The Stubbs Family

Alan James Arland Stubbs

Birth: 1898, in Cherry Hinton, Cambridgeshire, England

Father: James Warden Stubbs

Mother: Annie (Dixon) Stubbs

Nell Anketell
Ellen Benedict "Nell" Anketell (1927)
Married: Ellen Benedict Anketell on 21 January 1929, in St Mary's Cathedral,  Perth, Western Australia, Australia
The West Australian (Perth, WA) 1 February 1929 p1:
MARRIAGE.  
STUBBS— ANKETELL. — On January 21, 1929, at St. Mary's Cathedral, Perth, by Rev. Dean Brennan, Alan J. A. Stubbs, only son of Mr. J. W. Stubbs, Buenos Aires, to Ellen Benedict, only daughter of the late Mr. R. J. and Mrs. Anketell, South Perth.


Ellen, known as "Nell", was the daughter of Richard John Anketell (a pioneering surveyor/engineer who surveyed the Western Australia section of the Transcontinental Railway, constructed the No. 1 Rabbit Proof fence and the drainage of the Peel Estates and after whom a suburb of Perth is named) and Annie Feely. Nell was prominent local actress, and appeared in many stage productions in Perth. Before her marriage she was usually billed as "Nell Anketell" and afterwards as "Mrs. Alan Stubbs". Two example reviews from the many that appeared in the Perth newspapers are transcribed here:
The West Australian 11 December 1929 p20:
"HAY FEVER."
Repertory Club Success.
Among the younger generation of Englishmen now writing for the stage none has been more successful than Noel Coward, and few, if any, have been so prolific. The Repertory Club s choice of one of this brilliant young man's comedies, "Hay Fever," for performance at the Assembly Hall last night, was justified in the event. A very amusing piece of work it proved. It was played with a capital sense of its needs, notably in the matter of pace—in this connection Miss Molly Ick, the producer, shares the encomiums due—and the large audience obviously found in it an overflowing measure of entertainment. Under the circumstances, it is a pity that one performance only should have been arranged.
...
An able cast gave a very meritorious performance, and well deserved the applause showered upon its work. As Judith Miss N. Anketell (Mrs. Alan Stubbs) differentiated her style cleverly in the pas- sages in which the lady is most obviously play-acting, without falling into exaggeration. Her study was a convincing, and. so far as the part allowed, a gracious and dignified one.

The West Australian 18 October 1934 p20:
"LONDON WALL."
A Glimpse at a Social Factory.
(By "Polygon.")
...
Mrs. Alan Stubbs, as Miss Janus, acted with an effective intensity. There is always a mental concentration to her acting that makes its force felt to spite of any imperfections. In the scene where she earns of her rejection by her fiance, though one feels that there is some unsound psychology to the author's writing of the part, she gripped her audience by her very intensity.

Alan Stubbs Watercolour "South of Mandurah"
"South of Mandurah" by Alan Stubbs, a watercolour painted in 1936
Alan Stubbs Watercolour "South West Coastal Scene"
"South West Coastal scene" by Alan Stubbs, a watercolour painted in 1971
Occupation: Watercolour artist.
Two examples of his work, from early and late in his career, are shown here. These three reviews of exhibitions of Alan's work show his progression over the years.
The West Australian 6 April 1948 p14:
ART OF ALAN STUBBS
A Painter Of Light
(By C.G.).
  A very pleasant exhibition of water colours by Alan Stubbs will be opened by the Honorary Minister for Supply and Shipping (Mrs. Cardell-Oliver) at the Claude Hotchin Gallery, 900 Hay-street, at 3 p.m. today.
  The landscapes cover a wide range of Australian scenery, and include a variety of subjects seen under different conditions. The warmth and clarity of our light receives sympathetic treatment, and the skies are usually really well handled. Several sketches on tinted paper give opportunity for a range of greys and the use of body-colour.
  The artist has broadened his style a good deal, and has gone in for more expression than representation. Many of the pictures show careful study of the scene, sound colour and drawing, and good composition.
  Further developments in this painter's work may be confidently anticipated, for he is a sound workman as well as a persevering student.


The West Australian 27 April 1949 p10:
ART OF ALAN STUBBS
Exhibition Of W.A. Landscapes
  The popularity of Alan Stubbs's paintings of local scenery was evidenced yester- day by the large attendance at the opening of his exhibition by Mr. D. W. Brisbane in the Claude Hotchin Gallery.
  Mr. Brisbane pointed out that Mr. Stubbs was one of the local artists who have made much progress of late. The quality of his work should give visitors much pleasure, he said, and should enable them to secure pictures which they liked and could live with. He had followed Mr. Stubbs's career with much interest, and was glad to congratulate him on the success of his experiments.
Clear And Precise Style
(By C.G.)
  The present exhibition contains a fairly wide range of style and subject. The artist continually experiments with materials and methods of using them, and his results exhibit rather unusual variety. His natural style is rather clear and precise in colour and handling, with open light and clear skies. "Study of Trees" and "Near Denmark" exemplify this well.
  Elsewhere we find pictures of sombre tone and grayed hues. as in the scenes of Albang and the Stirling Ranges. At other times textured or tinted papers are used to experiment with atmospheric effects, as in "Sandhills and Clouds," "The Jetty, South Perth." and "Logs." The two last mentioned are among the best pictures in the show.
  A very pleasing picture is "The South Mole, Fremantle," in which the dark water and some-what dramatic sky convey more than the realities of the scene. Here and there one finds a cer-tain harshness of colour and treatment reminiscent of the artist's early work. but on the whole marked progress has been made. The number of pictures sold is no uncertain evidence that the public appreciates this type of painting.


The West Australian 31 October 1951 p10:
EXHIBITION BY LOCAL ARTIST
(By C.G.)
  In each exhibition Alan Stubbs takes a step forward.
  In his latest show the emphasis is on technique and light, with occasional lapses into a broader and more fluent treatment of landscape, which indicates a probable future development.
  This shows in "The Wind and the Dust" and "Fire-scorched Trees." A soft grey colouring in "A Perth Skyline" is very attractive also.
  Other pictures give variety to the show and indicate the range of the painter's interests. Most of the landscapes are rather static; a feeling for wind or water movement would improve them.

Notes:
Alan was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Field Artillery on 3 November 1917 (London Gazette 9 November 1917 p11669).

Death: 1976, in Australia

Census & Addresses:
1901: Gunton, Suffolk: Alan Stubbs, son, is aged 2, born in Cherry Hinton, Cambridgeshire
1952: Angelo Street, South Perth, Western Australia   (Western Mail (Perth, WA) 3 July 1852 p35)

Sources:

Amy Blanche Glascott Stubbs

Birth: 1870, in Liverpool district, Lancashire, England

Baptism: 24 April 1870, in St Columba, Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Father: Warden Flood Stubbs

Mother: Jane Elizabeth Cecilia (Russell) Stubbs

Sources:

Arabella Maria (Stubbs) Waller

Birth: 1832, in Kilmacahill, county Kilkenny, Ireland

Father: James Morgan Stubbs

Mother: Elizabeth (Glascott) Stubbs

Married: Charles Henry Waller on 22 July 1865, in Sleaford district, Lincolnshire, England

Children:
Notes:
Arabella was a friend of the author Deborah Alcock.
The Author of the Spanish Brothers (Deborah Alcock) Her Life and Works (Elizabeth Boyd Bayly, 1914)
[Deborah Alcock] was invited by a Dublin friend, Mrs. Flood, to spend a few days with her in order to meet a young cousin of hers, Miss Arabella Stubbs, whose sister, Miss Elizabeth Stubbs, was for so long Mrs. Pennefather’s private secretary at Mildmay. This young lady was also busy with her pen, writing essays on India, and the hostess thought the two scribes would like to know each other. So began a friendship which lasted for the rest of life, and brought another in its train when, in 1865, Miss Stubbs became the wife of the Rev. C. H. — afterwards Dr. — Waller, for many years the Principal of St. John’s Hall, Highbury. Deborah’s friendship and correspondence with him made another large addition to her possessions.


Death: 1914, in Faringdon district, Berkshire, England, aged 82

Census:
1881: 16 South Hill Park Gardens, London, Middlesex
1911: Faringdon district, Berkshire: Arabella Maria Waller is aged 79

Sources:

Arland D. Stubbs

Birth: 9 November 1904, in Washington, United States

Father: Charles Arland Stubbs

Mother: Ruby (Harder) Stubbs

Death: December 1985, in Polk county, Oregon, United States

Census:
1910: Precinct 1, Pierce county, Washington
1920: 14th Township, Contra Costa county, California

Sources:

Arthur George Bushby Stubbs

Birth: 11 March 1856, in Rangoon, Burma, India
Allen's Indian Mail 15 May 1856 p293
BIRTHS.
STUBBS, wife of J. W. 46th N.I. s. at Rangoon, March 11.


Baptism: 28 April 1856 in Madras, Madras, India

It is correct that Arthur was born in Rangoon and baptised in Madras six weeks later:
Allen's Indian Mail 15 May 1856 p294 SHIPPING.
PASSANGERS ARRIVED.
  Per steamer Berenice (April 4), from RANGOON.-
Lieut. Stubbs, 46th regt. N. I., and Mrs. Stubbs and child


Father:
James William Stubbs

Mother: Mary Catherine (Bushby) Stubbs

Education: Harrow School, which he attended from 1870 until 1872.
The Harrow School register, 1801-1893 p384 (1894)
    Entrances in January 1870.
Stubbs, Arthur George Bushby, son of Lieut.-Col. Stubbs, Harrow. (Home-Boarder)
  Left Mids. 1872; Lieut. 63rd Regt., 1875; Capt., 1884; joined A.P.D., 1866; served in Afghanistan, medal, 1878-9; in Egypt, medal and bronze star, 1882.
       Capt A. G. B. Stubbs, Acomb, York.


Married: Hannah Elizabeth H. Burge on 8 February 1887 in the parish church, Hampstead, Middlesex, England
Times of India 1 March 1887
DOMESTIC OCCURANCES.
Marriages.
Feb 8 at the parish church Hampstead by Rev RT Stubbs MA Rector of Charlcome Bath, Arthur George Bushby Stubbs Captain the Cheshire Regt son of late Col JW Stubbs Commissioner of West Berar to Hope eldest daughter of Major HB Burge APD late 59th Regt   

Hannah was born in 1862/3, in Dover, Kent, the daughter of Benjamin H. Burge and Caroline L. Burge. She is named as Hope in her marriage notice (but not the official marriage record), Burkes ILG (1899) and the 1911 census. Probably this was what her third initial stood for, and the name she generally went by. Hannah died in 1942, in Bath district, Somerset, aged 79
Census:
1881: Furtho Lodge, Sussex Road, Portsea, Hampshire
1891: Hope Stubbs, wife, is aged 28, born in Dover, Kent
1911: Portsmouth, Hampshire: Hope Stubbs is aged 48

Children:
Occupation: Army Officer, reaching the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army Pay Department.
Arthur was commissioned as a sub-lieutenant in the 63rd Regiment of Foot on 10 September 1875 (London Gazette 10 September 1878 p4453) and, in 1878, was promoted to Lieutenant with seniority from 10 September 1875 (London Gazette 17 September 1878 p5174). Arthur served with the 63rd Regiment in Southern Afghanistan in 1879-80 (medal), leading a company marching with General Phayre in relief of Kandahar.
The history of the late 63rd, West Suffolk, regiment p197 (James Slack, 1884)
  On the 28th July [1880] the regiment was held in readiness to proceed at once to the seat of war in Afghanistan, for the purpose of relieving the besieged garrison of Kandahar. Orders were received to start for Afghanistan on the 12th August. The strength of the regiment proceeding on service was as follows: — Twenty-two officers, and 807 non-commissioned officers and men. The undernamed officers proceeded on service with the regiment: — Lieutenant- William Lowry Auchinleck commanding the regiment, Major C. O. James; Captains, W. L. Gronow, H. B. Cook, H. Chevers; Lieutenants, A. G. B. Stubbs, W. B. Graham, H. S. Smith; Adjutant, F. W. Thomas, L. H. Reid; Second Lieutenants, D. M. L. H. Farrington, M. C. R. Lang, F. B. Mein, T. P. B. Teman, W. J. B. Wickham, E. W. Codrington, D. J. T. O'Brien; Quartermaster D. White; Surgeon-Majors, B. W. Carter, in medical charge, and A. Long; Surgeons, B. W. Weelings and J. Williamson.
  The regiment proceeded in the following order by rail as far as Sibi, a station on the frontier of Beluchistan : — Two companies started on the 12th August, two on the 13th, two on the 14th, and two on the 15th. On the 18th August, at 8 p.m., head-quarters with two companies left Sibi for Quetta, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. L. Auchinleck, viȃ the Bolan Pass, followed on the 19th, 20th, and 2lst by the remaining six companies, two companies each day, there being no accommodation for a larger nunber of men and their followers at the different posts in the Bolan Pass.
  The roads were in bad order, and deep water had to be crossed a number of times. They arrived at Quetta on the 24th, 25th, 26th, and 27th respectively. On the 25th, Captain Cook, Lieutenants Stubbs, and Reid, and second Lieutenant Codrington were ordered to proceed with 168 men to Chaman to join the advanced force under the command of Major-General R. Phayre; and on the 26th, Lieutenant and Adjutant Smith, and Lieutenant Thomas, with 154 men, marched from Quetta to garrison the Khojack, one of the Amram range of mountains - a very important position on the lines of communication; subsequently this party joined the companies under Captain Cook, who assumed command of the four companies.
  On the 29th, at 5 p.m., headquarters with four companies, two guns E battery Royal Horse Artillery to replace those lost at Maiwand, and the 8th Bengal Cavalry, under the command of Brigadier-General W. F. Walker, left Quetta for Kandahar, arriving at Killa Abdulla, distance fifty-two miles, on the 1st September. Second Lieutenant D. M. L. H. Farrington, who was sent back from Sukkur sick, died at Kurrachee on the 3rd September.
  On the 4th, news arrived that Lieutenant-General Roberts with the Kabul-Kandahar Field Force had reached Kandahar from Kabul on the 1st, and totally defeated Sirdar Ayoub Khan. The advanced four companies of the regiment were then within two forced marches of Kandahar and the scene of action.
  On the 5th, orders were issued for them to retire on Gulistan, where they arrived the same day. Orders were again issued to advance towards Kandahar, and on the 6th they arrived again at Killa Abdulla. The four companies were stationed a few miles outside Kandahar.


The 63rd Foot merged with the 96th Foot to form the Manchester Regiment in 1881, and Arthur saw action with the 1st Battalion, Manchester Regiment, in the Egyptian War of 1882 (Medal, and Khedive's Star) (Army List 1890 p264a). Arthur was promoted to captain on 1 January 1884 (London Gazette 4 March 1884 p1064). He transferred from the Manchester Regiment to the Cheshire Regiment on 10 October 1885 (London Gazette 9 October 1885 p4696). On 12 October 1886, Arthur resigned his Combatant Commission and transferred to the Army Pay Department as Paymaster, with the honorary rank of captain (London Gazette 20 October 1891 p5465). He was granted the honorary rank of Major on 9 September 1895 (London Gazette 10 September 1895 p5081) and appointed Staff Paymaster on 26 September 1900 (London Gazette 12 October 1895 p6255). Arthur was granted the substantive rank of Lieutenant-Colonel on 26 September 1905 (London Gazette 26 September 1905 p6474) and retired on 1 May 1913 (London Gazette 2 May 1913 p3151).

Census & Addresses:
1871: Harrow, Middlesex
1881: 18 Bridge Street, Kington, Herefordshire
1894: Acomb, Yorkshire  (The Harrow School register, 1801-1893 p384)
1911: Portsmouth, Hampshire: Arthur Stubbs is aged 55

Sources:

Cecilia Lucy Chambers (Stubbs) Sharpley

Birth: 4 October 1864, in Uttoxeter district, Staffordshire, England

Baptism: 26 February 1865, in Rocester, Staffordshire, England

Father: Warden Flood Stubbs

Mother: Jane Elizabeth Cecilia (Russell) Stubbs

Married: Arthur Henry Sharpley in 1898, in Croydon district, Surrey, England

Children:
Notes: Twin of Mary Lilian Russell Stubbs

Census:

1901: Mangotsfield, Gloucestershire: Celia L. C. Sharpley is aged 36, born in Derbyshire Linconshire
1911: Keynsham district, Somerset: Cecilia Lucy Ch Sharpley is aged 46

Sources:

Charles Saunders Stubbs

Birth: 2 July 1861

Father: James William Stubbs

Mother: Mary Catherine (Bushby) Stubbs

Death: 10 August 1862, in Akola, Bombay, India, aged 1 year and 6 months.
Bombay Times 18 August 1862
At Akola on the 10th August Charles Saunders the infant son of Captain John Stubbs Officiating Deputy Commissioner West Berar aged 1 year and 41 days

Sources:

Charles Arland Stubbs

Birth: November 1871, in Great Bowden, Leicestershire, England

Father: Edward Stubbs

Mother: Anne (Arland, Smith) Stubbs

Married (1st): Ruby Harder on 11 April 1904 in Trinity Parish Church, Seattle, King county, Washington, United States. The marriage was witnessed by D. L. Harder and Mrs. D. L. Harder, both of Issaquah. Charles Arland Stubbs is aged 31, born in Market Harboro', England, the son of Edward Stubbs and Annie Arland, and this is his first marriage. He is a resident of Issaquah, and his occupation is an amalgamator. Ruby Harder is aged 17, born in Port Huron, Michigan, the daughter of D. L. Harder and C. E. Brink, and this is her first marriage. She is a resident of Issaquah.

Ruby was born in 1886/7, in Port Huron, Michigan, the daughter of Delmar Lyon Harder and Charlotte Ella Brink. She died on 6 December 1906, in Seattle, King county, Washington, of peritonitis, aged 20.

Children:
Married (2nd): Frances H. _____
Frances was born  was born in 1886/7, in Scotland
Census:
1920: 14th Township, Contra Costa county, California

Occupation: Quartz Millman (1900) and Amalgamator (1904)
This job wanted ad from the time gives us some idea of the job of a quartz millman:
The San Francisco Call 10 April 1905 p8
QUARTZ millman, thoroughly understanding amalgamation and concentration, desires position; am practical, up to date and capable of taking charge of mill: understand engines, boilers and machinery; steady and reliable; best of references.

Notes: Charles emigrated to the United States in 1888.

Census & Addresses:
1881: 13 Greenfield Road, West Derby, Lancashire
1900: 35th Avenue, Seattle, King county, Washington
1910: Precinct 1, Pierce county, Washington
1920: 14th Township, Contra Costa county, California
1930: Byron, California    (Pacific Grove High Tide 22 August 1930 p1)

Sources:

Daphne Phyllis Stubbs

Birth: 1890, in York, East Riding of Yorkshire, England

Father: Arthur George Bushby Stubbs

Mother: Hannah Elizabeth H. (Burge) Stubbs

Census & Addresses:
1891: Daphne Stubbs is aged 0, born in York, Yorkshire
1901: Sidmouth, Devonshire: Daptine P. Stubbs is aged 10, born in Yorkshire
1911: Portsmouth, Hampshire: Daphne Stubbs is aged 20, born in Acomb, Yorkshire

Sources:

Doris Mary Stubbs

Birth: 1900, in Lowestoft, Suffolk, England

Father: James Warden Stubbs

Mother: Annie (Dixon) Stubbs

Census:
1901: Gunton, Suffolk: Doris Stubbs, daughter, is aged 0, born in Lowestoft, Suffolk

Sources:

Edward Stubbs

Birth: 1833/4, in county Kilkenny, Ireland

Father: James Morgan Stubbs

Mother: Elizabeth (Glascott) Stubbs

Married: Anne (Arland) Smith
Anne was born in 1836/7, in Cossington, Leicestershire, the daughter of George Arland. The 1881 census shows a stepdaughter of Edward, Fanny Smith, presumably from an earlier marriage of Anne's (possibly the marriage of Ann Arland to Edward Smith in Leicester district, 3Q1854 vol 7a p256). Fanny was born in 1856/7, in Sileby, Leicester.
Census:
1901: West Derby, Lancashire: Anne Stubbs is aged 64, born in Cossington, Leicestershire
1911: West Derby district, Lancashire: Ann Stubbs is aged 73

Children:
Occupation: Officer, Royal Navy. Edward reached the rank of Commander.
Midshipman Edward Stubbs was appointed to the Cumberland on 30 December 1850 (United Service Magazine February 1851 p321). Edward was made mate on 9 October 1852 and acting Lieutenant on 15 December 1852 (Navy list 1853 p299). He joined the Arab on 23 August 1853 (Navy list 1853 p138) as second lieutenant. The Arab was stationed  in Chatham in 1853, the East Indies in 1854 and North America and the West Indies in 1855 until 1857 (Navy list 1855 p223). Edward was promoted to lieutenant on 31 March 1856, still serving on the Arab (Navy list 1857 p52), and his seniority was eventually backdated to 15 December 1852. On 12 April 1857, Edward, in command of the Arab's pinnace, captured a slave schooner off the coast of Cuba and took her to Jamaica.
Rootsweb Naval Database
12 Apr 1857 the ship's pinnace under Lieutenant E. Stubbs detained a slave schooner, name unknown, on the coast of Cuba with 369 slaves on board, after a chase of 4 hours, which was taken to St. Ann's Bay on the north side of Jamaica, where the steam sloop Victor accompanied the prize to Port Royal for adjudication by the Vice Admiralty Court at Jamaica and landed the surviving 362 Negro slaves, who were put in the charge of the customs authorities. The pinnace was left to report the situation to the Arab when she arrived at the rendez-vous. No papers or flag to indicate the nationality or name of the vessel, which had departed Cabinda 48 days previously with 500 Negroes.

The "distribution of the tonnage bounty awarded for the Name Unknown, supposed Cuba or Zeldina, captured on the 12th April, 1857, by Her Majesty's ship Arab" occurred on 17 Novmber 1859. Edward would have earned the third class share of 25 19s. (London Gazette 11 November 1859 p4035), approximately 4 months pay.

When the Arab returned to Chatham, Edward stayed with his commander from the Arab, William Pearse, now commanding the newly launched Alert, joining as first lieutenant on 21 November 1857 (Navy list 1858 p142). The Alert sailed from Portsmouth for the Pacific in January 1858 was based at Esquimault on the southern tip of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Alert Bay in British Columbia is named after her, and Pearse Island after her commander. She returned to Plymouth in 1861, and was paid off.
The Times 23 September 1861:
The Alert, 17, screw, Commander Pearse, arrived at Spithead on Saturday, from the Pacific station, sailing from Valparaiso, June 8, passing the Gulf of Peenes on the 20th of June; cleared the Straits of Magellan on the 6th of July; arrived at Rio de Janeiro on the 22d of July, and sailing thence for England four days afterwards. She brought home a few supernumeraries from the station, who were landed from her at Portsmouth, and orders were given her to proceed to Devonport to strip and pay off. In the Straits of Magellan the Alert passed a Russian man-of-war steamer, and off Sandy Point, in the same passage, spoke the English missionary schooner Allan Gardner.

Edward joined the flagship Edgar in the Mediterranean as first lieutenant  on 11 July 1862 (Navy list 1872 p172). He was made commander on 25 March 1863 (Navy list 1872 p371), and finally got his ship, the Pandora, on 21 December 1865, a gun-vessel of 426 tons, stationed on the West Coast of Africa (Navy list 1866 p199). It was not a successful command - on 2 October 1866, the Pandora collided with HMS Griffon in the Bight of Benin a result of which the Griffon was wrecked.
The Nautical magazine December 1866 p685:
  The Army and Navy Gazette gives the following particulars of the loss of the Griffon:- "It appears that on the evening of the 2nd of October, H.M.S. Pandora was at anchor off Little Popoe, when H.M.S. Griffon was seen beating up to relieve her on that station. As she would not to be able to fetch Little Popoe before dark, the Pandora weighed and ran down to her, and Captain Davidson, of the Griffon, came on board to report himself to Captain Stubbs, his senior officer. At 8h. p.m. the two ships in company, under sail alone, with a steady, light breeze, were heading up on the port tack for Little Popoe, distant about two miles, the Griffon being on the Pandora's weather quarter. At this time the wind veered to the northward, and both ships broke off three or four points. The Pandora hove in stays, and, as she came head to wind, the Griffon, with her helm hard up, fouled her port quarter, carrying away a boat's davit. She soon cleared her, however, when the Pandora at once anchored, and the Griffon was hailed to do the same. The order was probably not understood, or, at any rate, not until too late, for in a few moments the Griffon ran into the surf and struck. Both anchors were let go, and the cables veered to the clinch, when they either parted or were slipped, and the heavy rollers and breakers carried the ship on to the beach. The fore and main masts went by the board, and the foreyard surging about alongside, knocked a hole in the port bow; this was, however, immediately patched up. The Pandora got up steam and veered cable until her stern was among the breakers in less than three fathoms water, but owing to the darkness of the night, and to the heavy surf, no material assistance could be rendered.
  It was not until the following forenoon that Captain Davidson, at great personal risk, effected a landing through the rollers, when he found that his officers and men had got safely on shore without any casualty. On the morning of the 3rd communication with the wreck was established by a 7 in. hawser which presently parted. Afterwards the Griffon's stream chain was brought to the Pandora, but the violent motions of both ships in the surf carried it away as soon a a slight strain was brought on it. Subsequently 175 fathoms of the Pandora's bower chain were floated on board the Griffon, every available puncheon, cask, and barrel being lashed to it. This operation, of the utmost difficulty in such a surf, was so successfully carried out, that the cable floated right on to the deck of the Griffon, but on the 6th this also parted. In the meantime the Mullet and Jaseur had arrived, and were joined on the 7th by the Oberon. But by this time it was evident that the Griffon would never come off, and that she was breaking up. So at length the Pandora weighed and steamed out from the perilous position which she had taken up among the rollers from the first. During this time every exertion was made by Captain Davidson to save as much as possible of the ship's stores. The sick were safely housed at Little Popoe. Most of the Griffon's men were sent afloat, while the arduous work on the shore was carried out by Captain Davidson with the Kroomen of the ships present. The ceaseless unflagging exertions by night and by day of the officers of the Pandora and Griffon to save as much government property as possible excited the warmest admiration in the squadron. The Griffon having been but just commissioned, the loss of three years' private stores will fall heavily on the captain and officers."


The Pandora returned to Portsmouth and was paid off on 22 February 1867. John Edwards, the Pandora's master, was court-martialled for the loss of the Griffon, but acquitted.
The Times 16 February 1867:
A naval court-martial assembled yesterday morning, under the presidency of Capt. E. Tatham, Her Majesty's ship Bellerophon, on board Her Majesty's ship Victory at Portsmouth, for the trial of prisoners. Mr. John Edwards, master of Her Majesty's ship Pandora, was arraigned on charge of having, on the 2d of October, 1866, allowed the Pandora to stand too close into the shore off Settle Popo, on the West Coast of Africa. Mr. Edwards was fully and honourably acquitted.

Edward never received another command. He retired on 12 January 1872 (London Gazette 18 January 1872 p196), and was allowed to assume the rank of Retired Captain on 25 March 1878 (London Gazette 29 March 1878 p2245). Edward was a member of the Royal Geographic Society (The Geographical magazine 1 December 1874 p390) and later became Secretary of the Liverpool Seamen's Orphanage (Poverty Bay Herald 12 April 1905).

Death: 1909, in West Derby district, Lancashire, England, aged 75

Census:
1871: Church Green, Great Bowden, Leicestershire
1881: 13 Greenfield Road, West Derby, Lancashire
1901: West Derby, Lancashire: Edward Stubbs is aged 67, born in Ireland and "Ret Capt Rn & Secty Lpool Seamans Orph Institute"

Sources:

Edward George Stubbs

Birth: 1866, in Wiveliscombe, Somerset, England

Father: Edward Stubbs

Mother: Anne (Arland, Smith) Stubbs

Occupation: Assistant schoolmaster at the Bury Grammar School.
Edward George Stubbs, Gent., was appointed Quartermaster of the 1st Volunteer Batallion, the Lancashire Fusiliers on 1 June 1900 (London Gazette 12 June 1900 p3690), and on 1 July 1900, Honorary Lieutenant Edward George Stubbs of the Cadet Corps (Bury Grammar School) attached to 1st Volunteer Batallion, the Lancashire Fusiliers, was made Lieutenant (London Gazette 26 February 1901 p1422).

Death: 1909, in West Derby district, Lancashire, England, aged 42

Census:
1871: Church Green, Great Bowden, Leicestershire
1881: 13 Greenfield Road, West Derby, Lancashire
1901: Bury, Lancashire: Edward George Stubbs, Boarder, is aged 34, born in Wiveliscombe, Somersetshire and an Assistant Schoolmaster

Sources:

Elizabeth Ann Stubbs

Birth: 1816/7, in New Ross, county Wexford, Ireland

Father: James Morgan Stubbs

Mother: Elizabeth (Glascott) Stubbs

Occupation: Private Secretary. In the 1881 census, Elizabeth is shown as Secretary, to a clergyman's widow, Catherine Pennefather. In The Author of the Spanish Brothers (Deborah Alcock) Her Life and Works, Elizabeth Boyd Bayly writes that "Miss Elizabeth Stubbs was for so long Mrs. Pennefather’s private secretary at Mildmay."

In 1855, Elizabeth, along with Catherine Pennefather, were original members of a prayer union founded by Emma Robarts, that became one of the precursor groups to the Young Women's Christian Association.
The Mildmay Conference 1880 pp246-7
Young Women's Christian Association ...
It consists of two parts, which have grown side by side. First, the prayer union, formed of all who desire to be distinctly and avowedly on the side of Christ. This was formed originally by Miss E. Robarts in 1855, and consisted of twenty-three members, who agreed to unite in prayer for young women each Saturday evening. Among these were Mrs. Pennefather, Mrs. H. Bonar, Mrs. Hoare, Miss Stubbs, &c. This prayer union has been silently spreading throughout the world, till at Miss Robarts's death, in 1877, the books contained the names of 10,560. Side by side with this union for prayer, with all its outcome of work for God, has been growing the London Young Women's Christian Association, under the presidency of Lady Kinnaird, for the establishing of classes, Institutes, and Homes as centres of Christian influence in different parts of the metropolis. After Miss Robarts's death these two Associations were united in one organization.

William Pennefather set up a missionary training school for women in the 1860’s. It was first based at 129-133 Mildmay Road and the trainees were known as Mildmay Deaconesses. They worked as missionaries with the poor of London and abroad. They also acted as nurses at the Mildmay Cottage Hospital, and taught evening classes at the Conference Hall. Elizabeth assisted Catherine in the continuation of this work.

Death: 1894, in Islington district, London, England, aged 77

Census:
1881: 68 & 70 Mildmay Park, London, Middlesex

Sources:

Elizabeth Minna Stubbs

Birth: 1876, in Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Baptism: 17 April 1876, in Lancashire, England

Father: Edward Stubbs

Mother: Anne (Arland, Smith) Stubbs

Occupation: Governess (1901)

Census & Addresses:
1881: 13 Greenfield Road, West Derby, Lancashire
1901: West Derby, Lancashire: Elizabeth M. Stubbs, daughter, is aged 25, born in Lpool, Lancashire. She is a Governess.
1930: South America    (Pacific Grove High Tide 22 August 1930 p1)

Sources:

Emily May Stubbs

Birth: 1869, in Great Bowden, Leicestershire, England

Father: Edward Stubbs

Mother: Anne (Arland, Smith) Stubbs

Occupation: Schoolmistress

Notes: In 1930, Emily May was "living in England" according to the obituary of her brother, William.

Census & Addresses:
1871: Church Green, Great Bowden, Leicestershire
1881: 13 Greenfield Road, West Derby, Lancashire
1901: West Derby, Lancashire: Emily M. Stubbs, daughter, is aged 32, born in Great Bowden, Leicestershire and a School Mistress
1911: West Derby district, Lancashire: Emily Mary Stubbs, daughter, is aged 42

Sources:

Florence Lighton (Stubbs) Rowan-Thomson

Florence Lighton Stubbs
Florence Lighton Stubbs
(click for full picture)
photograph courtesy of Barnaby Rogerson
Headstone of John Leslie Rowan-Thomson and Florence Lighton Stubbs
Headstone of Florence Lighton (Stubbs) Rowan-Tomson and John Leslie Rowan-Thomson in All Saints Churchyard, Tunworth, Hampshire
photograph from findagrave.com
Birth: 3 November 1894, in Durban, Natal
South Africa - a weekly journal 8 December 1894
BIRTHS
DAUGHTERS
STUBBS, Mrs. J. W. H., Durban, November 3.


Father: James William Hill Stubbs

Mother: Frances (Maxwell) Stubbs

Married: John Leslie Rowan-Thomson in 1919 in St George Hanover Square district, London, England

John was born in 1896, the second son of William Rowan Thomson and Janet Pender Rowan. He was a major in the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders and lived at Sayers, Great Somerford, Wiltshire. In 1919 John played rugby for Glasgow in an inter-city match against Edinburgh. John died in 1981, and is buried in All Saints Churchyard, Tunworth, Hampshire.

Death: 1975

Buried: All Saints Churchyard, Tunworth, Hampshire, England
The gravestone reads:
In memoriam
Florence Lighton Rowan-Thomson
1894 - 1975
and
Major John Leslie Rowan-Thomson
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
1896 - 1981


Sources:

Hamilton William Cecil Stubbs

Birth: 1868, in Uttoxeter district, Staffordshire, England

Baptism: 27 September 1868, in Rocester, Staffordshire, England

Father: Warden Flood Stubbs

Mother: Jane Elizabeth Cecilia (Russell) Stubbs

Sources:

Herbert Edward Crampton Stubbs

Birth: 1872, in West Derby district, Lancashire, England

Baptism: 16 June 1872, in St Columba, Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Father: Warden Flood Stubbs

Mother: Jane Elizabeth Cecilia (Russell) Stubbs

Married: Nina Kathleen Broadway on 8 March 1899, in Sealkot, Bengal, India. Herbert Edward Stubbs is recorded as single, aged 26, the son of W. Flood Stubbs. Nina Kathleen Broadway is recorded as single, aged 21, the daughter of P. N. Broadway.

Nina was born 1877/8, the daughter of Philip Neville Broadway, Assistant Deputy Superintendent of Police.

Children:
Occupation: Civil Engineer with the Public Works Department in India.

Herbert was elected an Associate Member of the Institute of Civil Engineers on 5 December 1899. His address at the time is listed as P.W.D., Jhelum Valley Road, Srinigar, Kashmir, India. (List of Members of the Institution of Civil Engineers 1900 p188).

Notes: 
Herbert was awarded a patent for a "back-rest for cycle saddles" on 4 August 1903 (Annual report of the Commissioner of Patents 1904 p497)

Sources:

Herbert Stubbs

Birth: 6 December 1906, in Srinigar, Kashmir, Bengal, India

Father: Herbert Edward Crampton Stubbs

Mother: Nina Kathleen (Broadway) Stubbs

Death: 6 December 1906, in Srinigar, Kashmir, Bengal, India

Burial: 7 December 1906, in Srinigar, Kashmir, Bengal, India

Sources:

James Morgan Stubbs

Birth: 1 November 1791

Father: James Stubbs

Mother: Anne (Morgan) Stubbs

Education: Trinity College Dublin, where James graduated B.A. in 1810 and M.A. in 1832.

Married (1st): Elizabeth Glascott on 29 March 1815

Children:
Married (2nd): Mary (Bradley) Morgan on 5 April 1853, in St Peter, Dublin, Ireland. The marriage was witnessed by John William Stubbs and J. H. Stubbs. James Morgan Stubbs is recorded as a widower, of full age, the son of James Stubbs, a clerk in holy orders. His address is Rossdroit, co Wexford, and his occupation is a clerk in holy orders. Margaret Morgan is recorded as a widow, of full age, the daughter of Andrew Hawes Bradley. Her address is 32 Holles Street, Dublin.
Mary was the widow of Rev. Alan Morgan, of Nant-y-deri, Monmouthshire.

Occupation: Clergyman
James was Vicar of Kilmacahill, county Kilkenny, then appointed Prebendary of Ullard, county Kilkenny, in 1835 (The British Magazine 1835 p225). He resigned that position to become rector of Rossdroit, county Wexford on 30 January 1849 (Fasti ecclesiae Hibernicae p85 (Cotton, 1878))

Death: 1 January 1858, at Rossdroit Rectory, county Wexford, Ireland, aged 67
The Gentleman's magazine February 1858 p224
Clergy Deceased.
Jan. 1.
At Rossdroit Rectory, aged 67, the Rev. James Morgan Stubbs.


Sources:

James William Stubbs

James William Stubbs at Akola
Colonel James William Stubbs at Akola, Berar, 1872
(click for full picture)
Birth: 23 February 1824

Father: James Morgan Stubbs

Mother: Elizabeth (Glascott) Stubbs

Married (1st): Mary Catherine Bushby on 25 November 1854, in Madras, Madras, India. James Stubbs is recorded as the son of James Morgan Stubbs. Mary Catherine Bushby is recorded as the daughter of George Alexander Bushby.
Bombay Times 2 December 1854
On the 25th Nov at the Residency Hydrabad by the Right Revd the Lord Bishop of Madras, James William Stubbs Esq 46th regt MNI to Mary Catherine eldest daughter of G.A.Bushby Esq Bengal Civil Service


Mary was born on 9 December 1824 and baptised on 7 January 1825 in Secunderabad, Madras, the daughter of George Alexander Bushby and Mary Ann Grusber Watson. She died on 8 June 1863, at sea, aboard the Walmer Castle, returning to England. Her death is commemorated in the British cemetery in Akola, West Berar. Peter Byrne writes of her memorial and the desecration of the cemetery.
India-L Archives: Subject: THE STUBBS FAMILY, BERAR, INDIA 1863.: 28 August 2001:
Some years ago I was in Akola and, passing the cemetery, saw some youths vandalizing the old memorials headstones. I and a Gurkha companion went in a chased them off but then walked around the cemetery and saw what they were doing.
The old graveyard was in a deplorable state, a sea of plastic and trash, old car tires, broken masonry...with many of the old monuments defaced or smashed and many of graves actually opened up, no doubt by vandals looking for valuables. An elderly custodian told me that he was aunable to do anything about it and was helpless in the face of gangs of young hooligans who came regularly to the place to do this.
As I was leaving the old chowkidar came out to my Land Rover and handed me a small and quite beautiful piece of marble from the (memorial) grave of Mary Stubbs, one of the few unbroken pieces left in the place and which he had kept in his guard shack. I brought it back with me (to the US, Los Angeles, where I now live and work as an author) and nothing would please me more than to be able to give this to any descendent of the Major and his wife, Mary.


Children:
Married (2nd): Elizabeth Ella Black on 3 September 1865, in Poona, Bombay, India. James William Stubbs is recorded as the son of James Morgan Stubbs. Elizabeth Ella Black is recorded as the daughter of Charles Christopher Black.
Elizabeth was born on 9 July 1836 and baptised on 5 January 1837 in St Mary, St Marylebone Road, St Marylebone, London, the daughter of Charles Christopher Black and Catherine Frances Marcia. She died on 25 November 1867.

Children:
Married (3rd): Margaret Mason Yule on 20 June 1872, in Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland.
Margaret was born on 25 June 1827 and baptised on 28 June 1827 in Inveresk with Musselburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, the daughter of William Yule and Elizabeth Paterson. Margaret died on 3 February 1875.
Occupation: Army Officer, Indian Staff Corps, reaching the rank of Colonel.
James was commissioned as Ensign on 27 February 1841, and promoted to Lieutenant on 3 November 1846 (Allen's Indian Mail 30 December 1846 p785). A member of the 46th Native Infantry, he was appointed Adjutant of the 1st inf. Hyderabad con. and made brevet-captain on 27 February 1856 (Allen's Indian Mail 18 April 1856 p228). James was promoted to Captain on 18 February 1861 (London Gazette 24 February 1863 p941), later backdated to 27 February 1856, and appointed to the Madras Staff Corps on 19 February 1862. He was promoted to Major in the Madras Staff Corps on 18 February 1863 (London Gazette 19 May 1863 p2633) with his seniority backdated to 27 February 1861 on 22 March 1865 (London Gazette 28 March 1865 p1746).

Officers of the Berar Commission
Officers of the Berar Commission (Akola, 1868).
James William Stubbs is back row, fifth from left
Allen's Indian Mail 1 July 1864 p505
  Capt. J. T. Bushby, asst. comsr., Hyderabad assigned dists., received charge of the dist. of West Berar from Major Stubbs on the afternoon of March 15, in addition to the duties of his permanent appointment.
...
  Major J. Stubbs, dep. comsr., West Berar, Hyderabad assigned dists., has obtained 13 days' leave of absence to proceed to Bombay, prep. to obtaining leave to Europe, on m.c.

John Thornhill Bushby (also pictured here - 3rd from left in the back row) was the younger brother of James's first wife, Mary Catherine Bushby.

Allen's Indian Mail 14 July 1864 p549
  May 14. - No. 137. -  Major J. Stubbs, dep. comsnr. West Berar, Hyderabad Assigned Districts, reported his departure to England on board the steamship Benares on the 27th March last.

Allen's Indian Mail 21 January 1865 p55
  No. 1,523.- H.E. the Viceroy and Gov. gen. in Council is pleased to app. Maj. J. W. Stubbs, dep. commr., West Berar, Hyderabad assigned dists., to offic. as 1st assist. to the resident at Hyderabad during abs. of Lieut. col. A. R. Thornhill, on m.c. to Europe.
  Maj. Stubbs reported his arrival at Hyderabad on the evening of Nov. 17, from leave on m.c. to Eur., and assumed charge of the office of 1st assist. resident, superint. of residency bazaars, and extra assist. in the Thuggee and Dacoitee dept., from Capt. H. Fraser, officg. 1st assist. resident, on the forenoon of Nov. 18, from which date Capt. Fraser reverts to his appointment of 2nd assist. resident.


Reminiscences of an old English civil engineer pp60-61 (Robert Maitland Brereton, 1908)
  Between 1865 and 1867 Mr. Brereton was resident engineer of No. 18 contract, betweeen Goolburgah and the Krishna River, within the Nizam's Dominion. Returning from Hyderabad (where he had been on business matters to see Sir George Yule, the Resident, and Salar Jung), in November, 1866, his horse fell on its side and Mr. Brereton's left leg was badly broken between the knee and ankle. This occurred when about 60 miles from Hyderabad; the only surgical aid then available was at Secunderabad, so he had himself carried on a charpoy conveyed on the heads of men and women, from village to village, to the house of his friend, Major James Stubbs, who was then first assistant to Sir George Yule, where he was attended by Dr. Pemberton, the residency surgeon. It took over forty hours to reach Secunderabad; in which he suffered much pain from the jolting method of conveyance. The following is copy of a letter written by Salar Jung to Major Stubbs:
          Hyderabad, Nov. 21, 1866.
My Dear Major Stubbs:
  I heard with much concern yesterday from Sir George Yule that Mr. Brereton had met with a severe accident. I am anxious to know about him and trust the accident does not entail very much suffering. Pray kindly assure him of my sympathy and my earnest hope that he will be all right again very soon ; and be able to give me his opinion about the steam carriage; for I am sure neither his friends nor the public can spare for any lengthened time the counsels and assistance of a man of his talents.
          (Signed) SALAR JUNG.


Salar Jung was Prime Minister of Hyderabad. Sir George Yule was the elder brother of James's third wife, Margaret Yule.

James was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel in the Madras Staff Corp on 27 February 1867 (London Gazette 5 July 1867 p3774). He was appointed, as a temporary assignment, Deputy Commisioner of the newly created Ellichpur district on 23 July 1867, which position he held for two months (Gazeteers of the Bombay Presidency)

He was again 1st Assistant Resident in Hyderabad in 1868, when Sir Richard Temple was Political Resident and he recalled James in several entries in his diary, amongst them:
Journals kept in Hyderabad, Kashmir, Sikkim, and Nepal p122 (Sir Richard Temple, 1887)
  TUESDAY, May 14th. [1868] - I sent the First Assistant, Col. Stubbs, to wait on the Minister, and remonstrate about a murder, wherein the corpse of the murdered woman was lying for hours on one of the high roads near the Residency, without apparently any notice being taken of it by the Nizam's police!
  I also asked Col. Stubbs as an officer of much experience, about the Arabs, and his account was much the same as Col. Briggs's. He thought, however, that they were not hostile to British interests, and that their Chiefs in particular were too rich to be revolutionary. I thought to myself that if the account given by Col. Briggs and Col. Stubbs, both very competent witnesses, of the strength of the Arabs, be correct, it was necessary that we should try to prevent their numbers increasing by immigration from Arabia. At the same time I thought that the Arabs of the present day could not be really very formidable.


James was promoted to Colonel on 27 February 1872 (London Gazette 4 October 1872 p4747).

Death: 27 January 1873, in Hendon district, Middlesex, England, aged 49

Will: proved 27 February 1873 by Sir George Udney Yule, Knight Commander of the Most Illustrious Order of the Star of India, and a Companion of the Order of the Bath, one of the executors therein named, leave being reserved to Lieutenant-Colonel Richard Godfrey Jones, the other executor named in the said will, to come in and prove the same.

Addresses:
1873: Harrow-on-the-Hill, Middlesex (London Gazette 20 May 1873 p2518)

Sources:

James William Hill Stubbs

James William Hill Stubbs
James William Hill Stubbs
photograph courtesy of Barnaby Rogerson
Birth: 24 January 1860, in Jaulnah, Madras, India
Allen's Indian Mail 7 March 1860 p176
BIRTHS.
STUBBS, wife of Capt. J., son, at Jaulnah, Jan 24


Baptism: 11 February 1860, in Jaulnah, Madras, India

Father: James William Stubbs

Mother: Mary Catherine (Bushby) Stubbs

Education: Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, Colorado
The Mines magazine p287 (Colorado School of Mines Alumni Association, 1914)
An old time ex-Mines man, James Stubbs, is "Technical Adviser" for the Sir J. B. Robinson interests in South Africa. Residence, Randfontein, Transvaal, S. Africa.
James attended the meeting of the American Institute of Mining Engineers held in Ottawa, Canada in October 1889. His address is listed as Wimbledon, England.

Married: Frances Maria Maxwell in 1892 in West Derby district, Lancashire, England

Frances was born on 23 January 1860, the daughter of George Maxwell. She died on 9 July 1925, and was buried in the Evangelical cemetery, Meran, South Tyrol, Italy.
The gravestone reads:
James William Hill Stubbs b. Jaulnah 29 January 1860. d. 19 April 1925
Frances Maria Stubbs b. 23 Jan 1860 d. 9 July 1925


Children:
Occupation: Mining Engineer and manager.
James was a managing director for J. B. Robinson Group.
Journal of the South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy April 1989 p116
SPOTLIGHT on Randfontein Estates Gold Mining Company
1896
  Suddenly, the Porges mill closed, with the directors announcing a shortage of labour and political disturbances. Development and stoping had not kept abreast of the 60-stamp mill.
  After four months the mill was reopened, and it was announced that a 100-stamp mill would be built. This sudden announcement led to the resignation of James Ferguson, and a young manager, James Stubbs, was brought in from Eastleight near Klerksdorp.
...
1904
  Yeatman, whose contract had expired, decided to return to the US. Hammond had returned to the US earlier, and James Stubbs took over complete management.
...
1906
  James Stubbs introduced six lightweight mechanical rock-drills, designed on the Rand by W. D. Gordon, to Porges Randfontein. He was promoted to managing director of Randfontein Estates, replacing James Ferguson, who had retired.
  In addition to crushing batteries, Stubbs also introduced tube mills to the property. The tube mills were to prove so efficient that they were soon introduced to all the Randfontein subsidiaries.
...
1908
  Stubbs was transferred to the Robinson Group's head office in Johannesburg, and he was replaced as general manager by a Cornishman, James Hebbard.

In a commission of enquiry into the control of Chionese labourers, conducted in Johannesburg in May 1906, the list of witnesses includes "Stubbs, James William Hill, Consulting Engineer, J. B. Robinson Group"

In August 1920 James, then working for Bainbridge,, Seymour and Co. Ltd made a two month long trip to Algeria. (Mining Magazine 1920 p104 and p167)

Notes:
James was a commissioned into the Royal Naval Reserve on 9 February 1877 (Navy List  1877 p219).

James is credited with introducing football to the Rocky Mountain region in 1888. While attending the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, James started a football team at the school, the first in the region. For a while the Mines team was a regional powerhouse - in 1890 it handed the newly formed football team at the University of Colorado a 103-0 loss - still the worst in the Buffalo's history.
The Mines magazine pp93-4 (Colorado School of Mines Alumni Association, 1919)
  We are proud of these heroic contributions of the children of James W. Stubbs, the founder of football in the Rocky Mountains. Mr. Stubbs and Harry A. Piper came to Golden in 1888 and enrolled in the Special Course in Assaying that was given at that time. They were two Englishmen who possessed that characteristic fondness for sports. They prevailed upon President Chauvenet for permission to introduce the new game and organize a school team. With Dr Chauvenet's open-mindedness and favorable attitude, the innovation met with instant success. The regular members of the first team were:
C. D. Smith, Capt.
Jas. W. Stubbs
H. A. Piper
R. W. Johnson
D. E. Heller
W. B. Lewis
E. C. De Lancy
E. A. Thies
W. H. Craigue
D. C. Irish
F. M. G. A. Wertheim-Salmonson.
  Mr. Stubbs and his brother-in-law Fred A. G. Maxwell, '95, are very prominent in South African mining affairs at Johannesburg.


During the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902), James joined the Rand Rifles and was commissioned as lieutenant. The Rand Rifle corps was raised towards the end of 1900, and was generally employed on the defences of Johannesburg and of posts in the surrounding district. They saw some skirmishing and some sharp attacks on posts, but they were not in any big engagements. The corps remained on service till the end of the war. The Rand Rifles Mine Guards helped to protect the goldmines against destruction.

Death: 19 April 1925

Buried: Evangelical cemetery, Meran, South Tyrol, Italy
The gravestone reads:
James William Hill Stubbs b. Jaulnah 29 January 1860. d. 19 April 1925
Frances Maria Stubbs b. 23 Jan 1860 d. 9 July 1925


Census & Addresses:
1871: Harrow, Middlesex
1890: Wimbledon, Surrey   (Transactions of the American Institute of Mining Engineers page xxviii)
1907: P.O. Box 2, Randfontein, Transvaal, South Africa  (Report of the South African Association for the Advancement of Science p610)
1914: Randfontein, Transvaal, South Africa

Sources:

James Edmund Glascott Stubbs

Birth: 1865, in Uttoxeter district, Staffordshire, England

Baptism: 11 February 1866, in Rocester, Staffordshire, England

Father: Warden Flood Stubbs

Mother: Jane Elizabeth Cecilia (Russell) Stubbs

Death: 1870, in Liverpool district, Lancashire, England

Sources:

James Warden Stubbs

Birth: 1868, in Great Bowden, Leicestershire, England

Father: Edward Stubbs

Mother: Anne (Arland, Smith) Stubbs

Education: Cambridge University, matriculating in 1889, but apparently not graduating.
Alumni Cantabrigiensis Part II vol 6 p75 (Venn, 1954)
STUBBS, JAMES WARDEN. Non-Coll. Matric. Easter, 1889. 'Of the Argentine and latterly of Bognor Regis.' Died at Solihull, Oct. 4, 1949, aged 81. (The Times, Oct. 21, 1949.)

Married: Annie Dixon in 1893 in Cambridge district, Cambridgeshire, England
Annie was born 1863, in Cambridge Holy Trinity, Cambridgeshire, the daughter of Thomas Dixon and Lucy Ellen Eastgate.
Census:
1881: Park Lodge, Park Terrace, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire
1901: Gunton, Suffolk: Annie Stubbs is aged 37, born in Cambridge Holy Trinity, Cambridgeshire

Children:
Occupation: Engineer, Post Office Telegraph

Notes: In 1888 James was secretary of a missionary club, the Diokontes Union in Cambridge.
The Church missionary gleaner March 1888 p47:
ANOTHER Missionary "club" of young men has been established at Cambridge, similar to the Mpwapwas, the Yorubans, and the Travancoreans It is called the "Diokontes Union" - diokontes being the Greek for those who "follow after" (Phil. iii. 12). The fields chosen to be specially studied by the members are the Niger, Nyanza, Punjab and Sindh, Japan, New Zealand, and Rupert's Land. All the members are also members of the Gleaners' Union. Mr. J. Warden Stubbs is Secretary.

Death: 4 October 1949, in Solihull, Warwickshire, England, aged 81

Census & Addresses:
1871: Church Green, Great Bowden, Leicestershire
1881: 13 Greenfield Road, West Derby, Lancashire
1901: Gunton, Suffolk: James Stubbs is aged 33, born in Bowden, Leicestershire and an Engineer P O Telegraph
1914: 783 Calle Florida, Buenos Aires, Argentina  (Year book of the Royal Colonial Institute 1914 p204)
1916: 783 Calle Florida, Buenos Aires, Argentina  (Year book of the Royal Colonial Institute 1916 p207)
1929: Buenos Aires, Argentina (The West Australian (Perth, WA) 1 February 1929 p1)
Alumni Cantabrigiensis Part II vol 6 p75 (Venn, 1954) describes him as "Of the Argentine and latterly of Bognor Regis".

Sources:

James Maxwell Stubbs

James Maxwell Stubbs
James Maxwell Stubbs
(click for full picture)
photograph courtesy of Barnaby Rogerson
James Maxwell Stubbs
James Maxwell Stubbs when he was in the 3rd Hussars at the beginning of the First World War.
photograph courtesy of Barnaby Rogerson
Birth: 18 November 1895, in Durban, Natal

Father: James William Hill Stubbs

Mother: Frances (Maxwell) Stubbs

Occupation: Army Officer and Commissioner in the Sudan Political Service
James served in the First World War. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 3rd Hussars on 1 October 1914 (Army List 1919 p268). James was seconded from the 3rd Hussars to the Royal Flying Corps as a a Flying Officer (Observer) on 27 September 1916 (London Gazette 13 October 1916 p9863) and was appointed a Flying Officer in the Military Wing of the Royal Flying Corps on 2 May 1917, with seniority from 3 July 1916 (London Gazette 29 May 1917 p5332). James was promoted to Lieutenant on 1 July 1917, while remaining seconded to the RFC (London Gazette 14 December 1917 p13145). James was severely wounded in an aerial combat (The Mines magazine pp93-4). James relinquished his commission, on ceasing to be employed, on 25 January 1919 (London Gazette 25 February 1919 p2739). James was promoted to captain in the 3rd Hussars, while remaining seconded, on 10 October 1927. He was given regimental seniority from 2 April 1925, but this seniority did not for army seniority or pay (London Gazette 6 March 1928 p1580). James was restored to the establishment on 17 February 1929, and retired on 9 March 1929 (London Gazette 8 March 1929 p1677). Captain Stubbs, having exceeded the age limit of liability to recall, ceased to belong to the Reserve of Officers on 18 November 1946 (London Gazette 10 December 1946 p6066).

James was District Commissioner of Northern Bhar el Ghazal, in Sudan, taking over from Mr. B. Owens (Sudan Tribune 14 September 2012). James, then District Commissioner of the Sudan Political Service, was awarded an O.B.E. on 3 June 1935 (London Gazette 31 May 1935 p3608). James published a paper on the "Fresh Water Fisheries in the Northern Bahr el Ghazal Waters" in Sudan Notes and Records vol 30 no. 2 (1949), pp. 245-251, while stationed at Aweil, which was accompanied by a set of sketches by his wife. Mrs. Stubbs was also the illustrator of An illustrated guide to the freshwater fishes of the Sudan (H. Sandon, 1950). James also published a papers "Notes on Beliefs and Customs of the Malwal Dinka of the Bahr el Ghazal Province" in Sudan Notes and Records vol 17 no. 2 (1934), pp. 244-254 and "Customary Law of the Aweil District Dinkas" in Sudan Law Journal and Report in 1962.

Death: 27 April 1981

Census:
1911: Bristol, Gloucestershire: James Maxwade Stubbs, is aged 15, born in Durban, Natal

Sources:

Kathleen Muriel (Stubbs) Ratti

Birth: 1897, in Cherry Hinton, Cambridgeshire, England

Father: James Warden Stubbs

Mother: Annie (Dixon) Stubbs

Married: Edmund I. Ratti in 1947 in Solihull district, Warwickshire, England

Occupation: Physiotherapist

Notes:
In July 1952 Kathleen flew out to Perth, Australia, to visit her brother, Alan, whom she had not seen for over 30 years.
Western Mail (Perth, WA) 3 July 1852 p35:
A BROTHER and sister who had not seen each other for nearly 30 years were able to be re-united in Perth as the result of fast, modern transport. Mrs. Edmund Ratti, a sister of Mr. Alan Stubbs, of Angelo-street, South Perth, flew out from England to spend two short weeks here before flying back to Warwickshire to her urgent work in physiotherapy. Entertained by Mrs. Michael Anketell, Mrs. Brendon Garner and other family relatives, the visitor is very impressed with local hospitality and with her first glimpses of the Australian countryside.

Census:
1901: Gunton, Suffolk: Kathleen Stubbs, daughter, is aged 4, born in Cherry Hinton, Cambridgeshire

Sources:

Lucy Charlotte Stubbs

Birth: 1822, in county Wexford, Ireland

Father: James Morgan Stubbs

Mother: Elizabeth (Glascott) Stubbs

Death: 1907, in Dublin North district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 85

Census:
1861: Rocester, Staffordshire: Lucy C. Stubbs, sister (to Warden E. Stubbs), is aged 39, born in county Wexford
1901: West Derby, Lancashire: Lucy C. Stubbs, sister (to Edward Stubbs), is aged 78, born in Ireland

Sources:

Mabel Cecilia Kathleen Stubbs

Birth: 17 July 1901, in Kashmir, India

Father: Herbert Edward Crampton Stubbs

Mother: Nina Kathleen (Broadway) Stubbs

Sources:

Margaret Dora Stubbs

Birth: 29 July 1866, in Bolarum, Hyderabad, Madras, India
Allen's Indian Mail 4 September 1866 p689
BIRTHS.
STUBBS - At Hyderabad, July 29, the wife of Major Stubbs, 1st Assistant Resident, of a daughter


Baptism: 23 October 1866 in Chudderghant, Madras, India

Father: James William Stubbs

Mother: Elizabeth Ella (Black) Stubbs

Death: 19 April 1937, in Chelsea district, London, England, aged 70

Census:
1871: Harrow, Middlesex
1901: Sidmouth, Devon: Margaret A. Stubbs is aged 34, born in India and living on her own means
1911: Bristol district, Gloucestershire: Margaret Dora Stubbs is aged 44

Sources:

Margaret Anne (Stubbs) Mayes

Birth: 1877, in Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Baptism: 22 March 1877, in Lancashire, England

Father: Edward Stubbs

Mother: Anne (Arland, Smith) Stubbs

Married: Howard Mayes in 1905 in West Derby district, Lancashire, England.
Howard was born in 1877 in Southampton district, Hampshire, the son of Walter and Emma Mayes. He was baptised in 1877 in Southampton All Saints, Hampshire. He was a marine engineer. In 1955 Howard was president of the family firm, E. Mayes & Son, a department store in Southampton.
Census:
1881: 174 High Street, Southampton All Saints, Hampshire
1891: "Kelvedon", Winn Road, South Stoneham, Hampshire
1901: 25 Winn Road, Portswood, Hampshire: Howard Mayes is aged 23, born in Southampton, Hants and he is a Marine Engineer (RG13/1068 folio 153 p6)

Census:
1881: 13 Greenfield Road, West Derby, Lancashire

Sources:

Mary Sarah Stubbs

Birth: 1820/1, in county Wexford, Ireland

Father: James Morgan Stubbs

Mother: Elizabeth (Glascott) Stubbs

Census:
1861: Rocester, Staffordshire: Mary P. Stubbs, sister (to Warden E. Stubbs), is aged 40, born in County Wexford
1871: Harrow, Middlesex
1901: Sidmouth, Devonshire: Mary Stubbs, head, is aged 81, born in Ireland. She is living on her Own Means.

Sources:

Mary Lilian Russell Stubbs

Birth: 4 October 1864, in Uttoxeter district, Staffordshire, England

Baptism: 26 February 1865, in Rocester, Staffordshire, England

Father: Warden Flood Stubbs

Mother: Jane Elizabeth Cecilia (Russell) Stubbs

Notes: Twin of Cecelia Lucy Chambers Stubbs

Census:
1901: Sevenoaks, Kent: Lilian Stubbs is aged 36, born in Rocester, Staffordshire
1911: Axminster, Devonshire: Lilian Mary R. Stubbs is aged 46

Sources:

Mary Bushby (Stubbs) Harvie

Mary Bushby Stubbs
Mary Bushby Stubbs
(click for full picture)
photograph courtesy of Barnaby Rogerson
Mary Bushby Stubbs
Mary Bushby Stubbs
image from Great War London citing IWM Women at War archive
Father: James William Hill Stubbs

Mother: Frances (Maxwell) Stubbs

Married: John Keith Harvie in 1919 in St. George Hanover Square district, London, England

John was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Harvie. of Kinirsmead, Bidston, Cheshire

Notes:
Mary was an ambulance driver on the Western Front during World War I, and was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in battle. She was also awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French government for her bravery in a separate incident.
London Gazette 19 October 1918 p12304
War Office,
19th October, 1918.
  His Majesty the KING has been pleased to approve the award of the Military Medal to the undermentioned Ladies for distinguished services in the Field as recorded:

...
Miss Mary Stubbs, F. A. N. Y.
  For gallantry and devotion to duty during an enemy air raid. Miss Stubbs was detailed to evacuate a hospital. While her car was waiting to be loaded a bomb dropped within 30 yards. The stretcher-bearers, who had been loading a car immediately in front, ran for protection to dug-outs, calling to Miss Stubbs to do the same. She, however, regardless of her own safety, stayed in the open with two wounded and helpless patients to help and reassure them. She finally got them unloaded and to a place of safety. During the unloading a second bomb fell on the hospital.

Mary's war service is mentioned in
Within the year after pp237-8 (Betty Adler, 1920)
   I want to tell you about these English Fany girls for they are one of the joys of my motoring in Belgium. F. A. N. Y. stands for First Aid Nursing Yeomanry, an organization of English war workers, that saw some of the foremost of the women’s service in the war. There is Mary Bushby Stubbs, such a pretty, blue-eyed Irish girl, whose home is in London, and she drove the car to Louvain. She had enlisted in the beginning of the war as a Red Cross Nursing Aid, but contracted a septic throat from nursing poisonous wounds — some of the wounded had gone for five days before they could reach the hospitals, she told me. Forbidden to nurse, she entered the Yeomanry motor car driving service and was sent to Chalons sur Marne in February, 1917. She drove an ambulance during the battle on the Chemin du Dames, was in the drive of Chalons and at Epernay. She has the Croix de Guerre, has one citation from the Chemin du Dames and one for the time they bombed the hospital at Chalons.
  “We lived on the rations of the French soldiers and often we were hungry,” she told me, once. “Their rations were black bread, black coffee, horse meat and beans.” She was one of the motor girls chosen to run the cars that brought the prisoners back from Germany after the armistice and had many thrilling moments.


The Mines magazine pp93-4 (Colorado School of Mines Alumni Association, 1919)
  Our beloved President Emeritus, Regis Chauvenet, has very kindly given us this photograph and account of the heroism displayed by Miss Mary Stubbs, the daughter of James W. Stubbs, the founder of football at the Colorado School of Mines.
  The following anecdote will be of special interest to our "boys" of the 90's; it will bring back visions of the days whose memories are sweet.
  On July 17, 1918, Miss Stubbs, of the British F. A. N. Y. [First Aid Nursing Yeomanry], was awarded the Medaille Militaire for gallantry and devotion to duty, during an enemy air raid on a hospital. She was detailed to assist in the evacuation of a French hospital. While her ambulance was waiting to be loaded with injured, a bomb exploded within thirty yards of her. The stretcher-bearers, who were loading her car, ran for protection to nearby dug-outs. Despite their pleas for her to seek safety, she remained in the open with two of her helpless patients and comforted them. With great difficulty she moved them to a place of safety. As she was unloading them a second bomb fell and added to the horror of the situation, but fortunately all three escaped injury.
  Again, on October 26, 1918, for bravery displayed during the evacuation of Hospital 33 at Chalons sur Marne, during the fierce night-bombardment of Arrons, she was awarded the Croix de Guerre.
  Her brother, J. M. Stubbs of the R. A. F. was severely wounded in an aerial combat.
  We are proud of these heroic contributions of the children of James W. Stubbs, the founder of football in the Rocky Mountains. Mr. Stubbs and Harry A. Piper came to Golden in 1888 and enrolled in the Special Course in Assaying that was given at that time. They were two Englishmen who possessed that characteristic fondness for sports. They prevailed upon President Chauvenet for permission to introduce the new game and organize a school team. With Dr Chauvenet's open-mindedness and favorable attitude, the innovation met with instant success. The regular members of the first team were:
C. D. Smith, Capt.
Jas. W. Stubbs
H. A. Piper
R. W. Johnson
D. E. Heller
W. B. Lewis
E. C. De Lancy
E. A. Thies
W. H. Craigue
D. C. Irish
F. M. G. A. Wertheim-Salmonson.
  Mr. Stubbs and his brother-in-law Fred A. G. Maxwell, '95, are very prominent in South African mining affairs at Johannesburg.


Death: 1937, in St Marylebone district, London, England, aged 43

Sources:

Murray Stubbs

Birth: 24 December 1857

Baptism: 10 January 1858 in Sholapore, Bombay, India

Father: James William Stubbs

Mother: Mary Catherine (Bushby) Stubbs

Death: 2 July 1859, in Jaulnah, Madras, India, aged 1 year and 6 months.
Bombay Times 6 July 1859
At Jaulna on the 2nd July Murray the infant son of Captain James Stubbs 46th Regiment Madras NI aged 1 year & 6 months.

Sources:

Spencer Pomeroy Balfour Stubbs

Birth: 1876, in West Derby district, Lancashire, England

Baptism: 7 May 1876, in St Columba, Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Father: Warden Flood Stubbs

Mother: Jane Elizabeth Cecilia (Russell) Stubbs

Death: 1877, in West Derby district, Lancashire, England

Sources:

Warden Flood Stubbs

Birth: 1830/1, in county Kilkenny, Ireland

Father: James Morgan Stubbs

Mother: Elizabeth (Glascott) Stubbs

Education: Trinity College Dublin, where Warden graduated B.A. in 1852.

Married:
Jane Elizabeth Cecilia Russell on 18 April 1861, in St Thomas, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland. The marriage was witnessed by Cecil Russell and John Boxwell. Warden F. Stubbs is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, a clerk in orders, resident at 75 L. Gardiner Street, Dublin, the son of James M. Stubbs, a clerk in orders. Jane E. C. Russell is recorded as a spinster, of full age, resident at 75 L. Gardiner Street, Dublin, the daughter of Cecil Russell, a clerk in orders. Jane signed her name in the register as J. E. Cecilia Russell.

Cecilia was born in 1837/8, in Ireland, the daughter of Rev. Cecil Russell.
Census:
1901: Sevenoaks, Kent: Cecelia Stubbs is aged 63, born in Ireland
1911: Axminster, Devonshire: Jane Elizabeth Cecilia Stubbs is aged 73

Children:
Occupation: Clergyman
Warden was ordained deacon in 1853 and priest in 1855. He was curate of Rossdroit, county Wexford, where his father was rector,  from 1853 until 1855, then curate at Ballinasloe, county Galway from 1855 until 1857, vicar of Rocester, Staffordshire from 1857 until 1869, then vicar of St Columba, Liverpool, from 1869 until 1888.

The Irish-American 5 September 1857 (New York, New York)
Galway
The Rev. Warden STUBBS, curate of Ballinasloe, has been presented to a valuable living in Staffordshire.

Crockford's clerical directory p632 (1868)
STUBBS, Warden Flood, Rocester Parsonage (Staffs), near Ashbourne, Derbyshire. - Dub. A.B. 1852; Deac. 1853, Pr. 1855. P.C. of Rocester, Dio. Lich. 1857. (Patron, W.H. Bainbridge, Esq; P. C's Inc. 160l and Ho; Pop. 1028.) Formerly C. of Rossdroit, co. Wexford, Ireland. 1853-55, Ballinasloe, Ireland 1855-57.

Bibliotheca staffordiensis p440 (1894)
STUBBS, Rev. Warden Flood. Trin. Coll., Dublin; B.A., 1852; Curate of Ross Droit, Wexford, 1853-55; Ballinasloe, Galway, 1855-57; Vicar of Rocester, 1857-59, P.C., St. Columbs, Liverpool, 1869-88; now of Belle Vue, Grange Road, Upper Norwood, S.E.
  Letters to the Public Press on "Synods," "Woodard Schools."


Publications:
Some of Life's Gleanings. Commonplace Book for Churchmen on Protestant Questions of the Day. From MS. books of the late Russell Wing. Selected and arranged by Warden F. Stubbs. (1904)

Death: 1908, in Sevenoaks district, Kent, England, aged 77

Census:
1861: Warden E. Stubbs is aged 30, born in County Kilberry
1891: Warden F. Stubbs is aged 60, born in Ireland
1894: Belle Vue, Grange Road, Upper Norwood, London  (Bibliotheca staffordiensis p440)
1899: The Limes, Mostyn Road, Merton Park, Surrey (Landed gentry of Ireland page xliv)
1901: Sevenoaks, Kent: Warden T. Stubbs is aged 70, born in Ireland and a Clergyman Church of England

Sources:

Warden James Christopher Stubbs

Birth: 1863, in Uttoxeter district, Staffordshire, England

Baptism: 27 September 1863, in Rocester, Staffordshire, England

Father: Warden Flood Stubbs

Mother: Jane Elizabeth Cecilia (Russell) Stubbs

Death: 1939, in Hastings district, Sussex, England, aged 75

Census:
1911: Oxford, Oxfordshire: Warden J. C. Stubbs is aged 44

Sources:

William Glascott Stubbs

Father: James Morgan Stubbs

Mother: Elizabeth (Glascott) Stubbs

Occupation:
Army Officer, Royal Artillery
William was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery on 19 June 1844 (London Gazette 25 June 1844 p2179) and promoted to First Lieutenant in the Royal Regiment of Artillery on 2 April 1846 (London Gazette 3 April 1846 p1236).

Death: in Australia

Sources:

William Glascott Stubbs

Birth: July/August 1870, in Great Bowden, Leicestershire, England

Father: Edward Stubbs

Mother: Anne (Arland, Smith) Stubbs

Married: Orrell Clementine Boudouin
Orrell was born in March 1874, in Grass Valley, Nevada county, California. Her father was born in France and her mother, Agnes, in Maryland. In the 1900 census, she is an attendant at the Stockton State Hospital.
Census:
1900: Stockton State Hospital, Stockton, San Joaquin county, California
1910: Township 8, Contra Costa county, California
1920: Precinct 53, Fresno, Fresno county, California

Occupation: William was an inspector in the oil industry, and worked for the Associated Pipe Line Co. Later in life he was appointed, and then elected, City Clerk of Pacific Grove, California.
Extinguishing and Preventing Oil and Gas Fires p16 (C. P. Bowie, 1920)
However, the particular solution used at Coalinga is giving good results. Mr. A. S. Jones, superintendent of the Associated Pipe Line Co., under date of April 29, 1919, inclosed a report of the same date from the company's inspector, Mr. W. G. Stubbs, in which Mr. Stubbs says that the original solutions were mixed at Coalinga in 1915, and in October, 1917 - two years later - the solutions in the tanks had evaporated somewhat, and when the tanks were refilled to the original level there was a slight addition of chemicals. He adds: "From that time, October, 1917, to date, April 29, 1919, no further addition of chemicals was made, and the samples, taken every 10 days, show the strength of the solutions to be still great enough."

Notes: William emigrated to the United States in 1890. On 13 September 1911, he and Orrell returned to the United States from Liverpool to Montreal aboard the Megantic.

Death: 18 August 1930, in Pacific Grove, Monterey county, California
Pacific Grove High Tide 22 August 1930 p1
W.G. Stubbs Passes Away
Community Pays Respect to Memory of Faithful Public Servant
Following an illness of several months, city clerk William Glascott Stubbs passed away at his home here Monday morning. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon. Stubbs was a native of England, 60 years of age, the third son of Captain Edward Stubbs, R.N. He came to the United States early in his youth, and resided in California for many years. Before coming to Pacific Grove, some three years ago, he held a responsible position with a large California oil corporation in Coalinga. In that city he was very popular and leaves many there friends to mourn his passing. Few men have come to Pacific Grove that so immediately established themselves in the heart of the community as he did. Stubbs was a willing and conscientious worker, public-spirited and friendly. He had a keen sense of humor and continually manifested such an abundance of genuine good will that he soon became one of the city’s most popular figures. Upon the resignation of city clerk O.E. Barker in 1928, Stubbs was appointed in his place. He filled the post so capably and conscientiously that he was elected to the post without opposition the following April. It was his intensive devotion to his duties that probably hastened his death. He was taken ill during May. When the city assessment roll was being prepared last moth, he returned to the office for a brief period each day in order to supervise the work. He then suffered a relapse and never recovered. Deceased was a member of the Masonic lodge and of the local St. Mary’s-by-the-Sea Episcopal church. He was prominent in the church affairs and one of the most loyal workers in the parish. Funeral services were held from St. Mary’s church Wednesday at 3:30 o’clock, and were attended by many local people, including all members of the city administration and a large delegation from the local Masonic lodge. There was a great wealth of beautiful floral tributes, emblematic of the high esteem to which Mr. Stubbs was held by all who knew him. Dr. Albert E. Clay, rector of St. Mary’s officiated. He was assisted by Rev. Mr. Reed of the Trinity church, San Jose, former rector at Coalinga. Gordon L. Wilson, choirmaster and organist, was at the organ, and the St. Mary’s choir took part in the simple, beautiful ceremony. Pall bearers were: G.W. Webber, City Treasurer, I.C. Fisher, C.W. Olmsted, W.J. Crabbe, James Parke and Col. J.I. Malbee. Following the services at the church, the long funeral procession proceeded to El Carmelo Cemetery where internment took place. Following a brief benediction by Dr. Clay, the impressive Masonic ritual was performed by officers and members of the local lodge. W.G. Stubbs leaves to mourn his loss, his widow, Mrs. Orrell Stubbs, and a daughter, Miss Dorothy Stubbs, both of Pacific Grove; two sisters living in England, Miss May Stubbs and Mrs. Howard Mayes; a brother and sister in South America, Warden Stubbs and Elizabeth Stubbs; and a brother, Charles Stubbs, who lives at Byron, California.

Buried: 20 August 1930, in El Carmelo cemetery, Pacific Grove, Monterey county, California

Census:
1871: Church Green, Great Bowden, Leicestershire
1881: 13 Greenfield Road, West Derby, Lancashire
1910: Township 8, Contra Costa county, California
1920: Precinct 53, Fresno, Fresno county, California

Sources:
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