The Glascott Family

Adam Glascott

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Deborah (Rogers) Glascott

Married: Sarah Gifford on 10 March 1799

Children:
Occupation: Adam was a captain in the Wexford militia. He was made a lieutenant in the Wexford militia on 9 September 1799, and Quartermaster on 26 August 1803.

1798 Rebellion And Waterford Chapter 15 Extracts From Contemporary Letters (Willie Fraher, 2001)
Letter written by Mrs Mary Cooke (wife of Rev John Cooke rector of Tramore) of Woodlands, 4 miles east of Waterford City, to her mother Mrs Sutton who had fled to Wales at the outbreak of the rebellion. It was written between the 6th and 8th June 1798.
...Thursday, June 7th ...
I have got up my spirits a little to-day an express arrived in Waterford last night that Genl. Johnstone had joined Ld. Blaney and completely routed one Camp of the Rebels, Carrigburne. Adam Glascott was wounded in the shoulder, He and one of the Bulgers going with the express from Ross to Waterford on Friday: Two expresses had been cut off, but Bulger fortunately got in with it.


Notes: of Portobello, county Wexford

Death: April 1816

Buried: 22 April 1816, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Will: dated 8 February 1810

Sources:

Adam Gifford Glascott

Birth: 10 March 1805, in Drogheda, county Louth, Ireland

Father: Adam Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Gifford) Glascott

Glascott survey of the port of Batoom
Adam Gifford Glascott's survey of the port of Batoom in the Black Sea (1840)
Occupation: Naval Officer and Surveyor.

The Foreign Office List, forming a complete British Diplomatic and Consular Handbook p89 (1865)
GLASCOTT, COMMANDER ADAM GIFFORD, R.N., F.R.G.S.,
entered the Royal Navy, October 12, 1821; served on the Coast of Ireland from that period till November 1824; served on the South American Station from 1825 till 1829, during a part of which time was attached to the Survey of the Coasts of Patagonia, Terra del Fuego, and the Straits of Magellan; served on the Coast of Africa and West Indies from 1829 till 1830; was attached to the Survey of the Grecian Archipelago, Coasts of Greece, Macedonia, Thrace, and Asia Minor, from 1832 till 1837. In the Spring of 1838 examined and reported upon the Coast of Lazistan, between Trebizond and Batoom, and surveyed the latter port. In the summer of 1838 accompanied Mr. Consul Brant, of Erzeroom, on a tour through Koordistan, made to examine into the resources and state of that country; returned to England in 1839. In 1840 was appointed Assistant Surveyor to Mr. (now Sir R. H.) Schomburgk, Commissioner for Surveying and Marking out the Boundaries of British Guiana; resigned the appointment in 1841, and became one of the Sworn Surveyors of that colony; was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant, November 23 1841; returned to England in 1845. In 1848 was appointed Surveyor to the British Commission under Colonel (now Lieut-General Sir William) Williams for the Settlement of the Turco-Persian Boundary: since the return of that officer to England in 1853 the charge of the Commission has devolved on him. In November 1857 the Commission was removed from Constantinople to St. Petersburgh, in order to facilitate its proceedings with the Officers of the Imperial Russian Staff, and in 1863 it was removed to London. Was promoted to the rank of Commander in the Royal Navy, July 1, 1864. Is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.


Adam entered the Royal Navy on 12 October 1821 and passed for mate on 5 August 1829 (Navy List 1840 p155). He was made lieutenant on 23 November 1841 (London Gazette 24 November 1841 p3016) and placed on reserve half-pay by 1855 (Navy List 1855 p124) Adam was promoted from lieutenant on the reserved list to retired commander on 1 July 1864 (London Gazette 7 October 1864 p4773).

Adam's real interest was in surveying. While serving on the South American Station from 1825 till 1829, he was attached to the Survey of the Coasts of Patagonia, Terra del Fuego, and the Straits of Magellan; From 1832 until 1837 Adam was attached to the Survey of the Grecian Archipelago, Coasts of Greece, Macedonia, Thrace, and Asia Minor and in the Spring of 1838 he examined and reported upon the Coast of Lazistan, between Trebizond and Batoom, and surveyed the latter port. In 1838 he accompanied James Brant, consul at Erz-Rúm, on a journey through Kurdistan from Erz-Rúm to Músh, surveying and mapping the route. Brant's full account of the journey was reported in The journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London vol 10 pp341-430 (1840):
My arrangements being completed, and the weather having become apparently settled, after a late and wet spring, I left Erẓ-Rúm on the 16th of June, 1838, accompanied by Mr. Adam Gifford Glascott, of her Majesty's navy, who had volunteered to make a map of our route, and my surgeon, Dr. Edward Dalzel Dickson...

The journey in what is now eastern Turkey, took them from the city now named Erzurum (then Erẓ-Rúm), to Muş (Músh), a detour to Elazığ (Kharpút), then on to Bitlis, Van, an ascent of Seiban Tagh (Sapán Tágh), the second highest peak in the region after Mount Ararat - becoming the first Europeans to do so, then to Doğubeyazıt (Báyazíd), as close as they could come to Mount Ararat, and back to Erzurum. They travelled about 900 miles on this journey. On the ascent of Sapán Tágh, many of the party fell ill, probably due to a combination of altitude sickness and volcanic gases.
p409
We all felt unpleasant effects from our ascent, and the Kurds said everybody experienced the same, which they attributed to the weight of the air. Dr. Dickson was quite sick at the stomach; Mr. Glascott so giddy that he could not continue taking his bearings without every few minutes quitting his work to rest; I had an intense headache; two persons were so affected that they could not proceed beyond the foot of the cone; one who mounted it descended at once, and on getting back vomited violently; even those who remained with the horses suffered from pain in the head. This could not have arisen from the mere height of the mountain, but might be occasioned by the escape of some gas from the crater; although, if so, it was quite imperceptible. Our barometer failed us at the top of the mountain: the mercury had long been gradually escaping from the tube; but we had hoped by care to have been able to preserve it in a sufficiently effective state to assist our ascertaining the height: however, so much air had got into the mercury that no dependence could be placed on it.

On the return from Báyazid to Erẓ-Rúm, a day's ride from their destination, the party was robbed:
p430
During the night we were robbed: Dr. Dickson lost all his clothes, Mr. Glascott his clothes and surveying instruments. The Beg was informed of the robbery, but no detection followed. The thieves were skilful and bold: they drew the curtain-pegs, and from under it drew out the things: many were in contact with Mr Glascott's bed, but neither he nor any individual of our numerous party heard the thieves, and the loss was not discovered till the next morning. We had had two guards to watch during the night, but they pretended not to have heard anything, and they must either have been asleep or accomplices with the robbers. Some months afterwards the principal part of the loss was repaid by the Beg, through a requisition to the Páshá.
Adam added this note concerning the map he drew of Kurdistan:
pp433-4 (1840)
Note respecting the Map of Kurdistán. By Mr. GLASCOTT, R.N.
  The map of Kurdistán, on the scale of 6 inches to a degree, though not entitled to consideration as a document of strict accuracy, yet will, I trust, be found sufficient to elucidate the geography of the tract of country which it embraces.
  The instruments at my disposal were a Theodolite and pocket-Chronometer, kindly supplied me by Lieut. Graves, now in command of the survey of the Grecian Archipelago, and a Sextant by Cary, graduated to 15".
  The map is constructed on a basis of twenty-two astronomical positions; of these, the Latitudes of thirteen are deduced from observations of the pole-star, and computed according to the rule published in the Nautical Almanac; three are deduced from the mean of the method just mentioned, and circum-meridional Altitudes of the sun; two are from circum-meridional Altitudes of the sun alone; and one (that of Báyazíd) from equal altitudes of the same body, which, of course, is to be considered but as approximate; the other three approximates, viz. Mezirah, Chevlí, and Kháss Kóï, were deduced from observations of the sun off the meridian.
  The Meridian Distances were measured by Chronometer, and applied to Erẓ-Rúm, adopting the Longitude of that place, deduced from the observations of the officers of the Imperial Russian Staff, as correct.
  The route is laid down from Magnetic Bearings taken with the Theodolite at every turn of the road, corrected for Variation, and the Distances are deduced from time carefully noted on my arrival at and departure from each station.
  Although on the route from Músh to Mezirah no astronomical observations were taken, yet my road book gave the Latitude of the latter place within one minute, and the Longitude within seven of the astronomical position; these errors I applied proportionally to each station from whence bearings and distances had been noted, and the change in the positions of some of the towns on that route, by so doing, was scarcely perceptible. Wherever the distances by my road-book fell short between two positions astronomically fixed, which they invariably did, I always adopted the method of proportioning above alluded to.
  On reference to the map it will be perceived that a great portion of our route round the Lake of Ván was contiguous to its shores, and in many instances so close as to enable me to sketch their sinuosities with tolerable accuracy. I had an opportunity of ascertaining from the summit of Sapán Tágh the contours of those parts which from the direction of the road I was prevented visiting, and of obtaining tangents to the principal points and bends of the bays; so that on the whole the general shape of the Lake has been satisfactorily ascertained.
  The meridian distances of the positions on the shores of the Lake with respect to Ván, deserve some degree of confidence, as the difference of Longitude by Chronometer between it and El-jiváz (the last station at which I observed) agreed within 30" of that deduced from their Latitudes and an Azimuth.
  The position of the summit of Sapán Tágh was ascertained by Azimuths taken at Ván, Arnis, and Ardísh; but as my Theodolite in point of accuracy was not what was to be desired, I have omitted inserting it in the table of astronomical positions.
       A. G. GLASCOTT, Royal Navy.   
Erẓ-Rúm, 15th July, 1839.

Adam returned to England from Turkey in 1839, his arrival noted in
The Athenæum 26 October 1839 p813
  We have also the pleasure to announce the arrival in this country, of Mr. A. G. Glascott, R.N., who during the last two years has been travelling, chiefly in company with Mr. Consul Brant, in Armenia and Turkish Kurdistán, and has had an opportunity of collecting much geographical information respecting that little known country. In the course of their journey, as we are informed, the party examined the valley of the Murád Sú, or Eastern Euphrates, made a trigonometric survey of the lake of Van; ascended the Supan Dágh, which reaches an elevation of upwards of 9,000 feet above the sea, and which, according to Armenian tradition, was the resting place of Noah's Ark; and were enabled to complete a very fine map of a large portion of the neighbouring districts. Mr Glascott was also, we believe, to have accompanied Mr. Pashley in his travels in Crete, in 1836, but was prevented by illness, which is much to be regretted, as we should probably have been spared the copy of a bad French map, which now disfigures an otherwise beautiful work.

In 1840 Adam was given leave by the Admiralty to join Sir Robert Schomburgk as assistant surveyor on an expedition to map and survey the boundaries of Britsh Guiana. The Guiana Boundary Expedition surveyed the Waini, Barima, Amacura, Barama and Cuyuni rivers for the first time.

Schomburgk, Glascott and others left London for Georgetown, British Guiana on 19 December 1840:
Travels in British Guiana p8 (Richard Schomburgk, 1847):
In spite of the eagerness and haste with which our preparations were carried out, it was nevertheless the 19th December before we could leave London. The expedition, consisting of my brother as commander. Marine-Lieutenant Glascott as assistant, Mr. Hancock as secretary, Mr. Walton as artist, and myself as volunteer, travelled by passenger-Bteamer to Gravesend to catch the good barque "Cleopatra" that was to convey us to the goal of our wishes : she had already been tugged there by steamer from the West India Docks where she had been freighted.


In Georgetown, preparing for the expedition, Richard Schomburgk contracted yellow fever and had been left for dead until Adam detected signs of life:
Travels in British Guiana p59 (Richard Schomburgk, 1847):
In spite of four of the best medical men being in continual attendance, and of everything being done to avert the onset of the last stage of the disease, this nevertheless took place on the afternoon of the fourth day. With the appearance of the black vomit consisting of a coffee-like evacuation that now set in and at the same time indicated the initial internal disintegration, the doctors gave me up as past help. The breathing and the heart-beats were no longer noticeable and all had left the death-chamber. Mr. Glascott then returned to the room, laid his hand again upon my heart, bent his face once more over my mouth and still found breath. The quickly recalled medicoes renewed their operations and the blood suddenly burst from mouth and nose to such an extent that it was six hours before it could be arrested. The hope of recovery was again awakened in my brother, and the doctor's "if your brother survives till midnight, there is hope," after cessation of the bleeding, were the first words of consolation from the self confident and well-known Dr. Smith. I lived over midnight and was also for twenty years the first case in Georgetown that had survived an attack of yel- low fever after onset of the black vomit,


Venezuela-British Guiana boundary arbitration p77 (1898)
Report of Sir Robert H. Schomburgk, on the Surveys of the Boundary Commission, June 22, 1841.
[Reprinted from Blue Book, No. 5, pp. 1-10.]
River Manari, a tributary of the Barima, June 22, 1841.
  Sir, In conformance with the plan which I had the honour to place before your Excellency, and which received your Excellency's approbation, the Boundary Expedition under my command, composed of the individuals mentioned in the accompanying document, left Georgetown on the afternoon of the 19th of April in the schooner "Home," which had been chartered for the purpose of conveying us to the Waini, or Guiania. After a stormy passage, which the vessel and her crew appeared to be but ill calculated to meet, we arrived in the afternoon of the 21st of April at the mouth of the Waini, where I resolved on disembarking our baggage, and selected a bank composed of sand and shells, heaved up by the sea, as the site of our camp. With the exception of some of our provisions, which were damaged, all our other baggage was disembarked in good order.
  I resolved on remaining at the mouth of the Waini a sufficient length of time to enable me to fix the geographical situation of that point with with some precision, and also for the purpose of ascertaining to what extent the entrance of the river was navigable. I accordingly commenced a survey, and with the assistance of Mr. Glascott, completed it by the 31st [sic] of April.
...

pp80-1
The situation of the River Barima, near its mouth, offered various difficulties to fix on a base-line for its survey. I resolved, therefore, to determine the respective distances of some of its chief points from each other by intervals noted by chronometer between the flashes and reports of guns fired from three stations. Mr. Superintendent King offered his services to the Assistant-Surveyor, Mr. Glascott, in firing the guns on the 18th of May, when, I am sorry to say, he experienced much temporary injury by the explosion of one of them. I was at first apprehensive for his sight; but am now happy that my fears on that score are entirely removed. Our survey of the Barima was finished by the 19th of May;
...

p83
The unsettled state of the weather during the period we encamped at the Barima made our astronomical observations very precarious. Mr. Glascott and myself, however, succeeded in flxing the situation of our camp to our satisfaction; but, as much as I should have liked to extend the survey of the mouth of the Barima to the Boca de Navios of the Orinoco, the unfavourable weather, the ill state of health of my crew, and the delay which would have been connected with it, prevented me from executing a work which, although my instructions did not point out such an undertaking, would have found every excuse by its general usefulness to navigation, if the circumstances had been more favourable.
  We left the mouth of the River Barima on the 20th of May, and arrived at Cumaka, which we had selected as our depôt, the following day.
  The exposure to the heavy rains which had set in did not fail to show its influence on the crew; and five were reported on the sick list. The 27th of May arrived, therefore, before we could start for the Amacura. Mr. Glascott, the assistant-surveyor being indisposed, he remained at Cumaka, and I was only accompaied by Mr Echlin.
...
pp88-9
On leaving Cumaka, and considering the present journey as a pioneering expedition, I had only provided myself with a chronometer, a sextant, an artificial horizon, and prismatic compass. The unfavourble state of the weather enabled me only to procure observations of the sun for the chronometer on the morning of the 6th of June, and ten days having elapsed without any intermediate observations, I could not depend upon its rate. However. I had desired Mr. Glascott, who, in consequence of indisposition, had remained at Cumaka, to fire, at 6 o'clock on the evening of the 6th of June, three guns, which we distinctly heard at Assecuru. We thus procured the direct compass bearing of Cumaka, and, combined with my observations for latitude, I received as result the difference of longitude between Cumaka and Assecuru.
  I was fortunate enough to procure here, and at the Upper Amacura, a large supply of Indian provisions, for which we paid, to the full satisfaction of the Indians, in such articles as they most desired, namely cutlasses knives, calico, salempores, beads, &c. The provisions which we had brought with us from Georgetown being nearly exhausted, this supply was very welcome, and as I had received information from Mr. Glascott and his party at Cumaka that they were short of provisions, I despatched a large supply by two small canoes across the portage of Yarikita.
...
p97
Report of Sir Robert H. Schomburgk, on the Surveys of the Boundary Commission, August, 1841.
[Reprinted from Blue Book, No. 5, pp. 11-21.]
  The party under my command left Cumaka, where we had sojourned for some time, as detailed in my former report, on the 13th of June; and having arrived at the junction of the Aruka with the Barima, we continued the ascent of the latter river in an east-south-eastern direction.
...
pp101-2
I was anxious to examine the Barima beyond its falls. I started, accordingly, on the 24th of June in a small canoe, accompanied by Mr. Glascott, the assistant-surveyor, and Mr. Echlin, the artist of the expedition; and, descending the Manari for a short distance, we reached the Barima by two of those natural canals (the Taima and Ataima) which so frequently connect rivers having a parallel course in these swampy regions. The almost continual torrents of rain which we had had for some weeks, had caused the Barima to overflow its banks, and we found the current running at the rate of from 4 to 4½ miles an hour; our progress was consequently slow. A short distance above the off-flow which connects the Barima and Manari, we visited a Warrau settlement called Emu, where we admired a gigantic bamboo, several hundred yards in circumference.

The party had now reached further up the headwaters of the Barima than any Europeans had done before:
Travels in British Guiana p162-3(Richard Schomburgk, 1847):
Although we had already here and there in the Barima at Manari mouth seen exposed large fine-grained sand-stone rocks which the Indians used for sharpening their knives and axes on, they were nevertheless so isolated as to offer no hindrance to the of boats, and tlie important cataract Mekorerussa, which the party reached in the afternoon, accordingly constituted the first but at the same time insurmountable stoppage : up to this point the Barinia would offer the most suitable highway for steamers. According to the concurring statements of the Indians, my brother and Mr. Glascott were the first white people who had ever penetrated so far, a statement that was confirmed by the fact that the course of the Barima proved to be quite different from what had hitherto been laid down in the maps. This observation determined them to continue their trip so far as the bed of the stream allowed. Fall now followed upon Fall, the largest of which the Indians called Uropocari. Although the river maintained its previous breadth, it nevertheless proved actually full of granite, until quartz, regularly disposed in layers, soon after made its appearance on the surface. During the course of the following day, after passing the mouth of many a moderately large stream in the Barima, particularly the Wanama and Mehokawaina, an insurmountable obstacle presented itself to their, further progress in the innumerable trees which, tumbled one over the other, crossed the river in all directions. They accordingly gave up. the corial with which Mr. Glascott remained behind, my brother continuing on foot in the company of several Indians.


Venezuela-British Guiana boundary arbitration p104 (1898)
I found it now advisable to discontinue the ascent in corials, as numerous trees which had fallen across the Barima would have thrown the greatest difficulties in the way of any farther attempt to advance with the boats.
  After having marked three trees with Her Majesty's initials, I left Mr. Glascott in charge of the camp which we had formed at the junction of the two rivers, and having armed the most effective of the crew with cutlasses and axes, we pathed a way through entangled brushes and swamps, following the left bank of the Barima.
...
p105
We reached on the following day, the camp at the junction of the two rivers, where Mr, Glascott, during our absence had only succeeded in taking meteorological observations, the unfavourable weather having prevented him from determining its geographical position astronomically.
  Having once more reached the corials, we floated down the river, and our return was rapid. While it had taken us 6 days to ascend from Manari to the Mokohawaina, we accomplished our return in 2½ days.
  An Indian messenger awaited us here from the Lower Barima with the news that a party of Venezuelans, headed by the Commandant of the Orinoco, had proceeded to the mouth of the Barima and the Amacura and cut down the boundary posts which, in the execution of the service confided to me, I had planted there.
  How far this information was founded in truth I cannot assert. However, the appearance of these boats, which were said to be armed, had created a panic among the Indians, and those of the Rivers Aruka and Amacura were fled into the woods.
  Our departure from Manari was delayed in consequence of the indisposition of the first coxswain, Peterson; and Mr. Echlin, attached as artist to the Expedition, but to whom, from his study of medicine and bis knowledge of the diseases of the colony, the medical treatment of our sick had been entrusted, reported that, in consequence of serious indisposition, Peterson would be unable to journey with us overland. From the information which I had procured, the road promised to be of the most fatiguing description, and I was anxious that the chronometers, of which two had hitherto preserved a fair rate, should reach safely the coast regions, in order to prove by re-measurement of Georgetown how far the observation taken by their means were to be trusted, I desired Mr. Glascott, the Assistant-Surveyor, to proceed with the coxswain by water to the coast, while Mr, Echlin and the men best fitted for such an undertaking were to accompany me overland to the River Cuyuni. I had another object in view in sending Mr. Glascott by the route alluded to, as, should the weather have proved favourable, he might be enabled to determine by astronomical observations some of the more important points on the coast.


After returning to Georgetown, Schomburgk planned a second expedition, this time to survey the Brazilian frontier. Adam wanted no part of it, and resigned. Robert's brother, Richard Schomburgk wrote in Travels in British Guiana p213 (Richard Schomburgk, 1847):
Within a few days after arrival our hitherto fellow travellers, Lieut. Glascott and Secretary Hancock, tendered their resignations to my brother and the Governor. Both had been none too pleased wit hthe perils and hardships of an expedition like ours, and as the most dangerous of the journeys were still to be performed they thought it wiser to withdraw before they started. Glascott intended settling in Georgetown as a Land Surveyor, especially as Emancipation had brought about considerable changes in the relations of property and opened a profitable field for his activities.


Adam remained in British Guiana and became one of the Sworn Surveyors of that colony. He returned to England in 1845 and in 1848 was appointed Surveyor to the British Commission under Colonel (now Lieut-General Sir William) Williams for the Settlement of the Turco-Persian Boundary.  Lady Sheil wrote of meeting Adam in Constantinople in 1850:
Glimpses of life and manners in Persia pp298-9 (Mary Sheil, 1856)
We were met in the harbour of Constantinople by Lieutenant Glascott, of the Royal Navy, attached to the Perso-Turkish Frontier Commission, who kindly brought to meet us two nice caiques, and had carriages ready for us on the shore to take us to the hotel.

When Williams returned to England in 1853 the charge of the Commission devolved on Adam. In November 1857 the Commission was removed from Constantinople to St. Petersburgh, in order to facilitate its proceedings with the Officers of the Imperial Russian Staff, and in 1863 it was removed to London.
From the gulf to Ararat: an expedition through Mesopotamia and Kurdistan pp10-11 (Gilbert Ernest Hubbard, 1917):
Even Colonel Williams' official report is not extant, as that valuable record of four years' arduous toil, having reached England, had the misfortune to be dropped overboard near Gravesend, and found a sepulchre in the mud of the Thames. Negotiations continued after the Commission's return to Constantinople for rather more than a year, when the Crimean War broke out and brought them to an abrupt end.
  When the war was over the frontier question was almost at once resumed. The first thing to do was to make a large-scale map of the frontier zone. For this purpose Commander Glascott, R.N., who had made the British survey, went to St Petersburg, where he and the Russian surveyors worked at their respective maps till 1865. When at last the maps were ready they were - apparently for the first time - compared, the result being that by the time eight out of the seventeen sheets which composed each set had been examined, four thousand discrepancies in names, places, &c., were discovered. As it was clearly useless for the purpose in question to have two maps which were so very discordant, the surveyors returned to their drawing tables and, by some surprising feat of cartography, so manipulated the two versions as to produce a single copy known henceforth by the euphemistic title of the Carte Identique. This map, executed on a scale of one inch to a mile, was completed in 1869, just twenty years after the first surveys were begun, - its English co-author having in the course of his labours risen from the rank of lieutenant to that of post-captain in the Royal Navy - a unique record, one may reasonably suppose, in the annals of the science. The share of this country alone in the cost of production ran well into five figures.


A naval biographical dictionary p400 (William R. O'Byrne, 1849)
GLASSCOTT. (LIEUTENANT, 1841)
ADAM GIFFORD GLASSCOTT entered the Navy 12 Oct. 1821; passed his examination 5 Aug. 1825; and obtained his commission 23 Nov 1841. He has not since been employed.


Notes: Adam was of Portobello and Stokestown, county Wexford.

Death: 12 December 1871, in Cheltenham district, Gloucestershire, England, aged 66

Sources:

Adam Glascott

Birth: 9 December 1809, at the barrack, Cork, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Beata (Archer) Glascott

Married: Susan Emily Ussher on 8 August 1849, in New Ross district, county Wexford, Ireland.
Adam Glascott is recorded as the son of John Glascott and Susan Emily Ussher is recorded as the daughter of John Ussher.

Notes: of Killowen, Whitechurch parish, county Wexford. Adam and Susan did not have children.

Death: 10 December 1852, at Killowen, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Alice (Glascott) McLeod

Birth: 16 August 1866, in Tintenbar, New South Wales, Australia

Baptism: 7 October 1866, in Casino, New South Wales, Australia

Father: Richard Donovan Glascott

Mother: Maria (King) Glascott

Married: John McLeod in 1888, in Lismore district, New South Wales, Australia

Children:

Death: 22 October 1952, in Queensland, Australia. Alice was living in White Street, Southport, Queensland, at the time of her death.

Buried: 23 October 1952, in Southport cemetery, Southport, Queensland, Australia
The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Queensland) 23 October 1952 p12
McLEOD, Mrs. Alice, White street, Southport. — The Relatives and Frlends of Mr. and Mrs. K. J. McLeod, Miss J. McLeod, Mrs. R. O. McLeod, Mr. J. McLeod are respectfully informed of the death of their beloved Mother, Mother-in-law, and Grandmother. The Funeral is appointed to leave Presbyterian Church, Southport, To-day (Thursday) after Service commencing 2.45 p.m., for Southport Cemetery.
      METROPOLITAN FUNERALS.
McLEOD. —Officers and Members of Loyal King Edward Lodge are respectfully invited to attend the Funeral of the late Mrs. A. McLeod, Mother of Brother K. McLeod.
  By Order of the Secretary


Will: dated 11 September 1931. Alice left property in Southport to Jessie Beatrice McLeod, Robert Oliver McLeod and Kenneth John McLeod.
The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Queensland) 9 January 1954 p12
GOVERNMENT NOTICES
TRANSMISSION BY DEATH. "THE REAL PROPERTY ACTS, 1861 TO 1952."
Notice is hereby given that applications have been made for the Registration of Transmission of Title to the Lands hereinafter mentioned Particulars of such applications are given below in the following order:- (a) Name of deceased proprietor: (b) Date of death; (c) Name ot claimant; (d) Description and situation of land: (e) Estate claimed to be transmitted: (f) Particulars of Will or otherwise. Any person desiring to oppose must do so by lodging a Caveat at the Principal Office of the Registrar of Titles in Brisbane unless the Lands are situated within the central or Northern Districts, in which case the Caveat must be lodged at the Local District Registry at Rockhampton or Townsville on or before the TWENTY-THIRD day of FEBRUARY, 1954.
...
(a) ALICE McLEOD, late of South port, widow.- (b) 22nd Oct., 1952.- (c) Jessie Beatrice McLeod, of Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, spinster, Robert Oliver McLeod. of Southport, and Kenneth John McLeod, of the same place, as Devisees as joint tenants.— (d) Subs. 36 37, suburban allot. 9, sec. 9, town Southport.- (e) Fee-simple.- (f) Will dated 11th September, 1951


Addresses:
1952: White Street, Southport, Queensland   (The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Queensland) 23 October 1952 p12)

Sources:

Amy Sarah Glascott

Birth: 1849/50, in Ireland

Father: William Madden Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth Harriet Lucy (Boyd) Glascott

Census:
1901: St Issells, Pembrokeshire: Amey S. Glascott is aged 51, born in Ireland
1911: Narbeth district, Pembrokeshire: Amy S. Glascott is aged 61

Sources:

Amy Glascott

Birth: 1868/9, in England

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Notes: Anna Willis describes Amy as a seven year old child in 1878.
The Days of My Pilgrimage chapter 10 (Anna Frances Willis):
Ethel and Amy slept in two little beds in our room and we looked after them practically altogether. ... Amy, also very fair, with short wavy hair, was a very imp of mischief. She seemed to be everywhere, tormenting each member of the family in turn, now insisting on peeling potatoes in the kitchen, then hiding the gardener's tools, then dragging little Philip into some escapade such as blacking his face with coal or helping themselves to sugar from the sideboard. By degrees the family got in the habit of sending her to me. It was "Go to Cousin Fanny" all day long, till at last I was rarely without her, but I never wearied of her. She was the first little child I had ever had to love and my whole heart went out to her and she loved me "frantically" in return. I suppose one's first love of any kind has some peculiar fascination about it and can never be repeated just the same again. I have had to do with many little children since but none ever appealed to me in just the same way (of course I do not include my own children in this statement).
...
I always brought Amy [to "Robinson Villa"] and sometimes Philip with me. I remember one evening we had Dolly Ord, who was a year or so older than Amy, to tea. The little girls had tea alone and then played in the garden. When I put Amy to bed she prayed most earnestly that she might not be ill in the night, "for you know, Lord," she added, "that it was Dolly who tempted me to take them". I found on enquiry that the children had helped themselves freely to the new potatoes left from late dinner. ...
I had a very pleasant week in Barrie and two at Lake Rosseau. Amy cried bitterly when I left but prayed every night that "dear darling Cousin Fanny would come home quite well and as fresh as a daisy".

Census:
1901: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford

Sources:

Annabella Glascott

Birth: 15 May 1803

Father: Adam Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Gifford) Glascott

Notes: Annabella did not marry

Death: 9 March 1870, in Waterford, county Waterford, Ireland, aged 67

Sources:

Anne (Glascott) Symes

Birth: 1733

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Anne (Gifford) Glascott

Married: Mitchelborne Symes on 9 May 1755, in Coolboy, county Wicklow, Ireland

Children: Death: 1816

Buried: 25 January 1816, in Kilcommon, county Wicklow, Ireland

Sources:

Anne (Glascott) Cherry

Baptism: 4 September 1766, in New Ross, county Wexford, Ireland

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Arabella (Stephens) Glascott

Married: Francis Penrose Cherry

Children:
Death: June 1838

Sources:

Anne Glascott

Birth: 1770

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Deborah (Rogers) Glascott

Notes: Anne did not marry.
The order of birth of Anne and her sister, Isabella, is unclear. Burke sometimes lists Isabella first (e.g. 1858, 1894) and sometimes he lists Anne first (e.g. 1862, 1871, 1875).

Death: 21 February 1830

Buried: 24 February 1830, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Anne Glascott

Birth: December 1794

Baptism: 9 December 1794

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Susannah (Tree) Glascott

Death: February 1795, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Anne Beata (Glascott) O'Donnavan

Birth: 19 May 1832, at 17 Leeson Street, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Mary (Donovan) Glascott

Married: William John (Donovan) O'Donnavan on 10 October 1872, in New Ross district, county Wexford, Ireland

William was Anne's first cousin. He was born on 9 June 1832, the son of William Donovan and Elizabeth Dallas. William Donovan, of Tomnalosset, was the son of Richard Donovan and Anne Richards, and the brother of Anne's mother, Mary (Donovan) Glascott. William was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, graduating B.A. in 1855, LL.B in 1859 (both in the name William John Donovan) and LL.D. in 1860 in the name William John O'Donnavan. He was a Member of the Royal Irish Academy, elected on 8 May 1865 (Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy vol 9 p224) and the Royal Dublin Society, elected in 1874 (Kerry cattle herd book p48). William's name change from his father's Donovan was deliberate, and presumably occurred between 1859, when William was awarded the degree of LL.B. in the name of Donovan and 1860 when he graduated LL.D. in the name O'Donnavan.
The Topographical Poems of John O'Dubhagain and Giolla-na-naomh O'Huidhrin p40 (A. Thom, 1862):
Morgan William O'Donovan, Esq., of Montpelier, in the county of Cork, has not only re-assumed the O', which his ancestors had rejected for many generations, but has styled himself "the O'Donovan," chief of his name, being the next of kin to the last acknowledged head of that family, the late General Richard O'Donovan, of Bawnlahan, whose family became extinct in the year 1841. His example in resuming the O' has been followed by Timothy O'Donovan, Esq., of O'Donovan's Cove, in the county of Cork, head of a very ancient sept of the same family, and by William John O'Donnavan, a junior member of the Wexford Clan-Donovan.

A letter written by William to Edmund Hogan, helping him with research for Hogan's book, The History of the Irish Wolfdog, has been preserved and an image of it, including his signature, is available at the Irish Wolfhound Archives.

William died in 1903, in Dublin South district, county Dublin, aged 70.
Addresses:
1860: 2 Cloisters, Temple, Dublin (Patronymica britannica page xliii)
1870: Foxcroft House, Portarlington, Queen's county   (The Visitation of the county of Rutland in the year 1618-19 p67)
1892: 15 Belgrave Road, Rathmines, county Dublin   (Transactions of the Royal Historical Society p370)
1899: 15 Belgrave Road, Rathmines, county Dublin   (Kerry cattle herd book p48)

Death: 1917, in Dublin North district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 84

Census:
1911: 93 Ranelagh Road, St Peters, county Dublin

Sources:

Arabella (Glascott) Stephens

Birth: 1772

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Arabella (Stephens) Glascott

Married: Walter Stephens

Children:
Death: 19 July 1838

Sources:

Arabella Glascott

Birth: 1803/4

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Madden) Glascott

Death: 30 November 1828, aged 24

Sources:

Arabella (Glascott) Roxburgh

Birth: 17 November 1808, in Ipswich, Suffolk, England

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Sophia Letitia (Strickland, Calder) Glascott

Married:
Adam Roxburgh on 17 April 1838, in Priory Church, Deerhurst, Gloucestershire, England
The Gentleman's magazine June 1838 p655
      MARRIAGES.
  April
-17.
At Deerhurst, Glouc. Adam Roxburgh, esq. of Manchester, to Arabella, dau. of the late W. Glascott, esq. Capt. in the army, and niece of Mrs. Strickland of Apperley Court.


The Tewkesbury yearly register and magazine 1838 p361
      MARRIAGES.
APRIL 17. - At the Priory Church, Deerhurst, Adam Roxburgh, esq. of Manchester, to Arabella, daughter of the late William Glascott, esq. formerly of the Light Dragoons, and niece of Mrs. Strickland, of Apperley Court.


Adam was born in 1804/5, in Glasgow, Lanarkshire. He is noted as being of Manchester and of "Gouroch Castle", Renfrewshire. He was a merchant (1851 census), elected Senior Magistrates or Provosts of the Burgh of Gourock on 13 June 1859 (Notes about Gourock, chiefly historical p43 (David Macrae, 1880)) , then Chief Magistrate (death notice). Adam died on 3 December 1865, in Gourock, Renfrewshire, aged 60.
Greenock Advertiser 5 December 1865 (transcribed at Watt Library, Greenock BMD Index R surnames p152)
Adam Roxburgh, former Chief Magistrate, Thornbank, Gourock, died at Gourock on 3rd December 1865 age 60

Notes: Arabella Roxburgh published a volume of poetry entitled Gleanings from Nature… (Edinburgh, 1869)

Bath: a new history p83 (Graham Davis, Penny Bonsall, 1996)
Mrs Arabella Roxburgh, granddaughter of a baronet from Yorkshire, is representative of many wealthy widows who retired to Bath in the later nineteenth century. She lived unostentatiously, devoting much of her time and income to works of piety and charity. During her lifetime she presented a number of pictures to the city, in the hope that they might form the nucleus of an art gallery.


Death: 24 November 1896, aged 88

Will: proved by Austin Joseph King and Francis Peter Roxburgh Ferguson the executors

The Library p28 (1897)
BATH.- By the will of the late Mrs. Roxburgh, a wealthy lady who spent the latter years of her life in Bath, that city has received some handsome bequests. To the corporation a sum of about £8,000 is bequeathed, to be devoted to the foundation of an art gallery, with or without a public library in connection with it. Mrs. Roxburgh also provided for the establishment of scholarships of the gross annual value of
£50 for pupils attending the Bath Technical, Secondary, and Art Schools.

The endowment greatly assisted the foundation of the Victoria Art Gallery in 1897. Arabella also bequeathed six paintings to the city including Portrait of Three Boys and a painting by Thomas Barker

Census & Addresses:
1851: 4 Gourock, Bath Street, Inverkip, Renfrewshire
1881: 11 Johnstone Street, Bathwick, Somerset
1891: 15 Daniel Street, Bathwick, Somerset
1896: 15 Daniel Street, Bath, Somerset   (London Gazette 2 April 1897 p1910)

Sources:

Arabella Glascott

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Cramer) Glascott

Notes: Arabella was one of four daughters of William Glascott who all emigrated to Australia. Arabella's elder sister, Sarah, settled in Launceston, Van Diemens Land.

Death: before 11 January 1851, when her sister Fanny died and was noted as being "only surviving daughter of the late Captain Glasscott, 66th Regiment."

Sources:

Archer Glascott

Birth: 30 March 1804, in Aughnacloy, county Tyrone, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Beata (Archer) Glascott

Death: 8 July 1804

Sources:

Arthur Moberley Glascott

Glascott Family at Alderton
Arthury Moberley Glascott (right) at Alderton House
Birth: 8 January 1876, in Toronto, York county, Ontario, Canada

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Notes: Arthur went back out to Canada in 1905, arriving in Quebec aboard the Southwark on 9 September 1905. He is recorded as aged 29, born in Ireland. The Days of My Pilgrimage chapter 67 (Anna Frances Willis):
  Arthur Glascott came from Ireland that year [1905] to live with the family. He was devoted to Mother [Anna Willis] and she was very good to him. His mother was one of the Cayleys, with whom Mother had lived before she went to the North West. and from chapter 70:
  While the family was living in the Markham Street house in Toronto, Aunt Dora had a stroke. She had rented the old Hamer homestead at Gordon Bay, Muskoka, and settled Arthur Glascott there, and she was going to stay and farm. In the spring of 1916 she had the stroke and David and Helen went up instead.


Death:
24 April 1924, in Hunstville, Muskoka county, Ontario, Canada, aged 48

Census:
1901: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford

Sources:

Beata (Glascott) Gifford

Birth: 8 January 1812, in Tuam, county Galway, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Beata (Archer) Glascott

Married: John Symes Gifford on 12 April 1845, in Whitechurch by New Ross, county Wexford, Ireland

Death: 4 January 1887, in Rathdown district, county Dublin and county Wicklow, Ireland, aged 73

Sources:

Bessie Dorothea (Glascott) Dawson

Birth: 1844 in county Wexford, Ireland

Father: William Madden Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth Harriet Lucy (Boyd) Glascott

Married: Harry Philip Dawson on 20 January 1869, in New Ross, county Wexford, Ireland. Harry Philip Dawson is listed as single, the son of George Pelsant Dawson. Bessie Dorothea Glascott is listed as single, the daughter of William Madden Glascott.

Harry Philip Dawson was born in 1839/40, the son of George Pelsant Dawson and Susan Jane Dodd. He was an army officer, commissioned as ensign, by purchase, in the 75th Foot on 9 November 1858 (London Gazette 9 November 1858 p4747) and promoted to lieutenant, by purchase, on 25 May 1860 (Army List 1862 p356). On 20 February 1861 Harry, then a Lieutenant, was appointed Instructor of Musketry (London Gazette 19 March 1861 p1243). The regiment was stationed in Bengal in 1862 (Army List 1862 p356). He was promoted to captain, by purchase, on 6 March 1867 (London Gazette 5 March 1867 p1532) and appointed Instructor of Musketry at the Depot Batallion on 9 November 1867 (London Gazette 8 November 1867 p5933). Harry died in 1895, in Waterford district, county Waterford, aged 55.

Occupation: Private Nurse. In the 1911 census, Bessie is recorded as a "private nurse" living in the same home as her cousin's wife, Mary (Carroll) Ussher and Mary's son Neville, a physician and surgeon, and likely was involved in his practice.

Death: 1916 in New Ross district, county Wexford, Ireland, aged 71

Census:
1901: Cheekpoint, Faithlegg, Waterford
1911: Landscape, Whitechurch, county Wexford

Sources:

Cassandra (Glascott) Atkinson

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Madden) Glascott

Married: Richard Wybrants Atkinson on 7 November 1828

Children:
Death: June 1862

Sources:

Charles Edward Glascott

Birth: 1847, in Constantinople, Ottoman Empire

Father: John Nassau Glascott

Mother: Anna Charlotte (Stephens) Glascott

Education: Royal High School, Edinburgfh, and Edinburgh Univeristy, where Charles graduated M.B., C.M. in 1868.

Married: Margaret Isabella McConkey on 15 July 1878, in Holy Trinity, Walton Breck, Lancashire, England

Margaret was born on 8 September 1858, in Hillsborough, county Down, Ireland, the daughter of John Macconkey.
Census:
1881: 11 St John St., Manchester, Lancashire
1901: Didsbury parish, Lancashire: Margaret E. Glascott is aged 41, born in Ireland
1911: Little Knowle, Budleigh Salterton, Devon: Margaret Isabella Glascott is aged 51, born in Hillsboro, county Down, Ireland

Occupation: Eye Surgeon
Charles obtained the F.R.C.S. Edin. in 1886. He was associated with the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital - as honorary surgeon for thirty-five years and later as senior consulting surgeon and vice-president.

Charles was honrary secretary of the Lancashire and Cheshire branch of the British Medical Association, retiring in 1893:
The British Medical Journal 23 December 1893 p1402
  Presentation to Dr. Glascott. - Dr. Glascott, of Manchester, was presented with a handsome service of plate in recognition of his services during the past ten years as honorary secretary of the Lancashire and Cheshire Branch of the British Medical Association. The articles comprised a silver waiter, silver tea and coffee service, silver bon-bon dishes, and silver-mounted claret jug. - Dr. TAYLOR, who presided, in makiing the presentation, said he was pleased to be the mouthpiece of over 200 members of that Branch of the British Medical Association, who wished to record their appreciation of the services of Dr. Glascott for the past ten years. During that time he had not made a single enemy among the 800 members connected with the Branch, but. on the contrary, had made many friends. The attention he had given to the business of the Branch had been continuous, and he might almost say unique, and his sole aim had been to carry out the duties demanded of him in the most praiseworthy and efficient manner possible. As a humble representative of the Lancashire and Cheshire Branch, he (Dr. Taylor) had much pleasure in presenting Dr. Glascott with the service of plate, the centre-piece of which bore the following inscription: "Presented to C. E. Glascott, Esq., M.D., on his retirement from the post of hon. secretary of the Lancashire and Cheshire Branch of the British Medical Association, in grateful recognition by the members of his valuable services from 1883 to 1893." - Dr. GLASCOTT, in accepting the presentation, said it was naturally with mingled feelings and not without emotion that he stood before them, saddened on the one hand by the thought that one great department of life's work was over for him, but cheered on the other by the remembrance of the many friendships he had formed, the many acts of kindness shown to him during his ten years of office, and of the crowning satisfaction that he had in so far found favour in their eyes as to be the recipient of such a splendid and unexpected presentation. Where all had helped so liberally and disinterestedly it was difficult to single out one for special thanks, but he felt that as secretary to the fund Dr. Barr was pre-eminently deserving of the expression of his most heartfelt thanks, for he it was who had borne the brunt of the trouble of organisation and correspondence on his own shoulders.

Publications:
1879: A Case of Amaursis Fugax (The British Medical Journal 19 July 1879 p84)

Death: 14 August 1918, at Rosemullion, Budleigh Salterton, Devon, England, aged 71
The British Medical Journal 24 August 1918 p38
DEATHS.
GLASCOTT. - On August 14th, at Rosemullion, Budleigh Salterton, after a very short illness, Charles Edward Glascott, M.D., F.R.C.S., late of Manchester.

Obituary:
The British Medical Journal 7 September 1918 p272
C. E. GLASCOTT, M.D.,
Consulting Surgeon, Manchester Royal Eye Hospital.
IT is with great regret that we have to announce tlle death, on August 14th, of Dr. Charles Edward Glascott at his home at Budleigh Salterton, South Devon. Charles Edward Glascott was born in 1847 at Constantinople, and received his education in Edinburgh at the Royal High School and the University. He graduated M.B., C.M. in 1868, and obtained the F.R.C.S.Edin. in 1886. He started practice in Manchester, and soon became known as one of the leading ophthalmological surgeons; for thirty-five years was honorary surgeon to the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, and, in conjunction with the late Dr. Little, undoubtedly assisted very greatly in making that hospital one of the foremost centres for the treatment of eye disease in the North of England. Later he became senior consulting surgeon and one of the vice-presidents of the institution. He is perhaps best remembered as lecturer and examiner in ophthalmology at the Manchester University, his lectures being always eminently practical and to the point. He was identified with a number of institutions and societies for the study of eye diseases and the care of the blind. He was the author of a considerable number of monographs on ophthalmological subjects, among which may be mentioned those on the causes and prevention of blindness, published in the reports of the Henshaw's Blind Asylum, Manchester, to which he was honorary oculist. For many years he took an active
interest in the work of the British Medical Association, especially on the scientific side; he acted as secretary of the Ophthalmological Section at the annual meeting at Liverpool in 1883, and was vice-president of this section at the annual meeting at Glasgow in 1888 and at Manchester in 1902.
  Under a somewhat brusque military manner, which sometimes on first acquaintance made students and hospital patients ratlher afraid of him, there was really concealed a tenderness and interest in their welfare which quickly endeared him to all who had the privilege of coming under his care. His old pupils, who include a considerable number of the leading eye specialists in the North, greatly missed him when he retired some years ago from Manchester to reside in Devonshire, and have learnt with the deepest regret of his death.


Census:
1881: 11 St John St., Manchester, Lancashire
1901: Didsbury parish, Lancashire: Charles E. Glascott is aged 53, born in Turkey (British Subject) and is an Ophthalmic Surgeon M.D.
1911: Little Knowle, Budleigh Salterton, Devon: Charles Edward Glascott is aged 63, born in British Embassy Fera Turkey

Sources:

Constance Glascott

Birth: 3 December 1885, in Hendon district, Middlesex, England

Father: William Edward Glascott

Mother: Katherine Freeman (Daniel) Glascott

Death: 3 June 1887, in Fulham district, Middlesex, England, aged 1

Sources:

Deborah Glascott

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Deborah (Rogers) Glascott

Notes: Deborah did not marry.

Death: 20 May 1840

Sources:

Eliza Glascott

Birth: 29 December 1799, in St Helier, Jersey, Channel Islands

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Beata (Archer) Glascott

Notes: Eliza never married

Death: 3 June 1882, in Delgany, county Wicklow, Ireland

Buried: in Delgany, county Wicklow, Ireland

Sources:

Elizabeth (Glascott) Rogers

Father: Francis Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Stephens) Glascott

Married: John Rogers on 13 November 1794

John was of New Ross, county Wexford. He died on 18 January 1799.

Children:
John and Elizabeth had one daughter who died young.

Sources:

Elizabeth (Glascott) Stubbs

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Madden) Glascott

Married: James Morgan Stubbs on 29 March 1815

Children:
Death: 28 July 1847

Sources:

Elizabeth Emma Mary Glascott

Birth: 1 April 1877, in Toronto, York county, Ontario, Canada

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Death: 5 April 1900

Sources:

Ethel Glascott

Birth: 1867/8, in Canada

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Notes: In the 1901 census, Ethel is described as an "imbecile", and it is noted that she cannot read or write. This was not always the case since in 1878, Anna Willis describes Ethel as spending "most of her time reading in the drawing room".
The Days of My Pilgrimage chapter 10 (Anna Frances Willis):
Ethel and Amy slept in two little beds in our room and we looked after them practically altogether. Ethel was a fair delicate child with a thick mane of fair hair. She spent most of her time reading in the drawing room. 

Death: 22 July 1909

Census:
1901: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford

Sources:

Eva Sophia Glascott

Birth: 4 May 1872, in Borris, county Carlow, Ireland

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Death: 1950, in Dublin North district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 78

Census:
1901: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford
1911: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford

Sources:

Fanny Barbara Glascott

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Cramer) Glascott

Notes: Emigrated to Van Diemens Land.

Death: 19 December 1850, in Melbourne, New South Wales
The Courier 11 January 1851 p2
          DEATH.
  At the residence of Mr. William Williamson, Collins-street, Melbourne, on the night of the 19th December, FANNY BARBARA GLASCOTT, only surviving daughter of the late Captain Glasscott, 66th Regiment.


Sources:

Frances Glascott

Father: Francis Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Stephens) Glascott

Buried: 1 July 1791

Notes: Frances never married.

Sources:

Francis Glascott

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Anne (Gifford) Glascott

Married: Sarah Stephens on 28 March 1754, by license dated 18 March 1754
The Gentleman's and London magazine April and May 1754 p259
MARRIAGES.
Mar. 28
Francis Glascott, of Alderstown, Co. Wexford, Esq; to the eldest Daughter of William Stephens, M.D.


Sarah was born on 28 December 1732 in Ballywadduck, county Wexford, the eldest daughter and sole heiress of William Stephens, M.D., F.R.S., of Chilcolm, county Kilkenny. She was the sister of Arabella Stephens, who married Francis's brother, William.

Children: These are the children as listed in Burke's Landed gentry of Ireland p170 (1899). The 1862 edition of Burke's Landed gentry of Great Britain and Ireland p555 has the same first three sons, but then has two more sons, Francis and Thomas both of whom are stated to have died unmarried, and just one daughter, Elizabeth who is stated to have married Joseph Rogers. It is possible that the truth is the superset of the two but it seems unlikely that there was both a son named Francis and a daughter named Frances unless the son died young. On the whole I have preferred the data in the 1899 edition, mainly because it is substantially more detailed and so more convincing.

Death: 29 December 1798

Both Burke and the tombstone inscription below indicate that Francis died aged 75. This would place his birth in 1822 or 1823, some six years before his parents marriage.

Buried: 1 January 1799
His tombstone inscription reads:
This stone is placed here to perpetuate the memory of Francis Glascott of Pilltown Esq. who departed this life on the 29th day of December 1798. Though 75 years of age and scarcely able to walk he most providentially escaped on foot through the thickest part of the battle of New Ross on the 5th June that same year a day forever to be recorded in this county when through the personal valour and exertion of General Henry Johnson the savage rebels received their first signal overthrow.

Notes: Francis inherited the house and demense of Pilltown and the town and lands of Whitechurch, by deed dated 24 April 1754. The Battle of New Ross took place on 5 June 1798. The rebel United Irishmen were led by a Protestant liberal, Bagenal Harvey who opposed the looting and murders committed by the rebels. Bagenal was deposed as Commander-in-Chief of the rebels three days after their defeat at New Ross and replaced by more hardline leaders. Bagenal was a close friend of Francis Glascott, who wrote to him asking for protection after the Battle of New Ross, but Bagenal was no longer in a position to help, and indeed, was betrayed to Crown forces and hanged on 28 June. Sarah Glascott, widow, of Pilltown, claimed relief of £81/18/1 for wine, spirits, cyder, sheep, bed, bedding and cloaths lost in 1798.

A historical account of the rise, progress and suppression of the rebellion in the county of Wexford pp111-2 (George Taylor, 1800)
While the rebels remained on Slieve-quilter, they committed several outrages on the persons and property of the surrounding inhabitants, particularly on a respectable old gentleman, Francis Glascott, of Pill-town, Esq. This gentleman and Mr. Harvey, prior to the commencement of the rebellion, were on very intimate terms; on which Mr. Glascott, (who was totally ignorant of Harvey's being deposed of his command in the rebel army) wrote to him, requesting he would send him a protection. Mr. Harvey returned him the following answer:
    "DEAR SIR,
  "I received your letter, but what to do for you I know not. I from my heart wish to protect all property; I can scarcely protect myself, and indeed my situation is much to be pitied and distressing to myself. I took my present situation in hopes of doing good, and preventing mischief: my trust is in Providence. I acted always an honest disinterested part, and had the advice I gave sometime since been taken, the present mischief could never have arisen. If I can retire to a private station again, I will immediately. Mr. Tottenham's refusing to speak to the gentleman I sent into Ross, who was madly shot by the soldiers, was very unfortunate; it has set the people mad with rage, and there is no restraining them. The person I sent in had private instructions to propose a reconciliation, but God knows where this business will end; but end how it may, the good men of both parties will be inevitably ruined.
        "I am with respect,
          "Dear Sir,
            "Yours, &c. &c. &c.
              "B.B. HARVEY."
 Slieve-quilter, June 9th, 1798.


Sources:

Francis Glascott

Birth: November 1795

Baptism: 5 November 1795

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Susannah (Tree) Glascott

Occupation: Naval Officer. Francis was a midshipman in the Royal Navy, and served in the Napoleonic Wars.

Notes: Francis died unmarried.

Sources:

Francis James Glascott

Birth: 27 January 1871, in Carlow district, county Carlow, Ireland

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Death: 19 May 1893 in New Ross district, county Wexford, Ireland, aged 22

Sources:

George Glascott 

Birth: 1693

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Anne (Perrott) Glascott

Married: Anne Gifford on 4 November 1729.
The marriage settlement was dated 24 October 1729.

Children: Notes: George inherited the estate at Alderton from his father in 1707, and the Perrott estate in county Kilkenny from his mother. He purchased a freehold interest of the house and lands of Killowen, held under Arthur, 5th Earl of Anglesey, on 2 December 1725, and the freehold of Pilltown and Whitechurch in county Wexford in his marriage settlement dated 24 October 1729, then bought the townland of Ballinamóna, which includes the Fruit Hill estate, on 19 April 1746. George settled Pilltown on his eldest son, Francis, on his marriage, and was succeeded at Alderton by his second son, John. The Perrott estate, Killowen, and  Ballinamóna were bequeathed to his third son, George.

Death: 10 April 1755

Will: dated 18 May 1750. Probate was granted to his widow on 15 May 1755.

Sources:

George Glascott

Baptism: 13 February 1732, at Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Anne (Gifford) Glascott

Education: Trinity College Dublin
Alumni dublinenses p138 (1935)
George Glascott (1750) was admitted Middle Temple 28th Sept., 1753, 3rd son of George, of Aldertown, Co. Wexford

Married: Deborah Rogers on 11 November 1761 in Boderan, county Wexford, Ireland. The marriage license is dated 12 November 1761.
The marriage was noted in Faulkner's Dublin Journal of Saturday 21st to Tuesday 24th November 1761 as a "few days ago" at Boderan .... to Miss Deborah Rogers of said place...with a considerable fortune.

Deborah was the daughter of Adam Rogers, of Boderan, county Wexford. Burke's 1858 edition states that Deborah died in 1798, and her will, dated 3 December 1795, was proved on 10 January 1799, while the 1871 edition has her death in August 1799 and the 1894 edition states that she was buried in Whitechurch on 16 August 1799.

Children:
Fruit Hill House
Fruit Hill House in Ballinamóna, county Wexford
Notes: George inherited the Perrott estates in county Kilkenny, the freehold of Killowen and the townland of Ballinamóna under his father's will. He lived at Fruit Hill in the townland of Ballinamóna, county Wexford. Fruit Hill is five and a half miles south-east of New Ross.

Death: 30 January 1788, at Fruit Hill, county Wexford, Ireland
The Gentleman's and London magazine February 1788 p112
    DEATHS for Jan. and Feb. 1788.
At Fruit-hall, county of Wexford, George Glascott, Esq


Will: dated 10 September 1780. George devised the Killowen estate to his third son, John. Probate was granted on 8 December 1788.

Sources:

George Stephens Glascott

Birth: 1755

Father: Francis Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Stephens) Glascott

Education: George entered Trinity College Dublin on 9 July 1772, and graduated B.A. in 1777.
Alumni dublinenses p138 (1935)
George Glascott (1772) was son of Francis, of Pilltown, Co. Wexford

Occupation:
Clergyman. George was presented to the rectory of Killesk and St James, Dunbrody on 19 February 1771.

Death: 1787, at sea in the Bristol Channel
George was lost in his yacht in the Bristol Channel.

Sources:

George Glascott

George Glascott
George Glascott of Fruit Hill, wearing blue coat, white waistcoat, stock and cravat. Miniature painted by Roger Jean in 1800.
image from Artnet
Birth: 10 October 1764

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Deborah (Rogers) Glascott

Married: Mary Anne De Rinzy on 5 July 1790.
The marriage settlement was made on 4 July 1790.
The Lady's magazine August 1791 p447
MARRIAGES.
July 14. George Glascott of Fruit-hill, county of Wexford, esq. to miss Anne Dorinsay, of Cronbeman.


Mary Anne was the youngest daughter of Thomas De Rinzy, of Clobemon Hall, county Wexford, and Elizabeth White. She died on 11 September 1829.

Children: Notes: George inherited Fruit Hall on his father's death in 1788.
A topographical dictionary of Ireland p181 (Samuel Lewis, 1837)
Fruit Hill, of G. Glascott, Esq., in whose demesne, which is remarkable for its fine timber, is a clump of evergreen oaks, here considered a great curiosity.

Death:
8 July 1838

Will: dated 7 December 1826

Sources:

George Glascott

Baptism: 2 May 1800, in New Ross, county Wexford, Ireland

Father: Adam Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Gifford) Glascott

Notes: George emigrated to the United States in 1822, settling initially in Baltimore, Maryland. He did not marry.

Death: 31 January 1834, in Manhattan, New York county, New York, United States

Sources:

George Glascott

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Anne (Ross) Glascott

Notes:

Glascott family tree by John Henry Glascott p10B (1877) states that "George Glascott enlisted in the army as a private soldier has not been heard of for many years."

Sources:

George Glascott

Birth: 14 January 1806 in Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Beata (Archer) Glascott

Married: Wilhelmina Catherine Edwards on 31 October 1835

Wilhelmina was born in 1808/9, the daughter of John Lloyd Edwards, of Roebuck, county Dublin. and Camolin Park, county Wexford, and Wilhelmina Deane. John was a J.P. for county Wexford. She died on 17 February 1871, in Kilmoney Abbey, county Cork, aged 62
death notice
    DEATHS.
Glascott - At Kilmoney Abbey, county Cork, Wilhelmina Catherine, wife of George Glascott, Esq., J.P., Killowen, county Wexord.


Children:
Occupation: Justice of the Peace for county Wexford and agent to the Annesley and the Earl of Mountnorris estate from October 1838 until it was sold in January 1852.

Notes: George was of Valentia, near Camolin, county Wexford.

Death: 22 February 1876 in Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 70
Wexford Chronicles p385 (George Griffiths, 1877)
    FEBRUARY 22.
...
GEORGE GLASCOTT, Esq., J.P., formerly of Valentia, Camolin, died in Dublin, 1876. He was for many years agent to the vast estates of the Earl of Mountnorris in the county Wexford.


Sources:

George Annesley Glascott

Birth: 1 February 1835, at 17 Leeson Street, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Baptism: 28 February 1835, in St Peters, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Mary (Donovan) Glascott

Married: Charlotte Ellen Louisa Meares on 13 June 1866 in Barrackpore, Bengal, India. The marriage was witnessed by Lt-Col J. R. Abbott, H. F. Payne and A. F. Dennis. The ceremony was performed by George's brother, Rev. William  Edward Glascott, a minister of Christ Church, Jessore.
Allen's Indian Mail 20 July 1866 p570
MARRIAGES.
GLASCOTT-MEARES - At Barrackpore, June 13, George Anursby Glascott, Esq., of Lokenathpore, Kishnagur, to Charlotte Ellen Louisa, second daughter of George Meares, Esq., of Sinduri, Kishnagur.


Charlotte was born on 29 March 1843, and baptised on 11 September 1843 in Krishnagar, Bengal, the daughter of George Richard James Meares and Caroline Alicia Nicholson. After George's death in 1883, Charlotte "returned" to England ("returned" because she had been born and lived her whole life in India) where we find her in Bedford in the 1891 census. She died in 1919 in Bedford district, aged 75.
Census:
1891: 18 Chaucer Road, Bedford St Paul, Bedfordshire
1901: Bedford St Paul, Bedfordshire: Charlotte Glascott is aged 58, born in India, living on own means.

Children:

Occupation: Indigo Planter and later Police Superindendent, E.B.A.

Notes: George sailed for India in December 1860. He became an indigo planter in Lokenathpore, near Krishnagar in Bengal province. George obtained a putni, or perpetual lease, from a zemindar - an Indian landowning aristocrat and from 1871 to 1873, he became embroiled in a complicated legal proceeding dealing with the status of a putni leased from two different zemindars. Indigo planters generally owned the indigo factory, and the indigo was grown by tenant farmers, or ryots. Sir Henry Cotton was then the area's magistrate and he describes the life of the indigo planters as well as a dealing he had with George Glascott:
Indian & home memories pp84-6 (Sir Henry Cotton, 1910)
Their life was on the whole a hard one with laborious days, and if there were amenities such as many a young man craves for, there were also temptations. In the saddle before daybreak with many a wide expanse of country to visit, a planter would often ride out three horses under a blazing sun and in the teeth of a fiery wind, and not get back to his factory before mid-day. After a bath there came breakfast and a quenching of thirst. It is said by Kipling that only those who have lived east of Suez know what thirst means, and of all men east of Suez I should say that these indigo planters had reason to know best. Whisky had not yet established any footing in India ; a peg meant brandy pawnee in a long glass, and I do not deny that plenty of brandy was consumed, but at the time of which I write Bass's bottled beer reigned supreme. Hodgson's Pale Ale had had its day, and Pilsener was yet unbrewed. These young planters as a body were as hard as nails, and they could stand with impunity an amount which would astonish the more temperate habits of the present generation. But not always! I can remember the twelve-bottle men, as they were called, who could get through twelve quart bottles of Bass at a sitting. There were very few of them, and they were relics of a day that was dying out; none, I think, lived to the age of forty.
  The relations of a Magistrate with the indigo planters were as delicate then as they are and always have been, say, with the tea planters of Assam. They were even more delicate in the case of indigo, as the indigo planter was ordinarily a landlord exercising almost patriarchal influence over his tenantry —who grew the plant for him under contract and a system of advances— as well as a: manufacturer of the dye. Such a system is obviously unsound, and it led from time immemorial to frequent disputes between the planter and the ryot which had culminated in a crisis before I came to Chooadanga. The fate of the industry in Lower Bengal was then doomed, but indigo cultivation struggled on for many years, and there were few signs of the total collapse which ensued after I left the district. Within ten years of my leaving Chooadanga nearly all the indigo factories had been dismantled, the palatial residences of the planters had been pulled down and their sites were unrecognisable amid the ordinary cultivation of the country. I imagine that even the oldest inhabitant would now have some difficulty in pointing out the exact location where the great piles of buildings representing Katchikatta, Peerpore, Kanhaidanga, and Lokenathpore once stood. Even in my time the system was in rapid decline, and I knew it was decaying, though I did not anticipate such early collapse. It was the more important, therefore, that I should have been strictly on my guard in my personal relations with the planting community. But I acted as others did and had always done, and I am free to admit that I was on a decree of intimacy with the planters of the district which must inevitably and insensibly have impaired that attitude of absolute impartiality which it is the first duty of judicial officers to maintain.
  It would have been impossible for a young man in my position to have deliberately isolated himself and shut himself off from communication with his fellow-countrymen. Such an idea is unthinkable. But it was to have been expected that I should display circumspection and exercise discrimination. I claim to have done something in this direction, but I do not claim to have been always successful. A case occurred in which there was a dispute between the ryots of the large village of Joyrampore and the neighbouring factory of Lokenathpore, of which a Mr. Glascott was manager. Glascott was said to have been once a seaman before the mast, and it was believed that a deeply sunk scar on his right temple had been caused by a blow from a marline-spike. Whether this was so or not, it may be fairly assumed that he was not the type of man for whom I could have any special liking. The fact remains that I decided this dispute in favour of the factory, and that when the case came before Government, as it did on a petition from the villagers, I was censured for partiality, and I remember that the Indian newspapers of the time — the Amrita Bazar Patrika, then published as a biglot in Jessore, and the Hindoo Patriot, then an English weekly in Calcutta — got hold of the Government letter and rubbed in the P's and Q's with characteristic emphasis. I was aggrieved at this, for really I was not very much to blame, and the case did not call for all the pother it excited; but when I look back at all the circumstances I have no doubt that on this occasion, and probably on others which never came to notice, I did not exercise the strict impartiality which is due from a Magistrate. That the censure did me good I am certain, for it made me more careful, and I have never ceased to realise the difficulty and responsibility which rest on English Magistrates in disposing of cases between their own fellow-countrymen and Indian litigants.


In 1868, the High Court upheld a civil ruling in favour of George Glascott against ryots who had failed to cultivate indigo in accordance with a contract he had held with them. Details are in The Weekly reporter: appellate High court vol 10 pp420-1 (1868).

George's brother-in-law, Gerald Meares, the owner of the indigo factory in Kuthlamaree, about 20 miles from Lokenathpore, was convicted of assault of Panchoo, a local dậk-runner and sentenced to two months' imprisonment in June 1873. George appeared as a witness for the defence, providing the that Gerald was visiting him in Lokenathpore at the time of the alleged assault in Kuthlamaree. Some doubt was created around the credibility of George's testimony becasue he had previously told the Superintendent of Police that he could not remember when Meares had visited or even that he had been there for sure on the day in question. George explained the discrepancy by saying at the trial that "I said I would give no evidence. I did not wish to be mixed up with the case at all. It was my busy time of year, and I did not wish to be at the trouble of going to Court." Deatils of the case are reported at the time of Meares's appeal, which was turned down, in The Weekly reporter: appellate High court vol 22 pp54-64 (1874).

In June 1877, George was involved in an ugly case involving the murder of Ramguti Biswas, an employee at George's factory who had been recently dismissed. In some bizarre legal proceedings, local officials decided that it was a case of malicious suicide ("malicious" in that it was done in order to accuse the factory people of murder!), not murder, despite medical evidence to the contrary, and two Indian men, including Biswas's brother, who had given evidence that Glascott had detained Biswas before his death, were then imprisoned for perjury, despite no judicial proceedings showing that their evidence was false. Extended involvelment by Indian lawyers eventual led to the acquittal of the two men on the perjury charge, but no-one was ever charged with Ramguti's murder. The case is described in The record of criminal cases: as between Europeans and natives for the last hundred years pp83-90 (1896).

George later joined the East Bengal Railways and was the Superintendent of Police living at Goalundo when he died.

Death: 3 October 1883, in Calcutta, India, of dysentry

Buried: 4 October 1883, in General Episcopalian Cemetery, Calcutta, India, aged 48

Will: George died intestate, leaving his widow an estate of 4,949-10-10 rupees.

Sources:

George William Glascott

Birth: 4 December 1867, in India

Baptism: 26 December 1867, in Lokenathpore, Bengal, India

Father: George Annesley Glascott

Mother: Charlotte Ellen Louisa (Meares) Glascott

Death: 16 May 1869 in Lokenathpore, Bengal, India
Allen's Indian Mail 16 June 1869 p570
DEATHS.
GLASCOTT - At Lokenathpore factory, May 16, George William, son of G. A. Glascott, aged 17 months.


Buried: 16 May 1869, in Krishnagar, Bengal, India

Sources:

Georgina Elizabeth Glascott

Birth: 1839/40

Father: William Madden Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth Harriet Lucy (Boyd) Glascott

Death: 1900 in Narbeth district, Pembrokeshire, Wales, aged 60

Sources:

Gerald Annesley Glascott

Birth: 29 June 1871, at Lokenathpore, Bengal, India
The Times of India 4 July 1871
Jun 29 at Lokenathpore, the wife of GA Glascott Esq, of a son

Baptism: 18 November 1871, in Krishnagar, Bengal, India

Father: George Annesley Glascott

Mother: Charlotte Ellen Louisa (Meares) Glascott

Married: Rosa Hannah North in 1902, in St George Hanover Square district, London, England
Rosa was born in 1875, in Holbeck district, West Riding of Yorkshire.
Census:
1911: Bedford, Bedfordshire: Rosa Glascott, visitor, is aged 35, born in Leeds, Yorkshire

Occupation: Civil Engineer. Gerald worked for the Burma Railway Company. In 1902 Gerald is listed as an executive engineer with the Burma Railway (Sessional papers vol 32 p545). He was awarded a patent in 1903, along with Henry Batten Huddleston, for "The interlocking of points and signals at stations on single-line railways, to be known as the 'H and G' system" (The Gazette of India 22 August 1903 p904) and in 1905 for "Simplifying the lowering of signals" (Indian engineering vol 38 23 September 1905 page xii). At both times he is recorded as residing in Rangoon. In 1907, Gerald's new method of computing plate-girder flange riveting received favourable mention in engineering journals:
Engineering News-Record vol 80 no.1 p47
Computation of Plate-Girder Flange Riveting Discussed
THE old-established method of calculating the pitch of plate-girder flange rivets, namely, dividing the product of rivet value and girder depth by the shear, has been under attack by bridge engineers in India recently, and was the subject of dicussion at a meeting of the Indian Railway Bridge Committee at Simla, Aug. 13-18, 1917.
...
The committee tentatively expresses a preference for the method used by the Burma Railways, which consists in calculating the horizontal shear at the dividing plane between web and flange according to the usual formula for longitudinal shear Applying the formula to this case gives: Pitch of rivets equals, moment of inertia of girder section, multiplied by rivet value, divided by the total vertical shear and by the statical moment of the flange about the neutral axis. The method recommended will be seen to be the logical accompaniment of the now common method of calculating plate-girders by moment of inertia, based on the view that the cross-section of a plate-girder is equivalent to a solid section. It was proposed in the present case by G. A. Glascott, deputy chief engineer of the Burma Railways, in 1907, in reply to criticisms of Rendel & Robertson.


A major project that Gerald was involved in, the Mandalay to Kunlon line, is described in From Steelton to Mandalay (The Pennsylvania Steel Company, 1902)
    SPEECH OF MR. G. DEUCHARS, ENGINEER-IN-CHIEF.
...
And now about the approaches, I mean the lines running down to the bridge on each side of the gorge. We have had a good deal more to do with them than we actually had with the construction of the bridge (I speak on behalf of Mr. Glascott, my very able Executive Engineer, and myself).
  Mr. Bagley, who may be described as the father of the Mandalay-Kunlon Railway, as you are doubtless aware, discovered the natural bridge as far as the railway is concerned, and fixed the route for crossing the gorge, and it only remained for us to complete his work. It was a somewhat difficult matter to find a line which would give at once approximately the cheapest and most efficient approach to the bridge, and the line, as you see it, is the result of much consideration and discussion, and also on the part of Mr. Glascott, of much hard work; he pretty well covered the hillsides with survey pegs before we got what we wanted. The south approach may be said to begin at a point about two miles north of Nawnghkio, at a level of 2,691 feet above the sea. From that point it descends to the bridge, which is at a level of 2,135 feet, on an almost continuous 1 in 40 gradient. The line after crossing the viaduct skirts the steep hillsides on the further side, involving two tunnels and some heavy cuttings, and then proceeds to turn and twist up the ascent by help of three semi-circular loops. Pinkaw (four miles from the viaduct) may be said to be the end of the north approach proper, but the line continues to ascend on a steep gradient for another nine miles, when it reaches a level of 3,256 feet above sea level, the highest point on the line between Maymyo and the Salween River.
  A feature of the work in crossing the gorge is the temporary line, which is three miles long and zigzags down the side of the gorge. This temporary line enabled materials of all kinds to be delivered direct by train at the foot of the viaduct and greatly simplified the work of erection. It also enabled us to cross rails and sleepers on a wire ropeway, so that plate-laying could be carried on the further side; two locomotives were even transported in pieces across this rope. This procedure enabled us to get the rails laid to a point about 35 miles ahead of the gorge by the time the viaduct was finished, and now admits of the line being opened to Hsipaw before the present rainy season, or six months earlier than would otherwise have been possible. It has also enabled us to get the large bridge over the Myitnge River, between Hsipaw and Lashio, spanned before the present rainy season, and has thus opened the possibility of the line being opened to Lashio in the beginning of 1902.

    SPEECH  OF SIR FREDERIC FRYER, K.C.S.I., LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OF BURMA
...
In May, 1898, a 1 in 40 line was submitted by Mr. Bagley, and then the Government of India proposed to raise the bridge and shorten the approaches, and a considerable amount of further survey work had to be undertaken, and every possible modification of Mr. Bagley's latest plans was considered by Mr. Deuchars, the Chief Engineer, who succeeded Mr. Bagley in September, 1898. At length it was decided to adhere to the original height of the viaduct, but to re-align the whole of the approaches, and to curve the ends of the viaduct so as to reduce the cost of tunnels and earthwork. The result is the present line as it now is, and construction on it commenced in August, 1899. Mr. Glascott was in charge of the division, and he deserves great credit for the skill with which he worked out the details of the alignment, both of the approaches and the bridge. He also had charge of the construction of the approaches, assisted by Mr. Bleeck, Assistant Engineer, and of the bridge itself, assisted by Mr. White, Executive Engineer. The principal credit is due, however, to the Engineer-in-Chief, Mr. Deuchars, who has been responsible for the conduct of the work, and who has had to guide his subordinates in all the intricate questions that have arisen regarding its construction. The construction of the approaches, involving very heavy work, has been carried out by Messrs. Glascott and Bleeck with skill and despatch. As regards the viaduct itself, once the Railways Company had settled the location and the height, and fixed the pedestals on which the ends of the tower rest, the American company did the rest. Thirty Americans were employed on the erection, and about 350 natives of India, chiefly rivetters.

Gerald was Deputy Superintendent of Ways and Works of the Burma Railway in 1908 (Indian engineering vol 43 p314).

Notes: Gerald inherited the 146 acre estate of Fruit Hill in county Wexford from Julia Glascott, who died in 1885. Julia was Gerald's grandfather's first cousin. The estate passed to his brother John on his death.

Gerald became an Associate of the Royal College of Science for Ireland in 1891 (Sessional papers vol 32 p545).

Death: 22 November 1909, aboard the S.S. Leicestershire in the Suez canal
The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser 8 December 1909 p4
  Burma papers report the death of Mr G. A. Glascott, deputy superintendent, way and works, Burma Railway, on the 22nd ultimo while on his way home in the S.S. Leicestershire.
  (Mr Glascott was we think a brother of Mr J. D. R. Glascott who was a member of the Burma cricket team that played a Straits team at Christmas 1906 in Rangoon.)


Sources:

Gifford Glascott

Birth: 15 May 1808

Father: Adam Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Gifford) Glascott

Education: Gifford was educated at the Ballitore School in Ballitoer, county Kildare, Ireland, entering on 5 December 1823.

Occupation: Army Officer
Gifford served in the Madras Army of the Honourable East India Company, reaching the rank of lieutenant.
Acting ensign Gifford Glascott was promoted to ensign in the 48th Native Infantry on 7 December 1831 (Asiatic Journal June 1832 p113). In September 1834, he transferred as second ensign to the 40th Native Infantry (Asiatic Journal February 1835 p141). Gifford is referred to as a lieutenant in this report in 1838, and in his death notice.
Parbury's oriental herald and colonial intelligencer 1838 p594
The Rattlesnake which conveyed Colonel Benson to Rangoon touched on her way there at Moulmein, where she took on board Captain Macleod, Assistant to the Resident, in Ava. Her escort of 50 picked men under Lieutenant Glascott of the 40th N. I. were at the same time embarked in the H. C's. Schooner George Swinton, which accompanied the man of war.


Notes: Gifford did not marry.

Death: 11 August 1842, in Berhampore, Madras, India
Bombay Times 3 September 1842
At Berhampore on the 11th August lieutenant G Glascott 40th regiment NI


Buried: 12 August 1842, in Berhampore, Madras, India

Sources:

Helen Glascott

Birth: 23 November 1880, in Waterford district, county Waterford, Ireland

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Census:
1901: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford

Sources:

Henrietta (Glascott) Babington

Baptism: 9 May 1792

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Mary Anne (De Rinzy) Glascott

Married: Pelham Babington on 11 December 1839, in the Diocese of Ossory, Leinster, Ireland

Pelham was of Glandine, county Wexford, and was a J.P. of county Wexford. He died on 28 December 1865.
Addresses:
121 Dorset street, upper, Dublin, county Dublin, and Glandine, Arthurstown, county Wexford   (Dublin Directory)
1852: Glandine Cottage, near Arthurstown, county Wexford   (A new gazetteer p763)

Notes: Henrietta lived on the Perrott property, in county Kilkenny.

Death: 7 December 1875 in Dublin South district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 83

Sources:

Hilda Glascott

Birth: 1882, in Waterford district, county Waterford, Ireland

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Death: 26 October 1911

Census:
1901: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford

Sources:

Isabella Glascott

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Deborah (Rogers) Glascott

Notes: Isabella did not marry.
The order of birth of Isabella and her sister, Anne, is unclear. Burke sometimes lists Isabella first (e.g. 1858, 1894) and sometimes he lists Anne first (e.g. 1862, 1871, 1875)

Death: 17 February 1831

Buried: 20 February 1831, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Will: dated 15 June 1830. Proved on 22 December 1831

Sources:

Isabella Glascott

Baptism: 6 June 1793

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Mary Anne (De Rinzy) Glascott

Notes: Isabella did not marry.

Death: 13 August 1846

Will: dated 5 March 1846. Probate was granted 8 July 1847

Sources:

James Jocelyn Glascott

Birth: 17 April 1845, in Ireland

Father: William Madden Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth Harriet Lucy (Boyd) Glascott

Education: Cheltenham College, entering in 1860.
Cheltenham college register 1841-1889 p187 (1890)
JANUARY, 1860
Glascott, James Jocelyn, son of William Madden Glascott, Esq., Alderton, New Ross, Ireland; born 17th April 1845.
  Ensign, 32nd Foot, 1865; Lieutenant, 1868; Adjutant, 1868-70; Captain, 1879; Major, Manchester Regiment (Retired), 1886. Adjutant, Auxiliary Forces, 1881-86.


Married: Anna Margaret Sophia Richards on 2 December 1868 in Clonmore, county Wexford, Ireland. James Jocelyn Glascott is recorded as the son of William Madden Glascott. Anna Margaret Sophia Richards is recorded as the daughter of John Richards.

Anna was born in 1844/5, in county Wexford, the daughter of John Richards, of Mcmine Castle, county Wexford, and Harriett Martha Gledstanes. She died on 13 November 1909.
Census & Addresses:
1878: Devonport, Devon  (London Gazette 27 February 1878 p1189)
1881: Churchwards Hotel, Victoria Road, Aldershot, Hampshire

Occupation: Army Officer
James was commissioned as Ensign in the 32nd (Cornwall) Regiment of Foot, by purchase, on 9 May 1865 (London Gazette 9 May 1865 p2432), and promoted to Lieutenant, by purchase, on 22 February 1868 (London Gazette 21 February 1868 p838). He was appointed Adjutant on 2 December 1868 (London Gazette 1 December 1868 p6404) and resigned that appointment on 20 July 1870 (London Gazette 19 July 1870 p3434). James was promoted to Captain on 9 July 1879 (London Gazette 22 July 1879 p4588) and on 13 September 1879 he transferred to the 96th Foot (London Gazette 12 September 1879 p5455). The 96th Fort merged with the 63rd Foot in 1881 to form the Manchester Regiment, and James was seconded to the 17th Lancashire Corps as Adjutant on 15 September 1881 (London Gazette 23 September 1881 p4808), then seconded to the 23rd Middlesex as Adjutant on 10 May 1883 (London Gazette 20 April 1883 p2114). James retired on 15 September 1886, with the honorary rank of Major (London Gazette 14 September 1886 p4421).

Notes:
In 1884, James appeared in the old Bailey in connection with a case in which he was defrauded by a man falsely claiming to be a man James knew when he served in Mauritius.
Proceedings of the Central Criminal Court, 15th December 1884, page 33
115. JAMES HILL alias McLEAN (39) , Unlawfully obtaining money by false pretences, with intent to defraud.
    MESSRS. MONTAGU WILLIAMS and HORACE AVORY Prosecuted.
  JAMES JOCELYN GLASCOTT. I am a Captain in the 2nd, Manchester Regiment—I served in the Mauritius in 1867 for a short time, and again in 1873 and 1874—I knew a gentleman named Hill there the last time—the prisoner is not that man—about 12th November this year this letter was sent to the headquarters of the Volunteer Battalion, 31, Great Smith Street, Westminster. (Reminding the witness of their acquaintance in the Mauritius, and asking him for 2l. or 3l. as a loan.) Believing the writer to be a gentleman I had known there I sent him a cheque on Cox and Co. for 5l., and about 16th November I received this letter in the same writing. (Expressing gratitude for the remittance.) I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at the police-court.
  Cross-examined by the Prisoner. The letter does not represent you as a former comrade, only as having known me in the Mauritius.
  Re-examined. I would not have lent a stranger the money.
  FREDERICK HODGES. I am cashier to Messrs. Cox, bankers, of Craig's Court—I cashed this cheque for 5l. over the counter on 16th November—it is endorsed "J. Hill"—I do not recollect the person who cashed it.
  AMY BRACKENBURY. I am the wife of Captain Herbert Brackenbury, of the Royal Artillery—I live at Brook Cottage, near Gosport—he is now on his way home from Hong Kong, but probably left before a letter which I forwarded to him arrived—that letter was from a Mr. Hill to my husband—on 28th October I received this letter. (Dated October 27th, 58, Hanover Gardens, Kennington Park, from J. Sill, stating that Captain Brackenbury would probably recollect him, requesting a loan of money in confluence of his illness.) I then sent a post-office order for 2l. to Mr. Hill with this letter. (In this the witness stated that she relied upon Mr. Hill's honour to return the amount, and hoping he would obtain medical relief.) He had said in his letter that he had cancer in his chest, and it was in consequence of my believing that that I sent the money—I then received this letter. (Signed "J. Hill" acknowledging the 2l.) I was in Singapore with Captain Brackenbury in 1881 and 1882, and the letter implied acquaintance with him there—I knew nobody of that name there, but there might have been—I never saw the prisoner till he was in custody—I said in my answer that I could afford to lend the 21, but not to give it.
  LANSDOWN (Police Inspector, Scotland Yard). I have charge of this case—Captain Reginald Hull is a prosecutor, and was a witness before the Magistrate—he is now ill in Yorkshire, and has sent me a medical certificate—on 24th November I took the prisoner at 4, Etherington Road, Clapham, on this warrant, which I read to him—he said, "Yes, my name is McLean, I had the cheque from Captain Glascott"—I searched his rooms, and found 46 volumes of the Army List, dating from January, 1856, to October, 1884, most of which have pencil marks against the names of certain officers, and in the List for October, 1884, there is a cross against Captain Glascott's name—I also found a number of sheets of paper with the names of officers in the Army List written in ink and marked off—I have compared them with the letters to Captain Glascott and Mrs. Brackenbury, and with a pocket-book found on the prisoner, and am of opinion that they are the same writing—I also found a bill-head at his lodging with an address at Leeds, and have compared it with these letters, and am of opinion that they are the same writing.
  HARRIET HUNT. I live with my husband at 4, Etherington Road, Clapham—I let apartments—the prisoner came to lodge with us on 6th September in the name of Graham, and remained till he was arrested—his health was very good, and he had no appearance of suffering from cancer in his chest—no doctor came to see him—he spent his time chiefly in copying from the Army List and writing letters—he only had two or three answers to them at my place, and those had the Leeds postmark.
  Cross-examined. I came into your room repeatedly to lay the cloth, and saw you copying from the Army Lists and writing.
  ELLEN DIXON. I am single, and am assistant to Mr. Walker a stationer, 82, High Street, Clapham—I have seen the prisoner there, we received letters for him, which he said were for a friend of his, and which we posted by his directions in envelopes sent to us addressed "J. Hill, Esq., 52, Portland Crescent, Leeds. Immediate."
  MARY PRICE. I keep a stationer's shop at 58, Hanover Gardens, Kenningfon Park Road—the prisoner came in about the end of August and bought various things; and after he had been there once or twice he asked me to take letters in for a friend of his, Mr. J. Hill, who he said was always travelling about, and had no place to have his letters, left—I consented, and after that five or six letters a week came for Mr. J. Hill, which the prisoner fetched away—I afterwards received a letter asking me to forward the letters to 52, Portland Crescent, Leeds.
  ANN SHAKLETON. I live at 52, Portland Crescent, Leeds—the prisoner lodged in my house for a few weeks three years ago, in the name of McLean; and in July last he wrote me this letter from Liverpool. (Stating that he was likely to come to Leeds in two or three weeks, and had given the witness's address to several friends, and requesting her to take in any letters for him.) I replied, and received seveial letters addressed to him, which I enclosed to "Mr. J. Brown, Clapham Park Road, near London," according to directions.
  Cross-examined. I did not forward any letters to Etherington Road—I did not know you lived there.
  GEORGE SMITH INGLIS. I am a professional expert in handwriting—I have examined the note book found on the prisoner, this envelope addressed to Captain Glascott, this letter to Mrs. Shakleton, and this letter to Mrs. Brakenbury, and in my opinion they are all in the same writing. (The entry in the note book was "A small sum would even help me. I have never been accustomed to this kind of thing, and God only knows it is the greatest suffering, and being placed as I am has driven me to it.")
  The prisoner in his defence stated that many men in the Army had made his house their home, and he got a quantity of old Army Lists at a bookstall, and wrote to several persons for help, being nearly starving, but got no answers. He contended that if he had had any intention to defraud Captain Glascott, he should have destroyed the letters instead of keeping them; but he consdered it a debt and would pay it.
          GUILTY.— Nine Months' Hard Labour.


Zoologist: a monthly journal of natural history April 1894 p138
THE MARTEN IN IRELAND
by G. E. H. BARRETT-HAMILTON
...
Major James Glascott told me (in 1887) that a Marten was killed at Alderton, about six miles from New Ross, about ten years ago. He remembers Martens in the county, and says that they used to kill the lambs.


Death: 1920 in Narbeth district, Pembrokeshire, Wales, aged 76

Census:
1901: St Issells, Pembrokeshire: James J. Glascott is aged 55, born in Ireland and an Officer Retired Major
1911: Narbeth district, Pembrokeshire: James Jocelyn Glascott is aged 65

Sources:

Jane (Glascott) Jacob

Father: Adam Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Gifford) Glascott

Married: Thomas John Jacob on 17 December 1834
Thomas was curate and rector of St Mullin, county Carlow, then prebendary of Taghmon, county Wexford from 1865 until 1871. His residence in 1874 was Osier Hill, Taghmon, and his living was valued at £341 (Return related to the Irish Church Act). Thomas died on 2 September 1874, and is buried at Taghmon.

Sources:

John Glascott

Baptism: 24 January 1731, at Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Anne (Gifford) Glascott

Married (1st): Elizabeth Boyse. The marriage license was dated 3 February 1756.
Elizabeth was born in 1731, the daughter of Nathaniel Boyse, of Bannow, county Wexford, and Elizaeth Rowe. She died on 23 February 1768.

Children: Married (2nd): Lucy Donovan on 18 July 1769
Lucy was the daughter of Richard Donovan, of Clonmore, county Wexford, and Winifred Milward. She died on 31 January 1827, and was buried at Whitechurch, county Wexford, on 15 March 1827.

Notes: John was a Justice of the Peace. He inherited the estate at Alderton from his father - his elder brother, Francis, had earlier inherited the estate at Pilltown by deed. John Glascott, of Aldertown, claimed relief of £467/13/9 for spirits, wine, cattle and provisions lost in 1798.

Arms:
Arms: Az. two eagles' legs barways erased a la quise ar. armed or.
Crest: An eagle displ. with two heads gu. armed and eaked sa.
Motto: Virtute decoratus

Memorial plaque to John Glascott
Memorial plaque to John Glascott, died 1810, of Alderton, on the wall of Whitechurch church, county Wexford
Death: 5 December 1810.
A memorial plaque to John is on the wall in Whitechurch church, county Wexford.

Will: dated 20 November 1802, with a codicil dated 4 December 1810. John devised most of his property, including the estate at Alderton, to Rev. William Glascott, the eldest surviving son of his brother, Francis, and appointed John Glascott, the son of his younger brother, George, as residuary legatee.

Sources:

John Boyse Glascott

Birth: 1760

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Boyse) Glascott

Notes: John died an infant.

Sources:

John Glascott

Father: Francis Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Stephens) Glascott

Married: Susannah Tree in Newfoundland
Susannah was born on 20 January 1765, in Boston, Massachusetts, the daughter of Francis Tree and Bridget Murphy, and was buried in Whitechurch, county Wexford, on 13 June 1818. Susannah moved with her family from Boston to Newfoundland in the late 1770's, presumably due to the American Revolution.

Children:
Notes: John was of Creakan, New Ross, county Wexford.

Buried: 13 April 1817, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

John Glascott

Birth: 1 March 1778

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Deborah (Rogers) Glascott

Married: Beata Archer on 14 April 1799 at Cove, county Cork, Ireland

Beata was born in 1773, the daughter of Henry Archer, of Ballyseskin, county Wexford. She died on 22 December 1850.

Children:
Occupation: Army officer, reaching the rank of captain in the Wexford militia. John was made a lieutenant in the Wexford militia on 1 September 1795, and captain on 24 August 1799. John was a J.P. for county Wexford on 6 April 1815, and he was agent to the Earl of Anglesey and Mountnorris from October 1814 until October 1838.

Killowen House
Killowen House in Whitechurch parish, county Wexford
Notes: John inherited Killowen, in Whitechurch parish, county Wexford from his father. John's grandfather, George, had bought the property from the Earl of Anglesey in 1725, but John was the first in the family to live at the estate. He is also noted as being of Banna Lodge, county Wexford. John also inherited, under his uncle's will, the Castle quarter of Taylorstown.
Guide through Ireland p49 (James Fraser, 1838)
At four miles [from Ross] also on the river is Killowan, Captain Glascott, near the hill of Slieve Kielter, a remarkable feature in this neighbourhood, and noted for greyhound coursing.

Death: 6 September 1841

Will: dated 22 May 1835 with codicils added on 16 July 1835, 2 November 1835 and 14 May 1839. Probate was granted on 2 October 1841,

Sources:

John Glascott

Birth: December 1793

Baptism: 29 December 1793

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Madden) Glascott

Burial: 12 April 1794, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

John Glascott

Birth: 24 November 1802, in Wexford, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Beata (Archer) Glascott

Education: Trinity College, Dublin, where John graduated B.A. on 11 February 1823, and M.A. on 19 February 1833.

Married: Mary Donovan on 9 December 1829, in Killanne, county Wexford, Ireland

Mary was born on 29 September 1798 and baptised on 5 February 1798 in Ferns, county Wexford, the daughter of Richard Donovan, of Ballymore, county Wexford, and Anne Richards. Mary died on 24 July 1867 in Gorey district, county Wexford, aged 70, and was buried on 27 July 1867, at Ballymore, county Wexford.

Children:
Occupation: Barrister-at-law. John was called to the Irish Bar on 23 January 1830.

Notes: of Killowen, near New Ross, county Wexford. He was formerly of Seafield and also of Clonatin, near Gorey, county Wexford, and 17 Leeson Street, Dublin (baptism record of son George in 1835)

Arms:
Arms - Quarterly: 1st and 4th, az., two eagles' claws erased, barways, arg., armed, or, for GLASCOTT; 2nd and 3rd, gu., three pears, or, on a chief, arg., a demi-lion, rampant, sa., armed, of the field, for PERROTT.
Crest - An eagle displayed, gu.
Motto - Virtute decoratus

Death: 27 November 1871, in Gorey district, county Wexford, Ireland, aged 69

Buried: 2 December 1871, in Ballymore, county Wexford, Ireland

Will: dated 26 July 1867. Probate was granted on 13 February 1872

Sources:

John Nassau Glascott

Birth: December 1813

Baptism: 14 December 1814

Father: Adam Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Gifford) Glascott

Married: Anna Charlotte Stephens on 24 January 1845, in Constantinople, Ottoman Empire
The Gentleman's magazine May 1845 p536
MARRIAGES.
Jan 24. At Constantinople, John Nassau Glascott, M.D. British Hospital, youngest son of the late Capt. Glascott, New Ross, Ireland, to Anna Charlotte, second dau. of the late Edw. Stephens, esq. Everton, Liverpool.


Anna was born on 26 November 1818, and baptised on 9 December 1818 in St Chad, Kirkby by Melling, Lancashire, the daughter of Edward and Mary Stephens, of Everton, Lancashire. She died in 1881 in Manchester district, Lancashire, aged 62.

Children:
Occupation: Surgeon, noted for being the first surgeon in Turkey to use ether.
South Australian (Adelaide, SA) 3 August 1847 p1
NOTES FROM TURKEY.
"A surgical operation, the patient being under the influence of ether, was performed here for the first time two days ago. A sailor of a merchant ship had his hip dis- located and his hip bone fractured, and had received some intestine injuries by the fall of a heavy bale of merchandise, from a crane in which it was suspended, upon him. Dr. Glascott, of the British hospital at Pera, performed the operation with great skill. The man was utterly insensible during the very difficult and, but for the
ether, most painful setting of the joint. There were as many as half a hundred people on board the ship to witness the performance and the effect of the ether. Both were completely successful. Though the man is in great danger, from his internal injuries, there is good hope of his recovery. No little sensation here has this proof of the virtue of ether in surgical operations caused. Orientals honour the medical and surgical science above all others."

The Medical Times 15 April 1848 p484
CHLOROFORM EMPLOYED AT CONSTANTINOPLE. - The Courrier de Constantinople of March 4 mentions the successful employment of chloroform by Dr. Glascott, who, with the assistance of Dr. Collier, amputated a Bulgarian's arm at Eyoub, completing the operation in nine seconds. Dr. Glascott was the first who applied the ether in surgical operations in that country. The Sultan has ordered a quarter-cask of chloroform for the use of the ladies of his harem!!

George Buchanan writes of arriving in Constantinople by ship in 1855, and being brought by boat to Galata wharf:
Camp life as seen by a civilian p7 (George Buchanan, 1871)
I had no leisure to notice the hundred sights of this celebrated landing place; only, one prominent object arrests the attention of all who land at Galata bridge - a huge board bearing the sign, "Dr. Glascott's Surgery."

Death: 2 June 1864, in Constantinople, Ottoman Empire
The Lancet 25 June 1864 p736
DEATHS.
On the 2nd inst., at Constantinople, Dr. J. Glascott.


Sources:

John Henry Glascott

Birth: 13 September 1830, at 17 Leeson St, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Mary (Donovan) Glascott

Education: Trinity College Dublin, which John entered on 1 July 1847 and graduated B.A. on 4 March 1851.

Married: Louisa Rebecca McGuire on 6 July 1872, in St Andrew, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland
The marriage was witnessed by Jane A. McGuire, W. C. Moore and Sarah McQuire. John Henry Glascott is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, resident at Moira Hotel, Trinity Street, the son of John Glascott, a barrister. Louisa Rebecca McGuire is recorded as a spinster, of full age, resident at 107 Lower Gardiner Street, the daughter of John McGuire, whose occupation is listed as S.J. R.J.C.

Louisa was born in 1840/1 in county Sligo, the daughter of John McGuire, of Tralee, county Kerry.
Census & Addresses:
1872: 107 Lower Gardiner Street, Dublin, county Dublin   (marriage record)
1901: Upper Leeson Street, Rathmines & Rathgar East, county Dublin
1911: 34 Hollybank Avenue, St. Peter's, Rathmines & Rathgar East, county Dublin

Children:
Occupation: John was appointed Justice of the Peace for county Wexford on 30 May 1855.

Notes: of Killowen, near New Ross, county Wexford.
Notes and gleanings relating to the county of Wexford pp185 (William Hickey, 1868)
At the north extremity of the barony, Killowen the property of Mr. John H. Glascott, J.P., has many acres of good timber, about fifty years' growth; the house, situated on the banks of the Barrow, has pleasing views of the Counties of Waterford and Kilkenny.


In The General armory of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales p402 (Sir Bernard Burke, 1884), Burke wrotes that John was "an accomplished genealogist and herald, whose skill and learning have contributed largely to the production of this work" and mentions him in the preface (page ii)
John H. Glascott, J.P., of Killowen, co. Wexford, so well known as a Genealogist and Herald, has, with indefatigable zeal and assiduous care, watched the progress of the work from the very beginning.

In 1872, John was involved in a law suit against Edward Byrne, who had originally sued, successfully, John's brother, Robert for seduction of Edward's daughter, but John claimed that some of the property seized under that suit was his, not Robert's. Byrne was originally imprisoned for failure to cover court costs, but released under the new Debtor's Act of 1872 abolishing imprisonment for debt.
The Irish law times and solicitors' journal 5 April 1873 pp60-1
    CONSOLIDATED CHAMBER.
  Reported by E. N. BLAKE, Esq., Barrister-at-law.
      (Before KEOGH, J.)
    In the Matter of EDWARD BYRNE.
  February 25, 1873. - 35 & 36 Vic., c. 57,ss. 4, 5 - Debt contracted after the passing of the Act - Discharge of debtor from custody.
  A verdict having been had for the plaintiff on the trial of an interpleader issue, to ascertain the oumership of a chattel which had been seized by the defendant on August 29, 1872, under a writ of fi. fa., the plaintiff, after the passing and before the commencement of the Debtors Act, (Ireland), 1872, issued a writ of ca. sa. for the costs of the trial, and thereupon, after the commencement of that Act, arrested and imprisoned the defendant.
  On motion it was ordered that the debtor be discharged from custody, but the Court refused to set aside the writ of ca. sa.

  The notice of motion in this matter required the sheriff of Wexford, and the attorney of the prisoner's detaining creditor, to forthwith discharge the prisoner from custody; or that, in case of neglect or refusal so to do, an application would be made for an order to set aside the writ of ca. sa., and the arrest, and to release the prisoner.
  The facts, appearing by affidavit, were as follows:- The prisoner, Edward Byrne, had in 1872 obtained a verdict, after Trinity term, for two hundred pounds, for the seduction of his daughter, against Robert R. Glascott; and, a writ of fi. fa. on foot of the judgment having been issued, the sheriff of the county of Wexford, on August 29, 1872, seized a horse thereunder, which, however, was claimed by John H. Glascott, the present detaining creditor. An interpleader order having been made at the instance of the sheriff, September 20, the issue was tried on November 4, 1872, between John H. Glascott and Edward Byrne, resulting in a verdict for the former. The claimant's costs of the interpleader trial amounted to £4l 6s. 9d., for which a writ of ca. sa. was issued on December 20, 1872, and under this writ Edward Byrne was arrested on February 3, 1873, and lodged in Wexford Gaol. The gaoler's certificate was referred to.
  L. N. Nunn, in support of the motion. On a former day we applied in Chamber, before Deasy, B. for a writ of habeas corpus, but were then advised to adopt the present as the proper proceeding. The entire of the debt for which the prisoner has been arrested arose and accrued after the passing of the Debtors Act (Ireland), 1872, and the prisoner was arrested after the commencement of that Act. Section 5 abolishes imprisonment for debts contracted after the passing of the Act, and section 4 defines what is to be deemed a debt contracted after the passing of the Act. [KEOGH, J. - What was the cause of action?] The seizure of the horse on August 29, 1872, which led to the interpleader action under which the liability for the costs was incurred.* [KEOGH, J. - Who has been served with notice of the motion?] The sheriff, and the attorney of the detaining creditor through whom the execution was issued.
  There was no appearance contra.
  KEOGH, J. - Let the prisoner be discharged.

  Attorney for the applicant, C. Taylor.


Arms:
Arms - Az. two eagles' legs barways erased a la quise ar. armed or., impaling for Mrs. GLASCOTT, LOUISA REBECCA, dau of JOHN MCGUIRE, Esq., Tralee, the arms of MCGUIRE of Knockaninny.
Crest - On a ducal coronet or, an eagle displ. with two heads gu. armed and beaked sa.
Motto - Virtute decoratus

Death: 26 November 1888, in Dublin South district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 58
The Irish law times and solicitors' journal 1 December 1888 p615
DEATHS.
GLASCOTT - November 26, at his residence, Marlborough-road, Dublin, aged 58 years, John Henry Glascott, J.P., eldest son of the late John Glascott, of Clonatin, Co. Wexford, barrlster-at-law.


Addresses:
1872: Moira Hotel, Trinity Street, Dublin, county Dublin   (marriage record)
1878: 9 Carlisle Avenue, Dublin, county Dublin (baptism record of son John)
1880: Killowen, county Wexford   (baptism record of daughter Mary)
1888: Marlborough  Road, Dublin, county Dublin   (death notice)

Sources:

John Richard Donovan Glascott

Birth: 10 June 1877 in Nuddea, Bengal, India
The Times of India 15 June 1877
Jun 10th at Nuddea, the wife of GS Glascott of a son

Baptism: 30 December 1877, in St John's Church, Calcutta, Bengal, India

Father: George Annesley Glascott

Mother: Charlotte Ellen Louisa (Meares) Glascott

Occupation: Electrical Mechanical Engineer. John joined the Indian State Railways in 1904, and in 1907 was an Assistant Engineer with the Burma Railways Company.
Indian engineering 26 October 1907 p266:
Instruction in Signal Engineering. - Mr. J. R. D. Glascott, Assistant Engineer, Burma Railways Company, has, it is understood, while on leave at Home, been placed on special deputation for a period of six months for the purpose of undergoing a course of practical instruction and training in Railway Signal Engineering.

John rose to be Agent, Burma Railways by 1920. At his investiture as C.I.E. in 1926, he is described as "Agent, Burma Railways, and Port Commissioner, Burma." (London Gazette 29 December 1925 p6)

Notes: John inherited the 146 acre estate of Fruit Hill in county Wexford from his brother, Gerald, in 1909. He served in World War I, and was appointed a lieutenant in the 21st Burma Railways Battalion on 1 April 1917 (London Gazette 17 January 1919 p920). John was made a Companion of the Indian Empire on 1 January 1926 (London Gazette 29 December 1925 p6). He was also a Member of thye Legislative Council in Burma.

John was obviously always interested in railways. In 1902 he wrote to The Model engineer and amateur electrician (15 September 1902 p141):
  Practical Letters from Our Readers.
    A Hint to Our Readers.
TO THE EDITOR OF
The Model Engineer
  DEAR SIR,-I have been looking over the back numbers of THE MODEL ENGINEER, and could not help remarking how much more useful the experiences of some of your contributors would be, if they gave fuller particulars as to the working of their engines, &c.
  For instance, it is of little use to say a model boiler "steams freely" or "will supply an engine 1 in. bore by 2 ins. stroke." Different readers might have different ideas as to what this might mean!
  It is not a difficult matter to measure the cubic inches of water, evaporated, in a given time, at the working pressure. The performances of various types of boilers could then be compared with some degree of accuracy.
  Brake h.p. of models can be very easily measured with simple apparatus.
  I should suggest that in future the following particulars be given:-
  Boilers.- Dimensioned sketch; weight in working order; working pressure; cubic inches of water evaporated per hour at that pressure; consumption of oil or spirit per hour to evaporate this amount.
  Engines:- Type and dimensions; boiler pressure at which worked; revolutions per minute (not guessed but measured); b.h.-p. developed at that speed and pressure; cubic inches evaporated in boiler per hour to produce this power.
  Steamers:- Dimensions of hull; full particulars ot boiler, as above; dimensions and revolutions of engine; diameter, pitch, and type of propeller; speed of boat accurately taken over measured course. From these particulars the slip of the screw can be calculated, and some notion of its efficiency arrived at.
  I should like to know if any one has tried making a model indicator, and with what success. I do not see them advertised by any of the model makers, nor any form of simple revolution counter.
  Trusting you will be able to find space for this in your valuable paper, yours truly, 
      J. R. D. Glascott,
     
Bedford

John represented Burma at cricket, playing against a Straits team in Christmas 1906 (The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser 8 December 1909 p4)

Death: 1938, in Gosport district, Hampshire, England, aged 61

Census & Addresses:
1891: 18 Chaucer Road, Bedford St Paul, Bedfordshire
1901: Bedford St Paul, Bedfordshire: John Glascott is aged 23, born in India, and is an Electrical Mechanical Engineer.
1902: Bedford, Bedfordshire   (The Model engineer and amateur electrician 15 September 1902 p141)

Sources:

John Perrott Glascott

Birth: 10 November 1877, in Donnybrook, county Dublin, Ireland

Baptism: 30 January 1878, in St Matthias, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Henry Glascott

Mother: Louisa Rebecca (McGuire) Glascott

Occupation: Banker

Census:
1901: Upper Leeson Street, Rathmines & Rathgar East, county Dublin
1911: 34 Hollybank Avenue, St. Peter's, Rathmines & Rathgar East, county Dublin

Sources:

John Glascott

Birth: 5 June 1887, in Fulham district, Middlesex, England

Father: William Edward Glascott

Mother: Katherine Freeman (Daniel) Glascott

Occupation: Army Officer, reaching the rank of captain.
John was made Second Lieutenant on probation in the 4th Battalion of the Prince of Wales's North Staffordshire Regiment on 27 July 1912 (London Gazette 26 July 1912 p5530) and confirmed in his rank in April 1913 (London Gazette 11 April 1913 p2637). He was promoted to lieutenant on 1 March 1914 (London Gazette 17 March 1914 p2355) and captain on 16 July 1915 (London Gazette 17 September 1915 p9288) and on 22 November 1915 John was seconded to the Machine Gun Corps (London Gazette 18 February 1916 p1892). John was appointed adjutant at the Labour Corps Group Headquarters on 14 November 1918 (London Gazette 31 January 1919 p1752), relinquishing that appointment on 17 June 1919 (London Gazette 19 September 1919 p11790)

Notes: There is a curious listing in the 1905 Rhode Island State census. A John Glascott is found as a lodger at 24 Broad Street, Providence, Rhode Island. He is shown as born in England in June 1887 and the only possible entry for such a person in the England Birth Index is this John. One small discrepancy is that his parents are both shown as born in England while John's father was actuallu born in Ireland. Further details from the census are that John emigrated to the United States in 1905, and had been living in Providence for 4 months at the time of the census (1 June 1905). His religion is listed as Episcopal and his occupation as "Driving own Laundry wagon" which last is entirely strange and does not seem to fit well with John subsequently becoming an army officer. I can find no further mention of John in Rhode Island, nor any indication of why, if this is indeed him, he returned to England before 1912 when he entered the army there.

Death: 20 October 1921, at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Endsleigh Gardens, London, England, aged 34.

Plaque on the War Memorial in Brill
John Glascott's name appears on the War Memorial in Brill, Buckinghamshire
Buried: All Saints, Brill, Buckinghamshire, England. John's name is listed on the War Memorial in Brill, for  the War of 1914-18. Perhaps the tropical disease from which it seems that he died was contracted during the War.

Sources:

Julia Glascott

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Deborah (Rogers) Glascott

Notes: Sometimes listed as Juliana Glascott. Julia did not marry.

Death: May 1794
Anthologia hibernica May 1794 p396
     DEATHS.
May, - In Ross, Miss Julia Glasscott, daughter of the late George Glasscott, of Fruit-hill, co. of Wexford, esq.


Earlier editions of Burke's (e.g. 1858) list Julia as "d. young in 1802" but later ones (e.g. 1871) correct this to "d. unm. May 1794".

Buried: 8 May 1794 in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Julia Anna Glascott

Baptism: 18 November 1795

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Mary Anne (De Rinzy) Glascott

Notes: In 1870, Julia is recorded as owning 148 acres at Fruit Hill, county Wexford. Juliana did not marry. Under the will of her sister, Isabella, and of Julia, Fruit Hill passed to George Annesley Glascott, the grandson of Julia first cousin.
Notes and gleanings relating to the county of Wexford pp185 (William Hickey, 1868)
An unmarried lady of the Glascott family (which came from Essex in 1644) occupies the small, but well timbered demesne of Fruit Hills: some fine old timber surrounds the house, which is of Cromwellian type.

Death: 15 October 1885, in New Ross district, county Wexford, Ireland, aged 89

Census:
1851: Wales. Julia Anna Glascott, visitor, is aged 54, born in Ireland

Sources:

Julia Glascott

Birth: 20 July 1807

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Beata (Archer) Glascott

Notes: Julia did not marry

Death: 10 December 1831

Burial: 13 December 1831, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Lucinda (Glascott) Publow

Baptism: 1 January 1797

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Susannah (Tree) Glascott

Married: Jean Baptiste (Poublon) Publow

Children:
Death: 18 August 1845

Burial: 20 August 1845 at St James, Perth, Lanark county, Ontario, Canada

Notes: Some sources have Lucinda's birthdate as 1 January 1895, but this seems unlikely both because it is so long before the baptism date, and because it conflicts with the birthdates of her elder siblings.

Lucinda and three siblings, Ann, William and John emigrated to Canada in 1819, sailing aboard the Thomas.

Sources:

Lucy (Glascott) Ussher

Birth: 1791 at Pilltown, county Wexford, Ireland

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Madden) Glascott

Married: John Ussher on 11 January 1811, at Landscape, county Wexford, Ireland

Children:
Death: 30 March 1863

Sources:

Lucy Sophia Glascott

Birth: 1846/7

Father: William Madden Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth Harriet Lucy (Boyd) Glascott

Death: 17 February 1940 in Bristol district, Gloucestershire, England, aged 93

Addreses:
1940: 17 Sion Hill, Bristol, Gloucestershire  (London Gazette 8 November 1940 p6456)

Sources:

Margaret (Glascott, Newton) Brownrigg

Father: Francis Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Stephens) Glascott

Married (1st): Hibbert Newton

Children:
Married (2nd): Theobald Brownrigg in August 1800

Theobald was the son of of John Brownrigg and Lydia Cahill. He was educated at Trinity College Dublin, where he received a B.A. in 1772 and M.A. in 1776. Theobald was licensed curate of Castlemacadam, county Wicklow, on  17 May 1771, and held this position until 1776. In 1798, Theobald, named as a curate resident in Newtonbarry, put in a claim for £239 for the loss of furniture, clothes, cattle and hay in Hacketstown (Carlow Claimants for losses in 1798). He was later Rector of Kells Grange, county Kilkenny. Theobald died in 1804, and was buried in Kilcommon, county Wicklow. On 3 July 1805, the House and demense of Johnsville, along with 25 acres, "lately occupied by Rev. Theobald Brownrigg dec'd" was put up for sale.

Death:
1838, in Gorey, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Margaret Glascott

Birth: 1801/2

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Madden) Glascott

Death: 7 August 1817, aged 15

Sources:

Mary Anne Glascott

Baptism: 4 July 1794

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Mary Anne (De Rinzy) Glascott

Buried: 21 December 1794, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Mary Anne Glascott

Baptism: 2 February 1797

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Mary Anne (De Rinzy) Glascott

Buried: 24 May 1797, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Mary Donovan Glascott

Birth: 14 April 1836, at 17 Leeson street, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Baptism: 6 June 1836, in St Peters, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Mary (Donovan) Glascott

Notes: Mary did not marry

Death: 1891, in Dublin South district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 54

Sources:

Mary Isabel Glascott

Birth: 1847/8, in Ireland

Father: William Madden Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth Harriet Lucy (Boyd) Glascott

Death: 1925 in Hastings district, Sussex, England, aged 76

Census:
1901: St Issells, Pembrokeshire: Mary M. Glascott is aged 53, born in Ireland
1911: Narbeth district, Pembrokeshire: Mary Isabel Glascott is aged 63

Sources:

Mary Ann Beata (Glascott) Sheppard

Birth: 8 July 1864, in Emigrant Creek, New South Wales, Australia

Baptism: 25 March 1865, in Grafton, New South Wales, Australia

Father: Richard Donovan Glascott

Mother: Maria (King) Glascott

Married: William Henry Shepherd on 28 May 1886, at the Jessop home in Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia

Children:

Death: 20 June 1941, in Tintenbar, New South Wales, Australia

Buried: Tintenbar, New South Wales, Australia

Sources:

Mary Louisa Alice Glascott

Birth: 16 May 1880, at Carlisle Avenue, Donnybrook, county Dublin, Ireland

Baptism: 1880, in Sandford, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Henry Glascott

Mother: Louisa Rebecca (McGuire) Glascott

Death: 31 July 1880, in Dublin South district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 0

Buried: Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Mary Katharine Glascott

Birth: 1889, in Brill, Buckinhamshire, England

Father: William Edward Glascott

Mother: Katherine Freeman (Daniel) Glascott

Census:
1891: 19 Pyenest Street, Shelton, Staffordshire
1901: Brill, Buckinghamshire: Mary K. Glascott, visitor, is aged 12, born in Brill, Buckinghamshire
1911: Wirral, Cheshire: Mary Glascott is aged 22, born in Brill

Sources:

Philip Jocelyn Glascott

Glascott Family at Alderton
Philip Jocelyn Glascott (center) and his wife (second left) at Alderton House
Birth: 27 August 1873, in Toronto, York county, Ontario, Canada

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Occupation: Marine Engineer

The Journal of the Chemical, Metallurgical & Mining Society of South Africa March 1905 p248:
Selected Transvaal Patent Applications.
(P.) 132/05. Philip Jocelyn Glascott. Improvements in stamp mills.   28.3.05.


Death: 1933

Notes: After Philip's death, without children, in 1933, Alderton House was sold to Major Robert Cazalet, ending a 270 year association of the Glascott family with the property.

Census:
1901: Llawhaden, Pembrokeshire: Philip Iscelyn Glascott is aged 27, born in Toronto, Canada and is a Marine Engineer.

Sources:

Richard Donovan Glascott

Birth: 12 September 1833, in New Ross, county Wexford, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Mary (Donovan) Glascott

Married: Maria King on 23 May 1863, in Grafton, New South Wales, Australia
Richard Donovan Glascott is recorded as single, aged 29, the son of John Glascott and Mary Donovan. Maria King is recorded as single, aged 17, born in New South Wales, the daughter of Richard King and Sarah Brown.

Maria was born on 16 February 1847 in Sydney, New South Wales, and baptised on 28 March 1847 in St Philip, Sydney, New South Wales, the daughter of Richard King and Sarah Brown, of Emigrant Creek, New South Wales. She died on 15 February 1939, and is buried in Ballina, New South Wales, Australia.

Children:

Occupation: Timber-getter and dairy farmer

Notes: Richard emigrated to Australia, arriving in Sydney as an able bodied seaman aboard the Alnwick Castleon 11 January 1857, aged 23. John Henry Glascott notes that Richard "went to Australia in 1855" so possibly he spent a couple of years at sea before arriving in Australia. On 11 August 1870 Richard purchased land on Teven Creek, which he named Aldertown, after the family home in county Wexford. He is listed as a dairy farmer living in Emigrant Creek (near Tintenbar, NSW) in the Greville’s Post Office Directory for Ballina in 1872, 1875 and 1877. He is later listed as being of Alstonville, Richmond River, New South Wales.

Richard kept a diary from 1 July  1864 until 23 November 1867, which was published in 2001 by Marlene Lester under the title "The Glascott diaries: the diaries and account books of Richard Donovan Glascott a timber-getter on the Richmond river in the 1860s and 1870s"
A Thematic History of the Ballina Shire pp77-78
The diaries of Richard Glascott are significant in that they provide an extremely rare day-to-day account of families living in the Newrybar and Tintenbar areas in the 1860s.18 Glascott worked in these localities cutting cedar and in mixed farming and, as his diaries reveal, supporting a wife and children, as were other cedar men. Importantly Glascott’s diaries debunk the stereotype that all cedar cutters were single, and engaged in constant drunkard behaviour.


Death: 9 April 1888, in Lismore district, New South Wales, Australia

Buried: Ballina Pioneer cemetery, Ballina, New South Wales, Australia

Sources:

Robert Richards Glascott

Birth: 24 November 1840 at 17 Leeson Street, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Baptism: 23 December 1840, in St Peters, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Mary (Donovan) Glascott

Occupation: Land Agent
In 1893, Robert is listed as an agent dealing with the affairs of Gerald Annesley Glascott, a minor. Gerald inherited the Fruit Hill estate in county Wexford when he was 14. Gerald lived at that time in Bedfordshire, and later moved to Burma.

Notes:
In 1872, Robert was sued by Edward Byrne, for seduction of Edward's daughter, and a verdict of £200 was granted. Edward was later counter-sued by Richard's elder brother, John Henry Glascott, for seizing property of John's while trying to collect on his judgement against Robert.
The Irish law times and solicitors' journal 5 April 1873 pp60-1
  The facts, appearing by affidavit, were as follows:- The prisoner, Edward Byrne, had in 1872 obtained a verdict, after Trinity term, for two hundred pounds, for the seduction of his daughter, against Robert R. Glascott; and, a writ of fi. fa. on foot of the judgment having been issued, the sheriff of the county of Wexford, on August 29, 1872, seized a horse thereunder, which, however, was claimed by John H. Glascott, the present detaining creditor.


Census:
1911: Ballynamona, Kilmokea, county Wexford

Sources:

Robert Richards Glascott

Birth: 2 April 1880 in Nuddea, Bengal, India
The Times of India 8 April 1880
April 2nd at Nuddea the wife of Geo H Glascott of a son

Baptism: 9 May 1880, in Calcutta, Bengal, India

Father: George Annesley Glascott

Mother: Charlotte Ellen Louisa (Meares) Glascott

Census:
1891: 18 Chaucer Road, Bedford St Paul, Bedfordshire

Sources:

Rose Glascott

Birth: 16 October 1874, in Toronto, York county, Ontario, Canada

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Death: 18 October 1874

Sources:

Sarah Glascott

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Madden) Glascott

Notes: Sarah did not marry.
The 1858 edition of Landed Gentry places Sarah as the second daughter, between Elizabeth and Lucy, while the 1899 edition places her third, between Lucy and Cassandra. She is described as the second daughter of the Rev William Glasscott of Pilltown House, Co Wexford in the Ennis Chronicle of 12 August 1829 transcribed in the IGRS newsletter vol 3 no. 10, April 2003

Death: 22 July 1829, in Whitechurch, county Wexford, Ireland

Sources:

Sarah (Glascott) Hasler

Birth: 1789/90, in Newfoundland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Susannah (Tree) Glascott

Married: Thomas Hasler on 14 September 1814, in St Mary's, New Ross, county Wexford, Ireland
Thomas is recorded as being of Knockmullen, and Sarah is recorded as being of New Ross.

Children:
Death: 1870, in West Derby district, Lancashire, England, aged 80

Census:
1851: 29 Mill Road, Everton, Lancashire
1861: 43 Mackenzie Street, Everton, Lancashire

Sources:

Sarah Christiana (Glascott) Williamson

Birth: 1818/9

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Cramer) Glascott

Married: William Williamson on 29 March 1843, in Van Diemen's Land
William is recorded as aged 29, and Sarah is recorded as aged 24.

Children: Notes: Sarah's name appears in a list of unclaimed letters at the Adelaide General Post Office on 7 April 1841, which is a possible indication of the year of immigration.

Death: 19 January 1848, in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, aged 29
Launceston Examiner 22 January 1848 p6
      DIED.
  At Launceston, on the 19th instant, Mrs. William Williamson, aged 29.

Buried: 21 January 1848, in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land

Sources:

Strickland Glascott

Birth: 1808, in Portugal

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Sophia Letitia (Strickland, Calder) Glascott

Occupation:
Artist

Notes: A number of letters addressed to Strickland are kept in the Gloucestershire Archives D6148/10/1. The description of the file is:
Letters, 1811-1879, mainly to Mrs Sophia Calder (later Glascott), fourth daughter of Sir George Strickland, Bt., and her son, Strickland (latterly of Apperley Court) exhibited as evidence in a suit in the Chancery Division of the High Court in 1895. With summary list of the letters noting references to Strickland Glascott
Include letters to and from Lisbon, Geneva and various places in France (including Paris, Boulogne & Lyons) where Strickland and his sister Amelia appear to have spent much of their time. Also include references to: military actions near Badajors in south-west Spain during Wellington's peninsular campaign, 1811-12; visits by Amelia to fairs at Portsmouth and Portsdown, 1815; Amelia's controversial marriage to an old Roman Catholic, 1828; proposed press advertisement appealing for donations to relieve ill and impecunious lady, 1829; description of the scenic features of the Rhineland by Strickland, then an artist, 1832


Death: 19 May 1895
At the time of his death, Strickland was resident at 2 Cathnor Road, Shepherd's Bush, London.

Buried: Caucade cemetery, Nice, France

Will: proved on 20 June 1895.

Sources:

Thomas Glascott

Birth: 1750

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Anne (Gifford) Glascott

Notes: Thomas did not marry

Death: 8 February 1772

Sources:

Wilhelmina (Glascott) Lynn

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Arabella (Stephens) Glascott

Married: John Lynn on 13 October 1790, in St Paul, Dublin., county Dublin, Ireland
Town and country magazine November 1790 p527
      MARRIAGES.
Oct. 13. -
J. Lynn, of Feathard, county of Wexford, esq. to miss Wilhelmina Glascott, of New Ross.


John was of Fethard, county Wexford. He died on 16 April 1800.

Notes: Wilhelmina was of New Ross, county Wexford.

Death: 5 September 1849

Sources:

Wilhelmina Glascott

Birth: 1796/7

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Madden) Glascott

Death: 31 October 1871, aged 74

Sources:

Wilhelmina Eliza Deane Glascott

Birth: 28 May 1837, in Camolin Park, county Wexford, Ireland

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Wilhelmina Catherine (Edwards) Glascott

Death: 14 January 1876 in Kinsale district, county Cork, Ireland, aged 38

Notes: Wilhelmina did not marry.

Addresses:
1875: Kilmoney Abbey, Carrigaline, county Cork   (Francis Guy's county and city of Cork directory p172)

Sources:

William Glascott

Father: George Glascott

Mother: Anne (Gifford) Glascott

Married: Arabella Stephens in Ross, Ireland, on 17 April 1765
The Gentleman's and London magazine April 1765 p256
List of MARRIAGES for the Year 1765.
April 17.
At Ross, Wm. Glasscott, esq; lieut. in the 2d reg. of foot commanded by major gen. Charles Montagu, to Miss Arabella Stevens.

The marriage license was dated 19 January 1765.

Arabella was born in 1744/5, the daughter of William Stephens, M.D., F.R.S., of Chilcolm, county Kilkenny and sister of Sarah Stephens, who married William's brother, Francis. She died on 16 June 1807, aged 62, and was buried on 24 June 1807, in Whitechurch, county Wexford.
Arabella Glascott, widow, of New Ross, was granted £13/13/0 for plate and furniture lost in 1798.

Children: Occupation: Army Officer
William was an ensign in the 2nd Regiment of Foor in 1757, and a lieutenant in that regiment at his marriage in 1765. In 1768 he was a lieutenant on half-pay in the 124th Foot.

Death: 1776

Sources:

William Glascott

Birth: 1756

Father: Francis Glascott

Mother: Sarah (Stephens) Glascott

Education: William entered Trinity College Dublin on 25 April 1775, and graduated B.A. in 1779.

Married: Elizabeth Madden on 10 October 1787
Elizabeth was born in 1766, the daughter of Rev. Samuel Madden, L.L.D., incumbent of Kells and Fiddown, county Kilkenny and vicar-general of the diocese of Ossory, and Cassandra Travers. She died on 23 May 1851.

Children:
Occupation: Clergyman. William was ordained priest on 16 July 1783. He was chaplain to his Majesty's fort of Duncannon and rector of Ballyhack, county Wexford.
Limerick Chronicle 18 July 1783
Kilkenny, July 16, On Sunday, the Hon. And Right Reverend Doctor Beresford, Lord Bishop of Ossory, held an ordination in the parish church of St. Mary's when the following gentlemen, viz. Edward Beaty, R. White, Bartholemew Thomas, Frederick Philips, Richard Henry Symes, William B??, William Chamberlaine, John Richards, Thomas Ryan, James Ellard, Matthew Moore, and John Leally, batchelors of arts, were ordained deacons; and Arthur Brownlow, William Glascott, Richard Bevan, John Pritty, John Higanbotham, and Thomas Paul, bachelors of arts, were ordained priests.

William was rector at Ballyhack during the 1798 rebellion, and evacuated his parish in the path of the rebels after the fall of Wexford. Rev. William Glascott, of Vicar;s Park, claimed relief of £194/3/6 for wine, spirits, cattle, furniture and cloaths lost in 1798.
Memoirs of the different rebellions in Ireland p521 (Richard Musgrave, 1802)
The reverend William Glascott, rector of the parish of St James or Ballyhack, which lies on the Ross river, above Duncannon fort, and opposite to Passage, having received the earliest intelligence of the rebel encampment formed on the mountain of Forth, and the defeat of the Meath militia there, critically alarmed his parishioners, some of whom sought an asylum in the fort of Duncannon; and others crossed the river at Ballyhack, and were treated with very great humanity by captain Forbes of the Ravensworth transport, who received as many of them as he could accommodate in his vessel, and provided them with necessaries. Two only fell into the hands of the rebels, who posted piquets on all the roads leading to Ross, Ballyhack and Duncannon, to intercept such protestants as might attempt to escape.

A topographical dictionary of Ireland p31 (Nicholas Carlisle, 1810)
KILLESK, in the Barony of Shelburne, Co. of WEXFORD, and Province of Leinster: a R. and V., consolidated, and Episcopally united, in 1780, and ever since, to the Impropriate Cures of Dunbrody, Rathroe, and St. James's: a Church, in repair, at Ballyhack, in the parish of St. James: no Glebe House, or Glebe: The Rev. William Glascott, the Incumbent (in 1806), who has cure of souls, is resident at Pilltown, a mile and an half from Dunbrody, and four miles from the church at Ballyhack, and discharges the duties in person.

Notes:
Alderton House
Alderton House
William inherited the estates of Pilltown from his father and Alderton from his uncle, John Glascott. He made substantial additions and alterations to Pilltown in the 1820's, and renamed it Alderton House. The original house of Aldertown was attached to an old quadrangular castle, Alderton Castle. The demesne was cut up into farms, and what remains of the house let to a farmer. In 1837, Samuel Lewis noted the agricultural improvements as a result of a system of drainage introduced by William Glascott.
A topographical dictionary of Ireland p714 (Samuel Lewis 1837)
WHITECHURCH ...
The parish is situated on the Ross river, by which it is bounded on the west; it comprises 5017 statute acres, chiefly under tillage; the soil is in some parts good and the system of agriculture has in particular instances been brought to a high state of perfection; green crops, and an extensive system of drainage, introduced by the late Mr. Glascott, have been continued with great success on the estate of Pilltown, and are gradually being adopted on other estates; ... The river, which abounds with the finest salmon, is here navigable for vessels of several hundred tons, and the inlets to Pilltown and Camlin are navigable for small vessels. At the village of Whitechurch is a station of the constabulary police. Pilltown, the seat of W.M. Glascott, Esq., is pleasantly situated on the Ross river, and surrounded by an extensive demesne embellished with thriving plantations.


Death:
29 September 1829

Sources:

William Glascott

Baptised: 17 February 1770

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Arabella (Stephens) Glascott

Married (1st): Anne Ross on 6 June 1791 in St Paul, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland
Anne is listed in Landed gentry of Great Britain and Ireland p448 as the daughter of  "-Maguire, Esq.". Possibly she was born Anne Maguire and married previously to a Ross. Glascott family tree by John Henry Glascott p8A (1877) lists William's first wife as "Anne, daur of ____ Ross, Esq. of Dublin"

Children: Married (2nd): Sophia Letitia (Strickland) Calder on 1 April 1808 in St Paul, St Paul's Square, Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

Sophia was baptised on 27 January 1774 in Boynton, Yorkshire, the daughter of Sir George Strickland, Bart, of Boynton Hall, Yorkshire and Elizabeth Laetitia Winn. She married, firstly, James Calder on 25 August 1798, in Boynton, Yorkshire, and had three children, a son, Freeman Calder, baptised in Woodbridge, Suffolk, in 1804, and two daughters, Amelia and Harriot. Captain James Calder, paymaster of the 21st Light Dragoons, drowned accidentally on 25 June 1805, in Woodbridge river, Suffolk, when his sailing boat was upset and sunk. Sophia died on 2 April 1859, in Hammersmith, Middlesex.

Children: Occupation: Army Officer
William was a lieutenant in the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, a cavalry regiment which became, in 1816, the 16th (The Queen's) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers). William served with the regiment in the Peninsula War during which he was arrested in April 1810 in Lisbon "for highly unofficerlike conduct and great neglect of duty", found guilty in a court-martial at Thomar, Portugal, on 10-11 September, and cashiered. In August 1811 he was pardoned by the Prince Regent and restored to his commission.
General Orders: Spain and Portugal : January 1st to December 31st 1811, Volume 3 pp180-182
          ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE.
          Fuente de Guinaldo, 3d Sept. 1811.
1.           (Copy)
          Horse Guards, 10th August, 1811.
  MY LORD,
                    HAVING laid before the Prince Regent the Proceedings of a General Court Martial held at Thomar, on the 10th and 11th September, 1810, for the trial of Lieutenant William Glascott, 16th Light Dragoons, who was arraigned upon the undermentioned charges, viz.
  1st. For highly unofficerlike conduct and great neglect of duty in leaving a village near Abrantes, to which place he had been sent in charge of sick from Elvas on the removal of the General Hospital from that place, and proceeding to Lisbon without leave, on or about the month of March last.
  2d. For remaining at Lisbon, in violation of the orders of this army, for a considerable length of time, and not returning to his detachment, or the Head Quarters of his regiment, till put in arrest at Lisbon and sent up to the army by order of the Commander of the Forces.
  3d. For highly unofficerlike conduct and neglect of duty in not reporting himself to Captain Seaton of the 88th Regiment, then commanding the detachment of sick at Abrantes, the said Lieutenant Glascott having been sent to that place in charge of a detachment of sick from Elvas.
  Upon which charges the Court came to the following decision:
  The Court having maturely and deliberately weighed and considered the evidence adduced in support of the prosecution against the prisoner Lieutenant Wm. Glascott of the 16th Light Dragoons, together with what he has set forth in his defence, and the evidence thereon, are of opinion that he is Guilty of the charges preferred against him, "being in breach of the Articles of War," and do by virtue thereof sentence him, the prisoner, Lieutenant William Glascott, of the 16th Light Dragoons, to be cashiered.
  I am to acquaint your Lordship that his Royal Highness was pleased, in the name and on the behalf of His Majesty, to approve and confirm the finding and sentence of the Court, but in consideration of the favourable circumstances stated by the President, Major General Leith, and also with reference to the period the Prisoner has been in arrest, since April, 1810, the Prince Regent was further pleased to extend to Lieutenant Glascott his most gracious pardon, and to command that he should be restored to the functions of his commission.
          (Signed)      FREDERICK,
                              Commander in Chief.
To General the Rt Honourable Visc.
  Wellington, K.B. Commander of
  the Forces in Portugal.

  2. Lieutenant Glascott of the 16th Light Dragoons, is to be released from his arrest, and to return to his duty with his regiment.

William is referred to as captain at the time of his second marriage to Sophia in 1808 (Peerage & baronetage of Great Britain & Ireland 1839 p999) and Christopher Richards notes that he was "a Capt in the 4th Light Dragoons". It is unclear how this relates to William being a lieutenant in 1811.

Death: 1828

Sources:

William Glascott

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Anne (Ross) Glascott

Married: Sarah Cramer

Sarah was the daughter of Marmaduke Cramer, of Rathmore, county Cork, and Sarah Gumbleton.

Children: Landed gentry of Great Britain and Ireland p448 (Sir Bernard Burke, 1858) notes that William "left four daus who went to Australia". I have not yet discovered the name of the fourth daughter. The last surviving of the daughters was Fanny who died on 19 December 1850 (The Courier 11 January 1851 p2).

Occupation:
Army Officer
Gentleman Cadet William Glascott from the Royal Military College was commissioned as ensign in the 12th Regiment of Foot on 21 April 1812 (London Gazette 18 April 1812 p731), and promoted to lieutenant, without purchase, on 23 October 1813 (London Gazette 9 November 1813 p2207). William is listed in the 1821 Army list p531 as being on half-pay. Lieutenant Glascott transferred from half-pay in the 12th Regiment to the 66th Regiment on 9 April 1925 (London Gazette 16 April 1825 p649).
The 66th was stationed in Canada. They had occupied an island in Georgian Bay but a land settlement between the British and the Americans ceded the island to the Americans. The British Regiment vacated and moved to Penatanguishene where it stayed for a number of years. Lieutenant Glascott is described as the Commandant of the station at Penatanguishene.
United service magazine January 1839 p105
The writer of this happened to visit the station at Penetanguishine, in Upper Canada, when the late Lieutenant Glascott of the 66th was Commandant, and he learned from that officer, that during his command there, all the limited service men of the detachment, as they approached the term of their engagement, had given notice of their intentions to avail themselves of the grant.

Landed gentry of Great Britain and Ireland p448 (Sir Bernard Burke, 1858) states that William was a captain in the 66th Regiment, possibly a posthumous promotion, but more likely an error. The memorial panel in St James on the Line states his rank as lieutenant.

Death: 23 January 1837, in Penatanguishene, Simcoe county, Ontario, Canada.
William froze to death after being thrown from a cutter while returning from town.

Buried: St James on the Line, Penatanguishene, Simcoe county, Ontario, Canada.
Foundations of faith: historic religious buildings of Ontario p82 (Violet M. Holroyd, 1991)
One side of the double memorial panel is to the memory of Lieut. Wm. Glascott who froze to death after being thrown from a  cutter while returning from town. There are two conflicting views  as to why  the other side was left blank. Some say it was to have been in memory of Mr. Glascott's traveling companion who was expected to die of pneumonia. However, the man recovered, was posted elsewhere and never heard of again. The other view is that it was left blank as a warning to soldiers against the dire consequences of intemperance.


The panel reads:
SACRED
to the memory
LT. WILLIAM GLASCOTT
  of His Majesty's 66th Regiment of Foot
WHO DIED JANUARY 23 1837
FROZEN TO DEATH ON HIS RETURN FROM
VILLAGE AFTER A NIGHT OF FESTIVITY

Sources:

William Madden Glascott

Birth: 4 September 1806

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth (Madden) Glascott

Education: Trinity College Dublin, graduating B.A. in 1827

Married: Elizabeth Harriet Lucy Boyd on 20 May 1836
Elizabeth was born in 1817/8, the daughter of Major James Boyd, of Rossclare, county Wexford, and Georgina Jocelyn. She died on 21 March 1877 in New Ross district, county Wexford, aged 59.

Children:
Occupation: J.P. in counties Kilkenny and Wexford, and High Sheriff of Wexford 1833-4.

Notes: William succeeded his father at Pilltown in 1829. The house had been recently remodelled, enlarged and renamed Alderton house. The original Alderton estate was still in the family. In 1878, William is recorded as the owner of 469 acres in county Kilkenny, with a letting value of £640, and 2,821 acres, with a letting value of £1701, in county Wexford.

Notes and gleanings relating to the county of Wexford pp184-5 (William Hickey, 1868)
  Mr. W. M. Madden Glascott, J.P., the principal land proprietor in the parish of White Church, holds about 200 acres of pasture land included, 100 acres reclaimed entirely at his own cost, and 100 acres of plantations. The soil is variable - some of it good, deep loam, the rest light, sharp soil. Limestone, sea sand, and town-manure, are cheaply conveyed by water from Ross, and sea-sand is abundant in the immediate neighbourhood of Alderstown. The value of Scotch fir and larch of thirty years' growth, and oak poles from twenty-five to thirty years growth, is here considerable, from the facility of sending timber away by water carriage. Mr. Glascott, pursuing the customary rotations, but never breaking up good grass land, has a large live stock, in proportion to the extent of his land - thirty dairy cows; twenty two year olds; twenty-four yearlings; twenty-four calve; twenty-eight sheep, and many pleasure and working horses and mules. The labourers on the estate have good slated cottages, with gardens, and 1s. a day, all the year round, and generally some firewood. Extra labourers are put to contract work. Satisfactory tenants, where the farms are in proper condition, as to size, compactness, &c., have leases of thirty years and the landlord's life; and every reasonable encouragement is given to well-conducted and industrious tenants. On some other estates the tenure is from year to year. Small holders and young labouring men in this district are still diminishing - so that when a press of work comes it is difficult to find labourers. Improved machines and implements are in use by Mr. Glascott and other gentlemen. Grubb and Wood's reaping machine, and portable horse-threshing machines are employed; and generally the large holders are improving very much. At the north extremity of the barony, Killowen the property of Mr. John H. Glascott, J.P., has many acres of good timber, about fifty years' growth; the house, situated on the banks of the Barrow, has pleasing views of the Counties of Waterford and Kilkenny. An unmarried lady of the Glascott family (which came from Essex in 1644) occupies the small, but well timbered demesne of Fruit Hills: some fine old timber surrounds the house, which is of Cromwellian type. The woods in this neighbourhood were formerly so dense and extensive, that an old saying was - "a man might walk from Aldertown to Pilltown on the tops of the trees." The original house of Aldertown was attached to an old quadrangular castle, which belonged to a branch of the richly land-endowed family of Sinnots. The demesne is now cut up into farms, and what remains of the house is let to a farmer.

Irish Sport and Sportsmen pp61-2 (B. M. Fitzpatrick, 1878)
THE CURRAGHMORE HOUNDS
That excellent sportsman, taking him as a rider to hounds, a judge of hounds and their management, as well as a crack shot, Wm. Madden Glascott, of Alderton, to whom I before alluded, wrote a little brochure on this season's sport, under the nom de plume of "A Visitor." As I have a copy, I will read you the account of one or two runs, as given by him, and coming from such a judge, they will be worth your attention. How well I remember him sailing, as he used to do, to hounds on his famous bay horse, "Schoolboy," and how I used to envy his performances, though he was then past the prime of life: but his heart, as it is this momont, was in its right place. This is what he says: "January 28th, 1862 - Castletown - Found our friend again at Talbot's Gorse, close to Annefield; had four mortal hours and five minutes again at him over the Wynne's Gorse country; away to Mr. Wall Morris's plantations, to near Callan, to near Kells; faraway into the Kilkenny Hunt country. This run (though too much of a good thing) was for pace, country, and length, such as a man can only expect to see once in his lifetime, and we believe the hounds had all the latter portion of it to themselves. No one up but the master, and no wonder, few even attempting to struggle on to the finish; and that good man, Mr. Mulcahy, losing his famous chestnut mare, found dead in her stable next morning, no doubt from the severity of the run."
  "March 14th — Kilmacthomas — Found in Sir Edward Kennedy's plantation; ran to near Woodhouse, back by Comeragh Lodge, and into the Dungarvan country; one hour and twenty minutes — very fast,
to ground on an island in a pond." I saw this run myself, and it was as fine as man need wish to see. Same day we had a tickler from Kilmacthomas Gorse up to Croghawn mountain — terrible pace, but only fifteen minutes.
  Glascott gives his opinion in his little pamphlet on the hounds, which I will also read you: "The hunting hounds consist generally of twenty-five or thirty couple, standing, on an average, about twenty-two and a half inches, of great length, bone, and muscle, which, on a near inspection, surprises you, as, looking at them sideways from a little distance, as they step along to cover, brought out, as they are, in such condition (fit to go), they appear light, lengthy hounds. We cannot say what the kennel discipline is, but when brought out, they appear to me as near perfection as it is possible to bring hounds. In the field they depend upon themselves (for hunting is the order of the day), and with a fair scent, and once clear of the field, they require little interference on the part of the huntsman."

Landed gentry of Great Britain and Ireland p449 (Sir Bernard Burke, 1858)
Arms - Quarterly: 1st and 4th, az., two eagles' claws, erased, barways, arg., armed, or, for GLASCOTT; 2nd and 3rd, gu., three pears, or, on a chief, arg., a demi-lion, rampant, sa., for PERROTT
Crest - An eagle, displayed, with two heads, per pale, arg. and az.
Motto - Virtute decoratus.
Seat - Alderton, near New Ross.


Death:
15 February 1895 in New Ross district, county Wexford, Ireland, aged 88

Sources:

William Glascott

Glascott Family at Alderton
William Glascott (2nd from right) and Fanny Isabella (left) at Alderton House
Birth: 29 June 1837, in county Wexford, Ireland

Father: William Madden Glascott

Mother: Elizabeth Harriet Lucy (Boyd) Glascott

Education: Rugby School, entering in 1853.
Rugby school register p26 (1886)
1853
lGlascott William, son of William M. Glascott, Esq. Alderton, New Ross, County Wexford, Ireland, aged 15, June 29     Evans
     lFormerly Captain 30th Regiment

Married (1st): Mary Cayley on 23 August 1866 in St James Anglican, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The marriage was witnessed by Sophia Cayley of Toronto and J. E. Goodwyer of Quebec. William Glascott is recorded as aged 29, born in Ireland the son of William Madden and Elizabeth Glascott, and resident in Quebec. Mary Cayley is recorded as aged 23, born in Niagara, the daughter of William and Emma Robinson Cayley, and resident in Toronto.

Mary was born on 30 August 1842 in Niagara, Ontario, the daughter of William Cayley and Emma Robinson Boulton, of Toronto, Ontario. She was known as "Minnie". Mary died on 14 August 1890, in Rosbercon, New Ross district, county Kilkenny, aged 74.
The Days of My Pilgrimage chapter 44 (Anna Frances Willis):
[1890] My cousin Sophie Cayley, who had lost her sister, mother and father during the previous winter, had received a letter begging her to come to Ireland at once if she wished to see her sister Minnie Glascott again. It was decided that Dora and Sophie should travel together and that Dora should visit Ireland before going on to England. On the way there the vessel struck on the Fastnet Rock, near Ireland, but being a vessel with water tight compartments, they reached port without loss of life or cargo. After a few weeks Dora left Sophie with her sister, who lived until August, when she peacefully passed away.

Children:

Married (2nd): Fanny Isabella (Carroll) Harris on 3 September 1891 in New Ross district, county Wexford, Ireland.
Fanny was born on 3 December 1838, in Dublin, and baptised on 21 May 1839 in the parish of St Peter, Dublin, the daughter of William Hales Carroll and Fanny Isabella Tyndall, of Pembroke Road, Dublin. Fanny was the sister of Mary Carroll who married William first cousin, Richard Ussher. She married, firstly, John William Harris on 26 September 1868, in St Peter, Dublin. John died in 1884, in Dublin. Fanny died in 1915, in New Ross district, county Wexford., aged 76.

Occupation: Army Officer, serving in the 30th Regiment of Foot and reaching the rank of Captain.
William was commissioned as Ensign in the 30th Foot, without purchase, on 16 March 1858 (London Gazette 16 March 1858 p1456), and promoted to Lieutenant, by purchase, on 31 January 1860 (London Gazette 31 January 1860 p339). The 30th Foot deployed to Canada in 1861 in response to tensions caused by the American Civil War. William was promoted to Captain, by purchase, on 21 March 1865 (London Gazette 21 March 1865 p1619), and married in Toronto in 1866, at which time he is recorded as being resident in Quebec. The 30th Foot was posted to Ireland in 1869 and Captain Glascott retired on 24 December 1870 (London Gazette 23 December 1870 p5874). Back in Canada, Williiam is listed in 1873 as the Deputy Registrar at the offices of the Surrogate Court in Toronto at 51 Adelaide St E. The Registrar was his father-in-law, William Cayley.

Notes:
After returning from Canada to Ireland with his regiment in 1869, and then retiring from the army in 1870. William and his three children (Amy, William and "Miss Glascott") returned to Canada, arriving in Quebec aboard the Hibernian from Liverpool on 18 July 1872. In September 1877 William and family returned to Ireland, when with his father becoming elderly, he was needed to manage the family estate, which he inherited in 1895. When William died in 1917 his estate consisted of 2,821 acres.

In her autobiography, Anna Willis describes visiting her cousin, Mrs. William Cayley, Mary Cayley's mother, at her home at 172 Beverley Street in Toronto in 1876. William and Mary Glascott and five of their children were also living in the house at that time.
The Days of My Pilgrimage chapter 10 (Anna Frances Willis):
The station, now called the Old Union Station, was not yet built, but there was a small building somewhere in that neighbourhood where I disembarked and there Sophie and her sister Mrs. Glascott met me and brought me up in a cab to their house. I can feel myself now sitting at lunch at that big table, so filled with people, watching with envy the boys drinking ginger beer but too shy to accept it when offered me.
  Now I may as well go over the inmates of my new home. First of course was the Hon. William Cayley, a tall stout bald-headed old gentleman, the soul of kindness and hospitality. Mrs. Cayley was a little lady with a quick decided manner, of whom I was very much afraid, but she was always very kind to me. The eldest daughter Harriet was married to Mr. James Cartwright and living in Napanee, but the second, Minnie, was at her father's house with her husband and five little children. The two eldest were girls of seven and eight, Ethel and Amy. Then came Willie of six, little Philip just three, and Arthur, a baby. Two others, a boy and girl were with their father's people in Ireland. Mrs Cayley's youngest daughter was Sophie. She was about twenty-five. and a very serious earnest-minded Christian. She had left the Church of England some time before, as had both her sisters.The two youngest sons were also at home, Hugh and Arthur, boys of just my own age and soon great friends.
  The house was, as I have said, a very large one, but the rooms were all spacious and the two larger bedrooms had each a dressing room, quite as big as an ordinary bedroom today. Furnaces were not the order of the day in 1876 but a huge coal stove in the immense square hall and a second in the back hall were kept going and there were fires in the grates in nearly every room. How pleasant and "homey" the big dining room used to look in the morning, with its bright cheerful fire and the shining brass kettle on the "hob". The tea was made in the dining room and it was one of my duties to make it. I remember Mrs. Cayley instructing me: "Six spoonfuls, and be sure to make it by nine o'clock". A separate room could not be found for me, so Sophie generously shared hers with me-a large square room with two doors, one opening on to the front hall and the other on to the back hall where the nurseries were. A large bow window looked over the garden. The front of the house was right on the street, but the back, where the drawing and dining rooms were situated, looked over the garden. A sloping terrace led you to a beautiful croquet lawn, where Mr. Cayley used to play croquet on sunny afternoons with his old friends Mr. Todd and Mr. Michie and others whose names I have forgotten. At each corner of the lawn was a flower bed, brilliant with verbenas and petunias. To arrange these for the table was one of my duties and one I fear I did not excel in. Behind the lawn were trees and at the northwest corner Mr. Cayley had built a house for his son Frank when he married, and there they lived with the one baby Emma. All the south side of the garden was a shrubbery where the Glascott children played and where occasionally the cow pastured.
...
  So the days went on and the first of April brought "another little April fool", as Hugh said, to the house. It was a sweet baby and Mrs. Glascott took great pleasure in it and so did I. This young lady required a nurse to herself and as little Arthur was still a baby and needed a nurse to look after him the three elder children came to be almost entirely the charge of Sophie and myself. Ethel and Amy slept in two little beds in our room and we looked after them practically altogether. Ethel was a fair delicate child with a thick mane of fair hair. She spent most of her time reading in the drawing room. Amy, also very fair, with short wavy hair, was a very imp of mischief. She seemed to be everywhere, tormenting each member of the family in turn, now insisting on peeling potatoes in the kitchen, then hiding the gardener's tools, then dragging little Philip into some escapade such as blacking his face with coal or helping themselves to sugar from the sideboard. By degrees the family got in the habit of sending her to me. It was "Go to Cousin Fanny" all day long, till at last I was rarely without her, but I never wearied of her. She was the first little child I had ever had to love and my whole heart went out to her and she loved me "frantically" in return. I suppose one's first love of any kind has some peculiar fascination about it and can never be repeated just the same again. I have had to do with many little children since but none ever appealed to me in just the same way (of course I do not include my own children in this statement).
...
  Soon after the arrival of little Grace it was decided that the Glascotts should all return to Ireland, where Captain Glascott's father had an estate. I think the idea was that he look after it, as his father was growing old.
...
  There was much to do before the Glascotts left and the little carriage was kept busy with shopping and visits. My especial share of the work was to dress three large dolls for Ethel, Amy and Eva, the little sister in Ireland. I was a neat sewer but not a skillful one and it took me many, many hours to get all those clothes made.
  During the summer I was off and on at "Robinson Villa", where mother was keeping house for Fred and Osmond while Lady Robinson and Sir James and the girls went to the mountains and later to the sea, coming home by Saratoga. Dora accompanied them, so mother was a good deal alone unless I came up to stay with her. I always brought Amy and sometimes Philip with me. I remember one evening we had Dolly Ord, who was a year or so older than Amy, to tea. The little girls had tea alone and then played in the garden. When I put Amy to bed she prayed most earnestly that she might not be ill in the night, "for you know, Lord," she added, "that it was Dolly who tempted me to take them". I found on enquiry that the children had helped themselves freely to the new potatoes left from late dinner.
  Dr. Ardagh came in one day unexpectedly and declared I was pale and must come to Barrie with him and then on to Muskoka to stay with the Ords. I had been invited but had not expected to go, as there seemed so much to do. However I had a very pleasant week in Barrie and two at Lake Rosseau. Amy cried bitterly when I left but prayed every night that "dear darling Cousin Fanny would come home quite well and as fresh as a daisy".
  It was not long after my return that the separation came. It was in September and the house seemed very empty when such a party had gone out of it; Captain and Mrs. Glascott six children and two nurses. I still think of that day when I see the shining horse chestnuts lying on the ground and I go back to that morning when I walked sadly behind the shrubbery, feeling I must be alone where no one could see my tears. 


Death:
1917 in New Ross district, county Wexford, Ireland, aged 80

Census:
1901: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford
1911: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford

Sources:

William Edward Glascott

Birth: 13 June 1838, at 17 Leeson Street, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Baptism: 9 July 1838, in St Peters, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Glascott

Mother: Mary (Donovan) Glascott

Education: Trinty College Dublin. William graduated B.A. in 1862, and  M.A. in 1876.

Married (1st): Constance Warwick on 7 May 1878, in St Jude, Englefield Green, Surrey, England
The Irish law times and solicitors' journal 18 May 1878 p257
    MARRIAGES.
GLASCOTT and WARWICK - May 7, at St. Jude's Church, Englefield Green, Surrey, by the Rev. Solomon Donovan, M.A., uncle of the bridegroom, the Rev. W. E. Glascott, M.A., fourth son of the late J. Glascott, barrister-at-law, formerly of Clonatin, Gorey, and Leeson-street, Dublin, to Constance, youngest daughter of B. Warwick, Esq., of Englefleld Green, Surrey.


Constance was born in 1860, in Kensington district, Middlesex, the daughter of B. Warwick, of Englefield Green, Surrey. She died on 2 June 1879, in Windsor district, Berkshire and Surrey, aged 19.

Children:
Married (2nd): Katherine Freeman Daniel on 5 January 1885 in St Asaph district, Denbighshire and Flintshire, Wales.

Katherine was born in 1868/9, in Hanley, Staffordshire, the daughter of John Coates Daniel and Emma Marie Nicholls.
Census:
1881: Cambrian House, 3 Grove Place, Stoke upon Trent, Staffordshire
1901: St Margaret & St John the Evangelist, Westminster, London: Catherine F. Glascott, servant, is aged 35, born in Stoke On Trent, Staffordshire. Her occupation is Secretary.
1911: Hampstead, London: Cathrine Freeman Glascott is aged 41, born in Shelton, Stoke On Trent, Staffordshire

Children:
Occupation: Clergyman
William was ordained deacon on 21 October 1861 and priest on 21 February 1864. From 1865 until 1867 William was a minister at Christ Church in Jessore, Bengal, India and in 1866 he officiated at the wedding of his brother George in Barrackpore, Bengal. William was appointed curate-in-charge in Blackbourton, Oxfordshire on 1 April 1881, holding this post until 1884. He was appointed Vicar of Brill with Boarstall, Buckinghamshire, in 1887.

Death: 8 March 1889, in Thame district, Buckinghamshire, England, aged 50

Census:
1881: Vicarage, Black Bourton, Oxfordshire

Sources:

William Glascott

Birth: 20 June 1869, in Old Ross, county Wexford, Ireland

Father: William Glascott

Mother: Mary (Cayley) Glascott

Notes: In the 1901 census, William is described as a cripple, and it is noted that he can read, but presumably not write, as the others in the return are shown as "Can read and write" and William just as "Can read"

Death: 6 May 1904 in New Ross district, county Wexford, Ireland, aged 34

Census:
1901: Poulmaloe, Whitechurch, county Wexford

Sources:

William Edward Glascott

Birth: 17 March 1879, in Tynemouth district, Northumberland, England

Baptism: 30 March 1879, in Tynemouth, Northumberland, England

Father: William Edward Glascott

Mother: Constance (Warwick) Glascott

Death: 28 April 1879, in Tynemouth district, Northumberland, England, aged 0

Sources:
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