The Doyne Family

Anne Catherine (Doyne) Carter

Birth: 26 December 1850, in Ireland

Father: Philip Walter Doyne

Mother: Emily Sophia (Richards) Doyne

Married: Willoughby Carter on 9 January 1884, in Poole district, Dorset, England

Children:
Death: 21 September 1887

Census:
1881: East Street, Corfe Castle, Dorset

Sources:

Charles Goddard Doyne

Charles Goddard Doyne
Charles Goddard Doyne
Birth: 26 August 1852, in Enniscorthy, county Wexford, Ireland

Father:
Philip Walter Doyne

Mother: Emily Sophia (Richards) Doyne

Education: Marlborough College, then Trinity College, Cambridge. Charles graduated B.A. in 1875 and M.A. in 1880.
Marlborough College register p211 (1905)
Doyne, Charles Goddard, s. of the late Rev. P.W. Doyne, care of Mrs. Doyne, Monant, Torquay, b. Aug. 26, 1852; l. Xmas 1870. B 1
   Rev. C.G. Doyne, Branksome Vicarage, Bournemouth
 Trin. Coll. Camb.; B.A. 1874; M.A. 1880; H.O. 1875; V. of Branksome 1882


Alumni Cantabrigienses by John Venn (1940-54) transcribed at A Cambridge Alumni Database
Doyne, Charles Goddard.
Adm. pens. at TRINITY, July 8, 1871. S. of Philip Walter, clerk, of The Cottage, Wraxall. B. Aug. 26, 1852, at Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. School, Marlborough. Matric. Mich.. 1871; B.A. 1875; M.A. 1880. Ord. deacon, 1875; priest (Oxford) 1876; C. of Hambledon, 1875-7. C. of Longbridge Deverill, Wilts., 1877-80. C. of Corfe Castle, Dorset, 1880-2. V. of Branksome, 1882-1909. This Doyne family claims to derive from an ancient Irish [p.333] Sept, whose chieftains formerly ruled over the territory comprised in the present Queen's Co. Died Mar. 19, 1909, aged 56, at St Aldhelm's Clergy House, Branksome. Brother of Philip V. (1883). (Burke, L.G. of Ireland, which gives date of birth Oct. 26; Crockford; Scott, MSS.; Marlborough Coll. Reg.)


St Aldhelms Church
St Aldhelm's Church, Branksome, Dorset
Occupation: Clergyman. Charles was ordained deacon in 1875 and priest in 1876. He was curate of Hambledon, Buckinghamshire from 1875-7, curate of Longbridge Deverill, Wiltshire 1877-80, curate of Corfe Castle, Dorset from 1880-2 and vicar of Branksome, Dorset from 1882 until his death in 1909. Charles was the third vicar of All Saints Branksome which at the time used St Aldhelm's school as a mission church. He initiated the building of the new St Aldhelm's church. The foundation stone of the building, designed by G.F. Bodley, was laid on 2 December 1892, and the first part of the church was consecrated on 11 July 1894 by Bishop John Wordsworth of Salisbury. Charles died before the church was fully completed. The church as it stands today was completed in 1912, but the complete design, including a large tower, has never been implemented.

Death: 19 May 1909, at St Aldhelm's Clergy House, Branksome, Poole, Dorset, aged 56

Census:
1871: The Vicarage, Corfe Castle, Dorset
1881: East Street, Corfe Castle, Dorset
1901: All Saints Vicarage, Western Road, Parkstone, Dorset

Sources:

Charlotte Sophia Mary (Doyne) Finch

Birth: 30 December 1855, in Ireland

Father: Philip Walter Doyne

Mother: Emily Sophia (Richards) Doyne

Married: Arthur Edward Finch on 15 June 1881 in Farnham district, Hampshire or Surrey, England

Children:
Death: 1929, in Wycombe district, Buckinghamshire, England, aged 73

Census & Addresses:
1881: East Street, Corfe Castle, Dorset
1901: All Saints Vicarage, Western Road, Parkstone, Dorset
1914: Abbey Cottage, Well End, Buckinghamshire (Little Marlow on-line)

Sources:

Emily Elizabeth (Doyne) Adams

Birth: 24 March 1854, in Ireland

Father: Philip Walter Doyne

Mother: Emily Sophia (Richards) Doyne

Married: George Edward D'Arcy Adams on 1 June 1876, in All Saints, Wraxall, Somerset. George D'Arcy Adams is recorded as a bachelor, aged 30, a doctor of medicine from West Town in the parish of Backwell, the son of George Adams, a surgeon. Emily Elizabeth Doyne is listed as a spinster, aged 22, of Wraxall Cottage, the daughter of Philip Walter Doyne, a clerk in holy orders.
The Medical times and gazette 10 June 1876
MARRIAGES.
ADAMS-DOYNE,- On June 1, at the parish church, Wraxall, George Edward d'Arcy Adams, M.D., of West Town, Backwell, Somerset, to Emily Elizabeth Doyne, second daughter of the late Rev. P.W. Doyne.

Children:
Death: about 1945

Census:
1881: 1 Clifton Gardens, London, Middlesex
1891: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London
1901: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London

Sources:

Eric Dermot Doyne

Birth: 4 February 1903, in Beckley, Oxfordshire, England

Baptism: 10 March 1903, in Beckley, Oxfordshire, England

Father: Philip Valentine Doyne

Mother: Mary Elizabeth (Johnson) Doyne

Census & Addresses:
1911: Beckley Vicarage, Beckley, Oxfordshire

Sources:

Faith (Doyne) Herbert

Birth: 17 April 1893, in Horningsham, Wiltshire, England

Baptism: 12 May 1893, in St John the Baptist, Horningsham, Wiltshire, England. Faith Doyne is the daughter of Philip Valentine Doyne, a clerk in holy orders residing in Horningsham, and Mary Elizabeth.

Father:
Philip Valentine Doyne

Mother: Mary Elizabeth (Johnson) Doyne

Married: Charles Ivan Herbert on 7 December 1922, in Holy Trinity, Headington Quarry, Oxfordshire, England. At the time of his marriage, Charles was an army officer based with the Small Arms School Corps in Hythe, Kent.

Census & Addresses:
1901: Beckley Vicarage, Beckley, Oxfordshire
1911: Beckley Vicarage, Beckley, Oxfordshire

Sources:

Herbert William Gibbs Doyne

Birth: 12 January 1861, in Torre, Devon, England

Father:
Philip Walter Doyne

Mother: Emily Sophia (Richards) Doyne

Married: Rosa Pattie Pooler in 1893, in Newport district, Shropshire, England. Rose was born in 1871, in Church Aston, Shropshire, the daughter of Henry Pooler and Annie Tregarthen Mitchell. Rosa died in 1939, in Milton district, Kent, aged 68
1881: Cheswell, Lonford, Shropshire

Occupation: Naval Surgeon. Herbert served in the Royal Navy for 35 years, reaching the rank of Surgeon Rear-Admiral.
Herbert was admitted L.R.C.P. & S. Edin. in 1884 (Edinburgh Medical Journal June 1884 p1148) and entered the Royal Navy as surgeon on 21 August 1884 (London Gazette 26 August 1884 p3870). He joined the flag ship Duke of Wellington stationed in Portsmouth, as a supernumerary surgeon borne for service at the Royal Navy Hospital in Haslar, Hampshire. Herbert joined the flag ship Royal Adelaide on 29 October 1884 (Navy List 1884 p234) as a supernumerary surgeon "for disposal". On 1 January 1885, Herbert joined the flag ship Agincourt as surgeon, then on 14 April 1885 he transferred to the flag ship Bacchante bound for the East Indies (Navy List 1886 p197), and on 10 February 1890, he joined the Colossus stationed in the Mediterranean (Navy List 1891 p211). In March 1893, we see Herbert, then on the President (a training ship) appointed to the Royal Marine Depot in Walmer, Kent (British Medical Journal 18 March 1893 p610), then in March 1895, he joined the Crescent. Herbert was promoted to Staff Surgeon on 21 August 1896 (London Gazette 25 August 1896 p4817), a normal promotion after twelve years of service, then he was appointed to the Boscawen, additional, for the Minotaur on 19 November 1896 (British Medical Journal 14 November 1896 p1483), then to the Hawke on 27 October 1897 (British Medical Journal 6 November 1897 p1380), the Collingwood on 1 November 1898 (British Medical Journal 5 November 1898 p1465), the Lion on 3 October 1899 (British Medical Journal 16 September 1899 p755) and then the Centurion, bound for Yokohama, on 1 January 1900 (British Medical Journal 6 January 1900 p55). Herbert was made Fleet Surgeon on 21 August 1900 (London Gazette 11 December 1903 p8195), and on 20 June 1904 he was appointed to the President "for the Royal Naval Rendezvous, etc." (British Medical Journal 25 June 1904 p1518). In August 1906, Herbert was appointed to the Bulwark, (Lancet 25 August 1906 p521) then he joined the King Edward VII at its recommissioning on 5 March 1907 (British Medical Journal 23 February 1907 pS99). On 13 April 1909, Herbert was assigned additional to the President, docked in London, for three months' study at West London Hospital (British Medical Journal 17 April 1909 p181), then to the Devonport Yard on 1 September 1909 (British Medical Journal 4 September 1909 p214). He went to the Abermarle in 1912 "for general staff duties on commissioning" (British Medical Journal November 1912 pS561). Herbert was promoted to Deputy Surgeon-General on 6 May 1913 (London Gazette 17 June 1913 p4307). In July 1917, Herbert was appointed to the Royal Navy Barracks in Chatham, Kent (British Medical Journal 14 July 1917 pS15). He was promoted to Surgeon Rear-Admiral on 13 September 1919 (London Gazette 19 September 1919 p11685). He retired the next day, on 14 September 1919 (London Gazette 23 September 1919 p11799)

Herbert joined the British Medical Association in 1885, and at the annual meeting at Oxford in 1904 served as honorary secretary of the Navy, Army, and Ambulance Section (Yearbook of the scientific and learned societies of Great Britain, 1904, p254)

Notes: Herbert bought the mansion "Rose Hill" in Sittingbourne, Kent. He sold parts of the grounds to the Watling Trust for use as a cricket and hockey ground. The house was sold on his death and eventually fell into disrepair and was demolished in the 1960s. The ruins of the house can still be seen in the woodland overlooking the cricket field in Sittingbourne. (Historical Research Group of Sittingbourne)

Death: 23 January 1936, at the Royal Naval Hospital, Chatham, Kent, England, aged 75
British Medical Journal 15 February 1936 p846
Surgeon Captain Herbert William Gibbs Doyne, R.N. (ret.). died at the Royal Naval Hospital, Chatham, on January 23rd, aged 75. He took the L.R.C.P. & S.Ed. in 1884, after which he joined the Royal Navy as surgeon, and attained the rank of surgeon rear-admiral on September 13th, 1919. He served throughout the war of 1914-18. He joined the British Medical Association in 1885, and at the annual meeting at Oxford in 1904 served as honorary secretary of the Navy, Army, and Ambulance Section.

Census:
1881: 1 Clifton Gardens, London, Middlesex

Sources:

Humphrey Cathair Doyne

Birth: 5 September 1889, in Headington district, Oxfordshire, England

Father: Robert Walter Doyne

Mother: Gertrude Irene Hope (Hollings) Doyne

Education: Winchester College, then Trinity College, Oxford.
Winchester College register 1836-1906 p613 ed. John Bannerman Wainewright (1907)
DOYNE, HUMPHRY CATHAIR (G), b .5 Sept., 1889, bro. of Philip Geoffrey, above, p. 594.
   Left April, 1907.   Address 53, Broad St., Oxford.


Occupation: Soil Scientist. Humphrey worked for a period in the 1920s in Sierra Leone, and was Chief Chemist in Nigeria's Department of Agriculture in 1936. He published papers on "The Absorption of Iron by Soils" in Soil Science (1926); "Laterite and lateritic soil in Sierra Leone" in Journal of Agricultural Science (1930) and "Studies in tropical soils. Increase of acidity with depth" in Journal of Agricultural Science (1935). He wrote a book with Frederick J. Martin, Soil Survey of Sierra Leone, published in 1932.

Notes: Humphrey rowed at Henley Regattas, representing Trinity College in the Ladies' Plate and Thames Cup in 1909, and in the Visitors Fours and Wyfold Fours in 1911 (Henley races p459). He was also a keen photographer of trains, and two of his photos can be found in the The Railway Magazine (vol 22, 1908)
In his diary, Henry Balfour wrote of arriving in Freetown, Sierra Leone aboard the Accra on 21 September 1930, where "Dr. C. Christie, whom I had last me in Canada, joined the ship at Freetown, and also Humphrey C. Doyne, whom I had not seen for years." Further details of this voyage can be found in the diary, and the ship docked in Plymouth on 30 September.

Death:
August 1951

Census & Addresses:
1907: 53 Broad St, Oxford, Oxfordshire (Winchester College register 1836-1906 p613)

Sources:

Philip Walter Doyne

Title: Reverend

Birth: 25 June 1819, in Queen's County, Ireland

Father: Charles William Doyne

Mother: Charlotte (Stannus) Doyne

Education: Trinity College Dublin. Philip entered TCD on 14 October 1836, and graduated B.A. in 1840.

Married: Emily Sophia Richards on 25 April 1849, in Clone, county Wexford, Ireland

Children:
Occupation: Clergyman. Philip was Perpetual Curate of Monart, county Wexford (licensed 18 May 1843), and also curate of Tormohan, Devon, at the time of his death.
Ferns Clergy and parishes by James B. Leslie (1936):
Perpetual curate of Monart, Co Wexford, Licensed 18 May 1843
TCD 14 Oct 1836 Aged 18. B.A. 1840. Son of Charles William, clericus. Priest Dec 18 1842 (Ossary).


Death: 23 October 1861, in Torquay, Devon, England, of apoplexy, aged 43
The Gentleman's magazine (July-December1 1861) vol 211 p690 by Sylvanus Urban (1861)
CLERGY DECEASED
Oct. 23.  At Torquay, suddenly, of apoplexy, aged 43, the Rev. Philip Walter Doyne.


Buried: Ardamine cemetery, Gorey, county Wexford, Ireland. The font at Ardamine Church, made of Caen stone, is given in Philip's memory.

Addresses:
1849: Monart Glebe, Monart, county Wexford (marriage record)

Sources:

Philip Valentine Doyne

Birth: 14 February 1859, in Barrow Gurney, Somerset, England

Father:
Philip Walter Doyne

Mother: Emily Sophia (Richards) Doyne

Education: Clare College, Cambridge, graduating B.A. in 1883 and M.A. in 1890.
Alumni Cantabrigienses by John Venn (1940-54) transcribed at A Cambridge Alumni Database
Doyne, Philip Valentine.
Adm. at CLARE, Apr. 16, 1883. [3rd] s. of P. W. [Philip Walter, of The Cottage, Wraxall] B. Feb. 14, 1859. Matric. Easter, 1883; B.A. 1886; M.A. 1890.
Ord. deacon, 1886; priest (Salisbury) 1887; C. of Combe Bisset, Wilts., 1886-8. C. of Horningsham, 1888-94. V. of Beckley, 1894-1916. V. of Headington Quarry, Oxford, 1916-23.
Died Sept. 26, 1923.
Brother of Charles G. (1871). (Burke, L.G. of Ireland; Crockford; The Times, Sept. 28, 1923.)


Married: Mary Elizabeth Johnson on 10 July 1889 in Rochdale district, Lancashire, England. Mary was born in 1864, in Durham, county Durham, the daughter of Rev. W. Johnson. She died on 14 November 1929, in Birmingham South district, Warwickshire, aged 65, and is buried at Holy Trinity Church in Headington Quarry. Her address at the time of her death was 31 Woodstock Road, Balsall Heath, Warwickshire.
1881: "Clifton College" Ladies School, Clifton, Gloucestershire

Children:
Occupation: Clergyman
Philip was ordained as deacon in 1886 and priest in Salisbury in 1887. He was curate of Coombe Bisset, Wiltshire from 1886-8 and curate of Horningsham, Wiltshire, from 1888-94. Philip was then vicar of Beckley, Oxfordshire 1894-1916, and vicar of Headington Quarry, Oxford from 1916 until his death in 1923.

Death: 26 September 1923, in Headington district, Oxfordshire, England, aged 64

Buried: Holy Trinity Church, Headington Quarry, Oxfordshire, England. The chancel windows in Holy Trinity Church, depicting St Andrew (the Parish’s Patron Saint) and St Philip, were installed in Philip's memory.

Census & Addresses:
1891: Curales House, West Common, Horningsham, Wiltshire
1901: Beckley Vicarage, Beckley, Oxfordshire
1911: Beckley Vicarage, Beckley, Oxfordshire

Sources:

Philip Geoffrey Doyne

known as Geoff Doyne

Philip Geoffrey Doyne
Philip Geoffrey Doyne
Birth: 31 October 1886, in Headington district, Oxfordshire, England

Father: Robert Walter Doyne

Mother: Gertrude Irene Hope (Hollings) Doyne

Education: Winchester College, then Trinity College, Oxford and St. Thomas's Hospital. He graduated B.M., B.Ch. in 1913 and in the following year obtained the F.R.C.S.
Winchester College register 1836-1906 p594 ed. John Bannerman Wainewright (1907)
DOYNE, PHILIP GEOFFREY (G), b. 31 Oct., 1886, s. of Robert Walter Doyne, Esq., F.R.C.S., 53, Broad St., Oxford, and Gertrude Irene Hope, his wife, d. of John Hollings, Esq. (bro. of Humphry Cathair, below, p. 613).
  Trin. Coll. Oxon 1904. Address as above


Married:
Evelyn Ida Griffin on 3 August 1915, in Chelsea district, London, England. Evelyn was born on 25 July 1885, the daughter of Marten Harcourt Griffin and Isabella Elizabeth Spencer. She died on 6 May 1981, aged 95.

Occupation: Ophthalmologist
After holding a number of resident appointments at St. Thomas's, including that of ophthalmic house-surgeon, Philip joined the R.A.M.C. and served for two and a half years as an ophthalmic specialist (with the rank of captain) to the Middle East Force in Bagdad. After the war he returned to the appointment of ophthalmic registrar at St. Thomas's, and a little later was elected ophthalmic surgeon to the East London Hospital for Children. At the Royal London Ophthalmic Hospital he first held the Lang research scholarship and was then appointed to the staff as assistant surgeon, becoming in due course full surgeon and senior surgeon. Elected to the honorary staff of St. Thomas's Hospital on the retirement of Mr. J. H. Fisher, he was for a time sub-dean of the medical school, and from 1935 to 1946 he was head of the ophthalmic department. Philip took a special interest in children's eyes and for many years he was also ophthalmic surgeon to the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street.

Philip's publications include Artificially Induced Ophthalmia (British Journal of Ophthalmology 1919 pp313-5), Coloured Vision (Proceedings Royal Society of Medicine Section of Ophthalmology 1922 p29), Amaurosis in Infants (Lancet 22 September 1922 pp607-8) Tournay's Reaction (British Journal of Ophthalmology 1923 pp420-1), Ocular Torticollis (Proceedings Royal Society of Medicine Section of Ophthalmology 1929 p42); Syphilitic Diseases of the Eye (British Journal of Venereal Diseases 1930 219 p223) and Some Cases of Paralytic Squint (British Journal of Ophthalmology 1937 pp531-4)

Notes:
Philip was an accomplished fencer. He was twice amateur foils champion of Great Britain (in 1912 and 1920), and represented Britain at the Olympic Games in Antwerp in 1920 and Paris in 1924. Philip also rowed at Henley Regattas, representing Trinity College in the Ladies' Plate and Thames Cup in 1906, and Wyfold Fours in 1907 (Henley races p459)
Death: 22 January 1959, at his home at Assenden, near Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, England, aged 72

Obituaries: British Medical Journal 31 January 1959 pp305-6
Obituary
P. G. DOYNE, B.M., F.R.C.S.
Mr. P. G. Doyne, consulting ophthalmic surgeon to St. Thomas's Hospital, Moorfields Eye Hospital, and the Hospital for Sick Children, died at his home at Assenden, near Henley-on-Thames, on January 22. He was 72 years of age.
  Philip Geoffrey Doyne was born on October 31, 1886, the son of Mr. R. W. Doyne, F.R.C.S., the founder of the Oxford Eye Hospital and of the Oxford Ophthalmological Congress. Educated at Winchester, Trinity College, Oxford,
and St. Thomas's Hospital, he graduated B.M., B.Ch. in 1913 and in the following year obtained the F.R.C.S. After holding a number of resident appointments at St. Thomas's, including that of ophthalmic house-surgeon, he joined the R.A.M.C. and served for two and a half years as an ophthalmic specialist to the Middle East Force in Bagdad. After the war he returned to the appointment of ophthalmic registrar at St. Thomas's, and a little later he was elected ophthalmic surgeon to the East London Hospital for Children. At the Royal London Ophthalmic Hospital he first held the Lang research scholarship and was then appointed to the staff as assistant surgeon, becoming in due course full surgeon and senior surgeon. Elected to the honorary staff of St. Thomas's Hospital on the retirement of Mr. J. H. Fisher, he was for a time sub-dean of the medical school, and from 1935 to 1946 he was head of the ophthalmic department. He took a special interest in children's eyes and for many years he was also ophthalmic surgeon to the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street.
  Mr. Doyne served on the Ophthalmic Group Committee of the B.M.A. from 1938 to 1945. When the Association held its Annual Meeting at Bath in 1925 he acted as one of the honorary secretaries of the Section of Ophthalmology, and at Dublin in 1933 he was a vice-president of the Section. During the second world war he worked exceedingly hard in the Emergency Medical Service, living in rooms so as to be within easy reach of the hospitals to which he was attached. In 1943 he was elected master of the Oxford Ophthalmological Congress, of which his father had been the first master. When he retired in 1946 he went to live at Henley-on-Thames.
  Although an ophthalmic surgeon of distinction, with a well-deserved reputation for the soundness of his judgment, Doyne was of a very modest disposition and he made few contributions to the literature of his specialty. It often came as a surprise to his students to learn that he had been one of the greatest amateur fencers of his day. He represented Britain in the Olympic Games before the first world war, and he was twice amateur foils champion of Great Britain.
  Mr. Doyne leaves a widow and one daughter. His son-in-law, Emrys Lloyd, also fenced for Great Britain at the Olympic Games and is a British amateur foils champion.

  Mr. G. G. PENMAN writes: By the death of Geoffrey Doyne we lose another of that brilliant band of ophthalmologists who flourished between the wars. He may be said to have been cradled in Oxford ophthalmology, for his father was Robert Doyne, the great Oxford ophthalmologist, who founded the Oxford Ophthalmological Congress, which this year celebrates its fiftieth anniversary. It is sad that his son did not live to see, and enjoy in good health, this occasion. At his house at Bix, which he loved so much, Doyne was very close to Oxford. He was a master of his craft, with a fine pair of hands, a keen diagnostic sense, and a great store of knowledge. To his patients he was kindness itself, and his experience at Great Ormond Street showed itself in his gentleness with children and in his ability to obtain their confidence. In his teaching his clear and simple demonstrations and logical thought, with his wide acquaintance with the literature, were of the greatest value to all, from the undergraduate student to the senior registrar.
  As a man and as a colleague, Doyne was the kindest and friendliest of persons. He was always helpful and cheerful, with a quiet sense of humour, and never spoke an unkind word. The long and distressing illness which struck him at about the time of his retirement from hospital work deprived his friends of many years in which in the ordinary way they would still have seen much of him and enjoyed his companionship, which they sorely miss. Doyne was a fencer of international class, and when he gave up actively competing he continued to take a great interest in this sport. In this he followed his father, and his son-in-law continued the family tradition. He also enjoyed his garden at Bix, and played a steady game of golf on occasion. He loved his family and his home, and to his wife and daughter all his friends will tender their sincerest sympathy.


and in British Medical Journal 14 February 1959 pp446
P. G. DOYNE, B.M., F.R.C.S.
T. M. T. writes: Many will have read with sorrow the obituary of Mr. P. G. Doyne in the Journal of January 31 (p. 305), especially his ex-house-surgeons, who must be distributed all over the English-speaking world. It is not often that it can be said of a man that everybody with whom he came in contact went away with something of his personality imprinted on them. I am sure that every one of those fortunate persons will join with me in expressing sympathy with his widow and her daughter in their sad loss and spare a moment to remember him on his passing.

British Journal of Opthalmology (1959) p255-6
OBITUARY
PHILIP GEOFFREY DOYNE
  Progressive and harrowing ill health had taken Geoff Doyne from the company of his friends for a number of years. But many, especially those who knew him in London and Oxford, will have been saddened by the news of his death.
  Philip Geoffrey Doyne was born in 1886, the elder son of Robert Doyne, whose name is esteemed in ophthalmological circles all over the world. He was educated at Winchester, Trinity College, Oxford, and St. Thomas's Hospital, from which he qualified in 1913 following this by his F.R.C.S. (Eng.) in 1914. He served with the R.A.M.C. in the 1914-18 war and spent three years in Mesopotamia, becoming the Army Eye Specialist in Baghdad. He settled in London after the war and in due time was appointed ophthalmic surgeon to St. Thomas's Hospital and surgeon to the Royal London Ophthalmic Hospital (Moorfields). For a number of years he was ophthalmic surgeon to the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street. He was an examiner for the Diploma in Ophthalmology at Oxford for some years before the university discontinued the examination.
  He was of retiring nature and wrote and spoke little in medical circles, but was known to his colleagues and patients as a conscientious, kind, and sound ophthalmologist whose work and opinion were held in high regard. He became a Vice-President of the O.S.U.K., but a major affection was for the Oxford Congress founded fifty years ago by his father. Of this he was Master in the years immediately after the 1939-45 war and his delightful company there and advice on the Congress Council over the years will be remembered by many of his colleagues in Great Britain and overseas. His modest, gentle charm, his slightly diffident merry wit, and his hospitality endeared him to all who knew him.
  He was fond of games, he rowed in his College boat, and with his brother, especially when in later years he lived outside Henley, he kept a keen interest in rowing all his life. But his major athletic interest which brought him international fame was in fencing, for he was twice British Amateur Foils Champion and was in the Olympic team for that weapon. His fairness, skill, and courage brought honour and many demands for service as fencer, judge, and adviser. He kept fit enough to fence regularly till the age of sixty and enjoyed the company of a wide circle of friends.
  To his widow, his quiet but stalwart support, and to his daughter, his many friends extend their most real sympathy.


Census & Addresses:
1907: 53 Broad St, Oxford, Oxfordshire (Winchester College register 1836-1906 p594)

Sources:

Philip Denys Doyne

Birth: 28 October 1891, in Horningsham, Wiltshire, England

Baptism: 29 November 1891, in St John the Baptist, Horningsham, Wiltshire, England. Philip Denys Doyne is the son of Philip Valentine Doyne, a clerk in holy orders residing in Horningsham, and Mary Elizabeth.

Father:
Philip Valentine Doyne

Mother: Mary Elizabeth (Johnson) Doyne

Education: Lancing College, Sussex, then Keble College, Oxford, matriculating in 1910 and obtaining his B.A. in 1913

Occupation: Philip was a schoolmaster at Winchester House, Deal, Kent, for a year after graduating. He was about to start at Ely Theological College, studying to be a clergyman, when the First World War broke out, and instead he volunteered to serve immediately. Philip had been in the Officers' Training Corps at Oxford (The O.T.C. and the Great War p140) and commenced his service in September 1914. He served as a Lieutenant in the 2/4th Battalion of the Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, and was promoted temporary Captain on 11 December 1914. He went to the front on 3 August 1915, and on being posted to the 1/4th Battalion relinquished his temporary rank (London Gazette 7 September 1915 p8981)

Hebuterne Military Cemetery
Hebuterne Military Cemetery, where Philip is buried
Headington Quarry inscription
Memorial inscription in the porch of Headington Quarry church, which includes Philip's name
Death: 28 December 1915, in Hébuterne, Pas-de-Calais, France, aged 24. Just after returning from leave, Philip was shot when out with a patrol in Hébuterne.

Buried: Hébuterne Military Cemetery, Hébuterne, Pas-de-Calais, France (Grave reference I.D. 9). Philip is memorialised on the War memorial in Holy Trinity churchyard in Headington Quarry, Oxfordshire and on a memorial in Keble College, Oxford.

Census & Addresses:
1901: Beckley Vicarage, Beckley, Oxfordshire
1911: Beckley Vicarage, Beckley, Oxfordshire

Sources:

Robert Walter Doyne

Robert Walter Doyne
Robert Walter Doyne.
This photograph was clearly the source for the striking of the Doyne memorial medal shown below.
Birth: 15 May 1857, in Monart, county Wexford, Ireland

Father:
Philip Walter Doyne

Mother: Emily Sophia (Richards) Doyne

Education: Marlborough College, Wiltshire, then Keble College, Oxford where he matriculated in 1875, but did not finish due to illness. He then entered the Bristol Medical School, and later on St. Georges Hospital, London. He obtained the diploma of M.R.C.S., and then the diploma of F.R.C.S.Eng. on 8 December 1892. The honorary degree of M.A. was conferred upon him by Oxford University in 1903.
Robert attended Marlborough at the same time (and was on the Rifle Corps XI at the same time) as Arthur Edward Finch, the future husband of his sister, Charlotte Doyne.
Marlborough College register p233 (1905)
Doyne Robert Walter, s. of the late Rev. P.W. Doyne, care of Mrs. Doyne, Monant, Torquay, b. May 15, 1857; l. Easter 1875. B 1
    R.W. Doyne, Esq. 53 Broad Street Oxford
  R.C. XI. 1873-4; M.R.C.S. Eng. 1880; F.R.C.S Eng. 1892; M.A. Oxf. Honoris causa 1903; St. George's Hosp. formerly Surg. R.N.; Consulting Ophth. Surg. Radcliffe Infirm., Oxf.; Sen. Surg. Oxf. Eye Hosp.; Surg. Royal Eye Hosp. Lond.; Reader in Ophthalmology Oxf. Univ.; Author: The more Common Diseases of the Eye


Alumni Oxoniensus 1715-1886 vol 1 p385
(1891)
Doyne, Robert Walter, 2S. Philip Walter, cler. KEBLE COLL matric. 18 Oct., 1875, aged 18.

Married: Gertrude Irene Hope Hollings on 7 July 1885 in Hampstead district, Middlesex, England. Gertrude was born in 1864 in Bradford district, West Riding of Yorkshire, the youngest daughter of John Hollings, of The Watchetts, Frimley, Surrey.
1881: 30 Priory Road, London, Middlesex

Children:
Occupation: Ophthalmologist. Robert was, for a short period, a naval surgeon, joining the service on 21 August 1883 (London Gazette 25 August 1883 p4227), and posted to the Temeraire as surgeon on 1 April 1884 in time for its re-commission in Malta. (Royal Navy List 1884 p188). He resigned his commission upon his marriage in 1885. When Robert settled in Oxford in 1885 there were no facilities in the city for the treatment of ocular disease; Doyne led a committee that established the Oxford Eye Hospital in 1886 in which Robert worked for over 25 years, resigning the post of senior surgeon at the hospital in 1912. Mr. Doyne was consulting ophthalmic surgeon to the Radcliffe Infirmary and surgeon to the Royal Eye Hospital, London. In 1902 he became the first reader in ophthalmology to the University of Oxford, a post which he held for eleven years. In 1909 the Oxford Ophthalmological Congress was founded with Doyne as the first Master, an annual meeting which has since become one of the features of British and world ophthalmology.
Robert Walter Doyne medal Robert Walter Doyne medal
Robert Walter Doyne: Posthumous commemorative medal struck in bronze 1917 (Spink & Sons)
The respect with which he was held was epitomized by the establishment of the Doyne Memorial Lecture and Medal two years after his death, still one of the most prized distinctions of British Ophthalmology.

Robert was an acute and accurate clinical observer and one of the several conditions he first described was named Doyne's honeycomb choroiditis. This is the occurrence of colloid bodies (drusen) observed to lie on Bruch's membrane in certain families who lived in Oxford, England. These drusen tended to merge together and eventually become confluent, resembling a honeycomb. Today this condition is known to be a rare hereditary form of macular degeneration which results in progressive and irreversible loss of vision, and goes by several names such as macular drusen, malattia leventinese, dominant radial drusen and Doyne honeycomb retinal dystrophy.

Mr. Doyne was the author of a book entitled Notes on the More Common Diseases of the Eye (1896), and of papers on Treatment of Atrophic Retinae with Retinal Extract (British Medical Journal 25 July 1903 p190) Conjunctivitis (Lancet, 1910); Visual Sensation, Perception, Appreciation, and Judgement (Ophthalmoscope, 1910); Retinitis Pignentoss (ibid., 1910); The Value and Misuse of Spectacles in Treatment of Headache, Migraine, and other Functional Troubles of the Eyes (British Medical Journal 13 August 1910 pp361-5); Description of Hitherto Undescribed Forms of Iritis, Family Choroiditis, and Conjunctivitis (Trans. Ophth. Soc., 1910); and "Eye" in Sport (British Medical Journal 24 December 1910 p1960).

Death: 30 August 1916, in Oxford, Oxfordshire, England

Buried: Holy Trinity Church, Headington Quarry, Oxfordshire, England

Obituary:
British Medical Journal 16 September 1916 pp409-10
OBITUARY.
R. W. DOYNE, M.A.OXON., F.R.C.S.,

CONSULTING OPHTHALMIC SURGEON, RADCLIFFE INFIRMARY,
OXFORD.

WITH great regret we announce the death of Mr. R. W. Doyne, of Woodstock Road, Oxford. He was the son of the Rev. Philip Walter Doyne, and was born at Monart, co. Wexford, in 1857. He was educated at Marlborough, and matriculated at Keble College in 1875. Illness prevented his remaining at Oxford, and on leaving he entered the Bristol Medical School, and later on St. Georges Hospital. He obtained the diploma of M.R.C.S., and was for a short time in practice in Bristol. In 1883 he joined the navy, but left it in 1885 on his marriage, and settled in Oxford. He took the diploma of F.R.C.S.Eng. in 1892, and the honorary degree of M.A.Oxon. was conferred upon him in 1902.
  From the outset of his life in Oxford he made a special study of ophthalmology. Beginning in a very small way, with an eye dispensary in a builder's yard, he worked steadily on, encouraged by the loyal support of many good friends, among whom were Sir Henry Acland, Dr. Liddell, of Christ Church, Bishop Paget, Dr. Talbot, the Warden of Keble, and others. Soon the committee rented on a long lease buildings from the County Hospital, and so the Oxford Eye Hospital grew little by little, till it became one of the best known and most useful institutions in the Midland counties. In 1912, after more than twenty-five years' continuous service, Mr. Doyne resigned, the post of senior surgeon to the Oxford Eye Hospital, and many of his personal friends and admirers seized the opportunity of connecting his name permanently with the institution by placing within its walls an excellent marble bust with an inscription commemorating his services.
  Mr. Doyne was consulting ophthalmic surgeon to the Radcliffe Infirmary. He was also the first reader in ophthalmology to the University of Oxford, a post which he held for eleven years. He was surgeon to the Royal Eye Hospital, London. It was due to his energy that there was started in Oxford a congress of ophthalmologists, which has for years met with such unqualified success, and which has attracted to its discussions some of the most eminent ophthalmologists from every part of the world. For many years Mr. Doyne was the leading spirit of these gatherings. He proved himself a most genial and kindly host, and the success of these meetings depended very largely on the care, forethought, and power of organization he had expended on the arrangements for them. Consequently when ill health prevented his attending the last two gatherings, his work was not forgotten, and formal expressions of regret and sympathy were forwarded to him from the members of the congress present.
  To his skill as an ophthalmic surgeon many would be glad to testify. His boundless generosity to patients in needy circumstances was well known to some of his intimate friends. His death at a comparatively early age was due very largely to the intensity of energy he threw into any project he took up, and the scant amount of rest he allowed himself. It was especially owing to this superabundant energy that he bore down the opposition he met with from time to time in carrying out the numerous enterprises connected with his name.
  Mr. Doyne was the author of a book entitled The More Common Diseases of the Eye, and of papers on Conjunctivitis (Lancet, 1910); Visual Sensation, Perception, Appreciation, and Judgement (Ophthalmoscope, 1910); Retinitis Pignentoss (ibid., 1910); The Value and Misuse of Spectacles in Treatment of Headache, Migraine, and other Functional Troubles of the Eyes (BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 1910); and Description of Hitherto Undescribed Forms of Iritis, Family Choroiditis, and Conjunctivitis (Trans. Ophth. Soc., 1910).
  In private life it would be difficult to meet with a more generous friend than Mr. Doyne. In his periods of relaxation he delighted to gather his friends round him, and would do everything in his power to make them enjoy themselves. One of his chief amusements was fencing, and he was the founder of the Oxford Fencing Club.
  Mr. Doyne leaves a widow and two sons, one of whom, a captain R.A.M.C.(T.), is serving in Mesopotamia.

Sir ANDERSON CRITCHETT writes:- The malady which overtook our late colleague, Robert Doyne, about three years ago suddenly dimmed an exceptionally bright intelligence, and closed a most promising professional career, but before the blow fell time and opportunity had been afforded him to associate his name with work which must have permanent record. He initiated and brought to a high level of success the Oxford Ophthalmological Congress, and, owing to the deservedly high esteem in which he was held by the authorities, he secured the establishment of a diploma in ophthalmology in connexion with the University of Oxford. Had fate permitted, his marked ability and firm tenacity of purpose might have brought yet further achievement; but now we mourn the loss of an able colleague and a generous friend.


The Ophthalmic Year Book vol 13 p419 ed. Edward Jackson (1916):
DOYNE, ROBERT WALTER, born at Monart, County Wexford, Ireland, 1857, died at Oxford, England, August 30. He was educated at Marlborough, Keble College, Oxford, the Bristol Medical School and St. George's Hospital, London. He soon entered the medical services of the navy, but in 1885 settled in Oxford and devoted himself to ophthalmology. At that time there was neither ophthalmic surgeon nor clinic in the city. Even at the County Hospital there was no dark room, no test types, and no special appliances. After many difficulties and strenuous opposition, Doyne founded the Oxford Eye Hospital. In 1902 he was appointed the first Reader in Ophthalmology in the University of Oxford - a post he continued to hold until his health broke down three years ago. He was also consulting ophthalmic surgeon to the Radcliffe Infirmary, surgeon to the Royal Eye Hospital, London, and held besides a number of minor appointments.
  His name is associated with several conditions, as, for example, a congenital variety of cataract known as "Doyne's" or "discoid cataract"; a peculiar kind of degeneration of the choroid called "Doyne's" or "family choroiditis"; a form of inflammation of the iris "guttate" or "Doyne's iritis," and of conjunctivoblepharitis "Doyne's conjunctivitis." He was the author of "The More Common Diseases of the Eye" (1896). Doyne presided over the section on Ophthalmology at the annual meeting of the British Medical Association held at Oxford in 1904. After this summer gatherings of ophthalmologists developed under his influence into the Oxford Ophthalmological Congress, of which he was the first "Master" in 1910. For many years he conducted at Oxford courses in ophthalmology for practitioners, and was mainly instrumental in inducing the University of Oxford officially to recognize eyework by instituting a Diploma in Ophthalmology (19100. - Ophthalmoscope, Vol. 14, p. 563


The Toronto World 12 September 1918 p5 (Toronto, Ontario, Canada)
WILLS PROBATED
  Robert Walton Doyne, who died at his home, 121 Woodstock road, Oxford, England, Aug., 1916, left an estate valued at $90,447, and Mrs. Gertrude Irene Hope Doyne, Oxford, England, widow, who is sole beneficiary and executrix, has applied for ancillary probate of the will. The Ontario estate consists of 71 shares Brazilian, valued at $4,410, and 140 Crown Reserve valued at $65.
Notes:
On 15 March 1879, Robert was made a Second Lieutenant in the 1st Somersetshire Engineer Volunteer Corps (London Gazette 14 March 1879 p2141).
Who's Who p506 (1907)
DOYNE Robert Walter, M.A. Oxon.; F.R.C.S.; Consulting Ophthalmic Surgeon, Radcliffe Infirmary, since 1900; Reader in Ophthalmology, University of Oxford, since 1902; Senior Surgeon Oxford Eye Hospital; Surgeon Royal Eye Hospital, London; Ophthalmic surgeon S. John's Hospital, Cowley; b. 15 May 1857; 2nd s. of late Rev. P.W. Doyne; m. Gertrude Irene Hope, y.d. of late John Hollings. Educ.: Marlborough; Keble College, Oxford. After qualifying, travelled; then entered navy, which he left on marriage; founded Oxford Eye Hospital. Publication: The More Common Diseases of the Eye; Retinal Extract on the Treatment of Atrophic Retinae; several papers. Recreation: fencing. Address: 34 Weymouth Street, W.; 53 Broad Street, Oxford. Club: Royal Societies.

Census & Addresses: 1871: Marlborough College, Marlborough, Wiltshire
1881: Home Villa, Fishponds Rd, Stapleton, Gloucestershire
1883: Somerset Villa, Fishponds, Stapleton, Gloucestershire (Kelly's 1883 Directory of Somersetshire)
1895: 64 St Giles, Oxford, Oxfordshire (British Medical Journal 6 July 1895 p55)
1907: 53 Broad St, Oxford, Oxfordshire (Winchester College register 1836-1906 p594)
1916: 121 Woodstock Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire (The Toronto World 12 September 1918 p5)

Sources:
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