens, granddaughter, is aged 2, born in Wivehoe, Essex
1861: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex
1871: 4 Sussex Street, St George Hanover Square, Middlesex

Sources:

Emmy Hildred Charlotte Elizabeth H. (Havens) Hartopp

Birth: 1883 in Whitstable On Sea, Kent, England

Father: Robert Havens Havens

Mother: Charlotte Miriam (Gentry) Havens

Married: Edward Liddell Hartopp in 1904 in St George Hanover Square district, London, England

Edward was born in 1881, in Champion Hill, Surrey, the son of Edward Hey Hartopp and Helen Margaret Georgiana Liddell. Edward was a solicitor. Edward was admitted to practise in January 1904 and in 1907 was at the business address of Hastings House, Norfolk Street, London (The Law list 1907 p476). In 1910, Edward was a solicitor for the firm Chamberlain, Johnson and Hartopp of 10 Norfolk Street, Strand, Middlesex. (London Gazette 10 June 1910 p4117).
Edward was commissioned Second Lieutenant (on probation) in the 3rd Battalion, the Suffolk Regiment, on 10 November 1914 (London Gazette 6 November 1914 p9114) and he transferred to the Royal Field Artillery on 20 October 1915 (London Gazette 19 October 1915 p10288 with a correction of his name in London Gazette 22 October 1915 p10484). Edward was promoted to Lieutenant in the Worcester Regiment on 5 May 1916 (London Gazette 27 October 1916 p10518), and placed on the retired list on account of ill-health contracted on active service, on 19 March 1918 (London Gazette 15 March 1918 p3403).
In 1929, Edward is recorded in Shanghai, a lawyer for the firm Teesdale, Newman and MacDonald, appearing for the defence of A. C. Townsend, managing director of Townsend, Day and Co. Ltd, on a fraud charge (The Straits Times 9 August 1929 p17). In 1931, he is recorded in Hong Kong representing the estates of three European sailors presumed dead after the sinking of the steamer Kwongsang (The Straits Times 2 January 1932 p22), and in July 1932, again in Shanghai, representing a plaintiff, Isaac Silas Jacob Hardoon, of Bombay, challenging the will of Shanghai multi-millionaire Silas Aaron Hardoon (The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser 23 July 1932 p12). He died on 16 October 1942, at Country Hospital, Shanghai, China, and is listed amongst the Civilian War Dead by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.
Census & Addresses:
1881: Glenflesh, Champion Hill, Camberwell, Surrey
1891: St Mary, London: Edward Hartopp, visitor, is aged 10, born in Champion Hill, Surrey
1901: Chelsea, London: Edward L. Hartopp, son, is aged 20, born in Champion Hill, London. Occupation: Assisted Clerk Solicitors
1911: San Remo, Hove, Sussex: Edward L. Hartopp is aged 30, born in Camberwell, London
1942: 56 Peking Road, Shanghai, China (formerly of 24 Yuen Ming Yuen Road, Shanghai, China)   (London Gazette 11 May 1943 p2143)

Death: 1951, in Chichester district, West Sussex, England, aged 67

Census:
1891: Beach Street, Deal, Kent
1911: San Remo, Hove, Sussex: Emery Hartopp is aged 27, born in Whitstable, Kent

Sources:

Florence Nellie (Havens) Carter

Birth: 1897 in Stockbridge Hampshire, England

Father: Rawdon Havens Havens

Mother: Ellen Rabnott

Married: Edward G. C. Carter in 1931, in Rochford district, Essex, England

Census & Addresses:
1901: Stockbridge, Hampshire: Florence M. Harens, daughter, is aged 3, born in Stockbridge, Hampshire
1911: Prittlewell, Essex: Florence Havens is aged 13, born in Stockbridge, Hampshire
1945: 97 Pixmore Way, Letchworth, Hertfordshire   (London Gazette 27 July 1935 p3893)

Sources:

Harry Havens Havens

Birth: 1857 in Wivenhoe, Essex, England

Baptism: 6 June 1862 in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
Harry, of Wivenhoe was baptised on 6 June 1862, the son of Philip Havens, surgeon, and Elizabeth. He was baptised on the same day as six of his siblings.

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Elizabeth (Elsworthy) Havens

Education: Epsom College, Epsom, Surrey, which Harry left in 1874. Epsom College was founded in 1853 to provide support for poor members of the medical profession such as pensioners and orphans.
Epsom College Register p82 (1905)
Havens, Harry [Mrs. Havens, Donyland Hall, Colchester]; b. 1857, 1. 1874.
  Farming.
                   Nether Hall, Bradfield, Essex

Married: Mary Ann Sarah James on 11 April 1886, in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
Harry Havens Havens is recorded as a bachelor, aged 29. He is a farmer, of East Donyland. Mary Ann Sarah James is recorded as a spinster, aged 21, the daughter of Robert Oliver James, a mariner. She is resident at East Donyland. The marriage was witnessed by Rowland Hill Bucknall and Edgar Jones.

Mary was born in 1865, in East Donyland, Essex, the daughter of Robert Oliver James and Louisa Cranmer.
Census:
1881: Street, East Donyland, Essex
1891: Wiston Hall, Nayland-with-Wissington, Suffolk
1901: Maltings Farm, Nayland with Wissington, Suffolk
1911: Bradfield, Essex: Mary Havens is aged 45, born in Donyland, Essex

Occupation: Farmer. The 1881 census shows Harry farming the family farm at East Donyland. This is listed as 270 acres, employing 8 labourers and 2 boys. In the 1891, 1896 Kelly's Directory and 1901 census, Harry is farming in Nayland-with-Wissington in Suffolk, the farm being named as Maltings Farm in the 1901 census.

Notes: Daisy Cook is listed with Harry and Mary Havens in both the 1891 census (aged 7) and the 1901 census (aged 17). Dave Tylcoat notes that Harry and Mary had two adopted daughters, one named Winifred. Daisy could be a candidate for the other adopted daughter although she is described in the censuses as a visitor rather than a daughter. 5 year old Winifred Daisy North, born in Donyland, is living in their household in the 1911 census. Adoption was not a formal process in England at that time, which could explain why the adopted children (if that is what they were) kept their surnames.

In 1884, Harry was the complainant in an assault case against William Daniel Potter and Benjamin Barnard alleging that he was assaulted after an argument in the Ship Inn in East Donyland, but the case was dismissed due to conflicting evidence.
Essex Standard 3 May 1884
COLCHESTER (COUNTY) COURT 26 April - Before John Bateman, Esq. (in the chair), Capt. Brett, E. Roberts, J.W. Lay, W. Macandrew and J. Roberts Esqs. -  SERIOUS CHARGE OF ASSAULT AT EAST DONYLAND - Wm. Daniel Potter, Captain to Lord Alfred Paget’s yacht, Benjamin Barnard, a yacht captain, of East Donyland, were charged with having unlawfully assaulted Mr. Harry Havens, of East Donyland Hall, on Monday 14th April, and Thomas Barnard, a yacht captain, of East Donyland, was charged with having aided and abetted the other two to commit the assault. Mr. Henry Goody appeared for the complainant, and Mr. Joseph Beaumont for the defendants.
  Mr. Henry Goody, in opening the case said that the complainant lived at Donyland Hall, and he (Mr. Goody) might say at once that whatever might have taken place in this Court with regard to the members of Havens’ family, the complainant until that day had not been in any capacity before a Bench of Magistrates, and he now made his first appearance as the complainant in what he (Mr. Goody) should be able to prove was one of the grossest cases of assault ever brought before them. Mr. Goody then detailed the facts of the case as they are given in the following evidence which was called:-
  The complainant (Mr. Harry Havens) said - I reside at Donyland Hall, and farm it myself. On Monday 14th inst., accompanied by my brother Robert, and a man named Ranson Roper, I proceeded through Donyland Street, and ultimately went into the Ship Inn, at about  a quarter to 11 o’clock in the evening; I found a lot of people there - the room being full - and amongst them being the three defendants. Some one asked me to be chairman. I said “No,” and I believe the same person said “Will you sing a song?” and I said “I don’t sing at public houses:” and after that, the father of the two defendants Barnard sang a song, and broke down at the third verse. (Laughter.) Potter then said to the old man “Shut up, I’m chairman.” My brother said “If you are chairman, I wonder you don’t conduct yourself as such,” to which he replied “I meant Thos. Barnard;” and shortly after that, Thos. Barnard, putting his foot on the table, said “Do you want to fight you ----- ?” Immediately afterwards Benjamin Barnard said “Come out you ----- !” and all the people in the room jumped up, and they went out. After we had got outside someone threw a mug of beer in our faces. My brother asked who it was, but got no reply, and asked the same thing again with the same result. About this time Police-constable Lennon came up, and said “Come along with me away from this mob, for fear of a row,” and we went away with Police-constable Lennon. We were turning round the second corner on our direct way home, when the mob, composed of about 30 or 40 people, rushed at us behind our backs. My brother went back from the policeman for fear of being struck, and I faced round to the crowd and said “If you are men, fight like men.” The defendant, Thomas Barnard, rushed at me and tried to strike me, but I knocked him on one side. Immediately upon that I was surrounded by about 20, and received some severe blows on my head. I looked round and said “You cowards,” and at the same time received a blow on the head by Benjamin Barnard with a pewter mug. I guarded a portion of the blow, for if I had not done so my skull would have been fractured. The constable got hold of me to pull me from the mob, and was taking me away when I was struck on the shoulder by a stick twice - the blow being meant for my head no doubt - and the policeman received a blow on his hand. I didn’t see who aimed the blow. Ultimately the constable got me into the Anchor Inn, when I was covered with blood, and my clothing was saturated (produced). I received two wounds on the head, but I only saw the person who struck one blow. I had a black eye, and my nose was cut. When in the Anchor Inn I heard the mob shouting to get at me. My wounds were washed at the Anchor Inn.
  Cross-examined by Mr. Beaumont. I left home between five and six o’clock. I was at the Ipswich Arms about seven o’clock with my brother and Roper. I saw Potter and others there. I did not say to the landlady “That is Potter there,” and she did not reply “Yes it is,” and I did not say “I thought it was his ---- great conk.” (Laughter). I am not in the habit of swearing.
  Did you not afterwards go on to the steps of the door and standing there say “Where are your ---- friends and where are your foes?” - No, I am in the habit of carrying a small stick and I lost it that night (produced) I went from there into Donyland. On the night in question there was a Fair being held on Donyland Heath. As I was going down I did not say to my brother “We will go down and have a ---- rough and tumble with them.” We left the Ipswich Arms soon after seven o’clock, and went to the Oak, which is half a mile off, and remained there about two hours. From the Oak we went to the Crown.
  Did you on the night in question visit every public house in Donyland? - No. From the Crown we went to the Lion where we stayed until nearly eleven o’clock and went from there to the Ship. I did not go to the Anchor. When I went into the Ship they were singing songs. The landlord did not come in the room and tell me to be quiet. My two friends and I were not excited at the time. I had a stick with me. “Did you not, flourishing your stick about, say you would fight their ---- best man in the room?” - No; I will swear I did not. My brother was asked to sing, but I did not hear him answer “I know no ---- songs except indecent ones,” and Potter saying “This is a respectable house, you are amongst respectable company, and we will not have it here.” I known Capt. Potter is Lord Alfred Paget’s yachtsman and has been so for 22 years. I have never said to anyone I would “do” for Capt. Potter if I had the chance. I known a Mr. Pearson, but I never in his presence said I would pay Potter out if I caught him in a public room, nor did I ever say anything of the sort in the presence of any other person.
  Have you had a little fighting at home? - No.
  Will you swear your poor mother had not to send for the Police to stop a row with your brothers on the 7th of this month? - Yes.
  Did you not run from the Policeman on the night in question, and rush on the mob and strike right and left with your stick. - No.
  Did you not strike Capt. Potter with the stick? - No. I was attended on Tuesday morning by a medical man.
  Robert Havens, brother of the complainant, gave corroborative testimony, adding he was knocked down and otherwise ill-treated by the mob .
  Mr. Beaumont. Did you break from the crowd? - No.
  Were you not excited? - Well, one naturally would be so. My brother did nothing at all.
  Is it really in the Havens’ blood to do nothing at all? (Laughter.) - No answer.
  Did you not go out, as young gentlemen sometimes will, for the purpose of having a lark? - No, certainly not.
  Walter Levitt, the ferryman between East Donyland and Wyvenhoe, stated that he was at the Ferry on the 14th April, and about 11 o’clock there was a row as the people came out of the Ship Inn. There were about 20 people there. Witness went nearer, and saw some man with a pint pewter swinging his hand behind his back. He could not tell who it was. After that, witness left to attend to the Ferry, and when he returned the complainant had been taken into the Anchor Inn. He heard Thomas Barnard say, “They have gone into the Anchor. Let’s go in and have the place down and kill the ‘varmints.’”
  Eliza Allen, of Donyland, stated that on the night in question she went for some porter to the Anchor, and as she came out she saw the three defendants in the Ship yard. She heard Robert Havens ask who threw the pint of beer in his face. As the complainant and his brother went up Church Lane, she heard the three defendants and others shout and groan after them. She heard Thomas Barnard say, “Kill the ----.” Benjamin Barnard said the same; and when they got Robert Havens on the ground, Benjamin Barnard kicked him. She saw Capt. Potter with a stick in his hand, with which he struck at Harry Havens, but the blow struck the constable. She saw something strike Harry Havens on the head, and heard the mug, or whatever it was, rattle.
  Ranson Roper, a mariner, of East Donyland, who was in company of the Havens’ on the night in question, gave corroborative testimony as to their movements on Monday night up to their leaving the Ship Inn. He added that he did not see any of the defendants strike the complainant.
  Police-constable Lennon said that on the night in question he heard a noise outside the Ship Inn, and went to see what it was about. Thinking there was likely to be a disturbance, he advised the complainant and his brother to go away, and took each by one arm as far as Mr. Glozier’s shop, the crowd following, hooting and shouting. Robert Havens stepped back a few steps, and Harry Havens said he would follow his brother. Some one in the crowd struck Harry Havens, and then they commenced fighting in all directions. Harry Havens was bleeding from a blow received, but witness could not say who hit him. He took complainant into the Anchor Inn. Whilst witness had his hand on Harry Havens’ arm he received two heavy blows on the left hand.
  Mr. Charles A.S. Ling, surgeon, practising at Wyvenhoe, stated that on Tuesday, the 15th inst., Harry Havens came to his surgery suffering from two contused lacerated wounds on the head. They were not dangerous, but they might have proved dangerous. They would, no doubt, be caused by some blunt instrument. The complainant had also a bruised eye, and a bruise behind the ear.
  Mr. Beaumont, in addressing the Court on behalf of the defendants, stated that the defendants all bore excellent characters, Captain Potter having been engaged on Lord Paget’s yachts for 22 years; the two Barnards bore medals for saving life, and were the last men to commit such an act as it was alleged they had committed. He pointed out that by the complainant’s own evidence he had been guilty of midnight rowdyism, and said he should prove by evidence that the defendants were not the persons who inflicted the blows on the complainant. He then called the following evidence:-
  William Daniel Potter, who said: I am in the service of Lord Alfred Paget, and have the command of one or two of his yachts. I went with his Lordship and the Prince of Wales to India. On Easter Monday I was at East Donyland and went to the Ipswich Arms. Whilst there the complainant came in the house, and I heard him say, “That’s Potter, is it not?” and the landlady replied in the affirmative. The complainant said, “I thought it was by his ---- great conk.” The complainant then went on to the doorstep, flourished his stick about and said, “Where are your friends and where are your foes?” Shortly afterwards I left the house with Tom Barnard, James Barnard and a man named Pearson, and went to the Ship Inn, where we spent a very pleasant evening, and I was called the chairman. About a quarter to eleven the two Havens’ and Roper came in; Harry Havens sat near me, and the other two sat near the door. The complainant rapped his stick hard on the table and knocked over some glasses. The complainant said his brother Robert would sing a song, but Robert Havens replied, “I know no songs except obscene songs.” I said “We want no such songs here as we are in a respectable house, and you are in respectable company.” The complainant’s conduct was very noisy, and he said to Tom Barnard, “You are a ---- scamp.” The landlord came in and said it was 11 o’clock, and we left the house. I kept Tom Barnard in the house for a time, and we were the last out.
  Outside Roper and I had a fight - a brush up. (Laughter.) I never saw either of the Havens after I got out of the door.
  Cross-examined. I was not in company with the Barnards when in the Ipswich Arms, but we left together. The reason I kept Tom Barnard back was because I had heard Harry Havens threaten him. I’ll swear Barnard did not offer to fight the complainant. The woman Allen, when she spoke about me striking the complainant, spoke what was false.
  Robert Pearson, a painter, of Donyland, and brother-in-law of Captain Potter, gave corroborative evidence with reference to what took place in the Ship Inn. He added that when they had left the Ship Inn, at the request of the landlord, the complainant looked at his watch and said, “It is 11 o’clock, because if not I will smash the ---- doors in.” The constable came up at that time, and Benjamin Barnard said, “I’ll give him in charge.” He saw Robert Havens strike at Benjamin Barnard, and they closed, and both went to the ground. He did not see them after. A little lower down the general row was going on.
  In cross-examination, he said Roper had struck him, so he took off his coat, and they were going to have a quiet fight - (Laughter) - when Roper said he did not know it was a witness whom he had hit, and said he was very sorry for it.
  Re-examined. He heard the complainant say three or four months ago that he would give Captain Potter a good hiding whenever he happened with him in a public room.
  Ebenezer Southgate, chief cook in the Sunbeam yacht, belonging to Sir Thomas Brassey, said on the night in question he passed the complainant and his brother, and another person on the road from the Ipswich Arms, going towards East Donyland, when he heard Robert Havens say, “We will go down and have a ---- rough and tumble with them.” He saw the row outside the Ship Inn. Witness was struck on the back with a weapon and knocked down, and when he got up he saw Robert Havens on the top of Benjamin Barnard. He helped to get Barnard away from Robert Havens.
  Joseph Brown, captain of Major Duff’s yacht, also spoke as to having heard one of the Havens’ say when on their way from Donyland Heath to Donyland they “would have a ---- rough and tumble with them,” and he also corroborated the other witness as to what took place in the Ship Inn, and the Barnards did not strike the complainant. If they had done so he should have seen them. When witness left some one hit him on the arm.
  Cross-examined. Potter and others who were in his company on that night came to him the next morning and asked him to lay information against Havens for having struck the blow, and they said they would pay the expenses.
  Thomas Pitt, the landlord of the Ship Inn, East Donyland, said that there was a party at his house on the night in question and there was singing. Up to the time of the Havens’s coming in everything was peaceful and quiet. Harry Havens behaved in a very disorderly manner. After he had shut up the house he went behind his house and saw Thomas Barnard hiding.
  Cross-examined. The young Havens’s were not sober, nor were they drunk.
  Samuel Wade, a master mariner, East Donyland, said that on the night in question he was in the Ship Inn Yard, with Thomas Barnard’s wife, a few minutes after 11 o’clock, and he saw Thomas Barnard come from his hiding from behind the Ship Inn, and he remained with witness for about 15 minutes.
  Thomas Barnard, one of the defendants, said he had heard the evidence of Captain Potter and his witnesses as to what took place at the Ipswich Arms, and it was correct. Knowing he had to go to London the next day to meet his master, and seeing there was likely to be a row, he kept out of it as much as possible, and only saw the row at a distance. He hid behind the Ship Inn.
  William Turner B. Ennew, a yacht’s mate, living at East Donyland, spoke to witnessing the disturbance, and said that he pulled Robert Havens off Benjamin Barnard. Tom Barnard at this time was standing a short distance away talking to Captain Potter and Southgate. This was at Glazier’s Corner.
  James Barnard, brother to the two defendant Barnards, said he was with his brother Benjamin on the night in question. After they left the Ship he never left him, and, with the exception of the scuffle with Robert, he certainly never struck anyone.
  The Magistrates retired, and on returning into Court, the Chairman said the Bench had given the matter their careful consideration, and judging from the darkness of the night and the evidence of the witnesses for the complainant, they considered the case had not been proved satisfactorily that the three defendants had assaulted the complainant, and on that ground they dismissed the case, but they did not by any means exonerate the defendants from blame.
The case, which lasted until close upon six o’clock, caused a deal of excitement, and the Court was crowded during the hearing.”


Death: 1919, in Lexden district, Essex, England, aged 62

Census:
1861: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex
1881: Donyland Hall, East Donyland, Essex
1884: Donyland Hall, East Donyland, Essex   (Essex Standard 3 May 1884)
1891: Wiston Hall, Nayland-with-Wissington, Suffolk
1896: Wissington. Henry Havens Havens is listed as a farmer   (Kelly's directory of Suffolk 1896 p264)
1901: Maltings Farm, Nayland with Wissington, Suffolk
1905: Nether Hall, Bradfield, Essex   (Epsom College Register p82)
1911: Bradfield, Essex: Harry Havens Havens is aged 53, born in Wivenhoe, Essex

Sources:

Henrietta Cordelia Havens

Birth: 1813/4 in East Donyland, Essex, England

Baptised: 1 November 1805 in East Donyland, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Mary Anne (Sage) Havens

Death: 4 November 1882, at 63 Hilldrop Crescent, Islington, Middlesex, England, aged 68

Census & Addresses:
1841: Wivenhoe, Essex: Henrietta Havens is aged 20 (rounded down to nearest 5 years), born in Essex
1851: Henrietta C. Havins, visitor, is aged 34, born in East Donyland, Essex
1861: 19 Victoria Place, Eastbourne, Sussex
1881: 63 Hilldrop Crescent, Islington, Middlesex
1882: 63 Hilldrop Crescent, Islington, Middlesex   (The Ipswich Journal ‎(Ipswich, England) 14 November 1882)

Sources:

Henrietta Dorothy H. Havens

Birth: 1892 in Islington, London, England

Father: Robert Havens Havens

Mother: Henrietta Louisa (_____) Havens

Census:
1901: Farnborough, Hampshire: Dorothy Havens, daughter, is aged 7, born in Islington, London
1911: Bradford, West Riding of Yorkshire: Dorothy Henrietta Havens is aged 19, born in Islington, London

Sources:

Hugh Havens

Birth: 1860 in Wivenhoe, Essex, England

Baptism: 6 June 1862 in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
Hugh, of Wivenhoe was baptised on 6 June 1862, the son of Philip Havens, surgeon, and Elizabeth. He was baptised on the same day as six of his siblings.

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Elizabeth (Elsworthy) Havens

Education: Epsom College, Epsom, Surrey, which Hugh left in 1879. Epsom College was founded in 1853 to provide support for poor members of the medical profession such as pensioners and orphans.
Epsom College Register p95 (1905)
Havens, Hugh [P. Havens, Esq., Wivenhoe, Colchester]; b. 1860, 1. 1879.
    XV.

Married: Mary Esther Went on 16 November 1885, in St Stephens, Shepherds Bush, Middlesex, England

Mary was born in 1855, in Colchester, Essex, the daughter of Solomon Went and Elizabeth Deeks. Mary died on 9 June 1910 in Lambeth district, London, aged 53, and was buried in the Old Cemetery, Wivenhoe, Essex.
Census:
1861: Wivenhoe, Essex: Mary E. Went, daughter, is aged 5, born in Colchester, Essex
1881: Street "Chequer Tree House", East Donyland, Essex
1891: The Brewery, Littlebourn, Kent: Mary E. Havens, wife, is aged 30, born in Colchester, Essex
1901: 65 Westow Hill, Gypsy Hill, Lambeth, London: Mary E. Havens, wife, is aged 39, born in Colchester, Essex

Children:
Occupation: Brewer (1881, 1891); Toy Dealer (1901). The Havens family tree states his occupation as "retail sports outfitter".

Death: 1904, in Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, England, aged 43

Census:
1861: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex
1881: Donyland Hall, East Donyland, Essex
1891: The Brewery, Littlebourn, Kent: Hugh Havens, head, is aged 50, born in Wivenhoe, Essex. Occupation: Brewer & Maltster
1901: 65 Westow Hill, Gypsy Hill, Lambeth, London: Hugh Havens, head, is aged 40, born in Wivenhoe, Essex. Occupation: Toy Dealer

Sources:

Kate (Havens) Symonds

Birth: 1849 in East Donyland, Essex, England

Father: William Rawdon Havens

Mother: Mary Anne (Sage) Havens

Married: Robert Symonds on 25 July 1871, in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
Robert Symonds is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of Robert Symonds, farmer. The groom is a farmer, of Kenton. Kate Havens is recorded as a spinster, of full age, the daughter of William Havens, gentleman. She is resident at East Donyland. The marriage was witnessed by Robt Symonds and W. R. Havens.

The Essex Standard 28 July 1871
MARRIAGES - SYMONDS - HAVENS. July 25th, at East Donyland Church, by the Rev. T. C. Brettingham, Vicar of Fingringhoe, Robert, eldest son of Robert Symonds, of Kenton Hall, Suffolk, to Kate, only child of  W. R. Havens, of East Donyland.

Children:
Census:
1851: Kate Havens, daughter, is aged 2, born in East Donyland, Essex
1861: East Donyland, Essex: Kate Havens, daughter, is aged 12, born in East Donyland, Essex
1901: Walton-Le-Soken, Essex: Kate Symonds, head, is aged 51, born in Donyland, Essex. She is married, and Living On Own Means.

Sources:

Madge Hendrie Havens Jennings

Birth: 1887 in Witham, Essex, England

Father: Edward John Havens Havens

Mother: Caroline Louisa Constance (Jennings) Havens

Notes:
When Madge's parents separated in 1898, Madge was put in the custody of her mother (Auckland Star (Auckland, New Zealand) 29 October 1898 p3). Born Madge Hendrie Havens, she seems later to have added her mother's maiden name as her surname, and her death is recorded in the name Madge Hendrie Havens Jennings (London Gazette 16 December 1955 p7130).

Death: 2 December 1955

Census & Addresses:
1891: St Martin in the Field, London: Madge Havens, granddaughter, is aged 3, born in Witham, Essex
1901: Reigate, Surrey: Madge Havens, pupil, is aged 13, born in Colchester, Essex
1911: Kensington, London: Madge Hendris Havens, niece, aged 23, born in Whitham, Essex is in the home of her uncle Edward Lawrence Frederick Jennings.
1955: 28 Totnes Road, Paignton, Devon   (London Gazette 16 December 1955 p7130)

Sources:

Margaret Isabel (Havens) Tait

Birth: 1882, in Little Wenham, Suffolk, England

Father: William Havens

Mother: Rosa (Belles) Havens

Married: Martin Tait in 1913, in Balmain North district, New South Wales, Australia

Martin was an engineer, who worked on the Wodonga with Captain F. Rhodes. In 1923 we find him based in Gladstone, Queensland, where he was skipper of a boat chartered for a week to take vistors to North-West Island where Chris Poulson was setting up a turtle canning operation.
Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Queensland) 28 November 1923 pp11-12
WITH THE TURTLES.
ON NORTH WEST ISLAND.
REVIVING AN OLD INDUSTRY.
(By Our Special Representative,
A. H. Franklin.)
...
So, when Mr. E. Hempenstall said that he was making a trip to North-west Island, the recognised home of the turtle, and suggested that it would not be a bad idea to make one of the party, I readily agreed. And thus it was that last Thursday I found myself at the Stanley-street railway station with seven others, who were all bound for North-west Island. The party comprised Messrs. E. Hempenstal, B. Culpan, R. Anderson, W. G. I.amberton, J. W. M'Laughlin, and H. Conagban and Captain F. Rhodes. It was necessary to go to Gladstone and boat across to the island, which is about forty-three miles from Gladstone and approximately the same distance from Port Alma.
...
It took some time to get the party and equipment down to the jetty and aboard the motor boat Glen Nevis, skippered by Chris Poulson, a descendant of the Vikings of old. Comparatively young in years, he is old in experience and has been all over the world in wind- jammers. He had an able lieutenant in Percy Williamson. A second boat had to be requisitioned to carry some of the refreshments necessary for the trip, and this was skippered by an old friend of Captain Rhodes, Martin Tait, who was engineer with him on the Wodonga years ago. With him was Arthur Mellefont, who is his partner in the boat.
...
We dropped anchor at the edge of the reef, as the tide was out. and the Glen Nevis could not get across until the tide rose. Captain Rhodes, with Messrs. M'Laughlin and Culpan and myself, decided lo go ashore in the dinghy. We were dropped at the reef, and then had to walk the boat part of half-a-mile to the island. It was not too good over the coral, though it was most interesting, and we marvelled at the wonderful growths, with their still more marvellous colouring. Fishes darted in and out, and Captain Rhodes pulled out some trepang, or beche-de-mer. It was, however, not of the edible variety, though this is to be found on the reef.
...
By this time it was growing late, and there were no signs of the boats coming in, for Martin Tait's boat, which we had left behind, had arrived. From the noise that they were making on board it was evident that they were having a jolly time. Those aboard had got their fishing tackle out, and we could see that they had been successful.


Poulon's canning operation moved to Heron Island in 1926, and in the early 1930's, as the number of turtles diminsihed, was converted into a tourist resort. Martin wife became a cook at the Heron Island resort, and Martin himself is described in Poulson's entry in the Australian Dictionary of Biography as "a former factory-hand". In 1931, however, Martin was advertising that he was in a position to offer accomodations on Heron Island and the return trip by boat. It is unclear if Martin was acting as a sort of marketeer for Poulson's resort or if he was in fact a part owner.
Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Queensland) 28 November 1923 pp11-12
Mr. Martin Tait, writing in reference to tourist traffic to the Barrier Beef, stated that he was now in a position to supply accommodation on Heron Island for small parties at a charge of 10s. a day, plus 2 return fare on the motor launch Coralita. The President appealed to all members to make this fact as widely known as possible and to boost the traffic to the Barrier Beef.


Martin died on 27 September 1965, and is buried in Old Gladstone cemetery, Queensland

Occupation: Hotel Cook, on Heron Island, Queensland
Australian Dictionary of Biography entry for Poulson, Cristian (1890 - 1947)
Poulson was one of several entrepreneurs who entered the lucrative turtle-soup canning industry. In 1924 he established the Barrier Reef Trading Co. Ltd on North West Island. Transferring the business to Heron Island, he was a founding director of Gladstone Fisheries & Cold Stores Ltd in 1926. That year a party of tourists from Rockhampton paid him for a return trip to Heron Island; he used the money as a deposit on a launch. Turtle harvesting and processing was essentially seasonal work, concentrated in the summer months. As the number of turtles diminished, Poulson found that hosting parties of tourists in the turtle industry's off-season was more profitable than canning soup. In 1929 he applied to have Barrier Reef Trading wound up.
After Gladstone Fisheries failed to raise sufficient money to establish a tourist hostel in 1930, Poulson took over the project and opened a resort on Heron Island in 1932. Visitors came in his launch Coralita, walked through the shallows to shore, and slept in the galvanized-iron huts which had once housed turtle-factory workers. The main building served as a recreation hall. Mrs Martin Tait, the wife of a former factory-hand, did the cooking.

Notes: Known as "Peggy"

Death: 11 May 1964, in Queensland, Australia

Buried: Old Gladstone cemetery, Gladstone, Queensland, Australia
'my beloved wife and our mother'

Census:
1891: Churchford Hall Farm, Capel St Mary, Suffolk

Sources:

Mary Ann Havens

Birth: 12 June 1798

Baptised: 8 July 1798, in Rowhedge, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Mary Anne (Sage) Havens

Death: 17 May 1840, in Wivenhoe, Essex, England, aged 41

Sources:

Mary Philippa H. (Havens) De Crespigny

Birth: 1881 in Clacton On Sea, Essex, England

Father: Robert Havens Havens

Mother: Charlotte Miriam (Gentry) Havens

Death: 8 June 1959, at 48 High Street, Selsey, West Sussex, England, aged 78

Census:
1881: 44 Broad Street, Canterbury St. Mary Northgate, Kent
1891: Beach Street, Deal, Kent
1911: St Pancras, London

Sources:

May Dorothy Havens

Birth: 1880 in Little Wenham, Suffolk, England

Father: William Havens

Mother: Rosa (Belles) Havens

Death: 1963, in Sutton, Suffolk, England

Census:
1881: Hall Farm, Little Wenham, Suffolk
1891: Churchford Hall Farm, Capel St Mary, Suffolk
1901: St Thomas, Oxfordshire: May D. Havens, visitor, is aged 20, born in Wenham, Suffolk. Occupation: None Own Means
1911: Deal, Kent: May Dorothy Havens is aged 30, born in Wenham, Suffolk

Sources:

Monica Wentworth (Havens, Lees) Van Thusen

Birth: 1890 in Littlebourn, Kent, England

Father: Hugh Havens

Mother: Mary Esther (Went) Havens

Married (1st): Alfred Lees in 1912 in Leeds district, West Riding of Yorkshire, England

Married (2nd): Charles Van Thusen in 1927 in Lambeth district, London, England

Death: 1982, in Greater London, England

Census:
1891: The Brewery, Littlebourn, Kent: Monica W. Havens, daughter, is aged 1, born in Littlebourn, Essex
1901: 65 Westow Hill, Gypsy Hill, Lambeth, London: Monica W. Havens, daughter, is aged 11, born in Sittingbourne, Kent

Sources:

Philip Havens

Birth: 15 December 1692, in Colchester, Essex, England

Father: Robert Havens

Mother: Elizabeth (Talcott) Havens

Married: Ann Lowe on 16 January 1721/2 (OS/NS), in Norwich, Norfolk, England. Philip is listed as single, the son of Robert Havens. Ann is listed as single, the daughter of Gilbert Lowe. Philip was the son of Elizabeth Talcott, the great aunt of Ann Lowe, and so the two were first cousins, once removed.

Occupation: Baymaker - a maker of "bays" or baize which is a fine woolen felt-like fabric

Children:
Buried: 16 May 1769, in Colchester, Essex, England

Will: dated 17 June 1767, proved 16 June 1769, by Philip Havens, son.
Philip listed land and property at St Giles, Colchester, Little Wenham Hall and the farmhouse there called Hall Farm. In addition to his late wife "Ann my late wife, then Ann Lowe." who died at Colchester 2 Jun 1762 aged 60 years, he mentioned his two surviving children and his cousin John Alexander of Tottenham High Cross and his sister Mary now the wife of Mathew Mellor of Manchester.

Notes:
Fragmenta Genealogica vol 8 p70
Philip Havens, of Colchester, co. Essex, baymaker, purchased the Little Wenham Hall estates of Thomas Thurston, esquire, 23 November 1765. Will dated 17 June 1767, proved (P.C.C. 209 Bogg) 16 June 1769, by Philip Havens, the son and sole executor.


Fragmenta Genealogica vol 8 p29
INDENTURES of Lease and Release, made 22 and 23 November 1765, between Thomas Thurston, late of Ipswich, co. Suffolk, but now of Wenham Hall, co. Suffolk, esquire, only surviving son and heir of Joseph Thurston late of Colchester, co. Essex, esquire, deceased, of the 1st part, Robert Neale of Chancery Lane, St Andrews, Holborn, gent, of the 2nd part, and Philip Havens of Colchester, bay maker, of the 3rd part. Thomas Thurston having agreed to sell the Little Wenham Hall estates, "Flyngantes" or "Wallis," "Monkes land" and other lands in Great and Little Wenham and Capell, now releases them to Philip Havens for 5,500 to be paid to him and 3,000 to Mary Whetham.
  Signatures of Thomas Thurston and Robt Neale on fold of release.
  Signature of Thomas Thurston of fold of lease.
  Endorsed with (1) receipt for
5,500, signed Tho: Thurston; (2) receipt of 600, signed Robt Neale.
  Affadavit, dated 23 November 1765, by Thomas Thurston that there was no other incumbrance on the estate but the mortgage to Mary Whetham.

INDENTURES of Fine, Michaelmas Term, 1765. Philip Havens, Plaintiff, and Thomas Thurston, esquire, Deforciant, of 400 acres of land, 75 acres of meadow, 75 acres of pasture, ten acres of wood in parishes of Great Wenham, Little Wenham and Capell.

INDENTURE made 23 November 1765, between Mary Whetham, formerly of St George's, Hanover Square, and now of St James', Westminster, widow, of the 1st part, John Staples of the Middle Temple, London, of the 2nd part, Thomas Thurston of the 3rd part, Robert Neal and Philip Havens of the 4th part, and John Kendall of Colchester, co. Essex, bookseller, of the 5th part. Mary Whetham, in consideration of 3,000 paid to her by Philip Havens, transfers to John Kendall all her rights in the little Wenham Hall estates to hold in trust for Philip Havens. John Staples also transfers to John Kendall all his rights acquired 13 October 1746.
  Signatures of Mary Whetham, Jon Staples, Thomas Thurston and
Robt Neale on fold
  Endorsed with receipt of same date for
3,000, signed Mary Whetham, witnessed Jon Staples.

Essex Record Office D/DU 40/147
19 December 1758
[Attested copy of a deed of Appintment of Inheritance]
Philip Havens of Colchester, baymaker, and his wife Anne, to Philip Havens, their only son
(i) Messuage and land (4 acres) called Old Pains, 3 parcels of land (36 acres) called Holts in Salcott Virley
(ii) Messuage and lands (80 acres) called Sherwyns and Cuckoes, copyhold of the manor of Great Wigborough with Salcott
(iii) Several fields (18 acres) called Ashmans in Great Bromley, abutting east on the highway and west on a fen belonging to Elmstead Hall
(iv) Customary and heriotable tenement and lands (20 acres) called Dorlys alias Durrifalls, copyhold of the manor of Great Bromley
Recites: Conveyance (Lease and Release), 3, 4 March 1728, between Mary Gibson of Colchester (widow, executrix and devisee of Nathaniel Gibson, baker), and the said Philip Havebs, senior, in respect of (i); admission, 19 August 1728 of the said Philip, senior, to (ii) on surrender of Robert Witham; Conveyance (Lease and Release), 16, 17 August 1734 between Samuel Flake of Stow Maries, gentleman, and the said Philip, senior, in respect of (iii) and (iv); and the admission, 24 September 1735, of the said Philip, senior, to (iv)


Sources:

Philip Havens

Birth: 11 March 1732/3 (OS/NS), in Colchester, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Ann (Lowe) Havens

Married: Lucy Alefounder on 19 January 1768 in St Martin, Colchester, Essex, England. The marriage was witnessed by John Butler, Sarah Kendall and Mary Baker.
Lucy was baptised on 11 October 1745 in St James, Colchester, the daughter of John Alefounder and Elizabeth Upcher. She married, secondly, Captain Robert Bass on 9 April 1789. In a marriage settlement dated 7 April 1789 (Essex Record Office Acc 47 CPL 820), noted at Alefounder Ancestors, "1957 2s 5d Bank Stock was transferred to Charles Matthews esquire and Joseph Green, merchant (both of Colchester). Lucy was to have complete control of the money and dividends, which after her decease and in the absence of any will were to be divided between her surviving children at their ages of 21". Robert was a merchant, of Yarmouth, who also predeceased Lucy. Lucy died on 13 November 1809, and was buried in St James, Colchester, aged 64. The memorial inscription on a tomb in which her parents, brother and two of her children are also buried reads:
In memory of
JOHN ALEFOUNDER
who died June 14th 1763
Aged 63
Also ELIZH. ALEFOUNDER
who died March 10th 1763
Aged 62
ROBERT ALEFOUNDER
their son died August 11th. 1784
Aged 46
And WILLM. UPCHER HAVENS
their Grandson died Novr. 29. 1784
Aged 9 Years and 9 Weeks.
Also of LUCY HAVENS
who departed this life
May 28th. 1792 Aged 19 Years.
Also of
LUCY BASS, Formerly Wife of
PHILIP HAVENS.
Died Novr. 13th 1809. Aged 64.

Children:
Occupation: Baymaker - a maker of "bays" or baize which is a fine woolen felt-like fabric

Death: 17 January 1778, in Colchester, Essex, England

Buried: 23 January 1778, in Friend's Burial Ground, St Helen's Road, Colchester, Essex, England

Administration: granted in P.C.C. 3 February 1778, to Lucy Havens, the relict

Sources:
Signature of Philip Havens
Signature of Philip Havens

Philip Havens

Birth: 27 November 1768, in Colchester, Essex, England

Baptised: 21 December 1768, in St Giles, Colchester, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Lucy (Alefounder) Havens

Education: Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Philip was admitted as a pensioner on 20 June 1786 and was awarded the degree of LL.B. in 1794.
Alumni Cantabrigiensis
Havens, Philip.
Adm. pens. at CORPUS CHRISTI, June 20, 1786. Of Essex. Matric. Michs. 1786; Scholar, 1787; LL.B. 1794. Of Donyland Hall, Essex. Doubtless father of the next and of William [Rawdon] (1827).


Signature of Mary Anne (Sage) Havens
Signature of Mary Anne (Sage) Havens
Married: Mary Anne Sage on 6 October 1796 at St Mary the Virgin, Wivenhoe, Essex, England, by license.
Gentleman's Magazine vol 66 p1879
Marriages of remarkable Persons.
1796 Oct. 7.
  Philip Havens, esq. of Donyland-hall, Essex to Miss Sage, daughter of Edward Sage, esq. of Wivenhoe.

Mary Ann was born in 1774/5, the eldest daughter of Edward Sage, of Wivenhoe. She died on 14 August 1822 at Donyland Hall, aged 47, and is buried in East Donyland, Essex. There is a plaque in Mary Anne's memory in Rowhedge church.
The New Monthly Magazine October 1822 p477
ESSEX.
Died. At Donyland Hall, Mrs. Havens

Children:
Occupation: Merchant and County Magistrate. Philip was J.P. for Essex and the borough of Colchester. On 12 May 1812, Philip was appointed Deputy Lieutenant of the Cinque Port of Sandwich (London Gazette 11 July 1812 p1346).

Donyland Hall
Donyland Hall
image from Daniel Simons
Notes: Philip bought Donyland Hall in East Donyland, Essex, in 1794, and lived there until his death. Philip's son, grandson and great-grandson inherited the hall until the last sold it in 1924. In 1794 the house contained four parlours and a drawing room or ballroom 38 ft. by 21 ft. on the ground floor, nine bedrooms on the first floor, and servants' quarters in the attic.
White's Directory for Essex
(1848):
DONYLAND, (EAST) a small village, 3 miles S. S. E. of Colchester...
Philip Havens, Esq., is now lord of the manor, and owner of most of the soil. He resides at the Hall, a neat mansion, with woody pleasure grounds, near the confluence of the small river Roman with the Colne. The Hall and gardens were much improved about 1735, by Daniel Gausel, Esq., who enclosed the park.


Philip also inherited the estate of Little Wenham Hall in Little Wenham, Suffolk, on his father's death in 1778.

Death: 8 November 1856, in Wivenhoe, Essex, England
The Gentleman's Magazine December 1856 p780
DEATHS.
Oct. 8
  At Wivenhoe, aged 87, Philip Havens, esq., J.P. for the county of Essex and for the borough of Colchester, and a Deputy-Lieut. of the Cinque Ports.


Buried: 14 November 1856, in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England. There is a plaque in Philip's memory in the church.
Philip Havens of Wivenhoe was buried on 14 November 1856. His age is given as "nearly 88 years".

Will: dated 4 November 1844, proved 19 March 1857 (P.C.C.), by Philip Havens and William Rawden Havens, the sons.

Census:
1841: East Street, Wivenhoe, Essex: Philip Havens is aged 70 (rounded down to nearest 5 years), born in Essex. Occupation: Independent
1851: East Street, Wivenhoe, Essex: Philip Havens, head, is aged 82, born in Colchester, Essex. Occupation: County Magistrate

Sources:

Philip C. Havens

Birth: 31 August 1805 in East Donyland, Essex, England

Baptised: 1 November 1805 in East Donyland, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Mary Anne (Sage) Havens

Education: Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Philip was admitted as a pensioner on 15 October 1823, matriculating in Michaelmas term, 1824.
Alumni Cantabrigiensis
Havens, Philip.
Adm. pens. at CORPUS CHRISTI, Oct. 15, 1823. Of Essex. [Doubtless s. of Philip (above).] Matric. Michs. 1824. Brother of the next.


Married: Elizabeth Elsworthy
Elizabeth was born in 1817/8, in Colchester, Essex, the daughter of Judith. She died on 6 April 1885, at Donyland Hall, East Donyland, Essex, aged 67. She was buried on 11 April 1885 at St Lawrence, East Donyland, aged 67.
The Times 11 April 1885 p1 col B
On the 6th inst., at her residence, Donyland Hall, Colchester, Mrs. ELIZABETH E. HAVENS, and lady of the manor of East Donyland, in her 68th year.

Census:
1841: Wivenhoe, Essex. Elizabeth Elsworthy is aged 20 (rounded down to nearest 5 years), born in Essex
1851: Elizabeth Havens, daughter, is aged 32, born in Colchester, Essex
1861: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex
1871: 4 Sussex Street, St George Hanover Square, Middlesex
1881: Donyland Hall, East Donyland, Essex

Children:
Occupation: General Practitioner and Surgeon. M.R.C.S.
Philip was apprenticed to John Grimes of Ramsey, Huntingdonshire as an apothecary for 5 years and admitted as a Licentiate of the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries (L.S.A.) on 28 Oct 1830 (Guildhall Library MS 8241/5 p383).  He attended the London Hospital for twelve months and was admitted as Member of Royal College of Surgeons  (M.R.C.S.) on 24 Dec 1830. 

Death: 13 October 1874, at Donyland Hall, East Donyland, Essex, England, aged 69
The Medical Press 28 October 1874 p389
Deaths.
HAVENS.- On the 13th October, at Donyland Hall, Colchester, Philip Havens, M.R.C.S.E., aged 69.


Buried: 20 October 1874, in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England.
Philip Havens of Donyland Hall was buried on 20 October 1874, aged 69.

Will: dated 15 September 1874, proved 19 May 1875 (P.C.C.)

Census & Addresses:
1841: East Street, Wivenhoe, Essex: Philip Havens is aged 35 (rounded down to nearest 5 years), born in Essex. Occupation: Surgeon
1851: East Street, Wivenhoe, Essex: Philip Havens, son, is aged 45, born in East Donyland, Essex. Occupation: Doctor
1861: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex
1866: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex   (Essex Almanac p122)
1871: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex: Occupation: Surgeon and apothecary, MRCS & LACS

Sources:

Philip Havens

Birth: 1846 in Marylebone district, Middlesex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Elizabeth Elsworthy Havens

Education: Epsom College, Epsom, Surrey, which Philip left in 1862. Epsom College was founded in 1853 to provide support for poor members of the medical profession such as pensioners and orphans.
Epsom College Register p26 (1905)
Havens, Phillip [P. Havens, Esq., Wivenhoe, Colchester]; b. 1846, 1. 1862.

Death: 1869, in Lexden district, Essex, England, aged 22

Census:
1851: Philip Havens, grandson, is aged 4, born in London, Middlesex

Sources:

Philip Havens

Birth: 1884 in Lexden, Essex, England

Father: William Havens

Mother: Rosa (Belles) Havens

Census:
1891: Churchford Hall Farm, Capel St Mary, Suffolk
1901: Saham Tomey, Norfolk: Philip Havess, boarder, is aged 16, born in Colchester, Essex. Occupation: Schoolboy
1911: Messing, Essex: Philip Havens is aged 27, born in Lexden, Essex

Sources:

Rawdon Havens Havens

Rawdon Havens Havens
Rawdon Havens Havens
image from squidoo.com
Birth: 1859 in Wivenhoe, Essex, England

Baptism: 6 June 1862 in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
Rawdon, of Wivenhoe was baptised on 6 June 1862, the son of Philip Havens, surgeon and Elizabeth. He was baptised on the same day as six of his siblings.

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Elizabeth (Elsworthy) Havens

Education: Epsom College, Epsom, Surrey, which Rawdon left in 1878. Epsom College was founded in 1853 to provide support for poor members of the medical profession such as pensioners and orphans.
Epsom College Register p95 (1905)
Havens, Rawdon [Mrs. Havens, Wenham Castle, Colchester]; b. 1859, 1. 1878.
    XV.   Brewer
          96, Hamlet Court Road, Westcliff-on-Sea

Married (1st): Caroline (Smith) Cross on 6 February 1891, in St Andrew Holborn, London, England
Rawdon Havens Havens is recorded as single, aged 32, the son of Philip Havens. Caroline Cross is recorded as widowed, aged 38, the daughter of William Smith.

Caroline was born in 1852/3, the daughter of William Smith. She first married _____ Cross.

Married (2nd): Ellen Rabnott in 1895, in Southampton district, Hampshire, England

Children:
Original Havens store
The first Havens china and glass store founded in 1901 across the road from the current store
image from squidoo.com
New Havens store early
The new Havens store opened in 1920 was originally a single commercial story with living quarters above.
image from squidoo.com
Occupation: Brewer (1881, 1901), and later a china and glass storekeeper. In 1901, Rawdon gave up his brewery business and founded Havens, a china, glass and giftware store at 98 Hamlet Court Road in Westcliff-on-Sea, a suburb of Southend on Sea, Essex. In 1920 the freehold of the existing site at 138-140 Hamlet Court Road (opposite the original store) was purchased.  The Havens family lived in a cottage above the single story store until two more sales floors were added in a major expansion in 1935, creating the building that still stands today. The department store remains in business, and in the family, over 110 years later.

Death: 1935, in Rochford district, Essex, England, aged 76

Census:
1861: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex
1881: 65 Horninglow Road, Horninglow, Staffordshire
1901: Stockbridge, Hampshire: Rawden Harens, head, is aged 42, born in Colchester, Essex. Occupation: Brewer.
1905: 96 Hamlet Court Road, Westcliff-on-Sea, Southend on Sea, Essex   (Epsom College Register p95)
1911: Prittlewell, Essex: Rawden Havens is aged 52, born in Wyvenhoe, Essex

Sources:

Robert Havens Havens

Birth: 1853 in Colchester, Essex, England

Baptism: 6 June 1862 in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
Robert, of Wivenhoe was baptised on 6 June 1862, the son of Philip Havens, surgeon, and Elizabeth. He was baptised on the same day as six of his siblings.

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Elizabeth (Elsworthy) Havens

Married (1st): Charlotte Miriam Gentry in 1875, in Christchurch district, Hampshire, England

Charlotte was born in 1854, in Canterbury, Kent, the daughter of Wallace and Charlotte Gentry. Charlotte married, secondly, Francis Chilton Young on 18 February 1892, in St George, Gravesend, Kent. Charlotte is recorded as a widow, the daughter of Wallace Havens (I can only assume this should really be Wallace Gentry). Francis is recorded as a widower, a clerk in holy orders. He died in 1898.
Census:
1861: Canterbury, St Mary Northgate, Kent: Charlotte M. Gentry, daughter, is aged 6, born in Canterbury, Kent
1881: 44 Broad Street, Canterbury St. Mary Northgate, Kent
1891: Beach Street, Deal, Kent
1911: St Pancras, London: Charlotte Chilton Young is aged 56, born in Canterbury, Kent

Children:
Married (2nd): Henrietta Louisa _____

Henrietta was born 1867/8, in Hull, Yorkshire. She remarried George James Guest in 1904 in Chelsea district, London, and had another daughter, Florence Louisa Guest.
Census:
1891: Canterbury Villas, Netley St, Farnborough, Hampshire
1901: Farnborough, Hampshire: Louie Havens, head, is aged 26: Occupation: Living on Own Means
1911: Durrington, Wiltshire: Louisa Henrietta Guest is aged 32

Children:
Occupation: Architect and Surveyor (1881); Medical Electrician & Masseur (1891)
London Gazette 13 May 1887 p2662
NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership which has for some time past been carried on by James Shurman and Robert Havens Havens, under the style or firm of Shurman and Co., at Brighton, in the business of Architects, Surveyors, Auctioneers, Estate Agents, and Valuers, was this day dissolved by mutual consent.—As witness our hands this 4th day of May, 1887.
James Shurman.
Robert Havens Havens.

Notes: Presumable Robert and Charlotte divorced sometime between the birth of his third daughter in 1883 and the 1891 census when Robert is shown married to Henrietta. Charlotte remarried in 1892. Dave Tylcoat citing a letter dated 17 August 1962, states that Robert was disinherited. Possibly the circumstances surrounding Robert's divorce are the same as his disinheritance.

Death: 1897, in Hartley Wintney district, Hampshire, England, aged 44

Buried: 30 June 1897, in Farnborough, Hampshire, England, aged 44

Census:
1861: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex
1871: 4 Sussex Street, St George Hanover Square, Middlesex
1881: Blacker Lane, Great Clacton, Essex
1891: Canterbury Villas, Netley St, Farnborough, Hampshire

Sources:

Robert Vinicombe Havens Havens

Birth: 1876 in Wandsworth district, Surrey, England

Baptism: 30 December 1876, in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
Robert Vinicombe Havens, of Donyland Hall, was baptised in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, on 30 December 1876, the son of Robert Havens, architect, and Charlotte Miriam.

Father: Robert Havens Havens

Mother: Charlotte Miriam (Gentry) Havens

Death: 1877 in Tonbridge district, Kent, England

Sources:

Rose Emmaretta (Havens) Brown

Birth: 1879 in Little Wenham, Suffolk, England

Father: William Havens

Mother: Rosa (Belles) Havens

Married: Leonard James Philipps Brown in 1909, in Kensington district, London, England

Leonard was born in Camden Town, Middlesex, in 1877, the son of James Robert Brown and Sara Phoebe Phillipps. He died in 1951, in Kensington district, London, aged 74.
Census:
1881: 14 Hilldrop Road, London
1891: Bedford County School, Kempston, Bedfordshire: Leonard James Philipps Brown, schoolboy, is aged 14, born in St Pancras, Middlesex
1901: Kensington, London: Leonard Brown, son, is aged 24, born in St Pancras, London. Occupation: Shipbrokers Clerk
1911: Kensington, London: Leonard Brown is aged 34, born in Camden Town, London

Notes: Known as "Dolly".

Census:
1881: Hall Farm, Little Wenham, Suffolk
1891: Hampstead, London: Rose Havens, great niece, is aged 11, born in Little Wenham, Suffolk
1901: Kensington, London: Rose Havens, great niece is aged 21, born in Wenham, Suffolk
1911: Kensington, London: Rose Brown is aged 31, born in Wenham, Suffolk

Sources:

Ruth Victoria Havens Havens

Birth: 1894 in Hammersmith, London, England

Father: Robert Havens Havens

Mother: Henrietta Louisa (_____) Havens

Census:
1901: Farnborough, Hampshire: Ruth Havens, daughter, is aged 5, born in Hammersmith, London
1911: Fulham, London: Ruths Victoria Havens is aged 17, born in Hammersmith, London

Sources:

William Rawdon Havens

Birth: 23 December 1808 in East Donyland, Essex, England

Baptised: 8 June 1809 in Rowhedge, Essex, England

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Mary Anne (Sage) Havens

Education: Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. William was admitted as a pensioner on 4 April 1827, matriculating in Michaelmas term, 1827. He graduated B.A. in 1831 and M.A. in 1834.
Alumni Cantabrigiensis
Havens, William [Rawdon].
Adm. pens. at CORPUS CHRISTI, Apr. 4, 1827, as William. Of Essex. [Doubtless 2nd s. of Philip (1786), of Donyland Hall. B. 1809.] Matric. Michs. 1827; Scholar, 1828; B.A. 1831; M.A. 1834. Adm. at Lincoln's Inn, Apr. 12, 1831. Called to the Bar, May 11, 1835. Of Donyland Hall, Colchester, Essex; Lord of the manor of Donyland. Brother of the above. (Inns of Court; Law Lists, not in 1880; Foster, Men at the Bar.)


Married: Julia Lingwood (Seaman) Baker on 7 June 1848, in Donyland Church, Donyland, Essex, England.
The Essex Standard 9 June 1848
MARRIAGES. June 7th, at Donyland Church, by the Rev. V.M. Torriano, the Rector, W.R. Havens, Esq., to Julia Lingwood Baker, relict of the late Mr. J.B. Baker, of Kelvedon, and daughter of Mr. S. Seaman, of Donyland.

Julia was born in 1819/1820 in Colchester, Essex, and baptised on 29 February 1820 in St Mary the Virgin at the Walls, Colchester, the daughter of Shadrach Seaman and Isabella Lingwood. She married, firstly, Joseph Bennett Baker on 6 December 1836 in St Mary the Virgin at the Walls, Colchester, and had at least one child, Julia Agnes Baker born in 1843, in Donyland, Essex. Joseph Bennett Baker died in 1843, in Witham district, Essex. Julia died in 1905, in Tendring district, Essex, England, aged 84.
Census:
1851: Colchester, Essex: Julia L. Havens is aged 31, born in Colchester, Essex
1881: Fryerning Hill House, Fryerning, Essex
1901: Walton le Soken, Essex: Julia Lingwood Havens, head, is aged 81, born in Colchester, Essex. Occupation: Living on Own Means

Children:
Occupation: Barrister and Magistrate. William was admitted at Lincoln's Inn on 12 April 1831 and called to the Bar on 11 May 1835.

Men-at-the-bar: a biographical hand-list of the members of the various Inns of court p209 (Reeves and Turner, 1885)
Havens, William Rawdon, M.A., Corpus Christi Coll., Camb. 1834, lord of the manor of Donyland, a student of Lincoln's Inn 12 April 1831 (then aged 22), called to the bar 11 May 1835 (2nd son of Philip Havens, Esq., of Donyland Hall, Essex); born        1809.
  Donyland Hall, Colchester.

William stood for parliament in two elections in Colchester in 1857 and received 7 and 48 votes
respectively. He was appointed a magistrate in Colchester in 1857, and had a rocky relationship with his fellow magistrates. A bizarre series of complaints and counter-complaints followed, culminating with William's removal as a magistrate by the Lord Chancellor in February 1862.
A full account of the lengthy dispute can be found in the "Papers Relating to the Case of Mr. W. R. Havens" in Accounts and papers of the House of Commons p123-37 (1862).

In 1859, Punch reported a dissent by William to a severe sentence handed down to a nine year old accused of stealing half a pound of butter:
Punch, or the London Charivari 11 June 1859 p243
          AN OUTRAGE IN ESSEX.
  THE Exeter Telegraph publishes a police case, which, if true, ought to have been hushed up, as it is calculated to bring British institutions into contempt abroad. Our imprudent contemporary informs the world that-
  "The following is the report of a case adjudicated upon by the County Magistrates at the Town Hall, Colchester, on Saturday last, the 21st inst. The Justices of the Peace present on the occasion were THOMAS L'ESTRANGE EWEN, SAMUEL GREEN COOKE, WILLIAM RAWDON HAVENS, CARLTON SMYTHIES, and LEVISON GOWER, Esqrs, and the REV. W. WALSH, Rector of Great Tey."
  Then follows the charge:-
  "WILLIAM HENRY FRENCH, who was said to be only nine years of age, the son of a coast-guardsman, at Brightlingsea, was charged with stealing half a pound of fresh butter from GEO. BAXTER, at Brightlingsea."
  Next comes the evidence by which this grave accusation was supported-
  "It was proved that on Thursday the child went into tho prosecutor's shop for a trifling article, and soon afterwards he was found offering the butter for sale; but not finding a customer, he carried it home; the father instantly started to make inquiries respecting it, but the police-constable had gained information of the robbery, and during the parent's absence, took the child into custody."
  The prosecutor then, according to the report, alleged that the child had often entered his shop unperceived, and that his shop and his garden had been frequently pilfered - he could not say by the little prisoner. He also mentioned a rumour that it had been in Portsmouth gaol, which "the father, an honest-looking British tar, indignantly repudiated." The Essex Justices appear to have looked at the half pound of butter, and the infant, and the whole case, through highly magnifying spectacles:-
  "The Magistrates appeared to have great difficulty in dealing with the case, and cleared the Court for a consultation. Upon the re-admission of the public, the Chairman said the Magistrates felt bound to make an example of the boy, and ordered him to be imprisoned in Springfield Gaol for fourteen days and to be well whipped!!!"
  They probably argued that a cat-like theft deserved the punishment of the cat. On hearing his sentence-
  "The poor child was seized with indescribable terror, and wringing his hands, and crying most bitterly, he besought the Bench not to send him to gaol; but he was removed from the Court by the Police."
  It would be leaving one gentleman's name in very unmerited association, if we omitted to add that-
  "During the poor child's entreaties, MR. HAVENS (who was anxious to prevent the child being sent to gaol) seized his hat, and exclaiming, 'I can stand this no longer.' rushed from the Court."
  This is what a man does who has feelings - he gives way to them. On this occasion
MR. HAVENS became demonstrative; his colleagues were, of course, ashamed of him. But now - to reason coolly - here we have been exhausting the vocabulary of execration in abuse of the Austrian government for whipping women; what will Austria say of us, when Austria comes to learn that there are Magistrates in England capable of so rigorously enforcing the letter of the law as to send a baby to gaol to be lashed by the hangman?

The relationship with his fellow magistrates deteriorated, especially over an incident in November 1860 in which William was not informed about a change in time of a hearing and was then not allowed to reopen the hearing to question witnesses, ending with William calling a fellow magistrate "no gentleman" and a coward. The magistrates applied to the Lord Chancellor to remove William, but he declined. In February 1861, William made a public allegation of corruption against other magistrates and the court clerk, and the other magistrates applied for a rule of criminal information (effectively a libel suit, although one not requiring a grand jury indictment) against him:

The Times 28 May 1861 p10
          THE QUEEN V, HAVENS.
  Sir F. KELLY, with whom was Mr. PHILBRICK, moved for a rule calling upon William Rawdon Havens to show why a criminal information should not be files against him for scandalous and defamatory matters published by him, imputing to the applicants, the chairman and magistrates constituting the Petty Sessions at Colchester, that they had been guilty of corruption in their office. The person against whom the application was made was a magistrate, and a very important question would arise, whether a criminal information or indictment would lie against one magistrate for imputing to another magistrate corruption in his office, when the words were spoken with the knowledge and with the intention that they should be afterwards published in the newspapers.
  Mr. Justice WIGHTMAN, - Were the words spoken in his office of magistrate?
  Sir F. KELLY said they were, and he trusted the law upon the subject would be settled in this case, which was a matter of great importance. The application was made on the part of Mr. Thomas L. Ewen, who had been for 25 years a magistrate of Essex, and of four or five other magistrates, who, with Mr. Ewen as their chairman, formed the Petty Sessions at Colchester, and also on the part of a Mr. Howard, who had been for 24 years clerk to the magistrates. The gentleman against whom the application was made beagin to act as a magistrate in 1857. It appeared that on the 10th of November, 1860, the chairman and another magistrate met at 11 oclock to hear a charge of felony, which had been adjourned  from the last sitting, and they had almost concluded the inquiry, and were just about to commit the prisoner, when Mr. Havens and other magistrates came in, at 12 o'clock, the usual hour of meeting. The evidence was closed, and Mr. Havens, having asked for and looked over the depositions, requested to have the prosecutor recalled that he might put a question. This was objected to by the chairman, as it would have led to a rehearing, and, the opinion of the Bench being taken on the point, Mr. Havens was told that the question could not be put. Upon that he walked out of the meeting, and at the next meeting, on the 17th of November, he gave notice that he should propose to take the opinion of the Attorney-General as to whether it was not within his jurisdiction to recall the witness, and whether the magistrates were justified in not calling him back. On the 1st of December, 1860, Mr. Havens and a full Bench of six or seven other magistrates attended, and, when the public business was concluded, the chairman ordered the court to be cleared, in order that the reporters might be excluded. This was opposed by Mr. Havens, but the meeting decided that it should be done. Mr. Havens then made his motion, and complained that he had not received any notice of the early meeting on the 10th of November, and, taking offence at the use of the word "insinuation" used by the chairman, he called upon him to retract it. the chairman refused, and, being supported in his refusal by another magistrate, Mr. Leveson Gower, Mr. Havens told Mr. Gower that he was "no gentleman." Mr. Gower then retired from the meeting, and as he was doing so Mr. Havens called out after him that he was a "coward," and that his conduct was always infamous. The consequence was that the magistrates determined, on a full consideration, to address a memorial to the Lord Chancellor complaining of his conduct. A memorial was accordingly signed and presented to the Lord Chancellor on the 5th of December, 1860, but the Lord Chancellor, in a letter dated the 15th of December, declined to interfere.
  Mr. Justice WIGHTMAN. - This is preliminary.
  Sir F. KELLY said that on the 23d of February Mr. Havens attended a petty session, which was attended only by Mr. Hawkins and two other magistrates, and then brought the matter of the memorial before the bench, and intimated his intention to move that the clerk, Mr. Howard, should be dismissed from his office. Mr. Hawkins, the chairman, endeavoured to restrain him, but he was unable, and Mr. Havens proceeded, and called upon Mr. Howard, the clerk, to stand up. The clerk refused to do so, and Mr. Havens, after referring to the memorial and to a letter of the 1st of December, 1860, which the clerk had written to him by order of the magistrates, proceeded thus :-
  "I am not afraid that anything which the clerk can say or write will lower the estimation in which I am held in this court. I could have afforded to despise - nay, to laugh at his insolence. But there is sill more behind : and it is an awful charge that I have to make, and one from which even the boldest man must shrink. Bur duty urges me on, and the time is come when I must make it. There has been a corrupt administration of justice in this court for several years past. I do not mean to say that in any one case I could establish a charge of corruption, but, taking a series of cases together, and seeing how they have been dealt with, I shall be prepared to show that the administration of justice in this court has been corrupt."
The matter of the clerk's removal was brought forward at a meeting of the magistrates on the 4th of April, and in the course of his address Mr. Havens stigmitized certain statements in the memorial as "a lie," and "a monstrous lie." He challenged the magistrates and clerk to admit the publication of the memorial, and said that if they did he would bring an action upon it ; he charged the nine magistrates with having "concocted a false and malicious memorial ;" said they were "the tools of the clerk," and that "there are to be seven men to swear me down ; seven men, perhaps, who might conspire to perjure themselves. But let them try it before a jury ; let them try it where we do not go into court as gentlemen, but go in as men, and where cross-examination can be applied in the strongest way."
  Lord Chief Justice COCKBURN said that as Mr.Havens, in the presence of some of the magistrates, had made a charge that for some years past there had been a corrupt administration of justice, the learned counsel was entitled to a rule. - Rule nisi granted.


The rule nisi meant that a full trial would be held, but at that trial, in November 1861, William, rather than substantiate his claims of corruption, simply withdrew his accusations, and apologised. The Chief Justice then discharged the rule but ordered court costs to be bourne by the defendent, saying:
"Papers Relating to the Case of Mr. W. R. Havens"  p128
  The Chief Justice. - It cannot be doubted that Mr. Havens, the defendant, used most rash and ill-advised language ; but it was language couched in vague and general terms, and was capable of explanation. Undoubtedly that explanation was called for, and if it could not have been afforded, the rule must have been made absolute; but Mr. Havens has availed himself of the opportunity of entirely disclaiming any intention of imputing to the magistrates any charge of corruption, and, as far as the magistrates are concerned, he has made the disavowal for the purpose of setting himself right as regards his relations with them. As regards the clerk, to whom at the commencement of Mr. Bovill's observations I was afraid the charge of corruption was still intended to be imputed, this Court is bound to afford him the same protection against unfounded charges of corruption that it would have been found to have afforded to the magistrates. The charge indeed was one that involved the whole Court, and the officer of that Court was as much entitled to protection as the justices who presided ; but happily this discussion has led to an equally frank and full disavowal of any charge or imputation against the character of Mr. Howard and under these circumstances, I think the complete justice of the case will be satisfied (after the full and frank apology that has been made) by the rule being discharged, but with the consequences that usually attend such cases, and very properly so, because it cannot be denied that as Mr. Havens used this language, the magistrates were bound to vindicate themselves and their officer from the serious imputation cast upon them ; and it would be very hard indeed, that having been thus called upon to set the law in motion by the rash and ill-advised language of the defendant, they should have to bear the expenses of these proceedings. The rule, therefore, is discharged on payment of costs by the defendant.

On 8 February 1862, Thomas L'Estrange Ewen, Chairman of the Colchester Petty Sessions, and six other magistrates made the following complaint to the Lord Chancellor against William to the Lord Chancellor:
"Papers Relating to the Case of Mr. W. R. Havens" p131-4
          COLCHESTER PETTY SESSIONAL DIVISION.
STATEMENT in reference to the Conduct of Mr. William Rawdon Havens, one of the Magistrates of the Division; prepared for the Lord Chancellor, according to a request made through the Lord Braybrooke, on behalf of the Lord Lieutenant of the County.
  MR. HAVENS formerly practised at the bar, but has for some years ceased to follow his profession, and in the year 1857 he was appointed a magistrate of this county. Very shortly after taking his seat on the bench he showed a disposition to act contrary to the wishes of his brother magistrates, which occasionally led to unpleasant altercation and division of opinion in deciding upon cases brought before them. And for the last 18 months Mr Havens' conduct has been such as to cause the greatest possible annoyance to his brother magistrates, as well as to interrupt the public business. And for several months the chairman of the Bench, Thomas L'Estrange Ewen, Esquire, and those of his brother magistrates who were most constant in their attendance, were entirely driven away, and unable to take their seats upon the bench. At length, Mr Havens' ill feeling against his brother magistrates, and also against the clerk, who had acted for 25 years in that capacity without a shadow of reproach upon his character or conduct, became so great that he, in the open and public court, spoke of them in the most contemptuous and derisive manner, accusing them of acting falsely, and calling them "imbeciles" and "wretches," and in every possible way endeavouring to lower them in public estimation ; and ultimately he charged them and the clerk with "a corrupt administration of justice;" and this he did deliberately in the full and open court, and well knowing the reporters were present, and taking down all he was saying, with a view to its publication in the local newspapers.
  The charge of a corrupt administration of justice, and that too not in a single instance, but, as Mr. Havens openly asserted, for a series of years, being thus made by Mr. Havens against his brother magistrates and their clerk, was deemed of so serious a character that the chairman and seven other of the magistrates against whom the charge was considered more immediately to apply (though in effect it applied to the whole of the Bench) felt it impossible, with such a charge against them, to take their seats upon the bench, until their characters were cleared of the very serious imputation brought against them, and they were therefore compelled, in vindication of their character and office, to seek redress in a court of law ; and accordingly, in Trinity Term last, Sir Fitzroy Kelly obtained, on behalf of the magistrates and their clerk, from the Court of Queen's Bench, a Rule Nisi calling on Mr. Havens to show cause why a criminal information should not be filed against him. No sooner was this done than Mr. Havens sought to establish a charge of conspiracy against the eight magistrates and their clerk, by whom the rule had been obtained. They were summoned before the borough magistrates, where the case entirely failed, and the summons was dismissed. This, however, did not satisfy Mr. Havens, and at the next assizes he actually preferred a bill of indictment against them, which bill, however, as might be expected, was thrown out by the grand jury. There was, of course, no foundation whatever for this charge, and it no doubt emanated from a design on the part of Mr .Havens to prejudice the case of the magistrates in the Court of Queen's Bench, and which it would doubtless have done if this prosecution had been hanging over their heads when the rule should be argued. The case in the Queen's Bench did not come on for argument until the 22d of November last and it will be seen by what took place in court that Mr. Havens, in order to save himself from the very serious consequences of having the rule made absolute against him, resorted to the subterfuge of endeavouring to shift the charge from the magistrates to the clerk, and ultimately had to apologise for his conduct...
It was hoped that after these proceedings Mr. Havens would either have withdrawn from the bench, or allowed the business to be conducted without further interruption or annoyance...[but] it will be seen by what follows that his conduct as a magistrate has ever since been most unbecoming and reprehensible, scarcely a week having passed without his causing some annoyance and insult to his brother magistrates, as well as interruption to the public business...
  On the following Saturday (14th December) Mr. Havens again endeavoured to disturb the harmony of the Court by desiring that each magistrate on the bench should take his seat according to seniority in the commission. This was overruled ; and it would seem that the only possible motive Mr. Havens could have in thus acting was a wish to annoy the chairman personally, as if his motion had been carried into effect it would have placed him next the chairman.
  On the following Saturday (21st December), Mr. Havens took the extraordinary step of going to the Court somewhat earlier than the usual time of meeting, and when Mr. Ewen and the other magistrates who entered the court with him went there, they found him actually in the chair. Mr. Ewen, then, as the rightful chairman (for he has acted as such for the last 20 years and upwards) requested him as a gentleman to remove from the chair, in order that he, Mr. Ewen, might take his seat, and proceed with the public business. Mr. Havens positively refused to do so, alleging as a reason that at the last sitting no regard had been paid to seniority. The magistrates thereupon were under the necessity of adjourning the court for half an hour, to consult what to do. On their return they found Mr. Havens had all the while kept possession of the chair, and which he persisted in retaining. This caused so much disturbance in the court that the business was entirely stopped, and had to be put off till the following week. The scene caused by this unheard-of conduct on the part of Mr. Havens was altogether a most disgraceful one, and must necessarily have a very bad effect on the minds of the lower classes who were eye-witnesses to what occurred.
...
It will thus be seen that scarcely a week has elapsed since the termination of the proceedings in the Court of Queen's Bench, that the public business has not been in some way interrupted by Mr. Havens' extraordinary conduct ; and it is quite impossible to maintain the proper dignity of the Court, or that the law can be administered with any wholesome effect, if such proceedings are allowed to continue.
    Colchester 8 February 1862.
  Thomas L'Estrange Ewen, Chairman
  C.R. Bree M.D.
  John Leveson Gower
  Stephen Brown
  W. H. Penrose
  Samuel Cooke
  George Edward Tompson

 
This time the Lord Chancellor took action, demanding an explanation from William Havens of his actions, and suggesting that he might like to resign his commission.
"Papers Relating to the Case of Mr. W. R. Havens"  p135
COPY of a LETTER from the Honourable H. Campbell to W. R. Havens, Esq.
          34, Belgrave Square, 14 February 1862.

    Sir,
  I AM directed by the Lord Chancellor to forward to you the enclosed representation which has been sent to him by the Vice-Lieutenant of the County of Essex.
  I am further desired to inquire whether the representation thus made to the Lord Chancellor is substantially correct, and if so, what explanation you would wish to offer with respect to the conduct you have thought proper to adopt.
  Should the representation prove to be substantially correct, the Lord Chancellor fears it will be his duty to remove you from the Commission of the Peace.
  The Lord Chancellor will expect to receive your answer to the enclosed representation within a fortnight.
  It may be your desire to be removed from the Commission at your own request, a course which the Lord Chancellor suggests for your consideration.
       I have, &c
    (signed) Hallyburton Campbell,
                       Secretary of Commissions

William's response was weak, simply saying that the complaint was "false, and I believe maliciously false", without offering any other explanation of his actions.
"Papers Relating to the Case of Mr. W. R. Havens"  p135
The ANSWER of W. R. Havens, one of the Magistrates of the County of Essex, acting for the said Division, in reply to a Statement signed by T. L. Ewen, Esq., and Six other Magistrates, and laid before the Lord Chancellor.
  I, William Rawdon Havens, do say as follows:
  "That the said statement is false, and I believe maliciously false.
  "That a former statement, signed by the said T. L. Ewen and eight other magistrates, and laid before the late Lord Chancellor Campbell, is false, and I believe also maliciously false.
  "That a letter dated 1st December 1860, signed by the clerk to the magis trates of this division, and purporting to be written by direction of some of them, and addressed to me, is false, and I believe also maliciously false.
  "That if the magistrates and the clerk will publish in the City of London the said statements and letter, and admit the fact of publication, I will immediately bring an action against them for a false and malicious libel.
  "That the said statements and letter would technically form the subject of separate actions, but in substance are all intimately connected together, and ought (to save expense) to form the subject of one action, the jury coming to a separate finding on each document.
  "That an investigation into the alleged facts of the clerk's letter, and of the statement laid before the late Lord Chancellor Campbell, is material and necessary for my answer to the statement laid before the present Lord Chancellor.
  "That it is the duty of the magistrates and clerk either to publish the said statements and letters, or to withdraw and apologise for them.
  "That as one of the humblest of Her Majesty's servants, I demand a public investigation before a jury in a civil court.
  "That after verdict, or after a withdrawal by the magistrates and the clerk of the charges against me, I shall be ready and anxious to complete my defence before the Lord Chancellor.
  "And that a verdict of a jury or the withdrawal of the charges by the magistrates and the clerk will enable the Lord Chancellor to easily dispose of the case with satisfaction to himself and with justice to me.
                "W. R. Havens.
    Donyland, Colchester,
    24 February 1862."

The Lord Chancellor Campbell then struck William Havens from his commission as magistrate.
"Papers Relating to the Case of Mr. W. R. Havens"  p135
COPY of a LETTER from the Honourable H. Campbell to W. R. Havens, Esq.
         
House of Lords, 27 February 1862.
  Sir, 
  I HAVE to acknowledge the receipt of your letter and statement, which I have laid before the Lord Chancellor.
  In reply I am directed to state that the charges made against you are circumstantial and detailed.
  They are signed by Mr. Ewen, the Chairman of Petty Sessions, and several other magistrates, and are sent to the Lord Chancellor by and on the authority of the Vice-Lieutenant. To these full and particular statements you have not thought fit to return any other answer than the assertion that the whole of the statement is false and maliciously false. You thus charge your brother magistrates with having deliberately invented and published a series of falsehoods, with the malicious intent of doing you an injury.
  The Lord Chancellor cannot give credit to an accusation so incredible and so entirely unsupported. In his judgment, this charge is a most serious aggravation of your former offensive conduct. The forbearance shown to you in the proceedings in the Court of Queen's Bench has had no effect.
  It is impossible that you should remain in the same Commission with the gentlemen whom you have thus accused; and as the Lord Chancellor is satisfied of the correctness of the representation made to him, he feels it to be his duty to direct that your name be struck out of the Commission.
       I have, &c.
    (signed) Hallyburton Campbell,
          Secretary of Commissions

Death: 26 May 1887, in Walton-on-Naze, Essex, England, aged 78
The Times 1 June 1887 p1
On the 26th May, at Walton-on-Naze, WILLIAM RAWDON HAVENS, late of Donyland Heath, Barrister-at-law, aged 78


Census & Addresses:
1841: Lincolns Inn, Middlesex: William Havens is aged 30 (rounded down to nearest 5 years)
1851: William Rawdon Havens is aged 42, born in East Donyland, Essex. Occupation: Barrister not in practice
1861: East Donyland, Essex: William Rawdon Havens, head, is aged 52, born in East Donyland, Essex
1862: Donyland, Colchester, Essex   ("Papers Relating to the Case of Mr. W. R. Havens"  p135)
1874: Walton-on-Naze, Essex   (Post Office Directory of Essex 1874)
1881: Cliff Cottage, Walton le Soken, Essex

Sources:

William Havens

Birth: 1850 in Wivenhoe, Essex, England

Baptism: 6 June 1862 in St Lawrence, East Donyland, Essex, England
William, of Wivenhoe was baptised on 6 June 1862, the son of Philip Havens, surgeon, and Elizabeth. He was baptised on the same day as six of his siblings.

Father: Philip Havens

Mother: Elizabeth (Elsworthy) Havens

Married: Rosa Belles in 1878, in Marylebone district, Middlesex, England

Rosa was born in Edgbaston, Warwickshire, in 1847. She died in Samford district, Suffolk in 1930, aged 79.
Census:
1861: Rugby, Warwickshire: Rosa Belles, daughter, is aged 13
1881: Hall Farm, Little Wenham, Suffolk
1891: Churchford Hall Farm, Capel St Mary, Suffolk
1901: St Thomas, Oxfordshire: Rosa Havens, visitor, is aged 47, born in Birmingham, Warwickshire. Occupation: None Own Means
1911: Deal, Kent: Rose Havens is aged 63, born in Birmingham, Warwickshire

Childern:
Occupation: Farmer (1871, 1881), Farm Bailiff (1891) and Fisherman (1901). In 1871, William is shown as a farmer of 40 acres, employing 3 labourers and 2 boys. In 1881 he is farming at Hall Farm in Little Wenham, Suffolk, employing 15 men, 4 boys and 3 women. Hall Farm had been in the family for a long time - William's great-great-grandfather, Philip Havens, purchased it in 1765. Little Wenham Hall, built around 1275, is one of the oldest houses in England.
Little Wenham Hall
Little Wenham Hall
image from CastleUK.net
Kelly's Directory 1875 p946
LITTLE WENHAM ...
Wenham Hall is now a farm house: the ancient building there, now used as a granary, is one of the very few remaining relics of the domestic architecture of the thirteenth century, and affords the earliest example of the use of Flemish brick extant: it has a handsome groined roof, a great hall, a private chapel, and is partly fortified. William Havens, esq., is a lord of the manor. Thomas Clarke, esq., William Havens, esq., and Mr. Stephen Lott, are the principal landowners. The soil is strong clay; subsoil, clay. The chief crops are wheat, barley and oats.

William went bankrupt in 1883, and moved to Heath Farm House in Lexden
London Gazette 5 June 1883 p2974
        The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
    In tbe County Court of Essex, holden at Colchester.
In the Matter of a Bankruptcy Petition against William Havens, late of Wenham Hall, in the county of Suffolk, Farmer, and now of Heath Farm House, Lexden, in the county of Essex, out of business.
    UPON the hearing of this Petition this day, and upon proof satisfactory to the Court of the debt of the Petitioners, and of the act or acts of the Bankruptcy alleged to have been committed by the said William Havens having been given, it is ordered that the said William Havens be, and he is hereby, adjudged bankrupt.—Given under the Seal of the Court this 31st day of May, 1883.
        By the Court,
          Henry Goody, Registrar.
  The First General Meeting of the creditors of the said William Havens is hereby summoned to be held at the Townhall, Colchester, on tbe 20th day of .June, 1883, at four o'clock in the afternoon, and that tbe Court has ordered the bankrupt to attend thereat for examination, and to produce thereat a statement of his affairs, as required by the statute.
  Until the appointment of a Trustee, all persons having in their possession any of the effects of tbe bankrupt must deliver them, and all debts due to the bankrupt must be paid, to the Registrar. Creditors must forward their proofs of Debts to the Registrar.

The bankruptcy was discharged in 1884.
London Gazette 18 January 1884 p318
        The Bankruptcy Act, 1869.
    In tbe County Court of Essex, holden at Colchester.
In the Matter of William Havens, late of Wenham Hall, in the county of Suffolk, Farmer, and now of Heath
Farm House, Lexden, in the county of Essex, out of business, adjudicated a Bankrupt on 31st day of May, 1883.
NOTICE is hereby given, that a General Meeting of the Creditors, of the above-named bankrupt will be held at the offices of Messrs. Jones and Son, Townhall-chambers, Colchester, on Tuesday, the 29th day of January, 1884, at three o'clock in the afternoon, for the following purpose, viz.:—To consider an application then to be made by or on behalf of the above-named bankrupt for a special resolution to be passed by the creditors in the form, or to the effect following, namely, that the bankruptcy of the said William Havens, and his failure to pay 10s. in the pound, have not, in the opinion of the creditors, arisen from circumstances for which the bankrupt can justly be held responsible, and that the creditors desire that an Order of Discharge should be granted to the said bankrupt.—Dated this 14th day- of January,.
1884.
    JONES and SON, Townhall-chambers, Colchester,
      Solicitors for the Trustee.


and that Order of Discharge was applied for on 8 February 1884 (London Gazette 12 February 1884 p776). In the 1891 census, William is a farm bailiff on Churchford Hall farm in Cape St Mary, Suffolk and Kelly's Dirctory of Suffolk 1896 p86 lists William as a farm bailiff to R. T. Hicks in Capel St Mary.

Death: 1920, in Colchester district, Essex, England, aged 68

Census:
1851: William Havens, son, is aged 1, born in Wivenhoe, Essex
1861: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex
1871: West Street, Wivenhoe, Essex: Occupation: Farmer of 40 acres employing 3 labourers and 2 boys
1875: Wenham Hall, Little Wenham, Suffolk   (Kelly's Directory 1875 p946)
1881: Hall Farm, Little Wenham, Suffolk
1883: Heath Farm House, Lexden,. Essex   (London Gazette 5 June 1883 p2974)
1884: Heath Farm House, Lexden,. Essex   (London Gazette 12 Febuary 1884 p776)
1891: Churchford Hall Farm, Capel St Mary, Suffolk
1896: Capel St Mary, Suffolk   (Kelly's Dirctory of Suffolk 1896 p86)
1901: Chelmondiston, Suffolk: William Havers, head, is aged 51, born in Wivenhoe, Essex
1911: Chelmondiston, Suffolk: William Havens is aged 61

Sources:
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