The Adams Family

Albina Adams and W. Maurice Pryke
Albinia Muriel Adams and her cousin W. Maurice Pryke
 photo provided by Jo Clinton

Albinia Muriel (Adams) Austin

Birth: 30 August 1884, in Paddington, Middlesex, England

Father: George Edward D'Arcy Adams

Mother: Emily Elizabeth (Doyne) Adams

Married: Eric Austin in 1921 in Stroud district, Gloucestershire, England

Notes: Albinia attended the Birkbeck School of Art in London, under the headmastership of A. W. Mason, and in 1909 she was awarded the Hardy prize for painting flowers from nature.

Census:
1891: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London
1901: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London

Sources:

Charles Gofton Adams

Birth: 20 January 1887, in Paddington, Middlesex, England

Father: George Edward D'Arcy Adams

Mother: Emily Elizabeth (Doyne) Adams

Education: St Nicholas College, Lancing, Sussex.
A register of S. Nicholas college, Lancing p277 (1900)
Adams, Charles Gofton, born 20 Jan., 1887, son of Dr. Adams (see No. 1582), entered S. H. Jan., 1899
  (Brother of 1582 and 1591)

Married: Johanna Schlossen

Census:
1891: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London
1901: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London

Sources:

Emily Frances Margaret (Adams) Bury

Birth: 7 August 1892, in Oxford, Oxfordshire, England

Father: George Edward D'Arcy Adams

Mother: Emily Elizabeth (Doyne) Adams

Married: Charles Rugeley Bury on 11 July 1922 in Stroud district, Gloucestershire, England. Charles was born on 29 June 1890, in Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, the son of Charles Bury and Aimee Gwynneth Pryse. He served in World War I and was made a temporary Second Lieutenant in the Infantry on 11 November 1914 (London Gazette 10 November 1914 p9139). Charles became a scientist in the field of physical chemistry and in the post-war years made a major scientific contribution in correctly assessing the relationship of the electronic structure of atoms to their placement in the periodic table (Langmuir's Theory of the Arrangement of Electrons in Atoms and Molecules by Charles R. Bury, 1921). Charles died in 1968, in West Sussex.
1891: 2 Northfield Villas, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire
The world of physical chemistry p344 by Keith James Laidler (1993):
An alternative proposal was put forward in 1921 by Charles Rugeley Bury (1890-1968), who was a lecturer at the University College of Wales at Aberystwyth. The scheme that he described succinctly in a mere seven pages is essentially the scheme to be found in modern introductory textbooks of chemistry and physics. He deduced from the chemical evidence that the electrons are arranged in successive layers containing 2, 8, 18 and 32 electrons. He gave a clear discussion of the electronic arrangements in the actinides and lanthanides, and even made some predictions (inevitably not quite correct) for the transuranic elements.
  Bury's scheme was reproduced in The Electronic Theory of Valency by Nevil Vincent Sidgwick (1873-1952); this was an important book that first appeared in 1927 and which interpreted the chemical behavior of the elements in terms of their electronic configurations. Sidgwick acknowledged the important contribution of Bury, but almost all subsequent accounts have failed to do so and Bury's name is now almost entirely forgotten.Many accounts of the electronic configurations give the credit to Bohr. In 1921 Bohr did write two letters to Nature on the electronic configurations, but he only considered the noble gases. In his Nobel Prize address, a translation of which was published in Nature in 1923, Bohr did mention Bury and included a scheme that is essentially Bury's, without making it clear that this is the case.
  A striking example of the failure to acknowledge Bury's work is to be found in connection with the discovery of the element hafnium, of atomic number 72. When Bury wrote his paper hafnium had not been discovered, but he referred to the missing element 72 and predicted that it would not be a rare earth but would resemble zirconium. Bohr, knowing of this prediction, suggested to his assistants György Hevesy (1885 - 1966) and Dirk Coster (1889 - 1950) that they should look for the missing element in zirconium ores. They discovered it in  1922, in time for Bohr to announce its discovery in his Nobel Prize address in December of that year. Hevesy and Coster confirmed that hafnium is not a rare earth but an analogue of zirconium, but in their report of the discovery Bury was not mentioned.

Census:
1901: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London

Sources:
George Edward D'Arcy Adams
George Edward D'Arcy Adams
 photo provided by Jo Clinton

George Edward D'Arcy Adams

Title: Doctor

Birth: 1846, in Nailsea, Somerset, England

Baptism: 14 August 1846, in Wraxall, Somerset, England

Father: George Adams

Mother: Emily (Homer) Adams

Education: Honiton Grammar School, then King's College, London, and Aberdeen, and graduated M.B., C.M. in 1867. He proceeded M.D. in 1874, and obtained the D.P.H. Camb. in 1881.

Married: Emily Elizabeth Doyne on 1 June 1876, in All Saints, Wraxall, Somerset. George D'Arcy Adams is recorded as a bachelor, aged 30, a doctor of medicine from West Town in the parish of Backwell, the son of George Adams, a surgeon. Emily Elizabeth Doyne is listed as a spinster, aged 22, of Wraxall Cottage, the daughter of Philip Walter Doyne, a clerk in holy orders.
The Medical times and gazette 10 June 1876
MARRIAGES.
ADAMS-DOYNE,- On June 1, at the parish church, Wraxall, George Edward d'Arcy Adams, M.D., of West Town, Backwell, Somerset, to Emily Elizabeth Doyne, second daughter of the late Rev. P.W. Doyne.

Children:
Occupation: Medical Doctor. George was registered as a medical practitioner on 17 January 1868. For several years George held the appointment of surgeon on the Estancia San Jorge, Montevideo, Uruguay, but owing to his father becoming ill he returned to England and practised with him until 1880, when he purchased a practice in Maida Vale, London, at the same time being appointed medical officer to the Paddington Provident Dispensary and Kilburn General Dispensary. Later he joined Drs. Webb and Walker, who were in practice in the same district. Dr. Webb died and Dr. Walker retired, and Dr. Harold Darwin Hey subsequently joined him in partnership. Dr. D'Arcy Adams retired in 1919, after thirty-nine years in arduous general practice.

Dr. D'Arcy Adams was familiar with many European languages, including French, German, Norwegian, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese; he translated articles in foreign medical magazines for English publications, many of which can be seen in, for example, The Dublin Journal of Medical Science (1885), The London medical record (1887) and The London medical recorder (1890)

Notes: George was elected a fellow of the Geological Society on 7 February 1883. At the time the president of the Society was John Whitaker Hulke. (Nature 13 March 1883 p474)

Death: 20 March 1926, at Bussage, Brimscombe, Gloucestershire, aged 79

Obituary:
British Medical Journal 17 April 1926 p725
We regret to record the death of Dr. GEORGE EDWARD D'ARCY ADAMS, at Bussage, Brimscombe, Glos., on March 20th, in his 80th year. He was the eldest son of the late Dr. George Adams, who practised for many years at Nailsea, Somerset. Dr. D'Arcy Adams received his medical education at King's College, London, and Aberdeen, and graduated M.B., C.M. in 1867. He proceeded M.D. in 1874, and obtained the D.P.H.Camb. in 1881. For several years he held the appointment of surgeon on the Estancia San Jorge, Montevideo, Uruguay, but owing to his father becoming ill he returned to England and practised with him until 1880, when he purchased a practice in Maida Vale, London, at the same time being appointed medical officer to the Paddington Provident Dispensary and Kilburn General Dispensary. Later he joined Drs. Webb and Walker, who were in practice in the same district. Dr. Webb died and Dr. Walker retired, and Dr. Harold Darwin Hey subsequently joined him in partnership. Dr. D'Arcy Adams retired in 1919, after thirty-nine years in arduous general practice. He was a very well read man, familiar with many European languages, including French, German, Norwegian, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese; in his earlier days he translated articles in foreign medical magazines for English publications. His favourite hobby was sketching, in which he took great delight. He was greatly beloved by his patients and friends, alike for his courtesy, generosity, and unselfish devotion to his work. He leaves a widow, three sons (of whom two are members of the medical profession), and two daughters, with whom much sympathy is felt. He was a member of the British Medical Association.

Census & Addresses:
1872: Nailsea, Somerset (The Medical Register p2, 1872)
1875: Nailsea, Somerset (The Medical Register p2, 1875)
1881: 1 Clifton Gardens, London, Middlesex
1891: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London
1901: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London

Sources:
George Basil Doyne Adams
George Basil Doyne Adams
 photo provided by Jo Clinton

George Basil Doyne Adams

Birth: 4 June 1877, in West Town, Backwell, Somerset, England

Father: George Edward D'Arcy Adams

Mother: Emily Elizabeth (Doyne) Adams

Education: St Nicholas College, Lancing, Sussex, then Christ Church, Oxford where he graduated B.A. in 1899. He was awarded M.B., Bac. Surg. in 1903 and proceeded M.D in 1911. George obtained Dip. Publ. Health in 1914 from the University of Oxford.
A register of S. Nicholas college, Lancing p247 (1900)
Adams, George Basil Doyne, born 4 June, 1877, son of G. D'Arcy Adams, Esq., M.D., of London, entered S. H. as Exhibitioner and Scholar, May, 1891 (Prefect, Sept., 1893; Captain of School, Sept., 1894), left April, 1896. Subsequently at Ch. Ch., Oxford; B.A., 1899. Now at St. Bartholomew's Hospital.
  Address- 1, Clifton Gardens, Maida Vale, W.


Married: Alice Maud Dodgson, of Durban, Natal

Occupation: Medical Doctor. In 1901, George was a medical student, working at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London. George was admitted as a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England in December 1903, Lic. R. Coll. Phys. Lond., 1903, M.B., Bac. Surg., 1903, M.D., 1911, Dip. Publ. Health, 1914, Univ. Oxford

Biography at Wellington Hospital website:
George Basil Doyne ADAMS  
MRCS (Eng), LRCP (Lond), MB BCh, MD (Oxon), DPH (Lond)
Born Bedminster, England 1877   
MRCS (Eng) 1903, LRCP (Lond) 1903, MB BCh 1903, MD (Oxon) 1911, DPH (Lond) 1914
HP / HS, St. Bartholomew's Hospital 1903
RMO, Victoria Park Hospital for Consumption 1904 - 1905
Assistant Medical Superintendent, King Edward VII Sanitorium, Midhurst, Sussex 1906 - 1908
Medical Superintendent, West Water Sanatorium 1909 - 1911
Tuberculosis Medical Officer, Jagger, Durban, South Africa 1912 - 1914
Tuberculosis Specialist, Wellington Hospital and Charitable Aid Board 1915 - 1916
CO, Sanitary Corps, NZEF 1916 - 1918


Evening Post (Wellington, New Zealand), 21 August 1914,  p2
PERSONAL MATTERS

  Dr. Basil Adams, B.A., M.D., N.N.B. Ch., Oxon, who was yesterday appointed tuberculosis specialist to the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board, was for three years medical superintendent at the West Water Sanatorium, house physician at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, and resident medical officer at Victoria Park Hospital for Consumption. He was selected by Sir Robert Philip, of Edinburgh, from all British candidates to take up the post of tuberculosis medical officer at Jagger, Durban, for a three-years' engagement, which has just expired. He has had ten years' tuberculosis experience and work in all its branches. His appointment in Wellington will date from six months hence, as he wished to proceed from Natal to England, there to sit for examination for the degree of Doctor of Public Health.

Evening Post (Wellington, New Zealand), 7 April 1915, p1
I, GEORGE BASIL DOYNE ADAMS, Mem. R. Coll. Surg. Eng., 1903, Lic. R. Coll. Phys. Lond., 1903, M.B., Bac. Surg., 1903, M.D., 1911, Dip. Publ. Health, 1914, Univ. Oxford, now residing in Wellington, hereby give notice that I intend applying on the 6th May next to have my name placed on the Medical Register of the Dominion of New Zealand; and that I have deposited the evidence of my qualification in the office of the Registrar of Births and Deaths, at Wellington.
     (Signed)
   GEORGE BASIL DOYNE ADAMS.
  Dated at Wellington, 6th April, 1915.


Evening Post (Wellington, New Zealand), 5 March 1916,  p8
A BIG APPOINTMENT
FROM WELLINGTON HOSPITAL STAFF
NEW SANITARY CORPS
  An offer has been received by Dr. Basil Adams, Tuberculosis Medical Officer at the Wellington Hospital, to take up  the command of a very important portion of the New Zealand Expeditionary Forces.
  On 24th February Dr. Valintine, Director of Military Hospitals, wrote to Dr. Adams asking him to call at the office as soonas possible for the purpose of discussing his taking command of the Sanitary Corps which the Government proposed to send abroad. "I believe," wrote Dr. Valintine, "you possess a Diploma of Public Health, and I know that otherwise you are qualified to take over the command in question if such should meet with your desires." Two days later, after the interview, Dr. Valintine wrote offering, by direction of General Henderson, the position of officer in command of the Sanitary Corps. Dr, Adams, he said, would be required to go into camp at Awapuni at an early date.
  The matter necessarily involved the granting of a leave of absence to Dr. Adams from the staff of the Wellington Hospital, and it was considered at a special meeting of the board this afternoon.
  The Chairman (Mr. H. Baldwin) said it was felt that Dr. Adams' absence meant the shutting up of the whole of the tuberculosis department of which he was in charge. At the same time, the question arose as to whether it is not our duty to send the best men possible to look after those who have gone to the front to fight for the Empire. Dr. Adams's acceptance of the position meant his absence for twelve months.
  Rev. H. Van Staveren said that when the matter came before the Public Health Committee he had suggested that six months' leave of absence would be sufficient. It was found, however, that he must get leave for twelve months, and that there was no one to take up his work. That meant that all they had spent on the work in which Dr. Adams had been engaged would be wasted. He moved that six months' leave of absence be granted to Dr. Adams. for that period the nurse engaged could take charge of the cases, but she could not carry on for twelve months.
  Dr. Adams read a brief report of the result of his labours during the eleven months that he has had charge of the work. He said that he had spent some time in remedying the shocking state of affairs that he found on taking up his duties. During that period 541 persons had been examined, and 228 found to be suffering from tuberculosis. Of thos cases, 46 are now dead, 53 had left the Wellington district, and 17 were under the care of medical practitioners. Dr. Adams added that the range of contagion had been absurdly exaggerated, and that the trouble of dealing with the complaint had been increased through patients not leaving drink alone.
  Dr. Adams was granted leave of absence during the period; two months on full pay.

Evening Post (Wellington, New Zealand), 15 January 1917,  p12
WEDNESDAY, 17th JANUARY, 1917,
Commencing 1.30 p.m. sharp.
AT THE RESIDENCE,
47 TINAKORI-ROAD, WELLINGTON.
MR. S. GEORGE NATHAN has been favoured with instructions from Dr. Basil Adams (who is shortly leaving the Dominion) to sell by public auction the whole o£ his Household Furniture and Effects, at the residence, 47, Tinakori-road, as above -
  Being the contents of a well-furnished 7-roomed House, comprising-
Axminster carpets, occasional tables and chairs, escritoire, handsome sideboard, dining table, chairs, linoleums, rugs, bedsteads and mattresses, duchesse chests, chests of drawers, etc.
Everything to be sold without reserve, as Dr. Adams is leaving the Dominion.
    S. GEORGE NATHAN,
           Auctioneer

Death: 27 January 1958, at The Warren House, Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire, aged 80
British Medical Journal 15 February 1958 p412
DEATHS
Adams.-On January 27, 1958, at The Warren House, Wotton-under-Edge, Glos, George Basil Doyne Adams, M.D., D.P.H., aged 80.

Census & Addresses:
1881: 1 Clifton Gardens, London, Middlesex
1891: 52 Kingsgate Street, Winchester, Hampshire
1901: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London
1917: 47 Tinakori Road, Wellington, New Zealand Evening Post (Wellington, New Zealand), 15 January 1917,  p12
1958: The Warren House, Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire (death notice)

Sources:

Philip Edward Homer Adams

Birth: 20 April 1879, in West Town, Backwell, Somerset, England
The Medical Times and Gazette 26 April 1879 p469
BIRTHS
ADAMS.-On April 20, at West Town, Somerset, the wife of G. D'Arcy Adams, M.D. of a son.

Father: George Edward D'Arcy Adams

Mother: Emily Elizabeth (Doyne) Adams

Education: St Nicholas College, Lancing, Sussex, then Exeter College, Oxford, where he graduated B.A. with 2nd Class Natural Sciuence in 1901. He was later a student at the London Hospital and admitted as a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons on 14 December 1905. Philip took the diploma in ophthalmology in 1910.
A register of S. Nicholas college, Lancing p247 (1900)
Adams, Philip Edward Homer, born 20 April, 1879, son of Dr. Adams (see No. 1582), entered S. H. May, 1891, left July, 1897. Subsequently at the Eye Hospital, Oxford.
  Address- 1, Clifton Gardens, Maida Vale, W.


Married: Marjorie Smith on 20 January 1908, in St Michaels, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. Marjorie was born on 1 December 1888, in Summertown, Oxfordshire, the daughter of Alfred Cecil Smith and Linda Sarah Henriette Weber. Marjorie died on 23 October 1924, in Oxford, aged 35.
1891: 7 Fairfield, Manchester, Lancashire

Occupation: Ophthalmologist. Philip was admitted as a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons on 14 December 1905 and took the diploma in ophthalmology in 1910. He was connected with the Oxford Eye Hospital, which was founded by his uncle, Robert Walter Doyne, for over fifty years, and first came there while still a student in 1896. He was a clinical assistant in 1904; assistant to the honorary staff in 1905; appointed a surgeon in 1910; and from 1913 to 1941 he was a honorary surgeon and Margaret Ogilvie reader in ophthalmology to the University of Oxford. Since 1912 he had been consulting ophthalmic surgeon to the Radcliffe Infirmary. Mr. Adams was in private practice in Oxford for over thirty years and retired in 1941.
  The Oxford Ophthalmological Congress was founded by Mr. Adams among others. He was its Master from 1926 to 1928, and deputy master from 1929 to 1942. He had been a member of the B.M.A. since 1906, and was president of the Section of Ophthalmology when the Association met at Oxford in 1936. He was president of the Ophthalmological Section of the Royal Society of Medicine in 1944 and in 1945.

Some medical papers written by Philip include:
Two Cases of Congenital Cataract with Spontaneous Absorption of the Lens (Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine p413 - 1928)
Notes on Glaucoma (Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine p31 - 1944)

Death: 9 February 1948

Obituary:
British Medical Journal 6 March 1948 p478
P. E. H. ADAMS, M.B., F.R.C.S.
Philip Edward Homer Adams, who died on Feb. 9 at the age of 68, was a son of the late Dr. G. E. D'Arcy Adams. He was educated at Lancing and Exeter College, Oxford, and later was a student at the London Hospital. After graduating he took the F.R.C.S. in 1905 and the diploma in ophthalmology in 1910. He was connected with the Oxford Eye Hospital, which was founded by his uncle, Robert Doyne, for over fifty years, and first came there while still a student in 1896. He was a clinical assistant in 1904; assistant to the honorary staff in 1905; appointed a surgeon in 1910; and from 1913 to 1941 he was a honorary surgeon and Margaret Ogilvie reader in ophthalmology to the University of Oxford. Since 1912 he had been consulting ophthalmic surgeon to the Radcliffe Infirmary. Mr. Adams was in private practice in Oxford for over thirty years and retired in 1941.
  The Oxford Ophthalmological Congress was founded by Mr. Adams among others. He was its Master from 1926 to 1928, and deputy master from 1929 to 1942. He had been a member of the B.M.A. since 1906, and was president of the Section of Ophthalmology when the Association met at Oxford in 1936. He was president of the Ophthalmological Section of the Royal Society of Medicine in 1944 and in 1945. Since his retirement in 1941 Mr. Adams had been living at Theberton, Suffolk. He leaves a widow, a son, and two daughters.


Will:

British Medical Journal 7 August 1948 p320
Wills
  Mr. Philip Edward Homer Adams, of Theberton, Leiston, Suffolk, left £52,073.

Census & Addresses:
1881: 1 Clifton Gardens, London, Middlesex
1891: 1 Clifton Gardens, Paddington, London
1909: 34 St Giles Street, Oxford, Oxfordshire (St Giles, Oxford)
1948: Theberton, Leiston, Suffolk (obituary)

Sources:
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