The Talcott Family

Ann (Talcott) Furly

Birth: 31 January 1650, in Colchester, Essex, England

Father: William Talcott

Mother: Anna (_____) Talcott

Married: John Furly on 22 June 1669, in Colchester Quakers Non-Conformist Church, Colchester, Essex, England

Children:
Notes:
Ann is mentioned in the will of Susanna Shortland which was last updated on 10 June 1710, indicating that Ann was still alive at that point. Susanna was the widow of Thomas Shortland who was involved with Ann's father, William Talcott, in attempting to free James Parnell.
SHORTLAND, Susanna, widow, St Runwald, Colchester. "three of the daughters of William Talcott of Colchester aforesaid stapler that is to say unto Anne ffurly wife of John ffurly of Colchester aforsd Merchant and Elizabeth Havens wife of Robt Havens of the same Baymaker and unto Mary Dikes wife of Benjamin Dikes of the same currier summe of Twenty five pounds apeece".

Sources:

Elizabeth (Talcott) Havens

Father: William Talcott

Mother: Anna (_____) Talcott

Married: Robert Havens

Children:
Notes:
Ann is mentioned in the will of Susanna Shortland which was last updated on 10 June 1710, indicating that Ann was still alive at that point. Susanna was the widow of Thomas Shortland who was involved with Ann's father, William Talcott, in attempting to free James Parnell.
SHORTLAND, Susanna, widow, St Runwald, Colchester. "three of the daughters of William Talcott of Colchester aforesaid stapler that is to say unto Anne ffurly wife of John ffurly of Colchester aforsd Merchant and Elizabeth Havens wife of Robt Havens of the same Baymaker and unto Mary Dikes wife of Benjamin Dikes of the same currier summe of Twenty five pounds apeece".

Sources:

Robert Talcott

Birth: 1625, in Little Horkesley, Essex, England

Baptised: 3 February 1625/6 (OS/NS), in Little Horkesley, Essex, England
Little Horkesley church register:
1625 Robert ye sonne of Thomas Talcott Gent and Thamar his wife was baptised the third day of February

Father: Thomas Talcott

Mother: Thamar (Ball, Lewes) Talcott

Education: Royal Grammar School of Colchester and St John's College, Cambridge. Robert was admitted to the Royal Grammar School of Colchester on 2 October 1637, aged 12, and remained there for 5 years. Robert was admitted to St John's College, Cambridge University on 5 April 1642, aged 16, and obtained his B.A. in 1645/6.

Register of the scholars admitted to Colchester school, 1637-1740 pp12-3
ROBERT TALCOTT, eldest son of Thomas Talcott, gentleman.
  Born at Little Horkesley, Essex. In his 12th year. Admitted 2nd Oct., 1637.
  Remained at the school 5 years. Admitted pensioner, St. John's, Cambridge, 5th April, 1642, "aetat. 16" - tutor Mr. Clarke - (Mayer, p. 63). Dead at the time of the 1664 visitation. He was eldest son of Thomas Talcott (son of Robert Talcott, Alderman of Colchester), by Thamer, daughter of John Ball. of Horkesley Priory (Visitation of 1634). See below for admissions of his three brothers. The Talcotts were of Warwickshire origin, but had attained considerable consequence in Colchester in the early part of the 17th century. Their house stood in St. Mary's, between the Rectory grounds, and Head Street, (1584). In the course of a suit, concerning this house, the above Thomas Talcott petitioned the House of Lords (16th July, 1642) for postponement, on the ground that he had just lost his wife and a child by small pox, and that he, with six of his children, and three of his servants was then ill with the disease. (5th report, Hist. MSS. p. 38A.)


Admissions to the College of St. John the Evangelist in the University of Cambridge p63 (1893)
ADMISSIONS 1642.
Robert 'Tailcoatus' (margin Tailcote), son of Thomas 'Tailcote,' gent. of Colchester, Essex; born at Horsley (? Horksley), Essex; school, Colchester (Mr Dugard) for 3 years; admitted pensioner, tutor Mr Clarke, 5 April, aet. 16.


Alumni Catabrigiensis

Talcott or Tailcote, Robert
Adm. pens. (aged 16) at ST JOHN'S, Apr. 5, 1642. S. of Thomas, gent., of Colchester, Essex (and Thamer, dau. of John Ball, of Horksley, Essex), and nephew of Robert (above). B. at Horksley. Bapt. Feb. 3, 1625/6.
School, Colchester (Mr Dugard).
B.A. 1645-6.
(Vis. of Essex, 1634.)

Death: before 1664 when the Visitation of Essex records his younger brother Thomas as his father's heir.

Sources:

Thomas Talcott

Baptised: 25 March 1600, in St Botolph, Colchester, Essex, England

Father: Robert Talcott, an alderman of Colchester

Mother: Joanna (Crane) Talcott

Married: Thamar (Ball) Lewes on 6 April 1624, in Little Horkesley, Essex, England. Thomas Taylcotte, gent, married Thamar Lewis, widdow gent.

Children: Occupation: Coroner. The Essex Record Office, Chelmsford, Assize Files, has a Thomas Talcott as coroner from 1651 until 1667. In 1651 the two coroners are listed as Wm. Cheaveley and Tho. Talcott, gents. They are listed like that until August 1659 when they begin to be listed as Tho. Talcott and Rich. Stephens. In April 1666 the coroners are listed as Tho. Talcott and Rich. Stevens

Notes: The Talcotts were of Warwickshire origin, but had attained considerable consequence in Colchester in the early part of the 17th century. Their house stood in St. Mary's, between the Rectory grounds, and Head Street, (1584). In the course of a suit, concerning this house, Thomas Talcott petitioned the House of Lords (16th July 1642) for postponement, on the ground that he had just lost his wife and a child by smallpox, and that he, with six of his children, and three of his servants was then ill with the disease.

Arms:
Arms: Argent, on a pale sable three roses of the first, a crescent on a crescent for difference.
Crest: A demi-griffin erased wings edorsed or, gorged with a collar sable charged with three roses of the first

Death: 1685, in Colchester, Essex, England

Buried: 1685, in Colchester, Essex, England

Administration:
1686. Admin of Thomas Talcot granted April 29 1686 to Thomas T., son of Thomas T. late of Colchester.
1686. Admin of Thomas Talcot granted Sep 9 1686 to Jeremiah T. nephew by the brother of Thomas T. Thomas T. son of Thomas T. being dead.

Sources:

Thomas Talcott

Birth: 1626/7, in Little Horkesley, Essex, England

Baptised: 22 February 1626/7 (OS/NS), in Little Horkesley, Essex, England
Little Horkesley church register:
1626 Thomas & William ye sonnes of Thomas Taylecott Gent & Thamar his wife baptised xxiid. day of February Ao Dmi 1626

Father: Thomas Talcott

Mother: Thamar (Ball, Lewes) Talcott

Education: Royal Grammar School of Colchester where he was admitted on 2 April 1638, aged 11
Register of the scholars admitted to Colchester school, 1637-1740 p20
THOMAS TALCOTT, second son of Thomas Talcott, gentleman.
  Born at Little Horkesley, Essex. In his 11th year.
  Admitted 2nd April, 1638.
  Twin with William who follows. In the 1664 Visitation he is styled "sonne and heire" to his father and "aetat 31" (which is clearly wrong).
  Thomas Talcott, "late" Alderman, died 22nd Feb., 1685/6, and was buried in Trinity Church (M.I.)


Occupation: Alderman of  Colchester, Essex. He was likely the Thomas Talcott who was mayor of Colchester 1665/6.

Death: 22 February 1685/6 (OS/NS)

Buried: Trinity Church, Colchester, Essex, England
Inscription on a flat slate in the south aisle of Trinity Church, recorded by Edward Thomas Tylecote:
Here lyeth ye body of Thomas Talcott Esq: Late one of ye Aldermen of Colchester who Dyed ye 22 Day of February Anno Dom 1685/6

Administration: 1686. Admin of Thomas Talcot granted 24 Sep 1686 to John Shaw armiger & Thamar Shaw nephew & niece on the mother's side to Thomas Talcot late of Colch'r.

Notes: Twin to William

Sources:

William Talcott

Birth: 1626/7, in Little Horkesley, Essex, England

Baptised: 22 February 1626/7 (OS/NS), in Little Horkesley, Essex, England
Little Horkesley church register:
1626 Thomas & William ye sonnes of Thomas Taylecott Gent & Thamar his wife baptised xxiid. day of February Ao Dmi 1626

Father: Thomas Talcott

Mother: Thamar (Ball, Lewes) Talcott

Education: Royal Grammar School of Colchester where he was admitted on 2 April 1638, aged 11
Register of the scholars admitted to Colchester school, 1637-1740 p20
WILLIAM TALCOTT, third son of Thomas Talcott, gentleman.
  Born at Little Horkesley, Essex. In his 11th year.
  Admitted 2nd April, 1638.
  His name is not found in the 1664 Visitation, but he occurs as a friend of Parnell the Quaker, in 1655, at which time he was resident in Colchester.


Married: Anna _____. Dave Tylcoat has Anna surname as Tabor. In his will, William makes a bequest to John Tabor son of testator's late sister in law Mary Tabor. If John was illegitimate, then Mary's birth surname (and by extension, Anna's), would have been Tabor, but if Mary was married to some Mr. Tabor, then her (and Anna's) birth surname would have been something else. Anna was born in 1624/5, and died in 1709, aged 84. She was buried on 9 October 1709, in Colchester, Essex.

Anna is probably the Ann Talcot mentioned in Steven Crisp and his correspondents page xliv (Charlotte Fell-Smith, 1892) as being one of the persons appointed to inquire if both parties were free of engagements in the marriage of Steven Crisp, a renowned Quaker, and Gertrude (Dericks) Losevelt.
  The following entries from "The Women's Meeting Book for the town of Colchester," are interesting.
  "Coulchester, the 7th day of the 7th month [Sept], 1685.
   This day, came Steven Crisp and Gertrit Derrix to our meeting, and acquainted frinds with their intention of marage, and this metting desires Ann Ffurly and Ann Talcot to Inquire if she is clere from all others, and to give an account to this metting.
   "The 21st of the 7th month, 1685.
  This day, came Steven Crisp and Geertruyd Dircks to our meeting the 2 time, and acquainted frindes with thair intentions of taking each other in marage, and this meeting finding nothing but that thay are cleare from all others, this meeting desired Ann Furly and Ann Tailcoat to signify the same to the man's meeting."

Anna Talcot is also mention in the will of Steven Crisp (Steven Crisp and his correspondents p76) dated 23 May 1693:
Item: I doe give and bequeath to my friends Anna Talcot, and Elizabeth Furly of Colchester, twenty pounds for them to dispose of as they shall see meet.

Children:
Occupation: Wool Stapler

Death: January 1697/8 (OS/NS), at his home in Colchester, Essex, England

Buried: 19 January 1697/8 (OS/NS) in St Nicholas, Colchester, Essex, England
Church Register of St Nicholas, Colchester:
1697 - 8 Jan 19 Wm. Talcot of All Saints par. buried.

Will: proved 25 February 1697/8 (OS/NS)
PCC 1697 (52 Lord).
Test of Wm Talcott of Colchester stapler. Son in law John Furley & JF's wife Ann dau of testator. Testator owned a wood called Shrub wood containing about 117 acres lying in Stanway Co Essex between Butt Lane & Lexden Heath lately bought of John Stevens Esq & Robert Halls. Land also mentioned in parishes of Lanford & Mistley. Wife Anne. Dau Eliz wife of Robert Havens. Testator owned a wood called Middlewick lying in East Dougland Co Essex containing 111 acres. Testator lived in par of All Saints Colchester. Grandson Benj'n Dykes a minor son of testators dau Mary deceased by son in law Benj'n Dykes. Grandchild Mary Dykes. Woods called Olivers & Seamans containing 81 acres in par of Stanway are mentioned also Grove wood of 16 acres in par of Boxted Co Essex. Grandchild Sarah Swan dau of testators dau Sarah deceased by Wm Swan of Halstead Co Essex. Testator leaves lands to Sarah Swan in Fordham and Aldham Co Essex. Grandchildren John Furley, Wm F. & John Taylor and unto testator's 12 grandchildren viz James, Joseph, Eliz & Mary Furley; Robert, Eliz, Priscilla, Wm & Philip Havens; Benj'n & Mary Dykes, & Sarah Swan. Testators 2 grandchildren John & Christian Furley. Cousin Thomas Jarvis of Sudbury. Wm Jarvis of London - Wm Jarvis son of aforesaid Wm Jarvis. Thos Jarvis of Colchester son of aforesaid Thos Jarvis of Sudbury. Wm Jarvis of Braintree son of Thos Jarvis of Sudbury. Cousin John Gooday of Colch'r carpenter. Cousin Samuel Gooday. Cousins Susannah & Mary Gooday. Philip Robinson of Cambridge son of Robert Robinson. John Tabor son of testator's late sister in law Mary Tabor of Cambridge deceased. Charles Burnstead (?) of Cambridge. Johanna Foster of Cambridge. Two children of Anne Crispe of Cambridge. John Helden of Wickham Market tanner. Thomas Baylee. Arthur Cotton. Testator's wife Anne Ex'r. Made 4 Jan 1697. Codicil dated 6 Jan 1697. Witnessed by John Summers, Sarah Peery & Jo Freeman. Proved 25 Feb 1697.

Notes: Twin to Thomas.

William was one of the earliest converts to the Quaker movement in Essex (The Quakers in English Society 1655-1725 p12 by Adrian Davies, 2000). He was a friend of the Quaker James Parnell, who was persecuted and imprisoned for his beliefs in 1655. In Collection of the Sufferings of the People called Quakers Vol II p192 (Joseph Besse 1753), James's imprisonment and cruel treatment in Colchester Castle is described "whereupon two of his Friends William Talcot and Edward Grant, wealthy Tradesmen of that Town, offered to be bound in sufficient Bonds, and Thomas Shortland, another of his Friends, offered to lie in Prison in his Stead, so that he might have liberty to go to William Talcot's House, till he might recover of his bruises, but this was denied." James Parnell died in Colchester Castle on 4 May 1656, aged 19. This incident is also recounted in James Parnell pp73-4 (Charlotte Fell Smith, 1907).

In 1677, William was a member of a party of Quakers that undertook a journey to Holland to organize meetings there. The group also included George Fox, the founder of the Quaker movement, and William Penn (after whom Pennsylvania is named).
Journal of George Fox vol 2 pp176-7 (1803)
AFTER the meeting at Harwich we returned to John Vandewall's, where I had lodged; and when the boat was ready, taking leave of Friends, we that were bound for Holland, went on board about nine in the evening, on the 25th of the 5th Month, 1677.
  The Friends that went over with me, were William Penn, Robert Barclay, George Keith and his wife, John Furly and his brother, William Tallcoat, George Watts, and Isabel Yeomans, one of my wife's daughters. About one in the morning we weighed anchor, having a fair brisk wind, which by next morning brought us within sight of Holland. But that day proving very clear and calm we got forward little, till about four in the afternoon, when a fresh gale arose, which carried us within a league of land. Then being becalmed again, we cast anchor for that night, it being between the hours of nine and ten in the evening: but William Penn and Robert Barclay, understanding that Benjamin Furly was come from Rotterdam to the Briel to meet us, got two of the boatmen to let down a small boat that belonged to the packet, and row them to shore; but before they coidd reach it the gates were shut; and there being no house without the gates, they lay in a fisherman's boat all night. As soon as the gates were opened in the morning, they went in, and found Benjamin Furly, with other Friends of Rotterdam, that were come thither to receive us; and they sent a boat, with three young men in it, that lived with Benjamin Furly, who brought us to the BRIEL, where the Friends received us with great gladness.
  We stayed about two hours to refresh ourselves, and then took boat, with the Holland Friends, for ROTTERDAM, where we arrived about eleven that day, the 28th of the Month. I was very well this voyage, but some of the Friends were sea-sick. A fine passage we had, and all came safe and well to land; blessed and praised be the name of the Lord for ever!
  Next day, being First-day, we had two meetings at Benjamin Furly's, where many of the town's-people and some officers came in, and all were civil. Benjamin Furly or John Claus, a Friend of Amsterdam, interpreted, when any Friend declared. I spent the next day in visiting Friends there. The day following, William Penn and I, with other Friends, went towards Amsterdam with some Friends of that city, who came to Rotterdam to conduct us thither. We took boat in the afternoon, and passing by OVERKIRK, came to DELFT, through which we walked on foot; and then took boat again to LEYDEN, where we lodged that night at an inn. This is six Dutch miles from Rotterdam, which are eighteen English miles, and five hours' sail or travelling; for our boat was drawn by a horse that went on the shore. Next day taking boat again, we went to HAARLEM, fourteen miles from Leyden, where we had appointed a meeting, which proved very large; for many of the town's-people came in, and two of their preachers. The Lord gave us a blessed opportunity, not only with respect to Friends, but to other sober people, and the meeting ended peaceably and well. After it we passed to AMSTERDAM, accompanied by several Friends of that city and of Alkmaar.


The select works of William Penn, vol 2 pp400-402 (William Penn, 1825):
The next morning [25 May 1677] early I left Colchester, and came to Harwich about noon, accompanied with George Wats and John Furly the elder, William Tailcoat, and J. Witherly of Colchester; where we found dear G.F. at J. Vandewall's house, with many more friends.
  After dinner, we went all to the meeting; where the Lord gave us a blessed earnest of his love and presence, that should be with us in this voyage: for his holy, overcoming, refreshing power, did open all our hearts, and many of our mouths in ministry, prayer, and praises, to the magnifying of his own name and truth in that place.
  The meeting done, we returned to John Vandewall's house, where we took our leave of friends; that is to say, of the friends of that place, with others that came with us, or met us there: and so we went on board the packet-boat; where, by the special favour of the master of the packets to me, having formerly served under my father, we had the best accommodation given to us. Many of the friends accompanied us to the ship; not leaving us till all was fixed, and then we parted in the fellowship of Jesus.
  Those that came over were G. Fox, R. Barclay, G.K.G. Wats, J. Furly, W. Tallcoat, J. Yeamans, E.K. myself, with two of our servants.
  We set sail about three in the morning, being the fifth day of the week; and got the sixth day at night within half a league of the Briel.
  We had good service those two days in the ship with several passengers. French and Dutch: and though they seemed at first to be shy of us, and to slight us, yet at last their hearts were much opened in kindness toward us, and the universal principle had place.
  The next morning friends were fetched on shore by a boat of Rotterdam, with some friends of that city, that came to the Briel to meet us. The friends that came were A. Sonneman, B. Furly, and S. Johnson, Vettekeuken, with three young men that live at B. Furly's house.
  After we had eaten, we took boat immediately for Rotterdam; where we arrived about noon, and where many friends came to see us, among whom we were comforted.
  The next day, being the first day of the week, we had two meetings at B. Furly's house; whither resorted a great company of people, some of them being of the considerablest note of that city. And Oh! blessed be the true word of life, that never faileth them that rest upon it, and abide in it, the gospel was preached, the dead were raised, and the living comforted; and God, even our God, bore heavenly record to his only begotten Son in us: and truth is honourable in the eyes of several in that place.
  The next day, being the second day of the week, we spent in visiting friends from house to house; not in one company, being lodged in several quarters of the city. All our visits were precious meetings; for, indeed, for that end God brought us into this land.
  Several of us dined and supped that day at two great men's houses, where we had blessed opportunities to make known unto them what was the hope of our glory: that mystery, which to the Gentiles is now revealing, even Christ Jesus, the light and life of the world, manifested in us.
  The next day, being the third day of the week, G.F. J.F. W.T. and myself, after having broken our fast at A. Sonneman's, took boat for Leyden; where we came that night, in order to be at Haerlem next day, at a meeting appointed by G.F. and myself from Rotterdam: being accompanied by J. Bocliffs, J. Arents, and J. Claus, that came from Amsterdam on purpose to conduct us thither.
  At Haerlem we arrived about the 11th hour; and went to the house of a good old man, that had long waited for, and is now come to behold, the consolation and salvation of Israel.
  After we had a little refreshed ourselves, we went to the meeting; where the Lord gave us a blessed opportunity, not only with respect to friends, but many sober baptists and professors, that came in, and abode in the meeting to the end: blessed be the name of the Lord,
  The meeting done, we went to Amsterdam, in company with several friends of that city, and of Alchmaer and Embden, who met us at the meeting at Haerlem. We lodged at Gertruyd Dirick's house.

Sources:
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