The Maconchy Family

Agnes Fanny Maconchy

Birth: 1857/8, in Exeter, Devon, England

Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Death: 1938, in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England, aged 80

Census:
1881: 2 Vyvyan Terrace, Clifton, Gloucestershire

Sources:

Alice Deborah (Maconchy) Mallock

Birth: 1853/4, at Ardamine, Gorey, county Wexford, Ireland

Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Married: John Jervis Mallock in 1888, in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England. John's brother, Richard was married to Alice's sister, Elizabeth Emily.

Death: 1931, in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England, aged 77

Census:
1881: Cockington Court, Cockington, Devon
1891: Huccaby, Tavistock, Devon
1901: East Allington, Dorset: Alice Deborah Mallock, Wife, M, 47, Ireland (RG13/2082 fol 47 p7)

Sources:

Deborah Agnes (Maconchy) Ormerod

Birth: 5 March 1902

Father:
Ernest William Stuart King Maconchy

Mother: Caroline Agnes (Campbell) Maconchy

Married: Edward Wareing Ormerod on 31 May 1930 in Basingstoke district, Hampshire, England. Edward was born on 18 May 1880 in Marylebone, Middlesex, the son of  Joseph Arderne Ormerod and Mary Ellen Milner. He was educated at Rugby and graduated M.A. in 1904 from Queen's College, Oxford. Edward was Rector of Newnham with Hook, Hampshire, from 1924 to 1933, and Rector of East Woodhay, Hampshire from 1933 to 1958. He died on 10 August 1959.
1881: 25 Upper Wimpole Street, London, Middlesex

Death: 19 September 1985

Buried: St Martins, East Woodhay, Hampshire, England; section E.12.1

Sources:

Eileen Ruth (Maconchy) Marsh

Birth: about 1898

Father:
George Campbell Maconchy

Mother: Lilian Constantia (Metherall) Maconchy

Married: Philip Everard Graham Marsh on 18 April 1918, in St Peters, Bayswater, London, England
Visitation of England and Wales vol 20 p69 ed. Frederick Arthur Crisp (1919):
Philip Everard Graham Marsh, M.C., Captain Royal Arrny Service Corps (attached Royal Air Force), of Wethersfield, co. Essex, married at St. Peter's, Bayswater, London, 18 April 1918, Eileen Ruth, youngest daughter of George Campbell Maconchy, of the Public Works Department, Bengal, India.

Philip was born on 2 January 1895, in Bangalore, India, the son of Henry Graham Marsh and Violet Hughes-Hallett. He served in France in the Army Service Corps and was awarded the M.C. Captain Marsh transferred to the Royal Air Force and was an instructor at Feltwell aerodrome in Norfolk where he died in a mid-air collision on 20 December 1918.
Flight Global 16 January 1919
Capt. PHILIP EVERARD GRAHAM MARSH, M.C., R.A.F., who, with his mechanic, was killed by a collision in the air while flying at the Feltwell aerodrome on December 20, was the only son of Major H. G. Marsh, 19th Hussars (retired), and Mrs. Marsh, of Danes Vale, Wethersfield, Essex. Capt. Marsh was educated at Lancing, and got his commission from Sandhurst in August, 1914. He served in France with the A.S.C., won the M.C., and was mentioned in despatches. He was then for a short time with the Border Regt., and afterwards transferred to the R.A.F. He was instructor at the Feltwell aerodrome at the time of his death. Capt. Marsh was only lately married. The funeral took place on Christmas Eve at Wethersfield Parish Church.

Sources:

Elizabeth Emily (Maconchy) Mallock

Birth: 1848/9, in Salsborough, county Wexford, Ireland

Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Married: Richard Mallock on 19 June 1880, in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England. Richard's brother, John, would later marry Elizabeth Emily's sister, Alice.

Elizabeth received a dressing case as a wedding gift. The item was auctioned at Greenslade Taylor Hunt in 2000, and the description gives some insight into Elizabeth's lifestyle:
[Silver] A Victorian coromandel veneered Dressing Case having inlaid gilt brass stringing and monogram, with lift up lid and base drawer, the interior fitted with concealed mirror and letter compartment and fitted tray. Containing a set of 10 variously sized and shaped bottles and containers, all with monogrammed silver gilt covers, London 1880, makers mark FP, also with silver button hook of small dimensions, Birmingham 1900, an ivory handled manicure toll and 2 mother of pearl handled manicure tools and a matching button hook and folding knife. With leather carrying case and photocopied part of a family tree identifying original owner, Elizabeth Emily Maconchy who was given the case on her marriage in 1880, 21cms high, 33.5cms wide

Children:
Notes: Elizabeth was a member of an essay society for teenage girls and young women started by the novelist Charlotte Mary Yonge and known as the Gosling Society. Each girl adopted a pen-name and wrote two essays a month for Charlotte, and the best essays were circulated among them all. These girls were all being educated at home while their brothers, if they had any, went to schools and universities. Many were the daughters of rural clergymen or landowners and led isolated and monotonous lives. It must have been enormously encouraging for them to have a famous woman novelist criticising their work and taking their intellectual aspirations seriously. Elizabeth's pen-name was Potatoe.
POTATOE, (Elizabeth) Emily Maconchy (1848/9-1927), Corrinagh, Torquay (new c.1866/7- after 1869). Third daughter of George Maconchy (1818-1889) of Rathmore, co. Longford, and Corrinagh, Torquay, and his wife  Louisa Richards (d.1864), she married (1880), as his 2nd wife, Richard Mallock (d. 1900), MP for Torquay.

Elizabeth kept a journal of her time at Cockington Court, before her husband's death. Some of the journal is excerpted at the Cockington Court website.
1881: This winter we began to make the tennis ground ... above the old croquet ground ... to do so we had to cut away a great quantity of bushes ...and some trees -  thus letting a quantity of light and air into the house ... the snowdrops were lovely down by the ponds. We began doing what we did ever after ? moving them from under bushes and spreading them ... and bringing some up about the tennis ground and plantation. ... There were very few daffodils then ... a large patch in Yonder Lawn  of Lent Lilies ... and just a few of those tender, musk scented, creamy "Cernuus" above the lower pond and by the top pond, which I was told Dart had planted long ago.

1882 (March): Tennis ground marked out and played on first time.
(29th April) Great gale blowing all day ... We lost over 120 trees. Two big elms in the rookery were blown down. ...; a walk with D... up to the summerhouse and nailed up creepers. They all died in the winter ,,, the East wind too cold for them.
Roger planted an oak tree in the front lawn. It was a young tree grown from an acorn which Mrs Mallock brought from Algiers in 1875. It is the tree nearest to the ditch which runs round the little plantation to the left looking towards the sea from the house.

1883: More time spent at the ponds seeing after the work there ... Path made to Higher garden and back road being re-made. Path across from Almshouses and Lodge also done at this time ... Laurels by old drawing room being cut down.

Death:
1927, in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England, aged 78

Census & Addresses:
1874: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 28 February 1874 p937)
1875: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 27 February 1875 p896)
1876: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 26 February 1876 p989)
1878: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 27 February 1878 p1059)
1879: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 26 February 1879 p1042)
1880: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 25 February 1880 p939)
1881: Cockington Court, Cockington, Devon
1891: Huccaby, Tavistock, Devon

Sources:

Ernest William Stuart King Maconchy

Birth: 18 June 1860, in Exeter, Devon, England

Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Married: Caroline Agnes Campbell on 2 November 1895, in St Pauls, Onslow Square, London. Caroline was the daughter of Alexander Henry Campbell and Agnes Douglas. She died on 15 July 1953.

Children:
Occupation: Army Officer.
Ernest entered the army on 13 March 1880 when he was made Second Lieutenant in the Royal South Downs, later known as the 5th Royal Irish Rifles (London Gazette 12 March 1880 p2020). He was made lieutenant on 28 January 1882 in the 5th Batallion (Royal Irish Rifles) of the East Yorkshire regiment (London Gazette 27 January 1882 p318), and transferred from the East Yorkshire Regiment to the Madras Staff Corps on 11 September 1883 (London Gazette 28 September 1886 p4739). Ernest saw action in the Hazara Ezpedition and was wounded in 1891, when he was mentioned in dispatches by Major General W K Elles, CB: "I now beg to bring to the notice of His Excellency the good service of Lieutenant Maconchy, who arrived on the scene at a critical moment and was himself wounded" (The London Gazette 20 October 1891 p5456 contains an account of the entire action at Ghazikot). Lieutenant Maconchy was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order on 19 November 1891 "in recognition of services during the late Hazara Expedition" (London Gazette 24 November 1891 p6229).
Frontier and Overseas Expeditions from India (Vol 1, Tribes north of the Kabul River) p176, compiled by the Intelligence Branch of the Army Headquarters (1907) describes the action at Ghazikot:
 Early in the morning of the 19th March the outpost at Ghazikot, a small straggling village on the left bank of the Indus, about three-quarters of a mile north of Kanar, was attacked. A narrow street ran up the middle of the village; a small musjid was at its south-east corner; while north and south of it, at a distance of about 200 yards, were two narrow nalas running at right angles into the river. The outpost consisted of the Dogra company of the 4th Sikhs, under Subadar Dheru, and was composed of two native officers and sixty seven men. The picquet was placed behind some stone walls half-way between the northern nala and the village, while the remainder of the company bivouacked in rear of the musjid.
 On the evening of the 18th some shots were fired by the enemy at the picquet, and at about 3 A.M. on the 19th, the havildar in charge of this picquet reported to Subadar Dheru that the enemy were collecting in force in the nala to his front. When they arrived close enough to be seen, the picquet fired four volleys at them, on which the swordsmen of the enemy, with shouts, rushed past the right of the picquet straight for the musjid in the south-east corner of the village. The enemy being in this way in rear of the picquet, the latter retired and joined the main body of the company. A hot fire was then commenced on both sides, the enemy firing from the roofs of the houses, and charging with swords out of the musjid. At about 3-20 
A.M., reinforcements, consisting of a company of the 4th Sikhs under Lieutenant Maconchy, followed by a second company of the same regiment under Lieutenant Manning, arrived on the scene. Closely following on these, under Colonel Sir B. Bromhead C.B., came two companies of the 32nd Pioneers.
 At that time a very hot fire was going on, the enemy being in the musjid and on the roofs of the houses. Half a company of the 4th Sikhs, under Lieutenant Maconchy, rushed through the centre of the village and occupied the right front of it, but in getting through the narrow street, Lieutenant Maconchy and three sepoys were wounded. Colonel Bromhead with the Pioneers now joined this party, having swept round the right flank of the village, while a company of the 4th Sikhs at the same time went round the left flank. Under orders of Colonel Bromhead, all firing was then stopped, and orders given to rely on sword and bayonet only. By that time the main body of the enemy had evidently retired, but ghazis kept creeping from various places, firing and using their knives in the dark. When day broke the Pioneers and 4th Sikhs cleared the village, and Captain DeBrath, with one company of the former regiment, advanced about a mile along the path on the left bank of the river in the track of the enemy's line of retreat. when four men were seen crossing to the right bank on a raft, and about eighty returning to Bakrai at the mouth of the Shal Nala. The ravines and caves in the vicinity of Ghazikot were searched, but no more of the enemy were discovered.
 Lieutenant Maconchy was subsequently awarded the D.S.O. and Subadar Dheru, Havildar Waziru, Naik Ganesha Singh, Lance-Naik Alam Khan and Hospital Assistant Ahmadulla Khan received the 3rd Class of the Order of Merit for their gallantry on this occasion.


Ernest served in the Isizai Expedition in 1892 and on 28 January 1893, he was promoted to Captain (London Gazette 2 May 1893 p2555). Ernest was part of the Chitral Relief Force in 1895, and served on the North-West Frontier of India in 1897-98, being breveted as Major on 20 May 1898 (London Gazette 20 May 1898 p3167). Ernest was appointed as Deputy-Assistant Quartermaster-General, Intelligence Branch, Quartermaster-General's Department, on 31 August 1899 (London Gazette 23 February 1900 p1266) and promoted to Major on 19 July 1901 (London Gazette 4 October 1901 p6486). He fought in Waziristan in 1901 and the following telegram was received by the GOC: Telegram from Adjutant-General in India, No 5280A of 31 December 1901: "Ths C-in-C has heard with much satisfaction of the gallant behaviour of Major Maconchy, DSO and ??, who, by their promptness at a trying moment probably saved much loss of life". Ernest was appointed Assistant Quarter Master General of the Intelligence Branch on, 29 November 1901 (London Gazette 29 August 1902 p5610), vacating the appointment on 14 March 1904 (London Gazette 8 July 1904 p4345). On 18 March 1904, Ernest was granted the temporary rank of Lieutenant-Colonel whilst serving as regimental Commandant of the 51st Sikhs (Frontier Force) (London Gazette 5 July 1904 p4260) and he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on 1 June 1904 (London Gazette 23 September 1904 p6138). On 19 March 1906, Ernest was appointed Secretary, Department of Military Supply for the Government of India with the temporary rank of Colonel and he held this appointment until 1909 (London Gazette 4 May 1906 p3080). His promotion to Colonel came on 11 June 1907 (London Gazette 7 January 1908 p144), and he was created a Companion of the Indian Empire (C.I.E) on 1 January 1909 (London Gazette 29 December 1908 p2). Ernest was appointed Deputy Secretary, Army Department, Government of India on 1 April 1909 (London Gazette 4 June 1909 p4281) and held this appointment until 1 April 1912 (London Gazette 3 May 1912 p3185). He was created a C.B. in 1911. Ernest retired on 28 January 1914 (London Gazette 3 March 1914 p1735) but not for long - with the start of the War, Ernest was brought out of retirement on 12 October 1914, as Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster-General attached to Headquarters (London Gazette 20 November 1914 p9663), which appointment he held until 24 June 1915 (London Gazette 29 June 1915 p6272). On 19 July 1915, Ernest was appointed as Brigade Commander (London Gazette 30 July 1915 p7478) to command the 178th Brigade, 59th Division (the Sherwood Foresters). Ernest led the Sherwood Foresters as part of reinforcements to suppress the Easter Rising in Dublin in 1916, and 230 men under his command died in the action. On 6 June 1916, Ernest was given the temporary rank of Brigadier-General while commanding the 178th Brigade (London Gazette 2 June 1916 p5615). He was created a Companion of the Order of Saint Michael and Saint George (C.M.G.) on 1 January 1917 (London Gazette 23 January 1917 p924). The 59th Division deployed to France in February 1917, at which time Maconchy was nearly 57. It is surprising that a man of his age should have been sent on active service at this period of the war. He lasted only a few weeks before being "degummed" by his divisional commander, Arthur Sandbach. He was granted the honarary rank of Brigadier-General on 19 May 1917 (London Gazette 18 May 1917 p4863).

Edenmore Poultry Farm Advertisement
Advertisement for Edenmore Poultry Farm
Ernest evidently went into poultry farming in his retirement, as evidenced by this advertisement in Modern Poultry Keeping 26 July 1922.

Notes:
Who's Who 1907 p1149
MACONCHY, Col. Ernest William Stnart King, D.S.O. 1891; Secretary to the Government of India, Department of Military Supply; b. 18 June 1860; s. of late George Maconchy of Rathmore, Co. Longford; m. 1895, Caroline Agnes, d. of Alexander H Campbell, J.P., D.L., of 8 Cornwall Gardens, S.W.; one s. one d.  Entered army, 1882; Brevet Major, 1898; Major, 1901; Lieut.-Col. 1904; Colonel (temp.), 1906; served Hazara Expedition, 1888 (medal with clasp); Hazara, 1891 (wounded, despatches, clasp, D.S.O.); Izazai expedition, 1892; Chitral Relief Force, 1895 (medal with clasp); North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98 (despatches, brevet of Major, three clasps); Waziristan, 1901 (clasp); A.Q.M.G. Intelligence, India, 1903; Commanding 51st Sikhs Frontier Force, 1904. Address: c/o Messrs. Grindlay and Co., 61 Parliament Street, S.W. Club: Naval and Military.

Death: 1 September 1945

Census:
1881: 2 Vyvyan Terrace, Clifton, Gloucestershire
1920: "Edenmore", Hook, Hampshire (death of son George)

Sources:

George Maconchy

of Rathmore, Aughadiffe, county Longford

Birth: 2 July 1818, in Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Maconchy

Mother: Deborah (King) Maconchy

Education: Trinity College Dublin. George entered Trinity College on 16 October 1835, aged 17. He graduated with a B.A. in 1838.

Married (1st): Louisa Elizabeth Richards on 27 April 1843

Children:
Married (2nd): Janet Hamilton (Campbell) Middleton on 2 July 1867 in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England

Children:
Occupation: Magistrate. George was Justice of the Peace for county Longford and county Wexford. George was High Sherriff of county Longford in 1846

Death: 30 October 1889

Arms:
Arms: Gironny of eight, gu, and ermine, on a fess, or, three thistles, slipped. ppr.
Crest: A demi swan, wings expanded, ppr.
Motto: Humani nihil alienum ("Nothing concerning man is indifferent to me")
Seat: Rathmore, Aughadiffe, county Longford

Census & Addresses:
1871: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (History of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland Vol II p864)
1871: 20 Caledonia Place, Clifton, Gloucestershire
1881: 2 Vyvyan Terrace, Clifton, Gloucestershire

Sources:

George Campbell Maconchy

Birth: 23 January 1859, in Exeter, Devon, England
 
Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Married: Lilian Constantia Metherall on 6 April 1887, in Bankipore, Bengal Presidency, India. Lilian was born in 1864/5, the daughter of J. L. Metherall, of Calcutta. She died in 1927, in Cheltenham district, Gloucestershire.
The Times of India, 12 April 1887
April 6th at Bankipore GC Maconchy Public Works Dept son of G Maconchy esq of County Longford Ireland and Torquay Devon to Lilian Constantia daughter of JL Metherall of Calcutta 

Children:
Occupation: Civil Engineer in the Indian Public Works Department. Details of George's career can be seen in the obituary below. George published a number of technical articles such as this one on Discharge from a tidal river into a canal through a sluice in the Minutes of Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Volume 78 (1884) and a Report on Protective Irrigation Works in Bengal, Calcutta (1902). In 1906, George published Problems Connected With Flood Drainage: a Series of Six Lectures Delivered at the Sibpur Engineering College.

Death: 5 June 1907, in Filey, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, aged 48

Obituary:

Indian Engineering, 22 June 1907
The Late Mr. G.C. Maconchy. - By the death of Mr. George Campbell Maconchy the Bengal P.W.D. loses the services of a very valuable officer and a zealous servant. The late Mr. Maconchy joined the Indian Public Works Department, after competitive examination, from the Royal Indian Engineering College, Coopers Hill, in September 1880. He did not, however, arrive in India until October 1881, having gone through a year's practical training in England on the construction of girders, screw piles, piers and general machine work at Messrs. Hawkes and Crawshay's works at Gateshead, and on the construction of a new reservoir for the Bradford water-works. His first posting was to the Balasore Division. He was in charge of the Calcutta Second Division for a short period, from March 1891 to January 1892, when he was made Under-Secretary to the Local Government, an appointment which he held, with great credit, for more than two years. He proceeded on furlough early in 1896 and in 1897, on his return to duty, he was employed on Famine relief works and held charge of the Saran Famine Relief Division. In 1901 again, he was placed on special duty in connection with protective irrigation works in Bengal; and in 1902 he held the appointment of Sanitary Engineer to the Government of Bengal for six months, in addition to being Executive Engineer in charge of the Northern Drainage Embankment Division. He was promoted to the Superintending Engineer class in March 1903, and when in charge of the South-Western Circle he was appointed to act as a member of the Boiler Commission, 1903. In May last year he proceeded on 19 months' leave, never to return, having died at Filey in Yorkshire on the 5th June 1907 at the comparatively early age of 48. He was one of the best men of the Bengal P.W.D. and his death is a distinct loss to the Province.

Census:
1881: 9 Bellevue, Manningham, York, England

Sources:

George Alexander Maconchy

Birth: 12 November 1896, in West Bengal, India

Baptism: 21 December 1896, in Murree, West Bengal, India

Father:
Ernest William Stuart King Maconchy

Mother: Caroline Agnes (Campbell) Maconchy

Occupation: Army Officer.
George was admitted to the Indian Army from the unattached list as a second lieutenant on 26 January 1915, and joined the 5th Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force) (London Gazette 23 July 1915 p7205). He was made acting lieutenant whil adjutant of a batallion on 13 July 1916 until he was made acting captain while commanding a company on 24 August 1916, relinquished on 21 August 1916, when he became acting lieutenant again until 31 October 1916. On 1 December 1916 he was again made acting captain and relinquished this appointment on 24 December 1916 (London Gazette 1 January 1918 p175). He was promoted to lieutenant on 11 February 1917 (London Gazette 13 April 1917 p3511), with the promotion ante-dated to 11 November 1915 (London Gazette 17 August 1917 p8460), and made acting captain while commanding a company on 28 June 1917 (London Gazette 21 June 1918 p7332), and again as acting captain while holding the appointment of adjutant on 16 November 1917 (London Gazette 23 August 1918 p9838), an appointment he relinquished on 24 February 1918 (London Gazette 15 November 1918 p13506), was given again on 31 March 1918 (London Gazette 4 February 1919 p1814), and George was finally promoted to captain on 11 November 1918 (London Gazette 17 June 1919 p7711). George was made acting Lt-Col while commanding the batallion for a few days from 23 December 1919 to 26 December 1919, then acting Major while second in command of the batallion for a few days more until 28 December 1919 (London Gazette 20 April 1920 p4581). George died in action on 14 January 1920.
Delhi Memorial (India Gate)
Delhi Memorial (India Gate) where George's name is inscribed

Death: 14 January 1920, in action in Waziristan, India, aged 23. George Maconchy is memorialised at the Delhi Memorial (India Gate), Face 31, and on the front panel of the War Memorial in Hook, Hampshire. The altar at St Nicholas in Newnham, Hampshire, was given "in memory of Capt. G.A.Maconchy, 5th Royal Gurkha Rifles, k.i.a. Waziristan, 1920"

Sources:

Helen (Maconchy) Colvill

Birth: 1820/1, in Ireland

Baptised: Taney Church, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Maconchy

Mother: Deborah (King) Maconchy

Married: James Chaigneau Colvill on 31 August 1843

Children:
Death: 4 January 1900, in Dublin North district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 78

Census & Addresses:
1881: Overdale, Beckenham, Kent

Sources:

Helen Mary (Maconchy) Ward

Birth: 1845/6, in Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Married: Thomas Le Hunte Ward on 29 April 1869, in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England. Thomas was the brother of the wife of Helen's uncle, Solomon Richards.

Children:
Death: 28 February 1930, in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England, aged 84

Census:
1881: 10 Princess Buildings, Clifton, Gloucestershire
1901: 13 Onslow Gardens, Kensington, London

Sources:

John Maconchy

Birth: 30 May 1793

Father: John Maconchy

Mother: Helen (Cleghorn) Maconchy

Married: Deborah King in March 1816. Deborah was the daughter of Stewart King, of Donaghmeda, county Dublin, Master in Chancery. Deborah's sister, Anna Letitia married John's brother, William Maconchy.

Children:
Death: 10 December 1843

Notes: In 1825, John bought the house "Violet Hill" on Springdale Road in Raheny, county Dublin, and renamed it "Edenmore" after his family estates in county Longford. The house and lands were sold to a railway company in 1847, and today Edenmore houses St Joseph's Hospital.

Sources:

John Arthur Maconchy

of Rathmore, county Longford, and Rathmore, Raheny, county Dublin

Birth: 19 June 1852

Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Education: Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, receiving his diploma in December 1875, followed by successful examinations at the Highland and Agricultual Society of Scotland, and the Royal Agricultural Society.
(The Agricultural Students' Gazette, April 1876, p85)
THE HIGHLAND AND AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY.-The examinations of this Society for certificates and diplomas in Agriculture took place at the Society's Chambers, in Edinburgh, on March 21st and 22nd. Four students of the College entered as Candidates. Maconchy obtained the diploma and life-membership of the Society ; Baker, Cathcart, and Russell obtained first-class certificates, which entitle them to compete for the diploma when of age.
(The Agricultural Students' Gazette, June 1876, p104)
EXAMINATIONS,-In the examination held by the Royal Agricultural Society, at London, in April, J.A. Maconchy and D.L. Janasz obtained the life membership of the Society, with first-class certificates, the former receiving a prize of 25 the latter one of 15.

John was captain of the College Football XV, won the One Mile Race, and was Senior Vice-President of the Debating and Literary Society (debating such topics as "That the importation of Foreign Live Stock into this country ought to be prohibited"
(The Agricultural Students' Gazette, April 1865,  p12)
JA Maconchy (Captain for 1875) - A good forward in the scrimmage, though rather light: too slow outside.

(The Agricultural Students' Gazette, October 1875, p52)
ONE MILE RACE.
- J.A. Maconchy 1, H.K. Norris 2, T.M. Jameson 3, K.F. Brown-Constable 0, -After going two laps at a slow pace, Maconchy drew out from the rest, and soon led by ten yards, Norris taking second place. No further change in position took place, Maconchy coming right away in the last lap, and winning easily by 40 yards. Time, 5 min. 26 secs.

Married: Gertrude Annie Tottenham on 16 August 1887, in Dublin South district, county Dublin, Ireland. Gertrude was born on 14 November 1856, the daughter of Robert Tottenham, of Annamult, county Kilkenny, and Mary Bids (Synge) Tottenham. Gertrude died in July 1947, in Dublin North district, county Dublin, aged 90.

Children:
Occupation: John worked as an trustee in bankruptcy proceedings. Whitaker's Almanack (Whitaker, Joseph, 1907) lists John as an "Official Assignee" of the High Court of Justice of Ireland.

Notes:
John was, for many years, a Secretary of the Church of Ireland Representative Body.

Maconchy Crest
Crest of John Arthur Maconchy
drawing from myfamilysilver.com
Crest:
Crest: A demi swan, wings elevated, arg.
Motto: Humani nihil alienum ("Nothing concerning man is indifferent to me")

Death: 1933, in Dublin North district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 80

Addresses:
1899: 7 Clyde Road, Dublin (History of the Landed Gentry of Ireland p289)
1912: Rathmore, Raheny, county Dublin (Porter's Guide and Directory for North County Dublin 1912)

Sources:

Louisa Georgina Maconchy

Birth: 1846/7, in Ireland

Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Census & Addresses:
1874: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 28 February 1874 p937)
1875: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 27 February 1875 p896)
1876: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 26 February 1876 p989)
1878: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 27 February 1878 p1058)
1879: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 26 February 1879 p1042)
1880: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 25 February 1880 p939)
1881: Camberley Heathcote, Frimley, Surrey
1887: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 28 February 1887 p1085)
1901: Rectory, East Allington, Dorset: Louisa Georgina Maconchy, sister in law, S, 54, Living on own means, Ireland (RG13/2082  fol 47 p7) (staying with her sister Alice and her husband)

Sources:

Louisa (Maconchy) Cairns

Birth: about 1895

Father:
George Campbell Maconchy

Mother: Lilian Constantia (Metherall) Maconchy

Married: Edward Cairns. Edward was born about 1883.

Sources:

Lucy Florence (Maconchy) Lee

Birth: 1850/1, in Ireland

Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Married: Edward Arthur Lee on 15 June 1876, in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England

Children:
Death: 1928, in Petersfield district, Hampshire, England, aged 77

Census & Addresses:
1871: Rectory, Arrow, Warwickshire: Age 20
1874: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 28 February 1874 p937)
1875: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 27 February 1875 p896)
1876: Corrinagh, Torquay, Devon (London Gazette 26 February 1876 p989)
1881: Coldra House, Christchurch, Monmouthshire
1901: Fowley House, Bramshott, Liphook, Hampshire: Lucy F Lee, M, 50, Wife. Born Ireland (RG13/1094 fol 6 p4 schedule 22)

Sources:

Mary (Maconchy) Peel

Birth: 1888, in Dublin South district, county Dublin, Ireland

Father:
 John Arthur Maconchy

Mother: Gertrude Annie (Tottenham) Maconchy

Married: Henry Peel on 12 April 1913, in Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland. Henry was born in November 1882, in Clitheroe district, West Riding of Yorkshire. 

Sources:

Sophia (Maconchy) Colvill

Birth: 1856/7, in Ireland

Father:
George Maconchy

Mother: Louisa Elizabeth (Richards) Maconchy

Married: Robert Frederick Stewart Colvill on 24 October 1891, in Newton Abbot district, Devon, England. Robert was Sophia's first cousin.

Children:
Death: 14 November 1936

Census:
1881: Coldra House, Christchurch, Monmouthshire

Sources:
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