The Hulke Family

The Taranaki Herald 23 October 1908 p5 claims this about the early origins of the Hulke family fleeing Flanders during the Dutch Revolt:
[William King Hulke's] ancestors came from Flanders, whence, with thousands of other refugees, they fled to escape the butcheries of Alva in the war of extermination this ruthless zealot was prosecuting over the Low Countries. Most of these exiles settled in one or other of the Cinque Ports. Mr Hulke's forbears eventually making Deal their home, and there they have lived since the last quarter of the sixteenth century.

British Medical Journal 23 February 1895 p451 has a similar claim, and adds that the name was originally Hulcher:
  John Whitaker Hulke was born in 1830, and was the elder son of a highly esteemed surgeon at Deal, where the family had been resident for many generations. His ancestors, who bore originally the name of Hulcher, had left their native Low Countries during the persecutions of the Duke of Alva in the sixteenth century, and their descendant probably owed to his sturdy Puritan ancestors certain traits conspicuous in his character.


Ann (Hulke) Netherland

Birth: 1669

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ellen (Whale) Hulke

Married: William Netherland on 9 March 1697, in Deal, Kent, England

Death: 1712

Sources:

Ann Hulke

Birth: 10 November 1720

Baptism: 30 November 1720, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (Eastes) Hulke

Death: 4 September 1739

Sources:

Ann (Hulke) Dixson

Birth: 25 February 1800, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 2 April 1800, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ann (Read) Hulke

Married: John East Dixson on 10 June 1830, in Deal, Kent, England

Children: Death: 19 May 1882, in Wye, Kent, England, aged 82
Medical Times and Gazette 27 May 1882 p570
  DEATHS.
DIXSON.—The wife of John East Dixson M.R.C.S., at Wye, Kent, on May 19, in her 83rd year.

Kentish Express & Ashford News 27 May 1882 p8 col 7
DEATHS.
Ann DIXSON in her 83rd year the dearly loved wife of John East DIXSON, M.R.C.S.E. etc. daughter of the late William HULKE MD, vicar of Wye, died May 19 fell asleep in Jesus, at Wye, Kent after many years of patient suffering

Buried: 23 May 1882, in Wye, Kent, England

Census:
1841: Beach Street, Deal, Kent
1851: Church Street, Wye, Kent
1871: Wye, Kent
1881: Church St, Wye, Kent

Sources:

Anne Hulke

Birth: 1616

Father: Anthony Hulke

Mother: Mildred (Baker) Hulke

Sources:

Anne (_____) Hulke

Married: William Hulke

Children:

Anne (_____) Hulke

Married: John Hulke

Children: Sources:

Anne Hulke

Birth: 1733

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Ann (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Anne Hulke

Birth: 1735

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Mary (Brame) Hulke

Sources:

Anne Hulke

Birth: 1794

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ann (Read) Hulke

Sources:

Anne Maria (Hulke) Barrett

Birth: 1825 in Lambeth, Surrey, England

Baptism: 10 July 1825, in St Mary, Lambeth, Surrey, England

Father: William Manley Hulke

Mother: Lucy (Smith) Hulke

Married: Henry Barrett in 1848, in Huddersfield district, Yorkshire West Riding, England

Children: Occupation: Charwoman

Death: 1884, in Huddersfield district, Yorkshire West Riding, England, aged 59

Census:
1851: Anne Maria Barrett, wife, is aged 25, born in Lambeth, London
1861: 8 Love's Yard, Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding
1871: Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding
1881: 29 Front, Gillingham, Kent

Sources:

Anthony Hulke

Birth: 1580

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Mary

Married: Mildred Baker in 1604

Children: Sources:

Anthony Hulke

Birth: 1613

Father: Anthony Hulke

Mother: Mildred (Baker) Hulke

Married: Anne Gyfford in 1631

Sources:

Benjamin Hulke

Baptism: 23 August 1624, in St. Leonard's, Deal, Kent, England

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Ellen (_____) Hulke

Married: Elizabeth Safrey on 7 October 1656 in St. Clement's, Sandwich, Kent, England

Children: Sources:

Benjamin Hulke

Title: Captain

Birth: 14 April 1658

Baptism: 19 April 1658, in St. Leonard's, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Safrey) Hulke

Married: Elizabeth Jopton in 1680

Children: Occupation: Shipwright

Death: 7 February 1722/3  (OS/NS)

Buried: 10 February 1722/3 (OS/NS), in St. Leonard's, Deal, Kent, England

Notes: On 13 October 1699 the Charter of Deal was signed by King William III and this created Deal as a "Borough and Market Town" separate from Sandwich. Captain Joshua Coppin became the first mayor assisted by twelve jurats who were councilmen appointed for life, unless they misbehaved. Benjamin was one of these jurats. He was Mayor of Deal in 1706 and 1710 (The History of Deal, and Its Neighbourhood p321).

Deal: Past and Present p60 (Henry Stephen Chapman, 1890)
  The Committee appointed by the assembly to draw up the memorial to the Archbishop for the Chapel of Ease (May 24th, 1706) consisted of Mr. Benjamin Hulke, Mayor, who was assisted by Messrs. Gerrard, Bowles, Horn, Bletchynden and Knight.

Sources:

Benjamin Hulke

Birth: 1669

Father: George Hulke

Mother: Susan (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Benjamin Hulke

Birth: 1683

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Jopton) Hulke

Married: Elizabeth Warren in 1722

Children: Death: 1746

Sources:

Benjamin Hulke

Birth: 1697

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Scodden) Hulke


Benjamin Hulke

Birth: 11 August 1708

Baptism: 19 August 1708, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (Eastes) Hulke

Married: Frances Manley

Children: Occupation: Lieutenant in the Royal Navy. John served as 3rd lieutenant on the Dunkirk.
National Maritime Museum ADM 354/157/76
Reference: ADM 354/157/76
Description: John Clevland. The widow of Lieutenant Hulke, late of the Dunkirk, has applied for his wages because the ship sailed before he got down to her and he was never entered on her books. He has not been found on the books as Lieutenant and John Wilson, 3rd Lieutenant is discharged in November 1756 and John Wills 3rd Lieutenant was entered in February 1757 and there was no 3rd Lieutenant borne between those times so Mr Hulke may be entered and paid as 3rd Lieutenant from the date of his Commissione to the 10th February when he died.
Date: 1757 Oct 4

Death: 10 February 1757, of fever

Buried: 12 February 1757, in Stoke by Plymouth Churchyard

Sources:

Benjamin Hulke

Birth: 1722

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Warren) Hulke

Death: 1745

Sources:

Benjamin Hulke

Birth: 24 February 1754

Baptism: 25 March 1754, in St Leonard, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Frances (Manley) Hulke

Married: Jane Trathen on 20 August 1778, in Stoke Damerel, Devon England
The register for this marriage describes Benjamin as “Lieutenant of His Majesty’s ship Valiant”.

Jane died in 1787.

Children: Occupation: Officer in the Royal Navy
Benjamin was made lieutenant on 29 April 1778 (Three Decks - Warships in the Age of Sail) and is noted at his marriage on 20 August 1778 as being a "Lieutenant of His Majesty’s ship Valiant". He likely participated with the Valiant in the 1st Battle of Ushant on 27 July 1778. Benjamin was at the taking of Fort Omoa in the Captaincy General of Guatemala on 16 October 1779 (The Gentleman's Magazine October 1799 p900) and was the commanding officer of the garrison left to protect it. He was promoted to commander on 29 October 1779 (Three Decks - Warships in the Age of Sail). The British only held the fort until November 1779 when the garrison, which tropical diseases had reduced, was withdrawn under threat of a Spanish counter-attack. Benjamin was commended for his organization of the orderly retreat from the fort to the ship Porcupine without loss of men.
History of the war with America, France, Spain, and Holland vol 2 pp433-4 (John Andrews, 1786)
  Having refused to ransom the fort, a garrison was left for its protection on the departure of the British squadron; but as it was very inconsiderable from the small number of men that could be spared, on account of the various services for which they were wanted, the Spaniards in the neighbourhood resolved to make an attempt to retake it: they collected a body of two thousand men, with which they invested the fort on the twenty-fifth of November. The garrison defended it with the utmost bravery, keeping a constant fire upon the enemy, and obliging them to retire for shelter, and take up their quarters behind a hill. Here they made preparations for an assault; in which, from their numbers, they made no doubt of succeeding. They summoned the garrison to surrender, promising the honours of war, and a safe conveyance to Great Britain, with threats of severity in case of a refusal. These demands not being complied with, the enemy continued his operations, and made all ready for an escalade.
  In the mean time the condition of the besieged afforded no hopes of making any effectual resistance. They were but eighty-five in number, most of whom were, from illness and excessive fatigue, become incapable of duty. They were now obliged to make one sentinel answer for five, by shifting his place, and challenging five different times. They had no surgeon to attend the sick and wounded; none but salt provisions, nor even any water but what came from on board of a sloop of war stationed abreast of the fort.
  In this extremity they resolved, notwithstanding the menaces of the Spanish commander, to render the place as unserviceable as they could make it. To this purpose they spiked all the guns; and destroyed all the ammunition and military stores that could not be carried off. They even locked the gates of the fort; after which they embarked without the loss of a single man.
  All this was performed in defiance of the large force that besieged them, and when duly considered, was not less a matter of astonishment, than the very extraordinary manner in which the fort had been taken. The officer who conducted this remarkable defence and evacuation, was Captain Hulke of the navy.

Report on the manuscripts of Mrs. Stopford-Sackville, of Drayton House, Northamptonshire vol 2 p280 (1910)
(3) 1779, Nov. 18, "Admiral Penn."— Admiral Sir Peter Parker to Governor Bailing. Requesting a sufficient number of troops to garrison the Fortress of St. Ferdinando de Omoa, as his squadron is so much reduced, that he can no longer spare seamen and marines from more essential service.
(4) 1779, Nov. 20.—Governor Dalling's reply to the above that he has not sufficient troops to garrison Omoa and would recommend that the fort be blown up.
(5) 1780, January 1.—Affidavit by Capt. John Jacques that the Fort of St. Ferdinando de Omoa was attacked by six or seven hundred Spaniards on or about the 24th of November, and that the garrison, being reduced by sickness to about seventy people, mostly negroes, and being cut off by the enemy from their watering place, were constrained to evacuate it after having spiked all the guns, carried off the gunpowder and other stores, and destroyed the fortifications as far as possible. The garrison then embarked on his Majesty's ship " Porcupine."
(6) 1779, December 3, "Pomona" Port Royal Harbour, Rattan.—Stating that his Majesty's sloop " Porcupine" under command of Capt. Hulke, has arrived, and that Hulke reports having been compelled to give up Port Omoa, owing to the sickness of the garrison and of the company. The "Porcupine" people are very sickly.''
  Enclosing the letters of the Spanish commandant and the proceedings of Capt. Hulke' s Council of War.

(7) 1779, November 27, General Quarters. Camp at Omoa.—Don Matias de Galvez to the commander of Fort Omoa.—Explaining that the convention for exchange of prisoners agreed on between the English commanders and Messrs. Desmeaux and Dastier can be of no validity, these last having no power to pledge his Catholic Majesty's word. Advises him in friendship "to look or find out an honourable way to quit that fort'' fearing otherwise that the garrison will suffer the cruelties of the slave negroes and transported felons, who, on the offer of liberty may do what the most humane orders cannot prevent. Has a great esteem for the English nation, and "several English friends of the first quality in London," and is ready to grant an honourable capitulation, and to give a passport which shall be respected by all those at war with Great Britain. Will also put on board their vessels all kind of provisions, but nothing of any warlike stores belonging to the fort, the cannon of which he shall expect them not to damage.
(8) 1779, November 27.—Resolutions of the Council of War held at Omoa by desire of the Commander-in-Chief (Capt. Hulke), who lies very ill. There being not above thirty men in the garrison and the ship "Porcupine" capable of doing duty, and most of these negroes, on whom no dependance can be placed ; their officers being two of them dead and almost all the rest ill ; it being impossible from the position of the enemy to get either fresh provisions or good water, and there being no prospect of speedy relief, it is unanimously resolved that the fort shall be immediately quitted, it being first rendered unserviceable as much as possible. Signed, Rob. Butcher, lieutenant of the "Porcupine" ; John Brander, captain commanding on shore ; Geo. Newcombe, gunner of the "Porcupine." Copy.

Steel's original and correct list of the royal navy April 1782 p14 still lists Benjamin as the captain of the sloop Porcupine, a sloop of 16 guns, stationed in Jamaica. In April 1782, Benjamin took command of the Duguay Trouin, a 14-gun sloop, in Jamaica (Three Decks - Warships in the Age of Sail). The Duguay Trouin was originally a ship of the East India Company, the Princess Royal, but had been taken by the French and fitted out as a ship of war before being re-captured by the British ship off Mauritius in 1780 (The British Trident p327). Steel's original and correct list of the royal navy February 1783 p10 lists Benjamin as captain of the Guay-Trouin, stationed in North America in February 1783. On 2 March 1783 the Duguay-Trouin, along with the Resistance, captured the 28-gun French corvette La Coquette off Grand Turk Island.
The British Trident vol 3 pp132-3 (Archibald Duncan, 1805)
  On the 2d of March, the Resistance, of 44 guns, Captain James King, coming through Turk's Island passage, with the Du Guay Trouin, Captain Hulk, in company, discovered two ships at anchor, which cut their cables, got under way, and stood to the southward. The Resistance immediately gave chace to the stern-most ships, of 20 guns, which lost her main-top-mast, by carrying a press of sail, and then hauled her wind. The Resistance presently came up with her, gave her a dose from her upper-deckers, and stood after the other ship of 28 guns, which soon after began to fire her stern chaces, and continued so doing for about fifteen minutes, when the Resistance running along side to leeward, she struck the white flag, after discharging her broadside, and possession was taken of the French king's frigate La Coquette, pierced for 28 guns, five of which had been left ashore at Turk's Island, and carrying 200 men commanded by the Marquis de Grasse, a nephew to the celebrated Count de Grasse. The Resistance discharged only a few guns, and had two of her officers wounded by the Frenchman's fire. La Coquette and her consort, were two transports sailed from the Cape about three weeks before, with troops on board, bound on an expedition against Turk's Island, which they reduced and fortified, leaving a garrison of 530 men in the place.

Less than two weeks later, on 15 March 1783, Benjamin and the Duguay Trouin captured a French prize La Ville de Trieste, for which prize money was eventually paid out in 1788 (London Gazette 12 July 1788 p338). The Duguay Trouin was paid off in August 1783 (Three Decks - Warships in the Age of Sail). Benjamin was captain of the Helena, 14-guns, from February 1787 until November 1788. The Helena was being re-fitted at Plymouth Dockyard and was recommissioned for Milford when Benjamin took command, completing her fitting in May 1787 at a cost of £1566.0.0d (Three Decks - Warships in the Age of Sail). The ship is recorded as stationed in the British Channel in July 1787 (Walker's Hibernian Magazine 1787 p420) and was paid off in November 1788 (Three Decks - Warships in the Age of Sail). Benjamin was captain of the Dromedary from October 1790, when she was recommissioned during fitting at Deptford, until September 1791 when she was paid off (Three Decks - Warships in the Age of Sail), and in 1799, he was a captain in the Impress Service, based at Dover (The Naval Chronicle 1799 p300, Life in Nelson's Navy p122 (Dudley Pope, 1996)).

Death: 31 August 1799, in Deal, Kent, England, of apoplexy
The Gentleman's Magazine October 1799 p900
31. At Deal, in Kent (of which town he was a native), of apoplexy, aged about 48, Capt. Benjamin Hulke, of the royal navy. He was at the taking of Fort Omoa by scalade in 1779; and was promoted to the rank of master and commander in consequence of the bravery and good conduct he displayed on that occasion.

Burial: 5 September 1799, in St Leonard, Deal, Kent, England

Sources:

Benjamin Hulke

Birth: 14 August 1801, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ann (Read) Hulke

Education: Merchant Taylor's School in the City of London, entering the school in January 1812.
Register of the Scholars admitted to Merchant Taylors' School from A.D. 1562 to 1874 vol 2 p192 (Rev. Charles J. Robinson, 1883)
  Jan. 1812.
Benjamin Hulke, s. of William.

Married: Amy Edwards (Clayson) Noakes on 25 February 1843, in Deal, Kent, England
Annual Register 1843 p205
MARRIAGES.
25. ...
 — At Deal, Benjamin Hulke, esq., Solicitor, to Amy Edward Noakes, relict of the late William Noakes., esq., of Great Mongeham, and of Milestone House Deal.


Amy was born in 1803 in Deal, Kent, and baptised on 17 April 1803 in Deal, the daughter of John Clayson and Elizabeth Coleman. She was married firstly to William Noakes on 4 November 1820 in Deal. She died on 17 February 1855, at Paddock House, Deal, Kent, and was buried on 22 February 1855 at St Andrew, Deal.
Census:
1841: Upper Deal, Deal, Kent
1851: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
London Morning Post 20 February 1855 p8
HULKE.—On the 17th inst., at Paddock House, Deal, Amy Edwards, the wife of Benjamin Hulke, Esq., Solicitor, and Clerk of the Peace for that Borough. 

Occupation: Solicitor and Town Clerk.
Benjamin was town clerk for twenty-two years, and mayor of Deal in 1830.

Benjamin, along with his brother, William, and brother-in-law, John East Dixson, are listed as "Bankers, Dealers and Chapmen" when they were declared bankrupt on 1 December 1840 (London Gazette 26 January 1841 p233).

Death: 29 October 1858, at Paddock House, Deal, Kent, England, aged 57
The Law Times 27 November 1858 p116
       B. HULKE, ESQ.
  The late Benjamin Hulke, Esq., who died on the 29th ult. at his residence, Paddock House, near Deal, Kent, at the age of 57, was for many years a respected inhabitant of that town. He was born in 1801, educated at Merchant Tailors’ School in the City of London. He held the office of town clerk for twenty-two years. He was married to the widow of W. Noakes, Esq., but left no issue.


Buried: 2 November 1858, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent

Census & Addresses:
1841: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
1851: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
1852: Paddock House, Deal, Kent   (The Poll for the Knights of the Shire to Represent the Eastern Division of Kent in Parliament 16 and 17 July 1852 p90)
1855: Paddock House, Deal, Kent   (London Morning Post 20 February 1855 p8)
1858: Paddock House, Deal, Kent   (The Law Times 27 November 1858 p116)

Sources:

Benjamin Hulke

Birth: 9 September 1820 in Surrey, England

Baptism: 22 October 1820, in St George the Martyr, Southwark, Surrey, England

Father: William Manley Hulke

Mother: Lucy (Smith) Hulke

Occupation: Merchant Navy Seaman

Notes:
Huddersfield Chronicle 13 September 1851 (transcribed by Keith Rothery)
A JACK TAR ASHORE ON A LAND CRUISE.—Benjamin Hulke, a sailor, was charged by Inspector Brier with being drunk and disorderly in Lockwood's Yard, on the night of the 2nd instant. It appeared that Jack had just returned from a long voyage, and intending no doubt to astonish the “land lubbers,” he sallied out towards dusk on the 2nd instant, with a stiff breeze and full canvass. During the night he “boxed the compass,” and having “spliced the main brace” in company with a brother – though unfortunately not a brother “chip,” - he found himself at midnight, drifted amongst the rocks and shoals of his paternal “homestead,” in Lockwood's Yard. He there “layed too,” and held out a flag of truce to a couple of lazy land lubbers, “hailing” by the names of Gledhill and Atkinson, who had reeled topsails for a squall, when, from an unfortunate obliquity of vision as to “Jack’s” real colours, they cleared for action, and immediately after­wards brought him on his “beam-ends” by a “crack on the head.” Jack could not stand this, and coming to close quarters, he let fire in gallant style, but when on the point of “boarding” the enemy, up came the “blues,” and walked him off to “Chokey,” where he dropped anchor for the night, furled his sails until the storms of his land cruise were calmed, and then awoke from his dreams of “Jack on Spree” to find himself “Jack in Quod.” Jack, on being “hauled” up, pleaded guilty, begged their Honours' pardon, was fined 2s. 6d. and expenses; and has since, we believe, re-shipped on a cruise where there is plenty of blue but no “blues” or “Chokey.”

Census:
1861: Lockwood, Yorkshire West Riding: Benjamin Hulke, head, is aged 41, born in London, Middlesex

Sources:

Bertha Backhouse (Hulke) Leney

Birth: 25 August 1865, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 19 October 1865, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Married: Alfred Charles Leney on 27 October 1887, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England
Alfred Charles Leney is recorded as a bachelor, aged 27, living in Buckland. He is the son of Alfred Leney, brewer. Bertha Backhouse Hulke is recorded as a spinster, aged 22, living in Deal. She is the daughter of Frederick Thomas Hulke, Bachelor of Medicine. The marriage was witnessed by Harry Leney, Lewis L. B. Hulke and Charlotte Hulke

Canterbury Journal, Kentish Times and Farmers' Gazette 5 November 1887
27th Oct, at St Andrew’s, Deal, Alfred Charles (Fred), eldest son of Alfred Leney, Esq., of Buckland House, Dover, to Bertha Backhouse, third daughter of the late Frederick Thomas Hulke, M.B. Lond., Admiralty House, Deal.

Dover Express and East Kent News Friday 4 November 1887
MARRIAGE OF MR A. C. LENEY
On Thursday a large congregation assembled at St. Andrew’s Deal, to witness the marriage of Miss Bertha Backhouse Hulke, third daughter of the late Frederick Thomas Hulke, M.B., Lond., of Admiralty House, Deal, to Mr. A. C. Leney of Buckland House, Dover. The ceremony, which was choral, was performed by the Rev. C. E. S. Woolmer, Vicar of Sidcup, assisted by the Rev. R. Patterson, Rector of St. Andrew’s. The bride, who was attired in an exquisite gown of rich white satin with court train, pearl ornaments, and passementerie, and a long tulle veil, carried a bouquet of gardenias, stephanotis, and other white flowers, and wore a gold bangle with a diamond horseshoe, both the gift of the bridegroom. The bride was given away by her brother, Mr. Lewis I. B. Hulke, (the Buffs); her bridesmaids were her four sisters, the Misses Edith, Mabel, Dora and Jessie Hulke, and Miss Florence Leney, sister of the bridegroom. They wore stylish gowns of white Indian silk and gold braid, and white straw sailor hats trimmed with white ribbon and tulle; each carried a handsome bouquet of white and yellow flowers, and wore a gold bangle with horseshoe of pearls, the gifts of the bridegroom. Mr. Henry Leney, brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man. The presents, which were very numerous and costly, included a case of nut crackers and plated tea-caddy, from the servants of Admiralty House, plaited marmalade jars and cruet from the servants at Buckland House, a Wedgewood afternoon tea service and a pair of Golconds ware vases, from Mr. Leney’s Dover employees, silver cigar-case from Mr. Leney’s London staff, and salt cellars from one of their old servants.


Children: Death: 10 November 1955, at 11 Godwyn Road, Folkestone, Kent, England, aged 90
Dover Express 18 November 1955
     Death of Mrs. A. C. Leney.
  Widow of Mr. A. C. Leney, of Dover, Garden House, Saltwood, and Rhodes House, Sellenge, Mrs. Bertha Backhouse Leney died at 11, Godwyn Road, Folkestone, on Thursday last week in her 91st year.
  Third daughter of Dr. Frederick Hulke, who lived at Admiralty House, Deal, she married Mr. Leney in 1887, and they celebrated their diamond wedding in 1947.
  She is survived by two daughters, Mrs Algernon Pearson, of Coolville house, Clogheen, and Mrs. Raymond Grubb, of Castle Grace, Clogheen.
  The funeral took place privately at Charing Crematorium on Monday.

Census:
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: Admiralty House, Queen St, Deal, Kent
1891: Waterloo Crescent, St James the Apostle, Kent
1901: Salisbury Road, Dover, Kent
1911: Saltwood, Kent: Bertha Backhouse Leney is aged 44, born in Deal, Kent

Sources:

Catherine Hulke

Birth: 1731

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Warren) Hulke

Sources:

Celeb Hulke

Birth: 1587

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Mary

Death: 1607

Sources:

Charles Hulke

Birth: 1711

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Anne (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Charles Hulke

Charles Hulke
Charles Hulke (1886)
photo from scanned by Tom Law for the 125th Anniversary celebrations of Newtown School posted on flickr.com
Birth: 4 May 1836, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 8 June 1836, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Education: Faversham Grammar School, in England, and subsequently he received instruction at the hands of the Moravian Brothers, in Germany.

Married: Ellen Clarissa Collins, on 25 July 1855, in the Primitive Methodist Chapel, Te Henui, Taranaki, New Zealand
Taranaki Herald 1 August 1855 p2
MARRIED.
On the 25th inst., at the Primitive Methodist Chapel at Te Henui, by the Rev. J. LONG, Mr CHARLES HULKE to ELLEN, daughter of WILLIAM COLLINS Esq., of Te Henui.

Children: The marriage ended in 1862 when Ellen had an indiscreet affair with Henry Mosely Muttit. The following year she had a daughter, Priscilla Maude Hulke, whose birth certificate lists Henry Mosely as the father. In 1864, Charles sued Henry Mosely Muttit for criminal conduct, and was awarded twenty-five pounds damages.
Wellington Independent 21 June 1864 p3
    SUPREME COURT.
    CIVIL SITTINGS.
   Saturday, June 18, 1864.
  His Honor took his seat on the bench at a few minutes past 10 o'clock.
    CRIM. CON.
    HULKE v. MUTTIT.
  The following gentlemen were empannelled as a special jury:— Messrs H. Bethune, J. Bridges, C. D. Barraud, J. H. Wallace, W. Hickson, G. Moore, T. Kebbell, R. S. Ledger, J. Martin, E. A. Owen, E. Pearce, J. Pharazyn, Esq (foreman).
  This case, which created considerable interest, was an action raised by the plaintiff Charles Hulke, a Lieutenant in a Volunteer Company at Wanganui, against Henry Mosely Muttit, a Lieutenant in the 57th stationed there, for adultery with his (the plaintiff's) wife. The circumstances are fully disclosed in the following report of the evidence.
  Messrs Izard and Hart appeared for the plaintiff; Messrs Borlase and Allen for the defendant.
  Mr Izard stated the case to the jury, and called
  John Clark, deposed—I am a soldier of the 57th stationed at Wanganui. I know Mr Hulke. He lives neur Wanganui. He is a lieutenant in the Volunteers. I know Henry Muttit. He is a lieutenant in the 57th. I lived with him as servant till March. I know Mrs Hulke. I saw her at Muttit's house in March 1863. I do not know the day of the month. I saw her in the sitting room, having breakfast with Mr Muttit. I did not see her the night before. She stayed the whole of the day. She stayed all night. There are only two bedrooms in the house, mine and master's. Mrs Hulke did not sleep in my room. I took master's bath to his room in the morning, I saw some females' clothes lying on the floor. I saw the same clothes on Mrs Hulke at breakfast time. I also saw a brooch which I afterwards saw on Mrs Hulke's breast at breakfast. Mr Muttit told me not to give the woman any short answer, as she was of a respectable family.
  Cross-examined by Mr Borlase—I knew Mrs Hulke before that time. I have not seen much of her. I was at a soldier's ball in July, 1862. Mrs Hulke was there. It was at Kell's public house. Her husband was not there. I know him by sight. I did not speak to her at the ball. I left Mr Muttit in the latter end of March, or the middle of it. I had never spoken to Mrs Hulke. I saw her on the night of the ball dancing with a soldier.
  Hugh Gowrman, sworn—I am a soldier in the 57th stationed at Wanganui. I knew defendant and plaintiff. I have been in Mr Muttit's service. I went soon after John Clark left. I saw Mrs Hulke at Mr Muttit's house about three or four days after I arrived. It was about twilight. She had her bonnet and shawl off. I saw her in the sitting room. I saw her about a week after, she then stopped two days. I saw her about 7 o'clock in the morning. I saw her about 9 o'clock the night before. I went to master's room in the morning to take his bath. I saw a woman's dress on a chair. I afterwards saw Mrs Hulke wear it. She did not leave till the second day. I went as usual to my master's room the next morning. I saw the same clothes. The second time she came, about a week afterwards, I saw Mrs Hulke in the bedroom. She was undressed and in bed. Mr Muttit was in the room. I hoard him address her as Mrs Hulke.
  Cross examined by Mr Borlase—I knew Mrs Hulke when she came. I was not at the soldier's ball. I knew her when she staid at Mr Kells'. I knew nothing of her conduct. Her husband was not staying there at the time she lived at Kell's.
  William Wyborne, sworn—I am a farmer residing at Wanganui. I know Mr Hulke. I have known him five or six years. I know his relatives, they are in a good position, residing at Deal, in Kent. I do not know the age of Mr Hulke, but he is a young man. His father is a doctor. I am a married man, and frequently visited at Hulke's house. Mr and Mrs Hulke lived on good terms together. I never heard them have any differences between them. They have had two children in Wanganui, both are dead. Sometime in April, 1863 Mrs Hulke left her husband for good. Mr Hulke left his own house immediately after she left. He went to live with Mr Holder. Mr Hulke is a Lieutenant of Volunteers. He was a schoolmaster. He had about twenty scholars.
  Cross-examined by Mr Borlase—Mr Hulke lived two or two and a half miles from Wanganui. I lived three quarters of a mile from him. I visited him constantly. I don't remember Mrs Hulke being absent at any time. I remember her going to New Plymouth about twelve months ago last Christmas. She was away about five or six weeks. I did not see her when she lived at Kells'
  Re-examined by Mr Hart—I know Mrs Hulke's relations. They live at New Plymouth. Their name is Collins. I do not know in what position in life they are.
  Edward Newing, sworn—I am a farmer residing at Wanganui, about half a mile from Mr Hulke's. I have known him four years, and been in the habit of visiting him. I know his family. They live at Deal. His father is a medical gentleman Mr Hulke and his wife lived on amicable terms. I have never seen anything to the contrary of being affectionate. Mr Hulke's manner was that of a kind and affectionate husband. Mrs Hulke is about twenty-six or twenty-eight years old—and she is about the same age. I do not know Mrs Hulke's parents. I know some of her relatives in England. They are in a respectable position. They are living on their means.
  Cross-examined by Mr Borlase—I constantly visited at Mr Hulke's. I have seen Mrs Hulke at Wanganui in the street.
  This concluded the plaintiff's case.
  Mr Borlase addressed the Court at some length for the defendant and proceeded to call
  Bedford Sheriff, sworn—I am a trooper in the W.D.F. I lived at Wanganui up to about seven weeks ago. I lived near Mr Hulke's. I have seen Mrs Hulke often before March. I am a bachelor. My partner lived with me at the house I was formerly a farmer. Mrs Hulke has come to our house both with and without her husband. She has been there in the evening, and stopped till her husband came home. I did not know that she lived with any one in Wanganui. I have not seen her much.
  By the Court—Her husband knew she came to my house. Wilson (my partner) is a steady man.
  John Kells sworn—I  was a publican at Wanganui in 1862 and part of 1863. I remember a ball in July at my house. I know Mrs Hulke. She came to lodge with me. Her husband was not with her. I noticed her conduct. It was good. I twice gave her notice to leave my house. My dislike to female lodgers in the house was the only reason.
  By the Court—We never got paid for her board.
  Cross-examined by Mr Izard—I remember Mrs Hulko receiving a letter from her husband. She shewed it to me, and in consequence of its contents, I turned her out of the house. I am a married man. The ball was respectably conducted in every respect. The visitors were principally soldiers. Some of the officers were there.
  Re-examined by Mr Borlase—This was a ball got up by the soldiers.
  Arthur Wicksteed, sworn—I am a lieutenant in the Wanganui Militia. I have lived in Wanganui 12 years. I know both. Mr and Mrs Hulke. I was staying a good deal in Wanganui at the house of an officer of —— Regt. The officer was a bachelor. I have seen Mrs Hulke there repeatedly. I have seen her there both night and day. I have seen her there without her bonnet and shawl.
  By the Court—Her conduct while there was that of a mistress. I have seen her take the wine from the table when she considered my friend had had enough, and from that and other things, I concluded she must be his mistress. I have often slept at the house. I have seen Mrs Hulke there on successive days. There are four or five rooms in the house. When I stayed there all night I slept on a truckle, or soldier's bed. I have seen Mrs Hulke late at night there, and as early as nine o'clock in the morning.
  Re-examined by Mr Borlase:—I saw Mrs Hulke at the soldiers' ball, at Mr Kells' public house. Her conduct was most disgraceful. She was dancing with soldiers, kissing them and acting in a disgraceful manner for respectable married woman.
  By the Court.—She was both kissing the soldiers and being kissed by them at the ball. Some officers looked in at the window but did not go into the room. I did, but did not stay many minutes.
  Re-examined by Mr Borlase,—I left about half-past nine or ten o'clock. I have seen Mrs Kells. and Mrs Hulke together. I saw Mrs Kells turn her out of the bar on one occasion for kissing a soldier. Mrs Hulke said “Oh! never mind, Mrs Kells, no one saw it.” Mrs Kells replied “Yes, Atty Wicksteed did.” I was lying on the sofa in the parlor off the bar. [The witness here gratuitously informed the Court that his name was Arthur, but that his more familiar friends called him “Atty.” He also assured all concerned* that he and his friend were considered “wild fellows,” in fact regular “Don Juans.”]
  His Honor at the conclusion of this witnesses’ evidence remarked that he ought to have known better than to implicate the names of gentlemen in this case who were not in Court to defend themselves from imputation.
  [We have purposely omitted the name of the officer referred to in the above evidence, believing, with the learned judge, that it would be exceedingly unfair to mix up the name of any person in a case like this, particularly when absent.]
  Michael Boyle sworn—I am a soldier of the 57th. I remember the ball at Kells’ I was there. I know Mrs Hulke. She was at the ball. I danced with her. About eleven or twelve o’clock I went outside. I saw a man »nd woman lying down in the yard. They were lying near the stable on some loose hay and straw. Mrs Hulke was the woman.
  By the Court—I know positively Mrs Hulke was the woman. When I went into the yard I heard a voice say, “who's that.” The same voice spoke to me as I was entering the house. I said, “all right.” Mrs Hulke, as she passed, was arranging her hair.
  By Mr Borlase—I know Mr Hulke. He was not at the ball.
  Cross-examined by Mr Izard—It was between eleven and twelve o’clock at night. It was a bright night. I was close to them when I saw them, so close that I touched the man with my foot. I have not been in the service of the defendant, only since I came down here. I have spoken to Mr Muttit about this in Wanganui. Mr Muttit never gave me a watch or promised me one. I never received a promise that anything would be done for me for giving this evidence, I do not expect to get paid.
  Mr Borlase then read the following letter,—
        No. 1 Line, Wanganui,
            July 14, 1862.
To MRS. C. HULKE
  MADAM,—Some few weeks ago, I informed you that unless you changed your line of conduct I should be compelled to effect a separation. I presume that your are aware that you have disgraced yourself, that it is impossible for me to look upon you as my wife; and, therefore, I have resolved to allow you the sum of £20 (twenty pounds sterling) per annum, with sole right to all property you may legally possess or that may revert to you hereafter on condition of your signing a deed of separation. Please to send me the name of your legal advisers, as well as the name in full of the third party who will act as your trustee, in order that I may get the necessary documents prepared. Further comment is unnecessary. Your clothes and personal effects shall be sent to you.
          Charles HULKE,
            Wanganui.
To Mrs. C. Hulke,
    at J. Kells’, York Hotel.
  Mr Borlase then addressed the jury on the evidence.
  This closed the case for the defendant.
  Mr Izard replied on the whole.
  His Honor summed up the case to the Jury very briefly. He remarked that an attempt had been made on the part of the counsel for the defendant, to prove that the plaintiff Mr Hulke had condoned a previous offence of a similar character to that which was the subject of the present action and that therefore he did not come into court with clean hands on the present occasion. He (the learned Judge) considered that the evidence failed to prove that the plaintiff had been aware of his wife s previous guilt, or that he had in any way sanctioned it knowingly. In fact he appeared to have acted justly throughout. No condonation of other adulteries had been established. The defendant’s conduct had been of a disgraceful character, and scarcely befitting one who held a commission in her Majesty's service, still he did not think, the character of the woman being taken into consideration, that the plaintiff had suffered a serious loss. It was however for the Jury to determine whether they would award substantial or nominal damages. He felt it his duty to notice the manner in which Arthur Wicksteed, one of the defendant’s witnesses had given his evidence. The levity and flippancy with which he spoke of his own proceedings, as well as of the acts of others not present, was excessively unseemly. With these remarks he would leave the case in the hands of the Jury.
  The following were the issues presented to the Jury,—
  1. Was the said Ellen Clarissa married at the time of the trespass In the declaration mentioned the wife of the plaintiff.
  2. Did the defendant debauch and carnally known the said Ellen Clarissa as in the declaration mentioned.
  3. Were the said Ellen Clarissa and the plaintiff, at the time of the said trespass finally separated from each by agreement between them.
      IN MITIGATION OF DAMAGES.
  4. Was the plaintiff voluntarily living apart from the said Ellen Clarissa at the time of the said trespass.
  Had the plaintiff at the time of the said trespass abandoned the said Ellen Clarissa, and refused to supply her with the means of maintenance and support.
  6. To what damages, (if any,) is the plaintiff entitled.
  After a short consultation the Jury returned a verdict for the plaintiff on all the issues, damages £25.
  The Court then granted a certificate for a Special Jury.
  This case closed the Civil Sittings.

A similar report on this court case appeared in the Daily Southern Cross 24 June 1864 p6. The sad affair has a degree of irony in that Charles's father, William Hulke was on the opposite end of another high profile criminal conduct suit in 1816 (Bells Weekly Messenger 16 June 1816 p189 ) in which William was found guilty of the seduction of the wife of Admiral Sir Edward Owen.

Occupation: Farmer in early life and then a teacher. In 1863, Charles was appointed in charge of the Kaitoke School in Wanganui for thirteen years, then at Foxton school for seven.
Wanganui Chronicle 21 December 1881 p2
 The Foxton School.—We regret to learn that Foxton is likely to lose one of its best and staunchest friends, Mr C. Hulke, the master of the Foxton school, who has sold his property, and intends leaving for Europe, via Melbourne, early in the new year. We understand the purchaser of his property is Mr W. G. Robinson.

After a 2 year visit to Europe from 1882 to 1884 (arriving back in Wellington on 17 January 1884 aboard the Aorangi),
Staff of Newtown School 1886
Staff of Newtown School in 1886. Charles Hulke is seated, center
photo from scanned by Tom Law for the 125th Anniversary celebrations of Newtown School posted on flickr.com
Charles was appointed as assistant-master at Thorndon school in Wellington, then assistant-master at Newtown school, headmaster at Kilbirnie school and finally headmaster at Newtown school in Wellington, serving there from January 1887 until his death in 1898.

The Cyclopedia of New Zealand p379 (1897)
 The Newtown Public School, situated in Eiddiford Street, is the largest school in the City of Wellington...
   Mr. Charles Hulke, the Headmaster, resides in Normanby Street. He was born in Deal, Kent, and was educated at the Faversham Grammar School, in England, and subsequently received instruction at the hands of the Moravian Brothers, in Germany. Mr. Hulke came out to New Zealand as early as 1853, arriving in Auckland, from which place he “walked overland to New Plymouth, without experiencing any difficulties in connection with the natives, his opinion than being that New Zealand was the jolliest place in the world. He reached New Plymouth on the 21st of September, just about the time that the ship “Joseph Fletcher” was landing her passengers, including such well-known men as Archdeacon Stock, Carrick, and others. After remaining in Taranaki for some two or three years, Mr. Hulks removed to Wellington, and for some time engaged in farming pursuits. About 1861 he began teaching, and in 1863 was appointed to the charge of the Kaitoke School at Wanganui, which position he retained for thirteen years. In 1875 he was appointed to the Foxton School, and here he remained until he made up his mind to pay a visit to the land of his youth, and in 1882 started for Europe. He visited the educational establishments, and inspected mines and museums, and many places of scholastic note, in the interests of education. Mr. Hulke remained in Europe for two years, and had two sessions of study at the School of Mines in London, after completing which he returned to the Colony, and accepted the position of assistant-master at the Thorndon School, Wellington. After a year at this school, he occupied a similar position at the Newtown School, and from there was appointed to the charge of the Kilbirnie School. A year later he accepted his present position, entering upon his duties in January, 1887, and during the seven years Mr. Hulke has directed the affairs of this large school, the attendance has more than doubled. He is an enthusiastic analyst, and has fitted up for himself a large laboratory with all the latest appliances and improvements, including Professor Frankland's water analysing apparatus, the most recent arrangement for gas analysis, and the latest improvement in milk-testers, including one he has just imported from Messrs. Leffman and Beam. In use in his laboratory, Mr. Hulke has one of the finest balances that have been invented, by Oertling, of London, which is capable of weighing to the ten thousandth part of fifteen grains. In the interest of the health of the Newtown folks—more particularly the little people—Mr. Hulke has taken upon himself the duty of testing the milk supplied to the residents in his locality, and the result is that the milk suppliers have raised the standard of the milk throughout the entire district, to the benefit of all concerned. Mr. Hulke has fitted up all the chemical cases which are supplied by the Board of Education to the various City schools, and has also seen to the batteries which are likewise provided. He takes a great interest in the amusements of his young charges, and is nearly as enthusiastic over football and cricket as he is over his one great hobby, analytical chemistry.

Evening Post 23 March 1885 p3
EVENING CLASSES for Chemistry (theoretical and practical) will be opened early next month, at my Laboratory, Riddiford-street, Newtown.
      C. HULKE, F.C.S.S.,
          Lond. and Germany.

An excellent biographical account of Charles's life entitles "Charles Hulke and the golden age of the gentleman amateur" can be found at UNDERGROUND HISTORY - A peek below the surface at Karori Cemetery.

Notes: In 1857, George Oliver published a formal retraction of an accusation made by his wife that Charles Hulke had been involved in the burning down of his house in November 1856.
Taranaki Herald 28 February 1857 p2
To the Editor of the Taranaki Herald.
SIR,—A report having been circulated by Mrs George Oliver of the Mangorei, charging me with having set fire to their house, which was burnt down on the 15th November last, when I placed the matter in the hands of my Solicitor to demand a public apology for making such a statement—I enclose a copy of such apology for publication.
  I am, Sir, your obedient servant,
    CHARLES HULKE.
Mangorei, 24th February 1857.
      [Copy.] Mangorei, 30th January 1857.
  Dear Sir,—With reference to your note of the 27th inst., there is no reason whatever for any one saying that Mr Charles Hulke was concerned in the burning of my house, and that no person regrets more than Mrs Oliver having said in the moment of excitement after such a disaster implicating him in such an act.
      Remaining, dear Sir,
          Yours truly,
            G. OLIVER.
F. Norris, Esq.   

Death: 30 October 1898, in Wellington, New Zealand, from failure of the heart's action and disease of the heart and lungs.
Otago Daily Times 22 November 1898 p6
    A MYSTERIOUS DEATH.
      WELLINGTON, October 31.
  Mr C. Hulke, headmaster of the Newtown School, was found dead to-day. He lived by himself, and, not appearing at school, a visit was made to his house, where he was found in bed, having apparently been dead for some time. He was one of the best known teachers in Wellington. The death is supposed to have been due to heart disease, but Mr Hulke's friends were not aware that he had any weakness of the heart, and it was his boast that he never had a day's illness all his life. He was seen about in his usual health yesterday afternoon, but two visitors who called at the house last night could get no response to their knocking. The appearance of the body points to his having had a seizure of some kind.
  About a fortnight ago Mr Hulke gave some private papers into the keeping of a friend of his, and on these being opened this afternoon they were found to comprise Mr Hulke's will and a memorandum giving a number of singular directions. After referring to his financial position, which shows a credit balance, deceased says:—“I want one of the plainest funerals possible, and mind no one is to follow me. Of course there will be an inquest, and Mr Ashcroft (coroner) need only call Mrs and Miss —— to know my sentiments, which I have freely expressed to them since January last. I hope Mr —— will now be satisfied.” He concluded by directing how his personal effects are to be disposed of. The document was dated June 18, 1898. The chairman of the school committee received a letter this morning, written by deceased, in which the latter thanked the committee for the kindly consideration they had always shown him, and asking that the disposition of certain books should be made to the teachers connected with the school. These letters were taken to indicate that deceased had premeditated taking his life, but it is understood the suicide theory is not borne out by the post mortem which was made this afternoon.
          November 1.
  At the inquest on the body of Mr Hulke, teacher, the coroner stated that an adjournment would probably be necessary in order to have an analysis of the stomach, as the medical testimony might not be conclusive. Several witnesses gave evidence as to statements made by deceased which might imply either a presentiment of coming death or suicidal intention. Dr Tripe, who made the post mortem examination, said that the lungs and heart were diseased, but there was no sign of irritant poison. He would say that death was due to failure of the heart, from a diseased heart and lungs. A person in Mr Hulke's condition might go off at any time. The evidence of Mr Davidson, one of Mr Hulke's intimate friends, showed that he had frequently made use in witness's hearing of the expression “When I go, I'll go very quickly. I won't trouble anyone with a long illness.”
  A few weeks ago he remarked he felt he was breaking up, and that his heart was far gone. The mistress of Newtown School deposed that deceased had often said he would never go through a long illness. For. years he had said this, not particularly of late. He said he would do away with himself rather than have people bothering about him in an illness. Only last week he said that “the first day he did not come to school they would know he was dead.” He was eccentric, and always worried a great deal about small matters. Another of the teachers gave evidence that last Wednesday deceased said he wanted to see the examination over, and “Then he had a presentiment he was going to die.” He had frequently hinted that he would hasten his own end, and said he had something at home which would help him away. Dr Tripe, who made the post mortem, said all appearances pointed to death from natural causes. He did not think an analysis of the stomach would clear the matter up. The inquest was adjourned till Saturday to allow of an analysis of the stomach being made.
          November 5.
  At the adjourned inquest on the body of Mr Hulke, school teacher, Mr Skey said there was no evidence of poison in the intestines. The jury returned a verdict that according to the evidence of Dr Tripe and Mr Skey, there was no proof that deceased died from any other cause than failure of the heart's action. The coroner objected to the verdict pointing to any particular part of the evidence, and also to its negative form, and, after discussion, a verdict was given in a direct form—namely, “That, being bound by the medical evidence, the jury find that deceased died from failure of the heart's action and disease of the heart and lungs.”

Taranaki Herald 3 November 1898 p2
   The late Mr Charles Hulke, whose death occurred at Wellington at the beginning of the week, came to New Zealand in 1853, and followed farming pursuits for a time in the Taranaki district, but in 1861 he entered the teaching profession, and afterwards took service under the Wellington Education Board. The New Zea'and Times publishes a highly appreciative notice of the deceased gentleman, who “refused to be trammelled by standards, his method being a thorough grounding with an eye to each child's future career, even though failure was writ large on the examination sheets pro tem., and the capitation was thereby diminished. The object lesson which he unwittingly (or perhaps not unwittingly) gave when in charge at Thorndon of pupils failing in class subjects one year and harvesting the bulk of scholarship awards the next will not soon be forgotten by the Wellington educational authorities. The death of a man of the calibre and attainments of Mr Hulke practically causes an irreparable breach. He had that rare and potent faculty, which so many teachers lack, of readily transmitting to his pupils, of whatever degree, the piled-up riches of his master mind.”

Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand 1899 p720
    SIXTH MEETING :  22nd November, 1898.
      Sir W. L. Buller in the chair.
  The Chairman called attention to the death of the late Mr. Charles Hulke.
  He said he was sure that every member would deplore the loss of so active a member of the Society. He was a former President, and always took a great interest in the proceedings. He had known Mr. Hulke personally for twenty years, and could speak of him as a thoroughly conscientious and honourable man. He was a perfect enthusiast in his profession—that of a teacher—and was well informed on almost every subject. He was an excellent analytical chemist, and did much useful practical work in that line. He was a good German linguist, and one of the earliest volumes of their Transactions contained, he believed, his translation of Dr. Otto Finsch's pamphlet, being a criticism of his (Sir W. Buller’s) Essay on the Ornithology of New Zealand. Mr. Hulke's last appearance among them was at the conversazione held at the Museum in the early part of the session. He appeared then to be in perfect health, and he remembered him making some very original observations on the live tuataras exhibited on that occasion in the Maori House. By his death at a comparatively early age the Society had sustained a serious loss.

Grave of Charles Hulke in Karori Cemetery
Grave of Charles Hulke in Karori cemetery, Wellington, New Zealand
Burial: 2 November 1898, in Karori cemetery, Wellington, New Zealand. The grave is in the Public Section, plot 16K

The simple inscription on the headstone reads:
To the Memory of
Charles Hulke F.C.S.
Died 30 October 1898
Erected by a few friends

Evening Post 2 November 1898 p4
  The remains of Mr. Chas. Hulke were privately interred in the Karori Cemetery this morning. Only two carriages followed the hearse. The first contained Mr. H. Davidson (executor of deceased's estate), the Rev. Wm. Shirer (who performed the burial service), Mr. J. P. Luke (Chairman of the Newtown School Committee), and Mr. C. Bary (first assistant master of the school) and the second Mr. Colin Campbell (captain of the Melrose Football Club, of which Mr. Hulke was President for the 1897-98 term), and Messrs. J. W. Davis, A. Campbell, and L. Warwick. Some hundreds of scholars were drawn up in front of the Newtown School, and great was the disappointment when they were told they could not follow the funeral. Nearly every child carried either a wreath or a bunch of flowers. As they could not follow the hearse, the teachers of the school marshalled the children and took them by another route to the cemetery, and as the cortége entered the gates the scholars formed a double line through which the carriages passed. Handsome wreaths were sent by the teaching staff of the Newtown School, the German Liedertafel, the Melrose Football Club, and friends of the deceased. The Victoria Rebekah Lodge, I.O.O.F., at its regular meeting last night— the N.G., Sister Fulton, presiding—expressed deep regret at the death of Mr C. Hulke, who was an old member of the lodge. At last night's meeting of city ratepayers at Newtown the Chairman (Mr. C. M. Luke) made sympathetic reference to the late Mr. Hulke. He pointed out how much the deceased gentleman had identified himself with the interests of Newtown, and how affectionately he was regarded by the children, and concluded by moving a vote of sympathy with the deceased's relations and dearest friends. The motion was agreed to, all present standing as a mark of respect.

Probate:
Wanganui Herald 10 December 1898 p2
  Amongst the estates placed in the hands of the Public Trustee during November was that of the late C. Hulke, Newtown, £1560.

Census & Addresses:
1841: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
1897: Normanby Street, Wellington, New Zealand

Sources:

Charlotte Backhouse (Hulke) Hannam

Birth: 1863, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 3 June 1863, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Married: Philip James Hannam on 28 April 1886, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England
Philip James Hannam is recorded as a bachelor, aged 32, the son of Henry Jessard Hannam, esquire. He is living in Burcot, Dorchester and his occupation is listed as esquire. Charlotte Backhouse Hulke is recorded as a spinster, of Deal, aged 23, the daughter of Frederick Thomas Hulke, Bachelor of Medicine. The marriage was witnessed by Charlotte Hulke, E. B. Hulke, Frederick Backhouse Hulke and F. D. Hodgson.

Canterbury Journal, Kentish Times and Farmers' Gazette 8 May 1886
HANNAM—HULKE.—On the 28th April, at St. Andrew’s, Deal, Philip J, youngest son of the late H. J. Hannam, of Burcots House, Oxon, to Charlotte Backhouse, eldest daughter of the late Fred. Thos. Hulke, M.B. Lond., of Admiralty House, Deal.

Children: Notes: Known as "Lottie"

Death: 1938, in Watford district, Hertfordshire, England, aged 75

Census:
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: 4 A. Crescent, Camberwell, Surrey
1901: Ballards Lane, Finchley, Middlesex
1911: Watford Urban, Hertfordshire: Charlotte Backhouse Hannam is aged 47, born in Deal, Kent

Sources:

Dora Backhouse (Hulke, Noble) McFarlane

Birth: 1875, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 14 April 1875, in St. Andrew, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Married (1st): Hugh Percy Noble on 1 June 1905 at St Mary Abbots, Kensington, London, England
The Lancet 10 June 1905 p1623
    MARRIAGES.
NOBLE – HULKE.—On June 1st, 1905, at St Mary Abbots, Kensington, by the Rev. Canon Pennefather, vicar of the parish, assisted by the Rev. Arthur Armitstead, vicar of All Saints, East Finchley, Hugh Percy Noble, M.B., B.S. Lond., son of Samuel Clarke Noble, M.R.C.S. Eng., L.S.A. Lond., of Kendal, Westmorland, to Dora Backhouse, fifth daughter of the late Frederick Thomas Hulke, M.B. Lond., of Admiralty House, Deal, and of Mrs. F. T. Hulke of 162, Holland-road, Kensington.  

Hugh was born in 1872 in Kendal, Westmorland, and baptised on 20 August 1872 in St Thomas, Kendal, the son of Samuel Clarke Noble and Mary Ellen Wetherell. Hugh was an anaesthetist and surgeon. He died on 15 May 1922, in Stratton district, Cornwall.
Census:
1881: Stricklandgate, Kendal, Westmoreland
1891: Charterhouse Square, St Botolph Aldersgate, London
1901: Queen Anne Street, St Marylebone, London
1911: St Marylebone, London: Hugh Percy Noble is aged 38, born in Kendal, Westmoreland

Married (2nd): David McFarlane in 1922 in Paddington district, London, England

Death: 25 January 1954, in Hampstead district, London, aged 79

Census & Addresses:
1881: Admiralty House, Queen St, Deal, Kent
1891: Holland Road, Kensington, London
1901: Holland Road, Kensington, London
1911: Paddington, London: Dora Backhouse Noble is age 34, born in Deal, Kent
1954: 57 Marlborough Mansions, Canon Hill, London   (London Gazette 4 May 1954 p2664)

Sources:

Edith Backhouse (Hulke) Spreat

Birth: 1864, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 2 September 1864, in St. Andrews Church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Married: Frank Arthur Spreat on 9 July 1890, in Kensington district, London, England

Children: Death: 23 June 1948, at Areneg, Oakleigh Park North, Friern Barnet, Middlesex, aged 84
The Times 25 June 1948
On June 23, 1948, Edith Backhouse, of Burrington, Oakleigh Avenue, Whetstone, N.20. widow of F. A. Spreat, F.R.C.S. Funeral privately, at St. James' Church, Friern Barnet Lane, N.11, to-day (Friday), at 2.30 p.m. No mourning.

Burial: 25 June 1948, at St James's Church, Friern Barnet Lane, Friern Barnet, Middlesex

Probate:
Spreat Edith Backhouse of Burrington Oakleigh-avenue Whetstone Middlesex widow died 23 June at at Areneg Oakleigh Park North Friern Barnet Middlesex Probate London 29 October to Shirley Hulke Spreat architect and Joyce Hulke Spreat spinster. Effects £5700 17s.
Census & Addresses:
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: Admiralty House, Queen St, Deal, Kent
1891: The Firs, Oakleigh Park, Friern Barnet, Middlesex
1901: Clydesdale, Oakleigh Park, Friern Barnet, Middlesex
1911: Burrington, Oakleigh Park, Friern Barnet, Middlesex: Edith Backhouse Spreat is aged 46, born in Deal, Kent
1948: Burrington, Oakleigh Avenue, Whetstone, Middlesex   (National Probate Calendar)

Sources:

Edward Hulke

Birth: 1776

Mother: Elizabeth Hulke

Death: 1776

Sources:

Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Married: William Hulke

Children: Sources:

Eleanor Hulke

Birth: 1722

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Death: 1753

Sources:

Elizabeth Hulke

Birth: 1599

Father: Robert Hulke

Mother: Gene (Barber) Hulke

Death: 1603

Elizabeth (_____) Hulke

Married: John Hulke

Children:

Elizabeth Hulke

Birth: 1628

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Ellen (_____) Hulke

Death: 1630

Sources:

Elizabeth (Hulke) Snoswell

Baptism: 20 September 1663, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Safrey) Hulke

Married: Jeffrey Snoswell on 6 May 1684 in Eythorne, Kent, England

Children: Death: 1755

Sources:

Elizabeth Hulke

Birth: 1681

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Jopton) Hulke

Notes: Elizabeth is mentioned in the will of her grandmother, Elizabeth (Safrey) Hulke in 1685 and is bequeathed "one gold ring with three stones in it".

Sources:

Elizabeth (Hulke) Fido

Birth: 1699

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Scodden) Hulke

Married: T. Fido in 1719

Death: 1769

Sources:

Elizabeth (Hulke, Dixon) Hadley

Birth: 1706

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (Eastes) Hulke

Married (1st): Thomas Dixon, in 1728

Married (2nd): John Hadley on 1 August 1742, in Sutton-by-Dover, Kent, England

Death: 1797

Burial: 9 February 1797, in Deal, Kent, England

Sources:

Elizabeth Hulke

Birth: 1725

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Warren) Hulke

Sources:

Elizabeth (Hulke) Hulke

Birth: 1725

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Married: Hercules Hulke in 1747

Children: Death: 1768

Sources:

Elizabeth Hulke

Birth: 1747

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Mary (Breame) Hulke

Children: Sources:

Elizabeth King Hulke

Birth: 1832, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 19 September 1832, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Death: 1906, in Eastry district, Kent, aged 73

Buried: Deal, Kent, England

Census:
1841: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
1851: Farrier Street, Deal, Kent
1861: St James Westminster, Middlesex: Elis K Hulke, sister, is aged 28, born in Deal, Kent
1871: Deal, Kent
1891: 155 High Street, Deal, Kent

Elizabeth possibly appears in the 1881 census, mis-transcribed as Emma, and with an age transcribed as 40 rather than 49. "Emma" is otherwise unknown, and living at 155 High Street, Deal, Kent with the other unmarried Hulke sisters, and Elizabeth is not found elsewhere in the 1881 census.

Sources:

Ellen (_____) Hulke

Married: John Hulke

Children: Death: 1639

Sources:

Ellen (Hulke) Hockaway

Birth: 1667

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ellen (Whale) Hulke

Married: _____ Hockaway in 1699

Sources:

Ellen Noakes Powell Hulke

Birth: 1840, in High Street, Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 24 June 1840, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Death: 12 March 1929, in Eastry district, Kent, England, aged 88

Will: proved on 25 May 1929, by Philip James Hannam and Herbert Sydney Brown, the executors

Census & Addresses:
1841: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
1851: Farrier Street, Deal, Kent
1861: Deal, Kent: Ellen Hulke, daughter, is aged 20, born in Walmer, Kent
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: 155 High Street, Deal, Kent
1891: 155 High Street, Deal, Kent
1911: Deal, Kent: Ellen Noakes Powell Hulke is aged 70, born in High St Deal
1929: "Yonsea", 124 High Street, Deal, Kent   (London Gazette 31 May 1929 p3622)

Sources:

Emily Jane Hulke

Birth: 31 July 1829, in Deal Kent, England

Baptism: 9 September 1829, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Death: 27 January 1894, in Eastry district, Kent, England

Buried: Deal, Kent, England

Will:
I Emily Jane Hulke of 155 High Street Deal in the County of Kent Spinster hereby revoke all Wills and Testaments at any time heretofore made by me and declare this to be my last Will and Testament I give to each of my Executors hereinafter named who shall prove this my Will the sum of Ten guineas as a small acknowledgment for his trouble in executing the trusts of this my Will I give and devise all my real Estate and parts and shares of real Estate whatsoever and wheresoever unto and equally between my three sisters Elizabeth King Hulke and Frances Charlotte Hulke and Ellen Noakes Powell Hulke or such of them as shall survive me and their heirs and assigns as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and in case there shall be but one surviving then the whole to be for that one her heirs and assigns the same to be for their or her sole and separate use and benefit and I give and bequeath all my personal Estate not hereinbefore otherwise disposed of (subject to the payment of my just debts and funeral and testamentary expenses and the legacies bequeathed by this my Will or any Codicil hereto) unto and equally between my said three Sisters Elizabeth King Hulke and Frances Charlotte Hulke and Ellen Noakes Powell Hulke or such of them as shall survive me for their sole and separate use And in case there shall be but one of my said sisters who shall survive me then the whole to be for that one Sister for her sole and separate use but in case none of my said Sisters shall survive me I direct the Executors of this my Will hereinafter named absolutely to sell call in convert and collect all my real and personal Estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever (except such articles of jewellery and other effects of which I may leave a memorandum in writing touching my intended disposition thereof and of which I desire my Executors to dispose accordingly) And after payment of my just debts funeral and testamentary expenses and the legacies bequeathed by this my Will and any Codicil hereto I direct that my said Executors shall pay one moiety of the net proceeds of the said sale collection and conversion and of any ready money of which I may die possessed unto my Brother Charles Hulke absolutely And shall pay and divide the other moiety of the said net proceeds of sale and money or if my said Brother shall not become entitled to the moiety therof herein before directed to be paid to him shall pay and divide the whole thereof unto and equally between all the Daughters of my Sister Louisa Burton Plumbe (Widow of Samuel Alderson Plumbe) who shall then be living and the issue born in my lifetime of any of them who may then be dead such issue taking representatively their parents share the shares of such of them as shall be married to be for their sole and separate use and their receipts alone shall be good discharges for the same and I declare that any property hereby authorised to be sold may be sold either together or in parcels and by public auction or private contract and either with or without special conditions or stipulations relative to title or otherwise with power for my Executors to buy in any property put up for sale and rescind or vary any contract for sale and resell without being answerable for loss or dimunition in price and to execute assurances give effectual receipts for the purchase money and do all acts and things for completing such sale which my Executors may think proper And I declare that the Trustees or Trustee for the time being of this my Will may postpone the sale and conversion of my real and personal Estate or any part thereof for as long as they or he may think fit And I appoint my Brother John Whitaker Hulke and my nephew Edward William Wilmott to be Executors of this my Will In witness whereof I the said Emily Jane Hulke have to this my Will set my hand this twenty eighth day of March One thousand eight hundred and eighty one.
Signed by the said Emily Jane Hulke the Testatrix as and for her last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in her presence at her request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as Witnesses.
Emily Jane Hulke
A H Douglas Smith Major & Bk Master North Barracks Walmer
M. E. Smith North Barracks Walmer

On the 14th day of February 1894 Probate of this Will was granted at Canterbury to Edward William Wilmott Esquire one of the Executors

Probate:
from Probate records in Somerset House, London 1894
HULKE Emily Jane of 155 High Street Deal spinster died 27 January 1894 Probate Canterbury 14 Feb 1894 to Edward William Wilmott esquire Effects of £2361 14s 3d.

Census:
1841: Stone Hall, Great Mongeham, Kent
1851: Farrier Street, Deal, Kent
1861: Deal, Kent: Emily Hulke, daughter, is aged 31, born in Deal, Kent
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: 155 High Street, Deal, Kent
1891: 155 High Street, Deal, Kent

(Note: Emily Jane appears in the later censuses as Jane, by which name she was presumably known.)

Sources:

Ford Breame Hulke

Birth: 1739

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Mary (Brame) Hulke

Burial: 1 March 1740/41 (OS/NS), in St Paul, Deptford, Kent
Forard Breem Hulk is recorded as the son of Willm Hulk, living at Richard Mibbourns, King Row. Forard is noteed as a nussery child. Father, Willm Hulk, from Deal. Richd Mibbourn a shipwright.

Sources:

Frances Hulke

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Jopton) Hulke

Death: 1749

Sources:

Frances Hulke

Baptism: 4 August 1748, in the parish church of Deal, Kent, England

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Frances (Manley) Hulke

Burial: 23 November 1748, in the parish church of Deal, Kent, England

Sources:

Frances Hulke

Baptism: 26 November 1755, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Frances (Manley) Hulke

Burial: 2 December 1755, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Sources:

Frances Hulke

Birth: 17 April 1784, in Gillingham, Kent, England

Baptism: 18 May 1784, in Gillingham, Kent, England

Father: Thomas Manley Hulke

Mother: Ann Sarah (Douglas) Hulke

Death: 30 July 1784

Sources:

Frances Charlotte Hulke

Birth: 1838, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 18 April 1838, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Death: 1914, in Eastry district, Kent, England, aged 76

Buried: Deal, Kent, England

Census:
1841: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
1851: Farrier Street, Deal, Kent
1861: Deal, Kent: Frances Hulke, daughter, is aged 23, born in Deal, Kent
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: 155 High Street, Deal, Kent
1891: 155 High Street, Deal, Kent
1911: Deal, Kent: Frances Charlotte Hulke is aged 73, born in Deal, Kent

Sources:

Frederick Thomas Hulke

Frederick Thomas Hulke
Frederick Thomas Hulke
On the reverse of this photo is written "Dr Frederick Hulke"
photograph by Brookes Bro's (late Drayson), 50 St George's Street, Canterbury, provided courtesy of Claire Freestone
Birth: 8 May 1834, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 4 June 1834, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke
Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke
On the reverse of this photo is written "Aunt Charlotte Hulke"
photograph by Arthur King, 7 Norland Terrace, Notting Hill, provided courtesy of Claire Freestone
Married: Charlotte Backhouse on 28 June 1860 in St George Bloomsbury, Middlesex
British Medical Journal 7 July 1860 p533
     MARRIAGES.
HULKE, Frederick T., Esq., fourth son of William Hulke, Esq., Surgeon, Deal, to Charlotte, only daughter of the late Thomas C. BACKHOUSE,  Esq., at St George's, Bloomsbury, on June 28.

Charlotte was born in 1835, in Bloomsbury, Middlesex (1881) and baptised on 24 November 1835, in St Batholomew, Sydenham, Lewisham, Kent, the daughter of Thomas Cuthbert Backhouse and Maria Gotobed Iggulden. She died on 26 January 1910, in Kensington district, London, aged 75. Her will was proved on 5 May 1910 by Frederick Backhouse Hulke, Lewis Iggulden Backhouse Hulke and Shirley Worthington Woolmer.
Census & Addresses:
1841: St George Bloomsbury, Middlesex: Charlotte Backhouse is aged 5
1861: Deal, Kent: Charlotte Hulke, wife, is aged 25, born in Bloomsbury, Middlesex
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: Admiralty House, Queen St, Deal, Kent
1891: Holland Road, Kensington, London
1891: 162 Holland Road, Kensington, London   (London Register of Electors)
1901: Holland Road, Kensington, London
1901: 162 Holland Road, Kensington, London   (Royal Blue Book 1901 p948)
1905: 162 Holland Road, Kensington, London   (The Lancet 10 June 1905 p1623)
1910: 162 Holland Road, Kensington, London   (London Register of Electors)
1910: 162 Holland Road, Kensington, London   (London Gazette 17 May 1910 p3516)

Children: Occupation: Surgeon.
In the 1851 census, Frederick, then aged 16, is recorded as a dispensing assistant. In the 1871 census he is recorded as a surgeon, and in the 1881 census he is recorded as "General Practitioner Registered".

Notes: Frederick was an Honorary Assistant-Surgeon in the 6th Cinque Ports Rifle Volunteer Corps. He was commissioned on  9 May 1860 (Edinburgh Gazette 18 May 1860 p659), resigning his commission in 8 December 1863 (Edinburgh Gazette 8 December 1863 p1554), when the unit was disbanded (Tracing the Rifle Volunteers p48 (Ray Westlake, 2010)). In 1872 he was appointed as a Justice of the Peace ("placed on the Commission of the Peace") for Deal (The Lancet 13 January 1872 p64).

In 1873, Frederick was involved in a carriage accident.
Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald 4 October 1873
  On Wednesday morning last, an accident befel Mrs. Attersole, an old lady, who is very infirm and deaf. It appears that she went into the "Crown Inn," Beach Street, to fetch some beer for her lunch, and on leaving she became giddy, and did not hear a vehicle which was coming from the south. The horse's head was abreast of the door when Mrs. Attersole came out of the house, and she was knocked down, the wheel passing over her legs. The carriage in question was driven by Dr. Hulke, to whom not the slightest blame can be attached, as it was entirely owing to the deafness of the old lady that the accident happened. Both Mrs. Atterersole's legs were injured, and she was likewise bruised about the body and head and very much shaken. Dr. Hulke has paid the old lady every attention.

Frederick appeared before the Sandwich Election Commission investigating widespread bribery during the Sandwich parliamentary election in 1880. He was a leading member of the Conservative party in the area and closely involved in the selection of the candidate. After evidence of bribery was uncovered, the election of the Conservative candidate, Charles Crompton-Roberts was vacated and the Sandwich constituency was abolished in 1885, being incorporated into Eastern Kent.
Parliamentary Papers, House of Commons and Command vol 45 p363
        TWENTY-FIRST DAY.
        Wednesday, 22nd December 1880.
      Frederick Thomas Hulke sworn and examined.
  20,340. (Mr. Holl.) You reside in Queen Street, Deal?
—Yes.
  20,341. And you are a physician?—A surgeon.
  20,342. I think you took an active interest in the election that took place in May last?—Yes, I did.
  20,343. Your views were in the Conservative interest?—Conservative decidedly.
  20,344. You were one of the gentlemen who received Mr. Crompton Roberts when he came down?—Yes, I was.
  20,345. Did you receive any money or expend any money in connexion with the election?—The only amount I spent was that sum that Mr. Simmons mentioned, 7l.
  20,346. From whom did you receive that?—I received it from Mr. Simmons.
  20.347. Tell me what it was for, and how you expended it?—2l. of that I paid away to a man of the name of Jenner, for information that he was to get me after the last election, and before the present election, that is, between the walk-over and this election. I paid away a sovereign on two occasions to a man of the name of Jenner, in Walmer, to go about and get me information.
  20,348. Who was Jenner?—A waterman.
  20,349. Was it to get information in connexion with the election?—Yes.
  20,350. What character of information?—That our chances in Walmer were favourable.
  20,351. That is, to ascertain the views of the parties?—To ascertain what the views of the watermen were. Amongst watermen you are obliged to send a waterman.
  20,352. Was that given to him entirely for his time and trouble in obtaining such information?—Yes, entirely.
  20,353. Not with a view of his distributing any portion of it?—No, not with any such views at all.
  20,354. I understand you to say that you gave him a sovereign on two occasions.—Yes.
  20,355. How long was that before the election of May?—It must have been three or four weeks at least before that.
  20,356. How was the rest of the 7l. expended?—5l. was given to a Mr. Thomas Ralph, also for services rendered during the election.
  20,357. What is Mr Thomas Ralph?—He is a clerk, living in Alfred Square.
  20,358. What were the services that he rendered?—He was very active in going about, and he told me that also he was a little money out of pocket with necessary little expenses, and so on. I wanted him to be put down as a paid canvasser, to which he objected, and therefore I gave him the 5l. myself. He had his own reasons for objecting to going down as a paid canvasser.
  20,359. What were the services that he rendered?—He was showing himself active in the cause, attending meetings and putting himself otherwise to inconvenience. It was taking him out of his regular routine.
  20,360. Was he a voter?—Yes, he was a voter. He is a gentleman of some little position, although he is a clerk.
  20,361. Is this Alderman Ralph?—Yes, Mr. Thomas Ralph, the alderman.
  20,362. Do I understand you to say that the services he was rendering were simply going about to the different meetings. Was he canvassing?—I presume he was canvassing, but I had nothing to do with the canvassing, and therefore I could not say exactly. I do know that he was active, and used to attend our evening meetings.
  20,363. You would not pay a gentleman in his position, would you, for attending these meetings?—Not entirely; but then, you see, his presence was some support to us.
  20,364. Do you know anything more specific that he did beyond what you have told us?—No, I do not.
  20,365. You do not know whether he canvassed or not?—I know that I should imagine he did, but I do not know it personally.
  20,366. Was any portion of this 5l. that you gave to Alderman Ralph to be expended by him at all in treating, or in any such way?—No, it was given to him entirely for his services.
  20,367. Nothing of that kind at all?—No.
  20,368. You say positively it was given entirely for his services?—Yes.

  20,369. And such services as you have mentioned?—Yes.
  20,370. Was that all the money?—Yes, that was all the money.
  20,371. That was all the money you expended or received?—Yes, expended or received. I changed a cheque for Mr. Thomas on one occasion.
  20,372. When Mr. Simmons talks about your having paid for some champagne, do I understand you to say that that is a mistake of his?—Yes, it is a mistake of his. It was simply because I did not want him to know how this money was expended, and therefore at the time I said, “Put it down to Petty Cash, or anything you like,” telling him various little expenses that I was out of pocket.
  20,373. I suppose what you are saying now applies to the 5l. and not to the 2l.?—Yes.
  20,374. Why were you so anxious that Mr. Simmons, one of your own party, if I may so speak, should not know that you were going to give this 5l. to Mr. Alderman Ralph?—It might probably be in this way, that Mr. Ralph originally was upon the other side, that is years ago, and he might not like to have it known that he was put down as receiving anything for his services. I imagine that was what was passing through my mind.
  20,375. He had been upon the other side, and you thought he would not like it to be known that he had been rendering services?—Yes, that he had been rendering services openly.
  20,376. What you mean, I suppose, is you thought he would not like it to be known that he was receiving any remuneration for doing it?—Yes, that he had received anything.
  20,377. You see Alderman Ralph was, in point of fact, having formerly been upon the other side, taking remuneration for the services he rendered?—He rendered these services at lots of meetings for the last year or two. He had separated himself from his own party, and there was no intention on his part to receive anything, and no desire on my part to give him anything.
  20,378. You say that he separated himself from his own party long antecedent to this election?—Yes.
  20,379. A year or two?—Yes.
  20,380. Are you sure of that?—I should not like to be positive, because I do not know the ins and outs of the elections sufficiently.
  20,381. Are you able to say, or not, whether he had to your knowledge separated himself from the Liberal party for any considerable time previous to the general election?—Yes, that I will swear positively.
  20,382. Prior to the general election, you are positive about that?—Yes, I am positive about it. I think you will find that he took no part in the 1874 election.
  20.380. I understand you to say you are not able to state more specifically the precise character of the services that he rendered beyond the fact that he attended meetings and generally supported your cause.
  20,381. (Mr. Jeune.) When did you pay Mr. Jenner this 2l.—I paid Mr. Jenner 2l. some three or four weeks at least before the election. I cannot be positive, but the occasion was soon after the general election—the walk-over. I employed Jenner to go about and find out the feelings and views of the watermen in Walmer, and about another week or ten days after that I gave him a second sovereign and sent him round again.
  20,385. You say about three weeks after the walk-over you employed Jenner?—It was before that.
  20,386. How long was it after the general election that you employed him?— I could not be positive, but it was soon after.
  20,387. A fortnight?—I should think it would be, quite.
  20,388. And then you paid him a week after that?—Yes, somewhere thereabouts.
  20,389. The general election was the 4th April, and that brings you extremely close to the contested election?—You must bear in mind that there was not much time between the two.
  20,390. That is what I mean. The payment to him was a little close upon the contested election?—It had nothing to do with his views, I can assure you.
  20,391. I am not asking you that. You paid him this 2l. out of your own pocket?—Yes.
  20,392. Without any communication with anybody else?—Yes, without any communication with anybody else at all.
  20,393. When did you pay Mr Ralph the 5l.?—I paid him that upon the day of the election.
  20,394. Had you promised him anything before?—No, nothing. I am positive of that.
  20,395. Had you asked him to perform services for your party.?—No, I had not.
  20,396. How came you to pay Mr. Ralph 5l.? Did he ask you for it?—Yes, he asked me for it.
  20,397. That was upon the morning of the election?—That was upon the day of the election, but it was not in the morning; it was more in the afternoon.
  20,398. What did he come and say to you?—He met me casually; he was in a very excited state, and he told me that he was money out of pocket, and he thought that for the services he had rendered he should he remunerated. I then said to him, “I will mention it to Mr. Hughes, but it was understood that they were to put you down as a paid canvasser,” and he said, “I will not go down as a paid canvasser; I do not like to do that; but cannot you give me a little remuneration yourself, doctor?” That is the way it came about.
  20,399. And you then gave him 5l.?—Yes.
  20,400. That was out of your own pocket?—No, not that 5l., because just at that moment I happened to see Mr. Simmons. I had no money with me, and I said to Mr Simmons, “Can you lend me” or “Can you advance me a little money?” and he said, “I cannot; I have only a little in my pocket, which is for a charity.” Then I said, “What have you got?” and he pulled out his purse, and he gave me 7l., and he said, “What am I to put that down as?” I said, “Well, anything; charity begins at home,” or some such casual remark as that, because I did not want him to know anything about Mr. Ralph.
  20,401. Mr. Simmons has said that you said you had paid for some champagne; is that so?—Yes, I paid for some champagne, but not out of that money.
  20,402. Did you tell Mr. Simmons that was what it was for?—The next morning he asked me how he was to account for that money, because he was not content with my previous answer, and then I told him that I was money out of pocket myself, and, more than that, I had paid for champagne, and damage to a cart, and so on.
  20,403. You did tell him that you had paid for champagne?—Yes.
  20,404. And you also told him that you had paid 30s. for damage to a trap?—I did not tell him I had paid that, but 1 told him that the trap was damaged to that amount; that was merely to gammon him.
  20,405. I understand. As to the champagne, was it true that you had paid for some champagne?—Yes.
  20,100. What champagne was that?—I paid for some champagne the night of the election at the “Royal” hotel—three or four sovereigns.
  20,407. Who had the champagne?—The reporters and various others that were waiting for the result of the poll to be declared. I drank some of it myself.
  20,408. That was the champagne you meant, was it?—Yes.
  20,409. What was the trap?—It was a carriage of my own that was run into upon the afternoon of the polling day by some fly, and the wing was smashed off, and the iron work damaged.
  20,410. Did you tell Mr. Simmons that a carriage your own had been damaged?—Yes, I did, and that is the trap evidently he was alluding to.
  20,411. Mr. Simmons says that you asked him for about 10l., was that so?—No, I did not ask for that. I think it was 7l. or 8l. that I asked him for.
  20,412. He said expressly that you said to him, “Simmons, will you give me 10l.” and he only gave you 7l. because he had only got 71.?—No, I do not remember that. He had a sovereign or two more in his purse, I know, when he gave me the money.
  20,413. Besides that 2l. to Mr Jenner and 5l. to Mr. Ralph, what other sums did you pay in connexion with the election?—I do not know that I paid any at all.
  20414. It does turn out that you paid 3l. or 4l., or whatever it was, for this champagne drunk upon the polling day?—That was out of my own private purse.
  20,415. I dare say. Did you pay anything else out your own private purse?—I really cannot say that I did. I do not call anything to mind. I may have spent a shilling or two, but anything like 2l. or 3l. for champagne, I am positive I did not pay that.

  20,416. Did you not give anybody anything to drink before the polling?—No, not to a soul that I know of.
  20,117. You were pretty liberal with the champagne at the end?—Yes. I said, “We have been dry the whole time, and now we will have a wet.”
  20,418. Before that are you quite sure there was no other champagne?—No, I cannot call it to mind.

  20,419. Or any other less aristocratic refreshment?—No.
  20,420. Did you go about canvassing?—No, I never asked for a single vote. I object to canvassing, upon principle.
  20,421. Did you employ anybody else to canvass?—No, I did not employ anybody to canvass.      


Frederick and his family lived in Admiralty House, originally the official home of the Port Admiral, on Queen Street, in Deal.
Deal: Past and Present p86 (Henry Stephen Chapman, 1890)
  On January 23rd, 1783, twenty thousand pounds in specie was landed by two Deal luggers at this place. The money was taken out of a galliot, named the “Oaste Emes,” commanded by one Captain Laud, a Dutch ship which was bound from the Texel to Batavia when she ran ashore on the South Sand Head. The two countries being at that time engaged in war, this money was looked upon as a lawful prize, notwithstanding that the vessel was sailing under Russian colours when the disaster occurred, and the treasure, after being deposited for the night in the Admiralty House,* was next day sent away to London in two waggons guarded by a company of grenadiers.
  * This house—now the residence of Dr. Hulke, in Queen-street—is still distinguished by the same appellation. It was renovated and to some extent modernised about 20 years ago. Originally there were in it several strong-rooms. One of these—probably that in which the specie above referred to was placed for the night—still remains. It is a work of very substantial masonry, being built of large stones, with a domed roof and a marble floor. There is a small aperture which answers for a window that is protected with stout square bars. Entrance to this strong-room was made through a massive iron door which was fastened by a peculiar piece of mechanism, in the shape of a very powerful old-fashioned lock. The above incident suggests an idea of what almost fabulous wealth was undoubtedly stored in the precincts of this historic house in by-gone days when Deal was a port of great national importance.

Admiralty House was later converted into an Odeon cinema, and today is a snooker club and wine bar.

Death: 10 April 1881, at Admiralty House, Deal, Kent, England, aged 47
The Medical Press & Circular 20 April 1881 p348
     DEATHS.
HULKE.—April 10, suddenly, at Admiralty House, Deal, Frederick Thomas Hulke, M.B., J.P., aged 47

Taranaki Herald 6 June 1881 p2
DEATH OF DR. HULKE.
INTIMATION was received by Mr. W. K. Hulke, by the last mail, of the death of his brother Dr. F. T. Hulke, of Deal, England, who died somewhat suddenly on the morning of the 10th April last, at the age of 47 years. Dr. Hulke appears to have been very much respected by the inhabitants of Deal, and the local paper (The Deal Mercury) devotes a leading article to his obituary, in which the deceased gentleman is referred to in eulogistic language. The paper says—“When the sad truth of his death became generally known and comprehended, it appeared as if everyone had sustained a personal loss. There could not have been a family to whom he was a stranger. Long has it been since any one here was so universally respected, and long will it be before another is so universally esteemed. A more imposing spectacle than his funeral has not been withnessed here. It was the spectacle of a useful and a worthy life, honored at its close; the spectacle of the profound and tender sympathy generally felt for mourning relatives ; the spectacle of the strength of esteem and affection begotten of years of voluntary public and private labour for the welfare of the town at large. A debt of gratitude was due to him for the interest he invariably displayed in anything calculated to promote the prosperity of his townsmen. When his eyes closed for aye, Deal lost its truest friend and wisest councellor. His ear was always open to the tale of distress. Was any one in trouble? To the doctor he went straight away. If counsel could assist, it was readily given. As a medical attendant, the deceased gentleman's fame was great, and he became known rather as a friend, for in him both were admirably blended. To have been in death so respected, his life and walk must have been approved.”
   Considerable space is given in the same paper to an account of the funeral. It states that business in the town was suspended, the shops being closed, and the windows of private residences darkened. “Crowds collected at the various street corners, and other vantage points, to view the procession's long length ;” and when the coffin was taken into the Cemetery it was quickly hid from view by wreaths and garlands of flowers, offerings of sincere affection.
   Dr. Hulke was a Bachelor of Medicine, and was in partnership with his father, but at that gentleman’s death, succeeded to his practice, which, in his hands, soon became very extensive. He was appointed Magistrate to the Borough about 1871, and for the Cinque Ports shortly afterwards. He was for several years the leading member of the Conservative party in the Borough, and Chairman of the Committees.

Buried: Deal cemetery, Deal, Kent, England

Census:
1841: Stone Hall, Great Mongeham, Kent
1851: Farrier Street, Deal, Kent
1861: Deal, Kent: Frederick T. Hulke, head, is aged 26, born in Deal, Kent
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: Admiralty House, Queen Street, Deal, Kent

Sources:

Frederick Backhouse Hulke

Birth: 19 March 1862, at Admiralty House, Deal, Kent, England
The Gentleman's Magazine May 1862 p637
  BIRTHS.
  March 19.
  At the Admiralty-house, Deal, the wife of Dr. Fredk. Thos. Hulke, a son.

Baptism: 2 May 1862, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Education: Tonbridge School, Kent, which Frederick attended from 1877 to 1879.
The register of Tonbridge School, from 1820 to 1886 p183 (November 1886)
HULKE, Frederick Backhouse. 1877-9. Son of Frederick Thomas Hulke. b. 1862. In the Medical profession.

Married: Irene Harriet Stirling Jones in 1887, in Kingston district, Surrey, England

Irene was born on 8 April 1860, in Umballa, Punjab, India, and baptised on 1 July 1860 in Peshawur, North West Provinces, Bengal Presidency, the daughter of Juxon Henry Jones and Mary Hockin Stirling. She was known as "Coco". Coco attended Eastbourne Ladies College when the family returned from India after her father's retirement. A family account of this Jones family relates that "my mother spent her summer holidays with them as a girl and nothing could
have been more sedate than their lifestyle: Coco a busty matron much given to amateur theatricals; her Fred thin and rather hang-dog with a drooping moustache...Admiralty House in Deal, where she and her doctor husband lived, was supplied with tennis courts and terraces and the ghost of Nelson. She had a moderate family of two sons and a daughter and entertained her nieces and sisters every summer. She was also the life and soul of Upper Deal society and took the lead in its non-stop theatrical productions...Graceful is not the word that springs to mind when considering Coco. In the few photographs of early in the century she appears weighed down by an enormous bust and hat. By then she was a matron in middle age, referred to in my mother's diaries as The Beast, though like most of Violet's nicknames this was unkind; she lectured a lot and also "made" Violet break off her first engagement to a fellow art student. The war gave her plenty of scope for good works, which up to then had been centred on the House for Destitute Children and local boatmen. For these she opened Admiralty House to a hundred and fifty guests at a time, usually in fancy dress, and The Mercury was there to write up the costumes "donned by the fair sex" and the "splendid repasts" provided. No destitute children were there, needless to say, but maybe got a little more scrape on their bread as a result of the revelry; boatmen probably got tracts. There were a lot of wounded soldiers in Deal during the war and Coco helped to bandage them, but didn't invite them to her tennis parties even as spectators. Soldiers, in spite of their gallantry, were lower class and to be kept in their place. The Hulke household was often rent by "rows" and "bust ups" so it seems that Coco was Flawed too...
Coco died at sixty four and left me 100 in her will and an amethyst brooch surrounded by seed pearls, which made me feel warmly towards this largely unknown aunt. The life in Deal comes alive in my mother's diaries, and Coco emerges as a typical middle-class well-meaning woman, absorbed in running her house with a lot of servants, and raising money for the less privileged as long as it didn't impinge on her own comforts."
Irene died in 1924, in Eastry district, Kent, aged 62
Census:
1871: Eastbourne, Sussex
1891: Queen Street, Deal, Kent
1901: Church Street, Isleworth, Middlesex

Children: Occupation: Surgeon and General Practitioner. In the 1881 census, Frederick is listed as a "Student In Medicine"
London Gazette 28 July 1893 p4315
WE hereby agree that the Partnership hitherto subsisting between us the undersigned, Frederick Backhouse Hulke and Walter Frederick Lovell, practising together as Surgeons and General Practitioners, as Hulke and Lovell, at Deal and Walmer, in the county of Kent, has been this day dissolved by mutual consent. The practice will henceforth be carried on by the said Frederick Backhouse Hulke, to whom all bills are to be paid, and who will discharge all liabilities.—As witness our hands, July 22, 1893.
    FRED. B. HULKE.
    W. F. LOVELL.

Notes:
Frederick was an officer in the 4th Volunteer (Cinque Ports) Brigade, Cinque Ports Division, Royal Artillery, commissioned as a second lieutenant on 25 April 1888 (London Gazette 24 April 1888 p2329), promoted to lieutenant on 5 September 1888 (London Gazette 4 September 1888 p4738) and to captain on 4 May 1892 (London Gazette 3 May 1892 p2554). Frederick resigned his commission on 13 January 1894 (London Gazette 12 January 1894 p240). On 30 January 1917 he was appointed as a temporary captain in the Kent Volunteer Regiment (described then as "late Capt., 1st Cinque Ports Brig., Vol. Arty.") (London Gazette 26 January 1917 p1048). He relinquished that commission on 25 September 1919 and granted the honorary rank of captain (London Gazette 30 January 1920 p1352).

In 1914, Frederick wrote a letter to the Times concerning the Naval Brigade. The letter was rebutted in the
South Wales Weekly Post 24 October 1914 p7
      RAW RECRUITS.
  ANTWERP SCANDAL,
 AMAZING DISCLOSURES.
 Bayonets Tied on with String.

  The following letter in Friday's “Times” is from Mr. F. B. Hulke, Admiralty House, Deal, and makes some amazing disclosures concerning the nature of the Naval Brigade sent so ineffectually to Antwerp.
  When rumours first got about in this neighbourhood that these raw levies were going to the front, it was scoffed at as incredible. The opinions of many naval and military officers were unanimous that, to send the Brigade in their present condition to any fighting line was nothing less than “deliberate murder.” Individual officers, non-commissioned officers, and men of the force itself laughed at the suggestion of being employed as a fighting unit. When, shortly after their departure, it was reported on undeniable evidence that these Naval Volunteers and recruits had been actually sent to Antwerp, the general feeling throughout this district was one of intense
    Anger and consternation.
  You will appreciate the reason for this when I tell you that a large proportion of these men had no proper equipment and were practically untrained. The officers for the most part were learning as quickly as possible their work as infantrymen. They were still in the stage of reading out the words of command from manuals on parade. Even of these officers there was a great deficiency—I believe I am absolutely correct in stating that the first Brigade alone left Dover 16 officers short—and, of the 14 who accompanied them, not more than four, had any real practical knowledge of a line officer's duties. A very large number of the rank and file were without belts and pouches. I do not think any had pouches to hold the regulation 150 rounds. Some may have had one pouch to hold 40 rounds. Many had none at all. For lack of belts, they
  Tied their bayonets on with string.
There were few water-bottles, no identification discs, and none carried an entrenching tool. It would be interesting to discover how many of these men had fired even one round of .303 ammunition out of the modern Service rifle—I believe practically none. The only rifle practice was some miniature rifle shooting at 30 yards or thereabouts, and few did this.
  They were only served out with rifles a day or two before leaving, and I am told, on good authority, that a Marine non-com was sent to their camp either the day before, or the morning of, their, departure to show as many of them as possible how to fix bayonets.
        “BOSH.”
  EX-“DAILY POST” MAN RIDICULES STORY.

  Mr. R. J. Hodson, of the Central News (formerly of the “Daily Post”), who was in Antwerp during the siege, and spent two days with the British Marines and naval brigade, who were rushed into the city in the hope of saving it at the last moment, writes:—
  The remarkable statements which have been published as to the state of the naval brigade at Antwerp are very inaccurate. I take them seriatim.
  From the letter of Mr. F. B. Hulke, Admiralty House, Deal:
  (1) “A large proportion of these men had no proper equipment, and were practically untrained.”
  Answer: Many of the men lacked overcoats, but their fighting equipment was efficient. I saw no evidence of lack of training. If these men were “practically untrained,” they must have an abnormally standard of training in naval brigades. The way they set about improving the Belgian trenches was a revelation to the Belgian sappers.
  (2) “The officers were stall in the stage of reading out the words of command from manuals on parade.”
  Answer: If their parade drill was weak they showed no weakness in field work.
  (3) “A very large number of the rank and file were without belts and poaches.”
  Answer: I saw none suffering from such deficiency.
  (4) “For lack of belts they tied on their bayonets with string.”
  Answer: Bosh.
  (5) “There were no identification discs.”
  Answer: Quite untrue.
  (6) “None carried an entrenching tool.”
  Answer: There were some entrenching tools. but in any case it might be anticipated that a great fortress like Antwerp could supply these.
  (7) “Practically none had fired even one round of .303 of the modern Service rifle.”
  Answer: The handy way in which the men handled their rifles left me no ground for questions on this point.
  To sum up, Mr. F. B. Hulke's tale may be told to the marines. It will not be believed by anyone who saw the naval man in the trenches around Antwerp.

The Partridge
The Partridge
Frederick was once the owner of the Partridge, a 72 foot Victorian gaff cutter yacht built in 1885. This boat has recently been fully restored.

Death: 1925, in Eastry district, Kent, England, aged 66

Census & Addresses:
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: Admiralty House, Queen St, Deal, Kent
1888: Admiralty House, Deal, Kent   (baptism record of son Frederick)
1891: Queen Street, Deal, Kent
1891: Admiralty House, Deal, Kent   (baptism record of daughter Irene)

Sources:

Frederick Malcolm Stirling Hulke

Birth: 1888, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 19 December 1888, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Backhouse Hulke

Mother: Irene Harriet Stirling (Jones) Hulke

Married: Edith Ada Gladys Howatson in 1917, in Kensington district, London, England

Edith was born on 14 August 1890. She was known as Gladys. Edith died in 1983, in Dover district, Kent.

Occupation:  Physician and Surgeon
Frederick joined the Royal Army Medical Corps on 15 August 1914 and was commissioned with the temporary rank of lieutenant (London Gazette 18 August 1914 p6580). He was promoted to temporary captain 15 August 1915 (London Gazette 3 September 1915 p8828). Frederick relinquished his commission on 15 February 1919 and was granted the rank of major (London Gazette 25 March 1919 p3976). On 8 March 1922, Frederick was appointed by the Chief Inspector of Factories to be certifying surgeon under the Factory and Workshop Acts for the Deal district of Kent (London Gazette 14 March 1922 p2138).

Notes:
"Comarques", 122 High Street, Deal
"Comarques", 122 High Street, Deal was owned by the Hulke family for hundreds of years
photo from Historic England
Frederick is recorded at the baptism of his son in 1922 living at 20 Sondes Road in Deal in 1922. He and Gladys later lived at "Comarques", a large Georgian house at 122 High Street in Deal, probably inheriting the house when his father died in 1925. Comarques had been in the Hulke family for many years. From 1936 until 1939, Gladys rented the top floor of the house to John Ireland, a noted English composer, for the house now carried a blue plaque.
The John Ireland Companion p50 (Lewis Foreman, 2011)
Ireland rented part of the top floor of this house between 1936 and 1939. From 1937 he stayed in this flat on an increasingly regular basis, and did much of his writing here, producing his Concertino Pastorale for the Boyd Neel String Orchestra, for a performance in the 1939 Canterbury Festival.
p118-121
  Friends joked that John Ireland's topographical affections were akin to love affairs with places, but they were quick to acknowledge his gift of deep feeling which almost amounted to clairvoyance. On entering a house he would know at once if it was a happy place, or otherwise. His Deal home was very much in harmony with his feelings at a time when he needed to relax, meditate and write more music.
  The fine Georgian house named ‘Comarques’ provided Ireland with a spacious top flat, originally the nursery. This property has been owned and occupied by the Hulke family for over two centuries. Local history records the name of Hulke as Mayors of Deal, bankers, land owners, physicians and surgeons since the reign of Queen Anne. Almost directly opposite stands another house, originally in the ownership of the Hulke family and a passageway, far below street level, once connected the two properties. (There is a bricked-up entrance in the cellars of both). Such a passageway could be used at night, to avoid the Press gangs which frequented Deal in the eighteenth century and the ladies would find it conveniently cleaner to their dainty footwear and long dresses, than walking across the muddy street above
.
..
The flat was furnished with the greatest care, the centrepiece being the baby grand piano which had been presented to him by Chappell. It was rumoured that the understanding was that Ireland would promote sales for the firm; something that John Ireland was not at pains to do!
  From the main body of the old house the wife of Dr Hulke would hear Ireland play the occasional chord and expressed surprise that he could sit in his study for hours and compose musc with so little use of the piano.
  Whilst he was at ‘Comarques’ John Ireland's Concerto for Pianoforte and Orchestra was again given at the Henry Wood Promenade Concerts in Queen's Hall. It had first been performed there in 1930. This concert, on 1st September 1936, was conducted by Sir Henry J. Wood, with Artur Rubinstein as the soloist. Mrs Gladys Hulke was, of course, a guest of honour and kept the programme as a momento.  

Comarques was sold out of the Hulke family in 2010, listed for £825,000.

In 1919, Frederick won the Invergarry Cup presented by the Deal & Walmer Angling Association with a catch of 2lbs 14ozs

Death: 1927, in Pancras district, London, England, aged 39

Census & Addresses:
1891: Queen Street, Deal, Kent
1911: Deal, Kent: Frederick Malcolm Stirling Hulke is aged 22, born in Deal, Kent
1922: 20 Sondes Road, Deal, Kent   (baptism record of son transcribed at FreeReg)

Sources:

George Hulke

Birth: 1594

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Mary

Sources:

George Hulke

Father: Robert Hulke

Married: Susan

Children:

George Hulke

Birth: 1667

Father: George Hulke

Mother: Susan (_____) Hulke

Death: 1710

Sources:

George Hulke

Birth: 1707

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Scodden) Hulke

Death:  1737

Notes: George was a smuggler.

Sources:

Grace Hulke

Birth: 1730

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Death: 1735

Sources:

Henly Hulke

Birth: 1785

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Jane (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Hercules Hulke

Birth: 1728

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Warren) Hulke

Married: Elizabeth Hulke in 1747

Children: Death: 1774

Sources:

Irene Medora (Hulke) Harrison

Birth: 3 July 1891, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 31 August 1891, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Backhouse Hulke

Mother: Irene Harriet Stirling (Jones) Hulke

Married: William R. Harrison in 1914, in Tendring district, Essex, England

Notes:
Herald of the Golden Age July 1913 p183
The Concert given at Queen's Hall, on June 26th, in honour of Queen Alexandra's Day and in aid of the Work of the Order, was a brilliant success, and was attended by a large and distinguished audience.
  The Artistes who kindly gave their services, and rendered a most enjoyable programme of vocal and instrumental music were:—
...
Miss Medora Hulke

Death: 1989, in South East Hampshire district, Hampshire, England

Census:
1901: Church Street, Isleworth, Middlesex
1911: Deal, Kent: Irene Medora Hulke is aged 19, born in Deal, Kent

Sources:

Jane Hulke

Birth: 1631

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Ellen (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Jessie Backhouse (Hulke) Burnell

Birth: 19 February 1877, at Admiralty House, Deal, Kent, England
Medical Times and Gazette 3 March 1877 p248
    BIRTHS.
HULKE.—On February 19, at Admiralty House, Deal, the wife of Frederick Thomas Hulke, M.B., M.R.C.S.E., of a daughter. 

Baptism: 22 March 1877 in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Married: Charles Desborough Burnell on 13 October 1903, in Kensington, London, England.

Charles was born on 13 January 1876 in Beckenham, Kent, and baptised on 24 February 1876 in Beckenham, the son of George Edward Burnell-Jones and Harriet Desborough. He was educated at Eton and Magdalen College, Oxford and
Eights - Great Britain (Leander Club) vs. Hungary - Summer Olympics 1908
Eights - Great Britain (Leander Club) vs. Hungary - Summer Olympics 1908. Charles Desborough Burnell was a crewmember on the British boat
photo from wikipedia
Eights - Great Britain (Leander Club) Gold Medal - Summer Olympics 1908
Eights - Great Britain (Leander Club) Gold Medal - Summer Olympics 1908. The medal is displayed in the dining room of the Leander Club.
was an accomplished rower. Charles won the Eton Junior Sculls in 1892 and was a member of the winning Oxford crews in the Boat Races of 1895, 1896, 1897 and 1898. He became a member of Leander Club and was in the Leander crew which won the Grand Challenge Cup at Henley Royal Regatta for four consecutive years from 1898 to 1901. He was also a three-time winner of the Stewards' Challenge Cup at Henley. In 1908 he was a crew member of the Leander eight, which won the gold medal for Great Britain rowing at the 1908 Summer Olympics.

Charles was an army officer, initially as a volunteer commissioned into the 4th (Eton College) Volunteer Battalion, the Oxfordshire Light Infantry as a second lieutenant on 18 November 1893 (London Gazette 17 November 1893 p6427) and promoted to lieutenant on 26 May 1894 (London Gazette 25 May 1894 p3052), then resigning his commission on 30 January 1895 (London Gazette 29 January 1895 p553), dropping in rank to second lieutenant (supernumerary). Charles was re-appointed lieutenant in the 1st London on 19 January 1898 (London Gazette 18 January 1898 p303) and promoted to captain on 9 December 1902 (London Gazette 19 December 1902 p8763). On 1 April 1908 he was appointed to the 5th Battalion, City of London (Rifles) Regiment as a captain, the rank he held in the Volunteer Force (London Gazette 23 October 1908 p7651), and appointed honorary major with precedence from 31 March 1908 (London Gazette 11 May 1909 p3565). Charles resigned his commission on 15 January 1913 (London Gazette 14 January 1913 p328), but rejoined in the First World War, commissioned as captain (honorary major) in the 5th (City of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (London Rifle Brigade) on 10 August 1914 (London Gazette 22 September 1914 p7496). The Battalion embarked for France on 4 November 1914 and details of their activities are recorded in Short history of the London Rifle Brigade. Charles was wounded on 7 May 1915. He was appointed temporary major on 18 January 1916 (London Gazette 14 January 1916 p729), relinquishing that temporary rank on 11 March 1917 (London Gazette 9 March 1917 p2462) but promoted to acting lieutenant-colonel whilst commanding a battalion on 7 May 1917, reverting to the acting rank of major on 20 May 1917 (London Gazette 13 July 1917 p7062). Charles ceased to be employed at headquarters on 13 September 1917, relinquishing the acting rank of major (London Gazette 23 October 1917 p11004), but appointed acting major again on 29 January 1918 whilst employed as assistant commandant of Reinforcement Camps (London Gazette 19 March 1918 p3560), and made temporary lieutenant-colonel whilst commanding the 5th Battalion of the London Regiment on 19 May 1918 (London Gazette 14 March 1919 p3614). Charles served with distinction, being mentioned in despatches on 30 December 1918 (London Gazette 27 December 1918 p15198) and again on 10 July 1919 (London Gazette 8 July 1919 p8752) and awarded the Distinguished Service Order on 3 June 1919 (Edinburgh Gazette 5 June 1919 p1851). He relinquished his temporary rank on ceasing to be employed on 18 July 1919 (London Gazette 8 August 1919 p10188). After the war, Charles rejoined the family firm of stockbrokers in the City. He was Chairman of the Wokingham Rural District Council for 35 years. On 3 May 1927, Charles was awarded the Territorial Decoration for long service in the Territorial Force (London Gazette 3 May 1927 p2878). Lieutenant-Colonel C. D. Burnell, D.S.O., having reached the age limit, retired on 28 January 1931 (London Gazette 27 January 1931 p607) and on 1 August 1936 Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Desborough Burnell, D.S.O., T.D., of Wedmore, Rememhan Hill, Henley-on-Thames, was appointed Deputy Lieutenant in Berkshire (London Gazette 11 August 1936 p5256). He was awarded the Order of the British Empire for public services to Berkshire on 10 June 1954 (London Gazette 1 June 1954 p3269). Charles died on 3 October 1969, in Blewbury, Berkshire, aged 93, and is buried in St Nicholas Churchyard, Remenham, Berkshire.
Census:
1881: Springfield Terrace, Ilfracombe, Devon
1891: Lansdowne Road, Kensington, London
1901: Lansdowne Crescent, Kensington, London
1911: Walton upon Thames, Surrey: Charles Desborough Burnell is aged 35, born in Beckenham, Kent

Children:
Gravestone of Charles Desborough Burnell and Jessie Baclkhouse (Hulke) Burnell
Gravestone of Charles Desborough Burnell and Jessie Baclkhouse (Hulke) Burnell in St Nicholas Churchyard, Remenham, Berkshire
photo by Peter Drysdale posted at findagrave.com
Death: 23 December 1966, in Wargrave, Berkshire, England, aged 89

Buried: St Nicholas Churchyard, Remenham, Berkshire, England

Census:
1881: Admiralty House, Queen St, Deal, Kent
1891: Holland Road, Kensington, London
1901: Holland Road, Kensington, London
1911: Walton on Thames, Surrey: Jessie Backhouse Burnell is aged 34, born in Deal, Kent

Sources:

Joan Hulke

Birth: 1602

Father: Robert Hulke

Mother: Gene (Barber) Hulke

Death: 1615

Sources:

Joan Hulke

Birth: 1609

Father: Anthony Hulke

Mother: Mildred (Baker) Hulke

Sources:

John Hulke

Married: Mary

Children:

John Hulke

Birth: 1577

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Mary

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1598

Father: Robert Hulke

Mother: Gene (Barber) Hulke

Married: Elizabeth

Children:

John Hulke

Birth: 1605

Father: Robert Hulke

Mother: Gene (Barber) Hulke

Married: Ellen

Children: Death: 1639

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1627

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Ellen (_____) Hulke

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 19 November 1660

Baptism: 25 November 1660, in St. Leonard's, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Safrey) Hulke

Married: Sarah Eastes on 19 March 1705/6, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Children: Death: 1722

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1670

Father: George Hulke

Mother: Susan (_____) Hulke

Married: Elizabeth Scodden on 30 April 1696, in Deal, Kent

Children: Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1686

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Jopton) Hulke

Married: Anne

Children: Death: 1734

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1702

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Scodden) Hulke

Married: Sarah

Children: Death: 1748

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1710

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (Eastes) Hulke

Death: 1711

Burial: 2 October 1711, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1712

Baptism: 10 September 1712, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (Eastes) Hulke

Death: 1713

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1723

Baptism: 24 April 1723, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (_____) Hulke

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1729

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Death: 1729

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1738

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Warren) Hulke

Death: 1753

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 1738

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Mary (Brame) Hulke

Death: 1739

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 3 February 1751/2 (OS/NS)

Baptism: 24 February 1751/2 (OS/NS) , in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Frances (Manley) Hulke

Occupation: Captain, Royal Navy

Sources:

John Read Hulke

Birth: 1793

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ann (Read) Hulke

Death: 1793

Burial: 24 April 1793, in Deal, Kent, England

Sources:

John Hulke

Birth: 18 April 1803

Baptism: 22 August 1804, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ann (Read) Hulke

Occupation: Assistant surgeon, in the Honourable East India Company Service (HEICS). At the time of his death, John was assistant surgeon on the H.C.S. Waterloo.

Death: 15 July 1830, at sea, on the passage from China
Asiatic Journal October 1830 p120
  July 15. At sea, on the passage from China, Mr. John Hulke, assistant surgeon of the H.C.S. Waterloo.

Probate: granted 29 October 1830
Assistant surgeon on board the EICS Waterloo at sea, bach., to William Hulke [of Deal, Kent, Estate Duty Registers] Esq. the father, £200, Pts

Sources:

John Whitaker Hulke

John Whitaker Hulke
John Whitaker Hulke c. 1870
painting owned by University College London Hospitals displayed at Hunterian Museum; image published by BBC Your Paintings
John Whitaker Hulke
John Whitaker Hulke
On the reverse of this photo is written "Dr John Hulke celebrated occulist"
photograph by G. Jerrard late Claudet Photographic Studios, 107 Regent street, London, provided courtesy of Claire Freestone
Birth: 6 November 1830, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 8 December 1830, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Married: Julia Grace Ridley on 1 October 1858, in Hastings, Sussex, England
The Gentlemen's Magazine November 1858 p527
Oct. 1. At Hastings, John W. Hulke, of London, son of Wm. Hulke, esq., of Deal, Kent, to Julia G. Ridley, dau. of the late Samuel Ridley, of Hastings. 

Julia was born on 13 November 1831, at The Lower Road, Islington, Middlesex, the daughter of Samuel Ridley and Kezia Daniell, and baptised on 28 November 1832, in Cripplegate, London, as a non-conformist. She was baptised a second time, aged 17, on 10 July 1849, in St James Westminster (where her birth date is recorded as 30 November 1831). Julia died on 27 September 1924, in Marylebone district, London, aged 92. Her will was proved on 26 November 1924 by Edward William Wilmott.
Census & Addresses:
1851: St Mary in the Castle, Sussex: Julia G. Ridley, daughter, is aged 19, born in Islington, Middlesex (HO107-1635 fol 364 p15)
1861: St James Westminster, Middlesex; Julia G. Hulke is aged 29, born in Islington, Middlesex
1871: St James Westminster, Middlesex
1881: 10 Old Burlington St., Westminster, London, Middlesex
1891: St James Westminster: Julia Grace Hucke, wife, is aged 59, born in Islington, London
1898: 44 Montagu-square, St Marylebone, London   (London Register of Electors)
1901: St Marylebone, London: Julia Grace Hulke, head, is aged 69, born in Islington, London. She is Living on Own Means.
1911: St Marylebone, London: Julia G. Hulke, is aged 79, born in Islington, London
1912: 44 Montagu-square, St Marylebone, London   (London Register of Electors)
1924: 44 Montagu-square, London   (The London Gazette 23 December 1924 p9372)

Education: After attending boarding school in England, John continued his education in Germany, at the Moravian College at Neuwied (1843 to 1845). Returning to England, he studied at King's College School in London during 1846 and 1847, entering the medical department of that college in 1849.

Occupation: Surgeon.
In 1852, John, along with his father, was an attending physician at the death of the Duke of Wellington, and he signed the death certificate.
Medical Times & Gazette 25 September 1852 p301
THE LAST HOURS OF THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON.
PUBLIC interest has been so much excited on every matter connected with the Great Duke, that although we have been obliged to omit all other communications from the present Number, we feel that we should not be justified in withholding that of Mr. Hulke.
    [To the Editor of the Medical Times and Gazette.]
      155 Lower street, Deal, September 21, 1852.
  SIR,—I enclose you an account of the death of the Duke of Wellington for insertion in the Medical Times and Gazette, should you deem it sufficiently interesting to the readers of your widely circulated Journal.
     I am, Sir, &c.      J. W. HULKE.
  “Tuesday, September 14.—About half past eight this morning my father received a note from Walmer Castle, stating that the Duke of Wellington wished to see him. He immediately went to the Castle. His Grace complained of uneasiness about the chest and stomach; was then perfectly conscious, and answered questions put to him with correctness. Some medicine was ordered, and during its preparation His Grace took some tea and toast. Shortly after leaving the Castle, my father received another communication, stating that His Grace was much worse; he had had fits similar to those he was subject to. My father and I went directly, and found His Grace in bed, unconscious; eyes turned a little upwards, fixed; pupils of medium size; skin warm and moist; respiration very laborious, from accumulation of mucus in air tubes. Before our arrival his valet had applied a mustard poultice to his chest, as on a former occasion this had given relief.
  “Dr. M‘Arthur soon arrived, and Drs. Hume and Fergusson were telegraphed for.
  “Dr M‘Arthur advised a mustard emetic to be given, having prescribed one with advantage for the Duke several years ago under similar circumstances. This and other measures were now of no avail. His Grace became very restless, tried to turn on his left side; occasionally there were slight twitchings of the left arm. When raised in bed, his breathing was much more free, and this induced us to place him in an easy chair, when his respiration became much less embarrassed; his pulse sank, and His Grace was now placed more horizontally; the pulse rallied for a little time, and then gradually declined; the breathing became more feeble; and at twenty-five minutes past three o'clock p.m., His Grace breathed his last. So easy and gentle was the transition, that for the moment it was doubted. A mirror was held before His Grace's mouth; its brightness was undimmed, and he was no more.
      “JOHN WHITAKER HULKE.

In 1855, John volunteered his services during the Crimean War, and was for some time Assistant Surgeon to the British Civil Hospital at Smyrna. In the following year he was attached to the General Hospital before Sebastopol. At the conclusion of the war he returned to England, became a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1857, and in the same year was appointed Assistant Surgeon to the Royal London Ophthalmic Hospital, Moorfields. John was editor of the "Report on Surgery" section of A Year-Book of Medicine & Surgery -1859, and that same year he received the Jacksonian Prize for his essay published in 1861 under the title of A practical treatise on the use of the ophthalmoscope.

In 1862, John was appointed Assistant-Surgeon to the Middlesex Hospital, becoming full Surgeon to this hospital in 1870, and from 1879 to the time of his death he was Senior Surgeon. John retained his connection with the Moorfields Eye Hospital, becoming full Surgeon there, and, on his retirement, Consulting Surgeon. In 1883, John published A System of Surgery: Theoretical and Practical

John's long official connection with the Royal College of Surgeons began by his appointment to the Board of Examiners in 1880. This office he held for two periods, retiring finally in 1890. In 1881 he became a member of the Council of the College, was Vice-President in 1888, and again in 1891, and in the latter year delivered the Bradshaw Lecture. In 1893 he was elected President of the Royal College of Surgeons.

Hulke Ornithopsis 1880
An example of the palaeontological work of John Whitaker Hulke
Notes: In addition to his career as a surgeon, John was an enthusiastic amateur scientist, and collector and student of dinosaur fossils. He wrote over 50 palaeontological papers, of which 28 were devoted to dinosaurs. Many of these were published in the Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, between 1869 and 1887. In 1882, John was elected President of the Geological Society of London, and in 1887, the Society awarded him their highest honor, the Wollaston Medal. After his death, John's extensive fossil collection of over 387 vertebrate specimens was donated to the Natural History Museum in London.
As a palaeontologist in the second half of the 19th century, John Hulke became involved in the sometimes vitriolic debates on evolution. The proposed link between dinosaurs and birds (now no longer controversial) was at the time considered a significant proof point of Darwinism, and was widely debated. Hulke's work on an Iguanodon fossil showed it to be a pelvic bone, not a scapula as previously thought, and had clear similarity to the pelvic bones of birds. Hulke's open support of Professor Huxley, an agnostic who was leading the charge showing a dinosaur-bird link, was significant because of Hulke's Calvinistic religious beliefs. In Archetypes and Ancestors: Palaeontology in Victorian London, 1850-1875 p134 (University of Chicago Press, 1984), Adrian Desmond notes that:
Entering geology laterally, as it were, at the moment of Huxley's triumph, Hulke proved not only a competent morphologist but a formidable ally. Perhaps even a natural one, despite (or rather because of) his Calvinistic leaning; he was a man of "strict" views and "austerity that amounted to harshness". Of Dutch Reformed descent, he was deeply religious; The Lancet commented that "his Protestantism was of the intolerant kind", to the degree that his judgments sometimes "seemed unnecessarily severe". This perhaps complemented Huxley's equally harsh 'scientific Calvinism', which banished "special providences" and left a rigidly-determined universe. Certainly Hulke took an immediate liking to his agnostic counterpart and entered the palaeontological fray on Huxley's side against the Romantic and "liberal" Owen.

Death: 19 February 1895, at Old Burlington Street, Westminster, London, England, of broncho-pneumonia following influenza.

Buried: 23 February 1895, at the New Deal cemetery, Deal, Kent, England
British Medical Journal 2 March 1895 p493
FUNERAL OF THE LATE PRESIDENT OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS.
  At the funeral of Mr Hulke at Deal. on Saturday, the institutions with which he was connected were officially represented as follows:– The Royal College of Surgeons by Mr. Reginald Harrison and Mr Alfred Willett (Vice-Presidents), and Mr Sibert Cowell (Assistant Secretary); the Laboratories of the Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons by Dr. G. Sims Woodhead; the Middlesex Hospital by Dr. Kingston Fowler, Mr. Pearce Gould, Mr. G. H. Lock (Mr Hulke's house-surgeon), and Mr. C. J. Armson and Mr. S. E. Trench (representing the Hospital Medical School); the Clinical Society by Mr. John Langton and Dr. O. Holman; the Geological Society by Mr. R. Lydekker (Vice-President). Mr. Harrison also represented the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society. On arrival at Deal the body was met by Mr. F. B. Hulke, a nephew of the deceased. The other mourners included the Mayor, Town Clerk, and Rector of Deal; Mr. E. Willmott, Dr. S. Plumbe, Messrs. Lewis, Sydney, F. B., and Walter Hulke, Major Plumbe, Mr. G. Barnett, Dr. Spreate, and Mr. F. Leney. The service was conducted by the Rev. D. Bruce Payne, Vicar of St. George's, Deal. The coffin plate bore the inscription: “John Whitaker Hulke, F.R.S., born 6th Nov., 1830, died 19th February, 1895.” On the same day a memorial service was held at St. James's, Piccadilly, and was attended by representatives of the Royal College of Surgeons, the Royal College of Physicians, of the Middlesex Hospital, the Geological Society, and the British Museum, and by many members of the medical profession in London. In our notice of the life of Mr. Hulke published on February 23rd, we omitted to recall the fact that he was the President of the Ophthalmological Society from 1886 to 1889, and that he delivered the Bowman Lecture for 1890, the subject being Sir William Bowman's Work in Relation to Ophthalmology.

Obituaries:
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Vol LVIII from April 25th 1895 to June 20 1895 page xlix
JOHN WHITAKER HULKE was born in the year 1830, and died on Tuesday, the 19th of February, 1895. The immediate cause of his death was broncho-pneumonia following influenza, and apparently caused by a chill taken when attending, in the early morning, a serious case at the Middlesex Hospital. Mr. Hulke was the son of a well-known surgeon of Deal, in which town his family had resided for several generations, and where his mortal remains are now laid to rest. Mr. Hulke received his early education at a private boarding school, where it appears he was very unhappy, and he was therefore quite ready to appreciate the kindness which, notwithstanding the roughness of school life, he experienced at the Moravian College at Neuweid, where his education was continued from 1843 to 1845 ; it was here that he gained his intimate knowledge of the German language, and the groundwork of his acquaintance with natural history; here also, in the Eifel district, his interest in geology was first awakened.
   Returning to England, he studied at King's College School during 1846 and 1847, entering the medical department of that college in 1849, where for the following few years he underwent his medical training.
   In 1855 he was attached to the medical staff of the General Hospital in the Crimea, and in March of that year was doing duty in the English Hospital at Smyrna.  Here the medical officers appear to have had comparatively comfortable quarters, but often very few patients.  Some excitement was kept up by a band of brigands roaming the neighbourhood, and on one occasion, a doctor of the town, having been carried off by them in the hope of ransom, Mr. Hulke was among the first to start to the rescue.  In September he left Smyrna for the camp before Sebastopol in the hope of gaining more experience, and here, during the winter of 1855-56, owing to the severe climate and other causes, he had a very trying time, on more than one occasion narrowly escaping the shots of the Russians, but, as he himself has said, gaining in those few months years of experience.  Letters sent home to Deal at this time contain graphic accounts of his surroundings, but no word of complaint of the hardships undergone.
   On returning to England he became a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, and received the appointment of Assistant-Surgeon to the Royal Ophthalmic Hospital, Moorfields, in 1857.  His well-known and classical essay on 'Diseases of the Retina' was written soon afterwards, and was awarded the Jacksonian Prize of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1859.  Not long after this he published a treatise on the ophthalmoscope, an instrument in use in Germany, but at that time not known to English practitioners.  Besides other works relating to diseases of the eye, Mr. Hulke made many contributions to general surgery, which were published in the 'Medicochirurgical Transactions,' and elsewhere.
   In the year 1862 Mr. Hulke was appointed Surgeon to the Middlesex Hospital, and it was here that the chief of his life's work may be said to have been accomplished.  His skill as an operator became widely known, while the keen interest which he took in his patients, and his kindly sympathy with them were best appreciated by those who in their trouble and sickness were so fortunate as to be under his care.  He eventually became senior surgeon to this hospital, a post he retained until the time of his death.
   In 1876 he was appointed Examiner to the Royal College of Surgeons, and in 1880 became a member of the Court of Examiners; in 1881 he was elected a member of the Council, in 1888, a Vice-President, and in 1893 President, which latter position he held at the time of his death. In 1883 he was President of both the Pathological and Geological Societies.
   Mr. Hulke was admitted to the Fellowship of the Royal Society in 1867, his claim being based exclusively on researches relating to the anatomy and physiology of the retina in man and the lower animals, particularly the reptiles.  These were embodied in two papers in the 'Philosophical Transactions' ("On the Anatomy of the Fovea centralis of the Human Retina," and "On the Chameleon's Retina"), and in a paper on the "Retina of Amphibia and Reptiles," in the first volume of the 'Journal of Anatomy and Physiology.'  These are characterised by patient and conscientious minuteness in the working out and description of details and cautious reserve in drawing inferences. Probably the most important and permanently valuable of Mr. Hulke's researches was the one relating to the retina of the chameleon, which the abundant material at his disposal enabled him to elaborate in a more complete manner than had before been possible.
   In judging of the value of histological work done nearly a generation ago, it must be remembered that at that time the minute anatomist had to work alone.  Hulke was the first in this country to follow in the footsteps of Max Schultze and Heinrich Müller - the first to employ those, at that time, new methods of research which have rendered it possible to acquire that relatively perfect knowledge of the fine structure of the organs of special sense which we now possess.  If the work of Hulke and his contemporaries is unknown, as no doubt it is to the student of the present day, it is not because it was unimportant, but rather because the anatomical facts then made out for the first time with very imperfect means of investigation, have been presented to him in sharper outline by men who, after all, only built on the foundations laid by their predecessors.  Hulke very soon after he became a Fellow of the Royal Society transferred his allegiance to geology, between which and his profession as a consulting surgeon his energies were thenceforth to be divided.  Had he continued his anatomical studies he would without doubt have attained to the foremost rank among physiological anatomists.
   During the quarter of a century which followed his first contributions to geological science, Mr. Hulke found leisure to apply himself to research in this field, notwithstanding his constantly increasing practice. He did so to so good a purpose that he became a palæontologist of no ordinary merit.  His knowledge of comparative anatomy, and especially of osteology, enabled him rapidly to grasp the meaning of structures presented by the remains of fossil vertebrates ; and this, combined with a naturally keen perception and a rigid adherence to facts, soon caused his opinion on palæontological matters to be sought, and held in the highest estimation.
   It was the fossil Reptilia which more especially occupied Mr. Hulke's attention, and his numerous papers on their osteology are a monument to his industry.  Many of the fossils which  he described were, in part at least, freed from the matrix by his own facile chisel ; and in this mechanical work, as he himself has said, he often found relaxation when his mind was over-wrought by professional anxieties.
   Mr. Hulke's well-earned vacations were often spent at localities of geological interest, more especially with a view to working out the fossils which might be obtained.  For this purpose he paid many visits to Brook, in the Isle of Wight, from whence have come many specimens of Wealden Dinosauria ; near here also, at Brixton, was preserved the unique collection of these Wealden reptiles, made by the Rev. W. Fox.  For many years Mr. Hulke was the only palæontologist who had free access to this collection ; and he did much good work in bringing to light its hidden treasures, which otherwise remained almost unknown until after the death of their owner, when they were transferred to the British Museum.
   In the year 1868 Mr. Hulke was elected a Fellow of the Geological Society of London, and from that time onwards the pages of the Quarterly Journal of that Society were frequently enriched by his writings.  No fewer than six of his papers were published in the two volumes which followed the year of his election, and these with one exception were descriptions of Saurian remains from the Kimmeridge clay of Dorset.  Several other papers on reptiles from the same locality appeared in subsequent volumes ; and many contributions to the osteology of this interesting group of reptiles have appeared in the 'Quarterly Journal' of the Geological Society, and in the 'Philosophical Transactions' of the Royal Society.
   Our first knowledge of the cranium of Iguanodon was due to Mr. Hulke's work upon a specimen from the Isle of Wight, which did not include facial bones, and the affinities of which it was by no means easy to determine.
   In 1873 and 1874 he made additions to our knowledge of the small Wealden Dinosaur, which had been named by Professor Huxley Hypsilophodon Foxii ; and in 1882 a still more important memoir on the same species was published in the 'Philosophical Transactions.'
   In 1874 and 1876 Mr. Hulke showed that a certain bone of Iguanodon which had been regarded as a scapula, was really  a part of the pelvis ; and, indeed, it proved to be the remarkable pubis of that reptile, which so nearly resembles that of a bird.
   In 1879 the two genera, Poikilopleuron and Megalosaurus, were shown by Hr. Hulke to be one and the same Dinosaurian genus.  In the same year he described the remains of a new Wealden Dinosaur under the name of Vectisaurus Valdensis ; and in 1880 he made known one of the most perfect Iguanodons discovered in this country which had been found in the Kimmeridge clay of Cumnor ; this was named Iguanodon Prestwichii.
   In the following year there appeared in the 'Philosophical Transactions' Mr. Hulke's memoir on Polocanthus Foxii.  This remarkable Dinosaur, the name for which had been suggested by Sir R. Owen, has a large dermal shield spread out above the iliac bones in such a way as to form a kind of carapace over the lumbar and sacral regions ; besides this, large spines and scutes were attached to other parts of the body.
   Mr. Hulke's presidential addresses to the Geological Society, 1883-4, formed an important contribution to our knowledge of reptilian osteology, and especially threw light on the structure of the shoulder girdle in Plesiosaurs and their allies.
   The Iguanodont remains found in England have been more or less fragmentary, and discoveries made by other workers helping to elucidate their structures were hailed by Hr. Hulke with satisfaction ; no one more heartily rejoiced than he did when the rich treasures of the Belgian Wealden rocks were brought to light by the geologists of that country, and they made the discovery of the series of magnificently perfect Iguanodon skeletons, several of which now adorn the Museum of Natural History at Brussels.
   Mr. Hulke was for many years on the Council of the Geological Society , and the high esteem in which he was held by the leading geologists of the day, as well as their thorough appreciation of his palæontological work, found expression by their electing him, in 1882, to fill the Presidential chair of the Society, and, in 1887, by their presenting him with the Wollaston Gold Medal, the greatest honours it was in their power to bestow.  In 1891 he was elected Foreign Secretary of the Geological Society, which office he still held at the time of his decease.
   Beloved and respected by all who knew him, Mr. Huke will long be lamented as a Christian gentleman.
J. B. S
E.T.N

British Medical Journal 23 February 1895 p451
      OBITUARY.
    JOHN WHITAKER HULKE, F.R.S.,
   President of the Royal College of Surgeons of England:
    Senior Surgeon to the Middlesex Hospital.
I
T seems but the other day that the profession of medicine in this country had to sorrow with the College of Physicians in the unexpected demise of its President, and now we have to express profound regret that a similar calamity has befallen the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Mr. Hulke, though he never, at least for many years past, presented the appearance of one endowed with a robust physical constitution, was yet until the other day apparently in the enjoyment of excellent health, and there seemed every reason to suppose that he had still many years of useful and honourable work before him. There can be no doubt that he has fallen a victim to the unreserved manner in which he devoted himself to the duties of the many honourable offices which had accumulated upon him, and to his unflinching determination to carry out these duties at whatever cost to himself.
  Mr Hulke attended a meeting of the Clinical Society, of which he was President, on February 8th; and we understand that during the bitter cold of that night, or rather in the early hours of Saturday morning, he obeyed an urgent summons to attend a case of strangulated hernia at the Middlesex Hospital, to which he was senior surgeon. Shortly afterwards he was seized with symptoms of influenza, which was followed by broncho-pneumonia, and in spite of the unremitting attention of his colleagues, Dr. Douglas Powell and Dr. Kingston Fowler, he succumbed to this insidious disease at noon on February 19th. The incident is made the more pathetic by the fact that his lifelong companion and fellow worker, Mrs. Hulke, was at the same time suffering from a dangerous attack of influenza.
  John Whitaker Hulke was born in 1830, and was the elder son of a highly esteemed surgeon at Deal, where the family had been resident for many generations. His ancestors, who bore originally the name of Hulcher, had left their native Low Countries during the persecutions of the Duke of Alva in the sixteenth century, and their descendant probably owed to his sturdy Puritan ancestors certain traits conspicuous in his character. The father attended the great Duke of Wellington during his last illness in September, 1852, and Mr Hulke was associated with his father in the treatment of this illustrious patient, and was present at his death. The late President of the College of Surgeons was educated at King's College School, and before becoming a medical student spent two years in Germany. He entered the medical school of King's College in 1849, and was dresser to the late Sir William Bowman, House Surgeon to Sir William Fergusson, and subsequently became Medical Tutor in succession to the late Dr. Brinton.     But though this last office was the more honourable, we believe that we are justified in saying that his most important service to the College was the manner in which be discharged the duties of Chairman of the Joint Committee of the two Royal Colleges charged with the management of the Laboratories on the Embankment. He was a member of this Committee at its first appointment in 1889, and was immediately elected its Chairman—an office which he held at the time of his death. His interest in the work carried on there was never-failing, and it may safely be said that in his capacity of Chairman be rendered most valuable services to the laboratories and the Colleges. He showed great tact in dealing with knotty questions arising from time to time in connection with the carrying on of the work in the laboratories; and his sound common sense, directness of purpose, and strict integrity, impressed all with whom he came in contact, in this capacity, in a most remarkable manner. His last official work in connection with the laboratories was to make arrangements for the co-operation of the Colleges with the Metropolitan Asylums Board in carrying on an extensive investigation into the causation of diphtheria, and in providing the hospitals under the Board with antitoxic serum for the treatment of this disease.
  As an examiner, Mr. Hulke had the reputation of being scrupulously fair and painstaking; he was free from “fads” and although considered somewhat severe by the candidates he was known by his colleagues to be only what an examiner should be—thoroughly searching and absolutely impartial. Students found it impossible to evade his questions, which were well pushed home until it was clear that the student knew his subject or did not. When elected a member of the Council of the College, as those who knew him anticipated, Mr. Hulke from the very first showed himself possessed of distinctly conservative tendencies. He had no sympathy with the movement set on foot by those Fellows and Members who desired to take part in the government of the College, and he opposed most strenuously the proposal that was made in the year 1884 to delegate to the Fellows the election of the President on the nomination of the Council. He always upheld the powers of the Council, and maintained the view that, as the Council was responsible for the good government of the College, so it should take upon itself full responsibility of action without seeking the advice of the Fellows and Members on the various Collegiate questions as they arose. Mr. Hulke was re-elected to the Council in 1889. He was greatly interested in the development of the museum, and it may safely be said that no member of the Council was more intimately acquainted with the work done there, or with the immense value of the additions made to the various collections by the late and present conservators—Sir William Flower and Professor Stewart—for whose abiilities he had the highest admiration; whilst he himself, as a member of the Museum Committee, was constantly endeavouring to add to the usefulness of the collection.
  His time was always at the disposal of the College, and, whilst he often appeared to be taking little part in the various questions under discussion, the weight of his opinion was always thrown in the balance, and on many occasions, as those who have sat on committees with him well know, his quietly expressed opinion has been the turning point in the discussion, and was always for the elevation of the College both as a scientific and as an examining body. As a member of the Committee of Management Mr. Hulke brought a long and useful experience to bar on the educational matters concerning the College, and his loss on this Committee will be severely felt. He was also one of the delegates representing the Royal College of Surgeons before the Gresham University Commission. In 1888 and again in 1891 Mr. Hulke held the office of Vice-President of the College, and in the latter year he delivered the Bradshaw Lecture.
  During his tenure of office as President of the College, he showed himself to be gifted with excellent business capacities, and has been looked upon as a “strong” man. Though holding very decided opinions he has gained the respect of those who in policy were bitterly opposed to him.
  Mr. Hulke was a man of somewhat complex character not easily to be summed up in a few words. He was esteemed most by those who knew him best, but even those who sometimes considered that his decided and openly expressed opinions bordered perhaps on prejudice, always felt constrained to respect the integrity and directness of purpose which characterised his words and actions.
  Punctilious and precise himself in all business matters—it is stated that he never failed to attend every meeting of every subcommittee of the Council of the College of Surgeons of which he was a member—he was disposed to expect a similar exactitude in others. There was a certain austerity in his address and in his manner of expressing his judgment on matters of business and sometimes also on those with whose opinions he was in conflict At the same time there was another side to his character not difficult to discover, and all those who were brought into social relation with him quickly found that under this austere manner was concealed a fund of geniality and of kindly humour, not spontaneous, perhaps, but easily elicited. He was a man of wide reading and considerable linguistic acquirements, and he kept himself well acquainted with foreign publications on those departments of science in which he was interested. As a clinical teacher he worked rather by demonstration and questioning than by didactic teaching. He insisted upon thorough, painstaking, and intelligent examination, and sought to train the students not only to an accurate observation of the phenomena of disease but to reason from them for themselves.
  In 1883 Mr. Hulke succeeded Dr. Samuel Wilks as President of the Pathological Society, and it is a curious proof of the eminence which he had attained in two departments of science that he was at the same time also President of the Geological Society. In 1893 he became President of the Clinical Society of London, of which he was an original member, and, as has been already said, one of his last public acts was to reside over a meeting of that Society. He was to have delivered the Hunterian Oration before the Royal College of Surgeons on February 14th, and the oration, which appears in another column, has been printed from the manuscript, probably the last to which he put his hand, which he had prepared for this occasion. When the day for the Hunterian festival came round, the hand of death had already been laid upon the orator, and a pathetic interest thus attaches to the eulogium which he had intended to pronounce upon Hunter.
  Though Mr. Hulke can hardly be described as a voluminous writer, a large number of papers were contributed by him to the Transactions of various societies, especially to those of the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society; and he frequently intervened with effect in the discussions at the medical societies in London. His earlier contributions to literature were mainly on the subject of the minute anatomy of the eye, and the anatomy of the retina of amphibia and reptiles was the topic of his first paper in the Proceedings of the Royal Society. His first contribution to palæontology was published in the Geological Society's quarterly journal in 1869, and thereafter follows, in the Royal Society's Catalogue of Scientific Papers, a long list of papers on saurians, reptilian fossils, ichthyosaurian remains, the two latest important contributions being descriptions of Iguanodon prestwichii (a new species from the clay at Kimmeridge Bay, Dorset (1880)) and of Polacanthus foxi (a large undescribed dinosaur from the Wealden formation in the Isle of Wight).
  We are indebted to Mr Timothy Holmes for the following estimate of Mr Hulke's work as a surgeon:—
  “It is difficult at the present moment, when our minds are full of the feelings of personal loss for one who had so many claims on the gratitude and love of his friends, to form a cool, unbiassed judgment of the surgical work of the late President of the College of Surgeons.
  “Mr. Hulke, in surgery as in all that he attempted, was more studious of thoroughness and efficiency than of originality or effect. His mind was eminently conservative, and averse to change for its own sake. He was, besides, deeply read in the surgical literature of our own and other countries, especially Germany, and had the most profound veneration for the doctrines inculcated by the great authors who have passed away. Nevertheless, his practical sagacity led him to investigate every proposal for the advancement of surgical treatment with a genuine desire for improvement with which no prejudice was allowed to interfere; and those who were privileged to attend his practice know that he was always eager to test any new proposal which seemed to justify its adoption by proved success, or even trustworthy reasoning. He was not a voluminous author. His contributions to general surgery are mainly to be found in the System of Surgery, of the third edition of which he was joint editor; and those who will read the articles in that work on Tetanus, on Injuries of the Head and of the Upper Extremity, and on Ophthalmic Surgery will be able to estimate the essentially practical character of the man, how ample his own experience had been, and how successfully daring he could be in grave emergencies; and yet how modestly he consented to revive the labours of other men. To the medical societies he was an unwearied and most fertile contributor; few men of his standing were more punctual at the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society, or had contributed more to its Transactions. He had served the Society in the honourable and laborious office of Librarian for many years, and its Council will suffer a loss from his death which they will find it difficult indeed to supply. He had served the office of President of the Pathological Society, and was actually President of the Clinical Society at the time of his death. His contributions to the journals were not numerous, but they were valuable.
  “He had filled the great office of President of the College of Surgeons for nearly two years, and although his management of the College was on lines mere Conservative than those advocated in this J
OURNAL: though he was averse from changes which seem necessary to some, he conducted his opposition in the spirit of a high-minded gentleman, not afraid to state his opinion and not unable to defend it with vigour, but sure to make himself respected and to respect the liberty of opinion of his opponents.
  “If it be true that the cause of his death was exposure to cold on one of the bitter nights we have lately experienced, while attending a call to the hospital, it is an appropriate ending to a life devoted to active surgical pursuits. Though he was far from being a man of strong constitution Hulke was the last man in the world to spare himself or to neglect any call of duty from personal considerations, and many of his friends can testify to the zeal with which he placed his ripe experience and knowledge at the service of those in distress.
  “Such, in a few words, was the late President—emphatically a good surgeon, a man of ripe and safe judgment; who shrank from no danger and no emergency, who might possibly have taken a still higher position in the future if he had been more careful to keep his great qualities before the eyes of the public; but who thought more of the interests of his patients and of his art than of his own; who was satisfied to do his duty; and of whom more than of most it could be said that he used his talent ‘as ever in his great Taskmaster’s eye.’”
  We are indebted to Mr. Arthur Smith Woodward, Assistant Keeper in the Department of Geology of the British Museum, for the following estimate of Mr. Hulke's services to geology:
  “Mr. Hulke was elected a Fellow of the Geological Society in 1868, becoming President in 1882-83, 1883-84. He received the Wollaston Medal in 1887. His address in 1883 dealt with the shoulder-girdle of extinct marine reptiles (Ichthyosauria and Plesiosauria); that in 1884 referred especially to recent researches on the Dinosaur Iguanodon by Dolio, of Brussels. He began to study fossil vertebrata in the collection made by Mr. Mansel (now Mansel Pleydell), of Blandford, Dorset, in the Kimmeridge clay of the Dorset cliffs. The specimens were later presented by Mr Mansel Pleydell to the British Museum. Papers by Mr. Hulke on The Humerus of a Gigantic Land Reptile, Two New Species of Marine Crocodiles, a Plesiosaurian and an Ichthyosaurian Reptile, from this collection, were read before the Geological Society, and published in its journal 1869-71.
  “In 1871 he was attracted by the collection of the Rev. William Fox (now in the British Museum) to study the Wealden reptiles of the cliffs of Brook and neighbourhood, Isle of Wight. He began to collect these himself, and found many valuable specimens, which are now in his own little museum. A new species of Iguanodon (I. seelyi) was dug out by him in 1870, and described before the Geological Society in 1882. Four short papers on the bones of another gigantic land reptile from Brook (Ornithopsis eucamerotus) were also published by the Geological Society later. But Mr. Hulke's most important memoir was his ‘attempt at a complete ostcology’ of the small Wealden dinosaur, Hypsilophodon foxi, published in Phil. Trans., 1883. Another valuable memoir was that on Polaranthus foxi in the Phil. Trans., 1882, a remarkable Dinosaur from Brook, completely covered with armour in the hip region. Other small notes on the pectoral arch and maxilla of Iguanodon appeared in the Journal of the Geological Society so recently as 1885-86.
  “In 1880 he described an imperfect skeleton of another new Dinosaur—Iguanodon prestwichi—obtained by Professor Prestwich from Kimmeridge clay, of Cumnor, Oxford.
  “In 1887 he began to study the collection of fossil reptiles made by Messrs. C. E. and A. N. Leeds, of Eyebury, in the Oxford clay of Peterborough (now in the British Museum). He described the evidence of two new Dinosaurian reptiles—Ornithopsis leedsi and Omosaurus durobrivensis. He afterwards contributed to the Proceedings of the Zoological Society an important paper on the Osteology of Mesozoic Crocodiles based on the same collection. His latest paper was of a controversial nature, on the Shoulder Girdle of the Extinct Marine Reptiles, Ichthyosauria and Plesiosauria; it was read before the Royal Society in May, 1892.
  “
To sum up, Mr. Hulke made most substantial contributions to our knowledge of the great extinct land reptiles (Dinosauria) of the Secondary Period, especially remarkable because all his investigations were carried out in the leisure of a busy professional career.”
  Mr J. W. Hulke was elected a member of the Committee of the Indigent Blind Visiting Society in May, 1867, and was up to the time of his death a most active member of that Committee. He, with the late Dr. Armitage, did a great deal to make the condition of the blind better than it was thirty years ago; their condition of living was gone into thoroughly, classes were formed to instruct them, and everything that two experts like Dr. Armitage and Mr. Hulke could suggest was as far as possible carried out. Mr. Hulke was for about twenty-five years examining surgeon to the Society, and examined and certified to every case that was brought before the Committee until three years ago, when his honorary office was shared by Mr. A. Q. Silcock.
  A special meeting of the Council of the Clinical Society was held on February 20th, when the following resolution was unanimously adopted and directed to be transmitted to Mrs. Hulke:—
  The Council of the Clinical Society of London has learnt with deep regret of the death of the President of the Society, John Whitaker Hulke, F.R.S., one of its original members, among its most earnest supporters, a highly-gifted and very learned surgeon, who has filled the office of President with his wonted punctuality, urbanity, and zeal. The Council begs to offer its heartfelt and regretful sympathy to Mrs. Hulke in her great sorrow.
The Council resolved also that the next meeting of the Clinical Society, which was to be held on February 22nd, should be postponed until March 1st, as a sign of respect to the deceased President.
  The funeral will take place at Deal on Saturday, February 23rd. Those who wish to attend the ceremony should travel by a train at 10 A.M. from Victoria (L.C. & D.R.). A memorial service will be held at 1 P.M. on the same day at St James’s, Piccadilly.

The Annual Register - A Review of Public Events at Home and Abroad for the Year 1895 edited by Edmund Burke (Longmans, Green and Co., 1896):
Obituary:
On the 19th, at Old Burlington Street, W., aged 64, John Whitaker Hulke, F.R.S., President of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, eldest son of a surgeon at Deal, who attended the first Duke of Wellington in his last illness. Educated at King's College School, London, and in Germany; entered Medical School of King's College, 1849; appointed Surgeon to British Hospital at Smyrna, 1855; F.R.C.S., 1857; Assistan Surgeon, King's College Hospital, 1857; Moorfields Eye Hospital, 1858; Middlesex Hospital, 1859; Senior Surgeon, 1866; Vice-President of the College of Surgeons, 1884; President, 1893. Married, 1858.


Will:
London Standard 27 April 1895 p7
Mr. John Whitaker Hulke, of 10, Old Burlington-street, surgeon, President of the Royal College of Surgeons, who died on the 19th of February last, aged sixty-four years, leaving personalty of which the gross value has been entered for probate at 8018l., appointed as sole executrix his wife, Mrs. Julia Grace Hulke, and devised and bequeathed to her all his real and personal estate, but in the event of her death in his lifetime, the testator bequeathed the portraits of his father, his grandfather, and his great grandmother to his nephew, Frederick, and his collection of reptilian fossils to the British Museum, and all the residue of his property to the Middlesex Hospital, for a convalescent branch, to be called the Hulke Convalescent Home.

Census & Addresses:
1841: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
1851: John W. Hulke, lodger, is aged 20, born in Deal, Kent
1856-7: Deal, Kent   (Kent Register of Electors)
1857-8: Deal, Kent   (Kent Register of Electors)
1861: St James Westminster, Middlesex: John W. Hulke, head, is aged 30, born in Deal, Kent
1871: St James Westminster, Middlesex
1881: 10 Old Burlington Street, St James Westminster, Middlesex
1890: 10 Old Burlington Street, St James Westminster, London   (London Register of Electors)
1891: St James Westminster, London: John Whitaker Hucke, head, is aged 60, born in Deal, Kent
1893: 10 Old Burlington Street, St James Westminster, London   (London Register of Electors)
1894: 10 Old Burlington Street, St James Westminster, London   (London Register of Electors)
1895: 10 Old Burlington Street, St James Westminster, London   (London Register of Electors)

Sources:

Judith Hulke

Birth: 1634

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Ellen (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Julius Hulke

Birth: 1729

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Warren) Hulke

Sources:

Lewis Iggulden Backhouse Hulke

Lewis Iggulden Backhouse Hulke
Lewis Iggulden Backhouse Hulke
image from Georgia Coleridge
Louie Helena Mary (Treanor) Hulke and her daughter Charlotte Anita Hulke
Louie Helena Mary (Treanor) Hulke and her daughter Charlotte Anita Hulke
photograph by Lambert Weston, Folkestone, supplied by Georgia Coleridge
Birth: 1867, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptised: 10 May 1867, in St Andrews, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Education: King's School, Canterbury, Kent, and Royal Military College

Married: Louie Helena Mary Treanor, in 1895, in Eastry district, Kent, England

Louie was born in 1870 in Torquay, Devonshire, the daughter of Thomas Stanley Treanor and Ann Maria Sillitoe. She died on 6 April 1953, in Dover district, Kent, England, aged 82.
Census & Addresses:
1881: Deal, Kent
1891: Southlands Terrace, Deal, Kent
1953: "Caldbeck", Warwick Road, Walmer, Kent   (London Gazette 1 May 1953 p2457)

Children: Occupation: Army Officer, serving in The Buffs (East Kent regiment), reaching the rank of lieutenant-colonel.
Gentleman Cadet Lewis Igguldon Backhouse Hulke, from the Royal Military College, was commissioned second lieutenant in the York and Lancaster regiment on 14 September 1887 (London Gazette 13 September 1887 p4945) but transferred almost immediately to The Buffs (East Kent regiment) on 28 September 1887 (London Gazette 27 September 1887 p5265, with a name correction in London Gazette 4 October 1887 p5378), and shipped to join his battalion in India, arriving in Bombay from Portsmouth on the troopship Malabar on 21 March 1888 (Times of India 22 March 1888). Later in 1888 he was recorded in the Buff's 1st Battalion, stationed in Ranikhet (The India Office and Burma Office List 1888 p251a) but by 1899, the 1st battalion had moved in Dum Dum, Bengal (Hart's Annual Army List 1889 p237). Lewis was promoted to lieutenant on 11 Jul 1890 (London Gazette 9 September 1890 p4875). In 1891 the 1st battalion was still stationed in Dum Dum (Hart's Annual Army List 1891 p237) and in 1895 the 1st battalion was stationed in Jullander, Bengal (Hart's Annual Army List 1895 p236), and in 1896-7 stationed in Peshawur, Punjab (Hart's Annual Army List 1896 p237, Hart's Annual Army List 1897 p224). In 1898 the battalion was part of the Malakand Field Force (Hart's Annual Army List 1898 p229). Lewis was promoted to captain on 26 March 1897 (London Gazette 30 April 1897 p2368) and wounded in action on 27 September 1897, participating in the Malakland Field Force - "Captain L. I. B. Hulke, 1st Battalion East Kent Regiment (The Buffs), slight, gunshot." (London Gazette 11 January 1898 p157). The action in which Lewis was wounded is described by Winston Churchill, then a war reporter:
The Story of the Malakand Field Force p212-7 (Winston L. Spencer Churchill, 1901)
  The village of Zagai stands in a similar situation to that of Domodoloh. On either side long spurs advance into the valley, and the houses are built in terraces on the sides of the hollow so formed. Great chenar trees growing in all their luxuriant beauty out of the rocky ground by the water-course mark the hillside with a patch of green in contrast to the background of sombre brown. As the troops approached in fine array, the sound of incessant drumming was faintly heard, varied from time to time by the notes of a bugle. The cavalry reconnoitred and trotted off to watch the flank, after reporting the place strongly occupied. The enemy displayed standards on the crests of the spurs. The advance continued: the Guides on the left, the 38th Dogras in the centre, the Buffs on the right, and the 35th Sikhs in reserve. Firing began on the left at about nine o’clock, and a quarter of an hour later the guns came into action near the centre. The Guides and Buffs now climbed the ridges to the right and left. The enemy fell back according to their custom, “sniping”. Then the 38th pushed forward and occupied the village, which was handed over to the sappers to destroy. This they did most thoroughly, and at eleven o’clock a dense white smoke was rising from the houses and the stacks of bhoosa. Then the troops were ordered to withdraw. “Facilis ascensus Averni sed ...;” without allowing the quotation to lead me into difficulties, I will explain that while it is usually easy to advance against an Asiatic, all retirements are matters of danger. While the village was being destroyed, the enemy had been collecting. Their figures could be distinguished on the top of the mountain—a numerous line of dark dots against the sky ; others had tried to come, from the adjoining valleys on the left and right. Those on the right succeeded, and the Buffs were soon sharply engaged. On the left the cavalry again demonstrated the power of their arm. A large force of tribesmen, numbering at least 600 men, endeavoured to reach the scene of action. To get there, however, they had to cross the open ground, and this, in face of the Lancers, they would not do. Many of these same tribesmen had joined in the attack on the Malakand, and had been chased all across the plain of Khàr by the fierce Indian horsemen. They were not ambitious to repeat the experience. Every time they tried to cross the space, which separated them from their friends, Captain Cole trotted forward with his squadron, which was only about fifty strong, and the tribesmen immediately scurried back to the hills. For a long time they were delayed, and contented themselves by howling out to the sowars, that they would soon “make mincemeat of them,” to which the latter replied that they were welcome to try. At length, realising that they could not escape the cavalry, if they left the hills, they made a long circuit and arrived about half an hour after the village was destroyed and the troops had departed.
  Nevertheless, as soon as the retirement was seen to be in progress, a general attack was made all along the line. On the left, the Guides were threatened by a force of about 500 men, who advanced displaying standards, and waving swords. They dispersed these and drove them away by a steady long-range fire killing and wounding a large number. On the right, the Buffs were harassed by being commanded by another spur. Lieutenant Hasler’s company, which I accompanied, was protected from this flanking fire by the ground. A great many bullets, however, hummed overhead, and being anxious to see whence these were coming, the lieutenant walked across the crest to the far side. The half-company here was briskly engaged. From a point high up the mountain an accurate fire was directed upon them. We tried to get the range of this point with the Lee-Metford rifles. It was, as nearly as could be determined, 1400 yards. The tribesmen were only armed with Martini-Henrys. They nevertheless made excellent practice. Lieutenant R. E. Power was shot through the arm and, almost immediately afterwards, Lieutenant Keene was severely wounded in the body. Luckily the bullet struck his sword-hilt first or he would have been killed. Two or three men were also wounded here. Those, who know the range and power of the Martini-Henry rifle, will appreciate the skill and marksmanship, which can inflict loss even at so great a range.
  As the retirement proceeded, the tribesmen came to closer quarters. The Buffs, however, used their formidable weapon with great effect. I witnessed one striking demonstration of its power. Lieutenant F. S. Reeves remained behind with a dozen men to cover the withdrawal of his company, and in hopes of bringing effective fire to bear on the enemy, who at this time were pressing forward boldly. Three hundred yards away was a nullah, and along this, they began running, in hopes of cutting off the small party. At one point, however, the line of their advance was commanded by our fire. Presently a man ran into the open. The section fired immediately. The great advantage of the rifle was that there was no difficulty about guessing the exact range, as the fixed sight could be used. The man dropped—a spot of white. Four others rushed forward. Again there was a volley. All four fell and remained motionless. After this we made good our retreat almost unmolested.
  As soon as the troops were clear of the hills, the enemy occupied the rocks and ridges, and fired at the retreating soldiers. The Buff’s line of retirement lay over smooth, open ground. For ten minutes the fire was hot. Another officer¹ and seven or eight men dropped. The ground was wet and deep, and the bullets cutting into the soft mud, made strange and curious noises. As soon as the troops got out of range, the firing ceased, as the tribesmen did not dare follow into the open.
  On the extreme left, considerable bodies of the enemy appeared, and for a moment it seemed, that they would leave the hills, and come into the plain. The cavalry, however, trotted forward, and they ran back in confusion, bunching together as they did so. The battery immediately exploded two shrapnel shells in their midst with great effect. This ended the affair, and the troops returned to camp. The casualties were as follows:—
          BRITISH OFFICERS.
Wounded severely—2nd Lieutenant G. N. S. Keene.
        „      slightly—Captain L. I. B. Hulke.
        „           „    Lieutenant R. E. Power.
           BRITISH SOLDIERS.
                Killed         Wounded
Buffs           1                  10
            (Died of wounds)
NATIVE RANKS.
                                   Wounded
38th Dogras                       2
            Total casualties, 16    

¹ Since three officers are named as wounded in this action, and the woundings of Power and Keene are specified earlier, I conclude that this officer was likely Captain Hulke.

Hart's Annual Army List 1899 p230a
Captain Hulke served with the Zhob Valley Expedition in 1890. Served in the campaign on the North West Frontier of India under Sir William Lockhart in 1897-98 with the 1st Battalion the Buffs with the Malakand Field Force including the operations in Bajour and the Mohmand country, and with the Utman Khel Column of the Malakand Field Force - wounded (Clasp).

In 1899 the 1st battalion was stationed in Kamptee, Bombay presidency, (Hart's Annual Army List 1899 p229). On 7 March 1902 Lewis was seconded for service as an adjutant of Indian Volunteers (London Gazette 20 June 1902 p4051). He was promoted to major on 23 June 1906 (London Gazette 22 June 1906 p4305), and then to lieutenant-colonel on 7 February 1915 (London Gazette 16 March 1915 p2706). Lewis was appointed to temporary command of the Special Reserve Battalion of the Yorkshire Light Infantry on 18 January 1917 (London Gazette 26 January 1917 p962). He was "brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for distinguished services rendered in connection with the War" on 25 January 1919  (London Gazette 23 January 1917 p944), and on 7 February 1919 we see him, now sporting the C.M.G. appellation, moved from command of his battalion to the half-pay list (London Gazette 5 December 1919 p15170) and immediately back again to continue in command of the 3rd Yorkshire Light Infantry Special Reserves (London Gazette 5 December 1919 p15171), then back to the half-pay list on 30 September 1919 (London Gazette 16 December 1919 p15714). Lewis retired on 1 July 1920 (London Gazette 29 June 1920 p7079) and on 11 March 1922 he ceased to belong to the Reserve of Officers, having attained the age limit of liability to recall (London Gazette 10 March 1922 p2129).

Notes: Major L. I. B. Hulke, of The Buffs is recorded arriving in Singapore on the steamer Atsuta Maru on 6 March 1912 (The Straits Times 12 March 1912 p8).

Death: 1925,  in Eastry district, Kent, England Census:
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: Kings School, Canterbury, Kent

Sources:

Louisa Burton (Hulke) Plumbe

Louisa Burton (Hulke) Plumbe
Louisa Burton (Hulke) Plumbe
image from Claire Freestone
Birth: 3 October 1826, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 1 November 1826, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Married: Samuel Alderson Plumbe on 30 September 1852, in St. Andrew's, Deal, Kent, England
Samuel Alderson Plumbe is recorded as a physician, a bachelor, resident in London, the son of Samuel Plumbe, surgeon. Louisa Burton Hulke is recorded as a spinster, resident in Deal, the daughter of William Hulke, surgeon. The marriage was witnessed by Henry Plumbe, Margaret Thomson, J. W. Hulke and Emma Plumbe.
Observer 4 October 1852 p8
MARRIED.—
30th, at St Andrew's Church, Deal, Samuel Alderson Plumbe, M. D., Maidenhead, Berks, eldest son of the late Samuel Plumbe, Esq., Southampton-street, Bloomsbury, to Louisa Burton, second daughter of William Hulke, Esq., Deal, Kent


Morning Chronicle 4 October 1852 p8
     MARRIED.
On the 30th ult., at Deal, Samuel Alderson Plumbe, M. D., surgeon, of Maidenhead, Berks, to Louisa Burton, second daughter of William Hulke, Esq., surgeon, of Deal, Kent.


Children:
Death: 7 June 1900, at Monkendons, High Street, Maidenhead, Berkshire, England, aged 73
The Slough, Eton and Windsor Observer, 16 June 1900 p8 column 6
DEATHS.
PLUMBE. - On the 7th inst., at Monkendons, Maidenhead, Louisa Burton, widow of the late Samuel Alderson Plumbe, M.D., aged 73.


Buried: Cookham Dean, Berkshire, England

Will:
This is the last Will and Testament of me Louisa Burton Plumbe of Monkendons Maidenhead in the County of Berks Widow. I appoint my Sons Samuel Thomson Plumbe and Philip Algernon Plumbe to be the Executors and Trustees of this my Will I give all my wearing apparel jewellery and trinkets unto my daughters in equal shares. I devise and bequeath all my property and effects not hereby otherwise disposed of unto my Trustees Upon trust that they shall at their discretion sell call in and convert into money the same or such part thereof that shall not consist of money and shall out of the proceeds thereof and out of my ready money pay my funeral and testamentary expenses and debts and after such payments shall divide the same equally amongst all my children. Provided always that if any child of mine shall die in my lifetime leaving a child or children who shall survive me and being a son or sons shall attain the age of twenty one years or being a daughter or daughters shall attain that age or marry under that age then and in every such case the last mentioned child or children shall take (and if more than one equally between them) the share which his her or their parent would have taken of and in the residuary trust funds if such parent had survived me. And I declare that the signature of any of my daughters shall alone be a sufficient discharge for any money that may be paid them In witness whereof I have set my hand to this my Will the Twenty eighth day of August one thousand eight hundred and ninety one.
Signed by the said Louisa Burton Plumbe as her last Will in the presence of us both being present at the same time who in her presence and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses.
Louisa B. Plumbe
William Weed, Solicitor, Maidenhead.
William Nelson Lee, his Clerk.

On the Seventeenth day of August 1900, Probate of this Will was granted at Oxford to Samuel Thomson Plumbe and Philip Algernon Plumbe, the Sons, the Executors.


Probate:
from Probate records in Somerset House, London 1900
PLUMBE Louisa Burton of "Monkendons" High Street Maidenhead Berkshire Widow died 7 June 1900 Probate Oxford 17 August to Samuel Thomson Plumbe M.D. and Philip Algernon Plumbe bank-clerk Effects of £2641 18s 7d.

Census:
1841: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
1851: Farrier Street, Deal, Kent
1861: Cookham, Berkshire: Louisa B. Plumbe, wife, is aged 34, born in Deal , Kent
1871: Maidenhead, Berkshire
1881: High Street, Cookham, Berkshire
1891: 86-90 High Street, Cookham, Berkshire

Sources:

Lucy Hulke

Birth: 1708

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Anne (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Mabel Backhouse (Hulke) Barker

Birth: 31 January 1869, at Admiralty House, Deal, Kent, England
Medical Times and Gazette 6 February 1869 p157
    BIRTHS.
HULKE.—On January 31, at Admiralty House, Deal, the wife of Dr. Fred. Thos. Hulke, of a daughter.

Baptism: 21 April 1869, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Married: John Collier Barker in 1894, in Kensington district, London, England

John was born in 1862, in Hoby, Leicestershire and baptised in Hoby on 1 August 1862, the son of John Collier Barker and Sarah Lydia Payne. He was educated at Tonbridge school in Kent.
The register of Tonbridge School, from 1820 to 1886 p183 (November 1886)
BARKER, John Collier. 1877-80 Eldest son of the Rev. John Collier Barker. b. 1863. Mem. Roy. Coll. Surg. Author of  “Adventures of a Cutter Yacht in the Channel” and “A Short Description of Diseases of Arteries and Aneurisms.”

John was a medical practitioner, although in the 1891 census he is listed as a "physician surgeon not practicing".
Census:
1871: Hinckley, Leicestershire
1881: Bitton Road, Bitton, Gloucestershire
1891: Holland Road, Kensington, London - John is a visitor in the home of his future wife and mother-in-law.
1901: Clarendon Road, Watford Urban, Hertfordshire
1911: Watford Urban, Hertfordshire: John Collier Barker is aged 48, born in Hoby, Yorkshire

Children: Death: 1956, in Watford district, Hertfordshire, England, aged 87

Census:
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: Admiralty House, Queen St, Deal, Kent
1891: Holland Road, Kensington, London
1901: Clarendon Road, Watford Urban, Hertfordshire
1911: Watford Urban, Hertfordshire: Mabel Blackhouse Barker is aged 42, born in Deal, Kent

Sources:

Margaret Hulke

Birth: 1635

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Marge (Hulke) Seffery

Birth: 1600

Father: Robert Hulke

Mother: Gene (Barber) Hulke

Married: John Seffery

Marie Hulke

Birth: 1727

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Warren) Hulke

Death: 1768

Sources:

Martha Hulke

Birth: 1605

Father: Anthony Hulke

Mother: Mildred (Baker) Hulke

Sources:

Martha Hulke

Birth: 16 May 1787, in Kent

Baptism: 29 May 1787 in the Parish Church of Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ann (Read) Hulke

Death: 16 May 1843, in Deal, Kent, England, aged 56
The Law Times 20 May 1843 p182
HULKE, Miss, daughter of the late W. Hulke, Esq., M.D, and sister to B. Hulke, Esq., Town Clerk of the Borough of Deal, on the l6th inst., at Deal, aged 56.

The Gentleman's Magazine June to December 1843 p107
KENT.—May 16.  At Deal, on her birthday, Martha, eldest dau. of the late William Hulke, esq. M. D. of that town.

Burial: 20 May 1843, in Deal, Kent, England

Census:
1841: Lower Street, Deal, Kent

Sources:

Mary (_____) Hulke

Married: John Hulke

Children:

Mary Hulke

Birth: 1621

Father: Anthony Hulke

Mother: Mildred (Baker) Hulke

Sources:

Mary Hulke

Birth: 1629

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Ellen (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Mary Ann Hulke

Birth: 1690

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Jopton) Hulke

Death: 1711

Sources:

Mary (Hulke) Larne

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (Eastes) Hulke

Married: William Larne

Sources:

Mary Ann Hulke

Birth: 1716

Baptism: 29 June 1716, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (Eastes) Hulke

Death: 1720

Sources:

Mary Hulke

Birth: 1720

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Mary Hulke

Birth: 1727

Baptism: 23 February 1727, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Mary Ann Hulke

Birth: 1735

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Mary Hulke

Father: Hercules Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Hulke) Hulke

Sources:

Mary Ann (Hulke) Wilmott

Birth: 1823, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 6 August 1823, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Married: Edward Wilmott on 29 October 1846, in Deal, Kent, England
The Patrician vol 2 1846 p387
Wilmott, Edward, Esq. of Lewes, Sussex, to Mary Ann, eldest daughter of William Hulke, Esq., surgeon, Deal, Kent, 29th Oct.

Children: Death: 14 January 1865, in Hitchin district, Hertfordshire, England, aged 42
Cambridge Independent Press 21 January 1865
Wilmott—Jan. 14, Hitchin, Mary Ann, the beloved wife of Edward Wilmott, Esq., aged 42. Buried: in Hitchin cemetery (old section), Hertfordshire, England
The headstone reads:
Sacred to the memory of / MARY ANN the beloved wife of / EDWARD WILMOTT esq. of Hitchin / who died 14th Jan 1865 / aged 44 years / EDWARD WILMOTT / who died 8th June ???? / aged ?8 years

Census:
1841: Stone Hall, Great Mongeham, Kent
1851: Abinger Place, Saint John Under the Castle, Sussex
1861: 3 Landport Terrace, Portsea, Hampshire

Sources:

Michael Hulke

Birth: 1632

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Mildred Hulke

Birth: 1631

Father: Anthony Hulke

Mother: Mildred (Baker) Hulke

Sources:

Priscilla Hulke

Birth: 1601

Father: Robert Hulke

Mother: Gene (Barber) Hulke


Rachel Hulke

Birth: 1717

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Anne (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Richard Hulke

Birth: 1727

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Death: 1734

Sources:

Robert Hulke

Birth: 1574

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Mary

Married: Gene Barber in 1595

Children: Sources:

Robert Hulke

Birth: 1626

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Hulke

Children: Sources:

Robert Hulke

Birth: 1674

Father: George Hulke

Mother: Susan (_____) Hulke

Death: 1683

Sources:

Robert Shaw King Hulke

Birth: 1825

Baptism: 9 March 1825, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Death: 9 December 1825, in Deal, Kent, England
Cinque Ports Herald and Kent and Sussex Advertiser 11 December 1825
Dec. 9, at Deal, the infant son of Mr. W. Hulke, aged ten months

The grave monument of William Hulke and Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke
The grave monument of Robert Shaw King Hulke and his parents, William Hulke and Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke in St Leonard's church cemetery, Deal, Kent
photograph by Steve Lockwood at gravestonephotos.com
Buried: 19 December 1825, in St. Leonard church cemetery, Deal, Kent, England

Sources:

Samuel Hulke

Birth: 1725

Baptism: 4 June 1725, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Sarah Hulke

Birth: 1632

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Ellen (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Sarah Hulke

Birth: 1669

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ellen (Whale) Hulke

Death: 1680

Sources:

Sarah (Hulke) Pilcher

Birth: 1705

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Anne (_____) Hulke

Married: J. Pilcher in 1725

Death: 1775


Sarah (_____) Hulke

Married: John Hulke

Children:

Sarah (Hulke) Dill

Birth: 6 July 1718

Baptism: 17 July 1718

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (Eastes) Hulke

Married: Benjamin Dill on 10 August 1742, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Children: Sources:

Sarah Hulke

Birth: 1729

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Death: 1782

Sources:

Sarah Hulke

Birth: 1735

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Warren) Hulke

Sources:

Sarah Hulke

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Mary (Brame) Hulke

Death: 1745

Sources:

Susan (_____) Hulke

Married: George Hulke

Children:

Sydney Backhouse Hulke

Birth: 8 February 1871, at Admiralty House, Deal, Kent, England
The Medical Times and Gazette 18 February 1871 p205
    BIRTHS.
HULKE.—On February 8, at Admiralty House, Deal, the wife of Dr. Frederick T. Hulke, of a son.


Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Education: Dover College and Middlesex Hospital

Married (1st): Irene Beatrice Hawkins on 17 April 1901, in St Barnabas, Kensington, London, England
The Lancet 27 April 1901 p1249
    MARRIAGES.
HULKE–HAWKINS.—On April 17th, at St. Barnabas's, Kensington, Sydney Backhouse Hulke, F.R.C.S. Eng., third son of the late Frederick Thomas Hulke, of Admiralty House, Deal, to Irene Beatrice, youngest daughter of Major-General E. L. Hawkins, late R.A. 

Irene was the daughter of Major-General E. Lindsay Hawkins. She died on 7 July 1935, in Eastry district, Kent, aged 62.

Children: Married (2nd): Margery Ethel Kemp Hall in 1938, in Hampstead district, London, England

Margery was born in 1909, in Swindon district, Wiltshire.

Occupation: General Practitioner.
Sydney was MRCS 2 February 1893; FRCS 10 June 1897; LRCP 1893

>Death: 10 June 1939, at 127 High Street, Hungerford, Berkshire, England, aged 68

Buried: Old St Mary's church, Walmer, Kent

Biography:
Plarr's Lives of the Fellows Online
Born 8 February 1871 at Cemarques, High Street, Deal, Kent, the eighth child and fourth son of Frederick Thomas Hulke, FRCS, and Charlotte Backhouse, his wife. He was educated at Dover College and at the Middlesex Hospital, where his uncle John Whitaker Hulke, FRCS, was surgeon. He acted as apothecary and house surgeon at the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital in 1895, and afterwards filled the offices of house surgeon and surgical registrar at the Middlesex Hospital. Called to take part in the family practice, he spent the whole of his professional life in Deal. He was medical officer and public vaccinator for the Walmer district of the Eastry Union and medical officer to the Post Office.
He married (1) in 1901 Irene Beatrice Hawkins, daughter of Major-General E Lindsay Hawkins; she died on 7 July 1935, leaving him with two daughters, Beatrice Sydney and Muriel Sydney, who was admitted FRCS and became Mrs Brander; (2) in 1938 Marjorie Kemp-Hall, who survived him with a daughter. He retired from practice in July 1936, lived at 21 Platt's Lane, Hampstead, NW3, and died at 127 High Street, Hungerford on 10 June 1939. He was buried at Old St Mary's Church, Upper Walmer.
Hulke belonged to a medical family with an unusually long history. They were driven from the Low Countries by the persecution of the Duke of Alva and settled in Kent. Sydney Backhouse Hulke was a member of the tenth generation to practise medicine, while his great-nephew, Frederick Hulke, MRCS 1943, represents the twelfth generation. In the last five generations there have been several members of the family holding the diploma of FRCS.


Sources used to compile this entry: [Brit med J 1939, 2, 257; information given by Mrs Muriel Brander, FRCS, his daughter]. Census:
1871: Deal, Kent
1881: 20 Holme House, Canterbury, Kent

Sources:

Thomas Hulke

Birth: 1741

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Warren) Hulke

Sources:

Thomas Manley Hulke

Birth: 5 September 1750

Baptism: 24 September 1750, in the parish church, Deal, Kent

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Frances (Manley) Hulke

Married: Ann Sarah Douglas

Ann was born in 1756 and baptised on 19 May 1756 in St Thomas, Portsmouth, Hampshire, the daughter of Patrick Douglas and Catherine Eastwood. She was the sister of Admiral William "Billy" Douglas. Ann died on 10 March 1821, and was buried on 16 March 1821, in St Botolph, Aldersgate, London, aged 64. Ann was buried in the family grave of Robert and Charlotte Biggar.
The New Monthly Magazine 1821 p198
Mrs. A. S. Hulke, of Aldersgate-street, relict of the late T. M. Hulke, esq. R.N.

Children: Occupation: Naval Officer. Thomas served in the Royal Navy, reaching the rank of lieutenant before his death at the age of 38. He was a midshipman aboard the Triumph in 1772, under Captain Suckling, and one of the other midshipmen at the time was Suckling's nephew, Horatio Nelson.
Nelson: A Dream of Glory, 1758-1797 p59 (John Sugden, 2005)
  The nine 'middies' with whom he [Nelson] shared the following year were a mixed bunch. Almost fourteen, Horace was certainly the youngest, although whether he experienced any of the bullying that plagues some midshipmen's mess is doubtful. As the captain's nephew he was plainly destined for promotion, and help was still readily at hand in his friend Boyles, now nineteen years old. There was an even older acquaintance from the Raisonable in the mess, James Etheridge, a former acting mate who had been recommended to Suckling by the captain of the Alderney.
  The rest of Nelson's companions were either fresh-faced hopefuls like himself; deserving and experienced men raised from the ordinary seaman by a benign captain, but without the prospects of the 'young gentlemen'; or older men who simply lacked the ability to get promoted and remained trapped as midshipmen, increasingly humiliated by their advancing years. Among the first of these groups may have been Richard Puddicomb from Topsham, aged twenty-one; James Urmston, an Irishman, and Thomas Bagster, a former able seaman from Cowes, both twenty-four; the Welshman John Morgan, aged twenty-five; and Thomas Manley Hulke of Deal in Kent. Former able seaman Thomas Jaynes probably belonged to the second group, having been promoted in June 1771 to fill a hole left by two departing officers, Hamlin and Baker. But the senior midshipman in the mess may also have been the least able, for Jonathan Ferry of Woodbridge, Suffolk, another ex-able seaman, was forty-nine years old.
... It is not surprising, given the difficulty of the job and the stifling disadvantages of those deficient in 'interest', that most midshipmen never reached commissioned rank. Of the ten aboard the Triumph only three - Boyles, Hulke and Nelson - ever made lieutenant.

Thomas was promoted to lieutenant on 9 October 1777 (The Court and City Register p158). He was first lieutenant on the Resource under Captain Rowley in 1781 when he was mentioned in dispatches for his role in the Resource's taking of the Unicorn off Cape Blaise on the Florida coast in the Gulf of Mexico.
Naval and Military Memoirs of Great Britain from 1727-1783 pp209-10 (Beatson, 1804)
   His Majesty's ship Resource of twenty-eight guns commanded by Captain Rowley being sent to cruize off Cape Blaise, arrived at her station on the 19th of April about noon: and next day at two in the afternoon a large sail was perceived, bearing down on her. The Resource was then standing to the S.S.W.; but tacked and made the private signal. As the ship did not answer it, but kept bearing down, Captain Rowley beat to quarters, made every preparation for action, and soon hoisted his colours. About an hour afterwards the strange ship hoisted French colours, and half an hour after four began to engage. The Resource did the same; and soon came to close action, which continued till six o'clock, when the enemy struck. She proved to be the Unicorn frigate of twenty nine pounders, eight carronades, twelve pounders, and one hundred and eighty-one men, commanded by the Chevalier de St. Ture: she had eight men killed and thirty wounded in the action. The Resource had fifteen men killed and thirty wounded. Among the former was Mr. High, the gunner; and among the latter, Mr. Edwards, the Second Lieutenant. Captain Rowley was much pleased with the behaviour of Mr. Hulke, his First Lieutenant; and indeed with that of all the rest of the officers and ship's company, which he said was such as did them the greatest honour. Nor did he forget to mention, the signal services which he received during the action, from Major Alexander Campbell, the officers and men of the Loyal American Rangers, and also the artillerymen, then on board, whose good conduct entitled them to every commendation he could give. The Unicorn formerly belonged to his Majesty, but had been captured by the French last year on this station. She was purchased by Government, and once more added to the Royal Navy.

In 1782 Thomas was stationed in the West Indies. During this time the Royal Navy won a significant victory at the Battle of the Saintes on 12 April 1782 in which a number of French warships, including the flagship, were captured and a week later four more French warships were captured at the Battle of the Mona Passage, including two 64-gun ships of the line, the Jason and the Caton, both of which had been damaged in the earlier actions. Thomas Manly Hulke is listed as an officer of the prize crew assigned to take the Caton back to England where she was commissioned into the Royal Navy (The Life and Correspondence of the Late Admiral Lord Rodney vol 2 p417).

Death:
11 December 1787, in China, aged 38, while serving aboard the East Indiaman Queen.
The Gentleman's Magazine vol 63 p465 (1788)
DEATHS.
  1787. Dec. 11. In China, aged 38, Mr Thomas Manley Hulke, of Deal, in Kent, a lieutenant of the royal navy, and first mate of the Queen East India-man.


Sources:

Thomas Hulke

Birth: 1787

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Jane (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Thomas Manley Hulke

Birth: 25 April 1789

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ann (Read) Hulke

Death: 12 July 1831

Burial: 16 July 1831, in Deal, Kent, England

Sources:

Thomas Manley Hulke

Birth: 1822

Baptism: 30 January 1822, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Married: Ellen Barrett on 16 April 1844, in Fort William, Bengal, India
Thomas Manley Hulke is recorded as aged 22, the son of William Hulke. Ellen Barrett is recorded as aged 21, the daughter of William Barrett.
The Indian mail 6 June 1844 p433
MARRIAGES.
April 16. At Fort William, Mr. T. M. Hulke to Miss E. Barrett.

Bombay Times 4 May 1844
At Fort William on the 16th April by the Revd H Thomas, Mr TM Hulke to Miss E Barrett

Ellen was born in 1822/3, the daughter of William Barrett. She died on 11 August 1860, in Calcutta India.
Morning Chronicle 17 October 1860 p16
Hulke.—On the 11th of August, at Calcutta, Ellen, wife of Captain Thomas Manley Hulke.

Occupation: Officer in the navy of the East India Company.
Thomas was 3rd officer of the Phlegethon and participated in an attack on Pegu in Burma on 4 June 1852, during the Second Anglo-Burmese War.
London Gazette 20 August 1852 pp 2273-4
 Commander Tarleton, R.N. to Commodore G.R. Lambert, R.N. Commanding the Naval Forces at Rangoon.
      Her Majesty's Ship Fox, Rangoon,

Sir,            June 8, 1852.
  I HAVE the honour to inform you that, in pursuance of your orders, I proceeded on the morning, 3rd instant, with the boats expressed in the margin [Her Majesty's ship Fox.—Launch. Mr McMurdo, Mate; Mr. Lucas, Midshipman; crew, 15 men.—Pinnace. Mr. Copland, Mate; Mr. Hudson, Midshipman; crew, 15 men.—Gig. Mr. Cottam; crew, 6 men.—Cutters. Mr. Alexander, Mr. Lisboa; crew, 9 men each.—Mr. Morgan, Assistant-Surgeon, Her Majesty's ship Fox.—East India Company's steamer Moozuffur. Mr. Harding; crew, natives, in paddle-box boats.—A large canoe, fitted for the conveyance of the camp followers.] to the East India Company's steamer Phlegethon, which vessel having embarked 98 men, Bengal Native Infantry Rifle Company, Major Cotton commanding detachment, 100 men, Her Majesty's 80th Regiment, Captain Ormsby; 30 men, Sappers and Miners of the Madras division, Lieutenant Mackintosh; Lieutenant Mayne, Assistant Engineer, Captain Latter, Interpreter to the Lieutenant-General Commanding the Forces, also accompanied us.
  We proceeded up the Pegu River, as far as the village of Peinkeong, which we reached a little before 8 p.m. it being then high water. The stream becoming extremely narrow and shallow at this point, I did not deem it prudent to ascend it further, and therefore arranged with Major Cotton for proceeding with his detachment in the boats, on the next flood tide, which I looked for about two a.m. but the ebb ran for 9½ hours, so that we could not leave the steamer before 5.30 a.m. on the 4th. At Peinkeong. Captain Latter obtained information that a large number of Peguers had put themselves under the direction of one of their countrymen named Moungta; that they had assembled on the right bank of the river, where the day previous they had been engaged with a body of men under Moungyawik, the Birman Governor of Pegu. By the villagers’ account, the latter had been worsted, and had retired in the direction of Zangauain, situated on the river bank, immediately opposite Pegu. When within about five miles of this place, the chief, Moungta, came off to the boats, and confirmed the reports which had been previously received: his force, consisting of about 1500 men (imperfectly armed), lined the right bank of the river, and advanced with the boats. From his communication with Moungta, Captain Latter was satisfied that the enemy’s chief strength lay on the right bank. Major Cotton therefore decided on landing his detachment on that side, while I proceeded with the boats (as soon as the men were disembarked), to cooperate on his right flank. The river at this point is not more than sixty yards wide; the present village of Pegu stands on the left bank, which is steep and muddy below high water mark. About a quarter of a mile, in the rear of the houses, there is a broad ditch, the bottom of which, at this season, is a swamp; it runs along the west face of the old wall of Pegu, for the distance of two or three miles; the wall has been originally built of brick, and the top (which may be twenty feet above the bottom of the ditch), is now covered with jungle. The village of Zangauain, as I before mentioned, stands immediately opposite; it possesses a small pagoda, and is surrounded by a low growth of jungle.
  I had proceeded a short distance in the boats, when a sharp fire of musketry was opened upon us from the Pegu side. Feeling the disadvantage we laboured under by being underneath the enemy's fire, with no effectual means of returning it, I at once landed with the boat's crews of Her Majesty's ship Fox, and was shortly after joined by Captain Neblett and boat's crews of the Phlegethon (see margin), [East India Company's steamer Phlegethon.—Two Cutters, Messrs. T. M. Hulke, 3rd Officer; C. C. Sevenoakes, Midshipman; crew 22 men.] in all about 50 men. The Burmese fired upon us as we advanced, but were driven from point to point until completely broken; one party retreating by the river's side to the northward, and the other within the old wall before mentioned. Our object being attained, I was retiring in close order to the boats, when a fire of gingals and musketry was opened upon us from the wall; deeming it unwise to permit the Burmese to suppose we had retreated from them, I instantly engaged a native guide to shew us the causeway through the ditch, and then advanced to the attack. We halted a few seconds to gain breath, under shelter of an old house; then rushed in over the causeway, and through a breach to the right of the gateway. On getting over the wall we found ourselves among some fine trees, free from underwood; behind these the enemy stood with great resolution, until they were (in many instances), driven out by the bayonet; the defect in their firing was here very observable, as their shot in most cases struck the branches above our heads. We pushed them through to the plain beyond, when they broke and fled, leaving many dead; their number engaged might probably have been 100 men, and they also had a reserve of about 200 more (commanded by officers on horseback), beyond the reach of musketry. The whole party retired within the Great Pagoda, about a mile and a half to the eastward. I am glad to say that this service was performed with only one casualty on our side, one man having received a severe sword-cut in a personal encounter.
  Information was now brought me that our boats had been attacked by another party of the enemy from the southward; I accordingly hastened down to their relief, and happily found them safe. Mr. McMurdo, Mate of Her Majesty's ship Fox, who had been left with a few men in charge, reported that a very heavy fire had been opened upon them, to which he had endeavoured to reply with the pinnace's gun and small arm party, but the water was too low to do this with effect, and having one man killed and two wounded, he judiciously removed the remainder to the right bank, sending an application to Major Cotton for support. A party of rifles returning fortunately met the messenger, and, coming on with all speed, took up a position on the river side, from which they kept up so true and incessant a fire across the water that the enemy were compelled to abandon their attempt, and on our approach, to retreat. Major Cotton, having overcome all opposition on the opposite side, now crossed over with his detachment.
  On a consultation with him, it was determined to wait until 3 p.m. before we should advance to attack the Great Pagoda, the men being absolutely in need of repose after so much fatigue under a burning sun. The rifle company of the 67th was therefore bivouacked in the wood within the wall, Her Majesty's 80th Regiment on the river face; and the seamen returned to their boats; at 2 p.m. the alarm bugle was sounded, and, on my landing, I discovered that the Burmese had issued from the pagoda in considerable strength, with the evident intention of attacking us. The troops lost not a moment in getting under arms, and the seamen (see detail annexed) [Her Majesty's ship Fox.—Officers, Mr McMurdo, Mate; Mr. Hudson and Mr. Lucas, Midshipmen; 38 men. East India Company's steamer Phlegethon.—Captain Neblett; 22 men.], came on shore.
  The enemy fell back on our advance, a movement he appeared to have so little expected that many of his men were unable to regain their position in time to defend it, and those who did were so taken by surprise that their fire was ineffectual, and their four guns, which pointed down the steps leading up to the gateway, were found loaded by Her Majesty's 80th, who gallantly led the assault; and this naturally strong place was happily carried without a casualty on our side.
  I returned with the seamen to the boats, as soon as the pagoda was in our possession; embarked the detachment at noon 30th; on the 6th reached the steamer at Peinkeong, at 5 p.m.; she weighed on her return at 8 a.m.; on the 7th at noon, she took the ground, and, as the tide was ebbing, and there was no possibility of her moving for several hours, I ordered the Fox's boats to take the canoe with the camp followers in tow; I passed them in the gig, and arrived on board Her Majesty's ship Fox at 3 a.m. on the 8th.
  I have the honour to enclose the following list of casualties:
  Her Majesty's ship Fox.—3 seamen wounded.
  East India Company's steamer Phlegethon.—1 seaman killed.
  I beg leave to add that the conduct of both officers and men under my orders has been most exemplary, and to represent to you the valuable assistance and cooperation I received on all occasions from Captain Neblett, Commander of the East India Company's steamer Phlegethon.
    I have, &c.
      J. W. TARLETON.

This reference to "Mr. Hulke, of the Fire Queen" is likely of Thomas Manley Hulke. The Fire Queen was a steamer belonging to the East India Company.
Allen's Indian mail 2 June 1857 p333
our readers, nautical ones, at all events, will remember that by the account of the starving natives, who were taken off from the Alguada Reef about fifteen months ago by Mr. Hulke, of the Fire Queen, they state, that their vessel, with 300 coolies on board, went to pieces immediately!

Death: 16 October 1862, in Calcutta, Bengal, India, aged 40
Allen's Indian mail 21 November 1862 p906
DEATHS.
HULKE, Thomas M., at Calcutta, aged 40. 

Buried: 17 October 1862, Calcutta, Bengal, India

Sources:

Valentino Hulke

Birth: 1719

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Sources:

Victor Hulke

Birth: 21 November 1842
Victor was named by the "gracious command" of Queen Victoria after Princess Victoria. Victor's father was in attendance upon the royal children at Walmer Castle at the time of Victor's birth.

Observer 5 December 1842 p2
  Mrs. Hulke, the lady of Mr. William Hulke, surgeon, of Deal (who is daily in attendance, by command of her Majesty, upon the Prince of Wales and the Princess Royal, at the castle), was confined of a son on the 21st instant, the anniversary of the birth of the Princess Royal. Mr. Hulke has just received the distinguished honour of a communication from the Queen, through the medium of the Dowager Lady Lyttelton, couched in the most gracious terms, requesting (which may be viewed as a command) that the infant son of Mr. Hulke should be named after the Princess Royal, and that her Royal Highness's name being Victoria, the fortunate and highly-honoured son of the Princess's medical attendant should be christened "Victor." Such a command, and from so illustrious a source, will, of course, be most literally and gratefully obeyed by its highly-honoured parents.
  Yesterday morning, upon Mr. Hulke visiting, professionally, the Princess Royal, as usual, her Royal Highness, in a most graceful and artless manner, presented Mr. Hulke with an elegant gold pencil-case set with precious stones, and containing beautiful medallion portraits, in bas-relief, of her Majesty and His Royal Highness Prince Albert, entwined with the Garter. The Princess rose from her chair, (being at breakfast at the time,) and addressing Mr. Hulke, said, "I have something to present to you, Mr. Hulke, (handing the pencil-case). I beg you will give this to Victor as a present from me."   

The Annual Register or a View of the History and Politics of the Year 1842 p183
21. [November 1842] FIRST ANECDOTE OF THE PRINCESS ROYAL. - During Her Majesty's stay at Walmer Castle, Mr. William Hulke, a surgeon of Deal, was daily employed in attendance on the Royal infants. The wife of that gentleman during the same period was confined of a son, and the Queen graciously commanded that the child should be named Victor, after the Princess Royal, whose name is Victoria. To day upon visiting, professionally, the Princess Royal, as usual, Her Royal Highness, in a most graceful and artless manner, presented Mr. Hulke with an elegant gold pencil-case set with precious stones, and containing beautiful medallion portraits, in bas-relief, of her Majesty and His Royal Highness Prince Albert, entwined with the Garter. The Princess rose from her chair, (being at breakfast at the time,) and addressing Mr. Hulke, said, "I have something to present to you, Mr. Hulke, (handing the pencil-case) - I beg you will give this to Victor as a present from me."

Baptism: 28 December 1842, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

Occupation: Clerk in the Audit Department of the India office
Morning Chronicle 6 October 1860 p3
VACANCIES, APPOINTMENTS, AND PROMOTIONS IN THE CIVIL SERVICE.
INDIA-OFFICE.— ...
Mr. Victor Hulke has been appointed a junior assistant, Auditor's Department, London, and passed his examination.

Death: 30 April 1861, at 10 Old Burlington Street, St James Westminster, Middlesex, England
The Monthly (alphabetical) record of births, deaths, & marriages p284
HULKE—April 30, at 10 Old Burlington street, Victor, son of Wm. Hulke, Esq, surgeon, Deal, aged 13
(Note: Victor was actually aged 18 at his death)

The grave monument of William Hulke and Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke
The grave monument of Victor Hulke and his parents, William Hulke and Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke in St Leonard's church cemetery, Deal, Kent
photograph by Steve Lockwood at gravestonephotos.com
Buried: 7 May 1861, St. Leonard church cemetery, Deal, Kent, England

Sources:

Walter Backhouse Hulke

Walter Backhouse Hulke
Walter Backhouse Hulke
photo from The Daily Express 15 February 1922
Birth: 10 September 1872, at Admiralty House, Deal, Kent, England
The Medical Times and Gazette 11 September 1872 p340
    BIRTHS.
HULKE.—On September 10, at Admiralty House, Deal, the wife of Dr. Frederick T. Hulke, M.B., M.R.C.S., L.S.A., of a son.


Baptism: 15 November 1872, in St Andrew, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Frederick Thomas Hulke

Mother: Charlotte (Backhouse) Hulke

Education: Royal Military College

Married (1st): Ethel Gwendoline Lloyd in 1904, in St George Hanover Square district, London, England

Ethel was born on 3 Aug 1872, in Aldershot, Hampshire, and baptised on 22 August 1872 in Hale, Surrey, the daughter of Albert Lloyd and Emily Crowe. Ethel and her three children traveled to Canada on the Empress of Ireland, leaving Liverpool on 16 June 1911 and arriving in Quebec on 23 June, listing a previous visit to Banff in 1904. Along with her three children, she emigrated to Canada aboard the Corsican, sailing from Liverpool on 4 July 1919 and arriving in Quebec on 14 July 1919 listing her destination as Vancouver. Ethel died on 5 February 1966 at 282 Pallisier Avenue, View Royal, British Columbia, of pneumonia, aged 93. She was buried on 7 February 1966 in Colwood Burial Park, Colwood, British Columbia.
Census:
1881: Thames Ditton, Surrey
1891: Cheltenham, Gloucestershire
1901: Warwick Street, Kensington, London
1911: Wallington, Surrey: Ethel Gwendoline Hulke is aged 38, born in Aldershot, Hampshire
1911: Section 19&20 R3, Comiaken district, Nanaimo, British Columbia

Children: Married (2nd): Elsie Marian (Ainsworth) Gordon in 1922, in Paddington district, London, England

Elsie was born in 1882, in Buxton, Derbyshire, the daughter of William Ainsworth and Mary Ann Caroline Gallard. She married firstly George Sutton Gordon in 1909, in Peterborough district, and had at least one child, John Ainsworth Gordon born in 1912. Elsie died in 1943, in Cockermouth district, Cumberland, aged 59.
Census:
1891: High Street, Lincoln, Lincolnshire
1901: Kirby Road, Leicester
1911: Eccleshall, Yorkshire West Riding: Elsie Marian Gordon is aged 28, born in Buxton, Derbyshire

Occupation: Army Officer
Walter was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Lincolnshire regiment on 19 November 1892 (London Gazette 18 November 1892 p6476) and promoted to lieutenant on 12 September 1894 (London Gazette 11 December 1894 p7280). Walter was seconded to the staff on 1 April 1899 (London Gazette 2 May 1899 p2806), vacating his appointment as Superintendent of Gymnasia in June 1901 (London Gazette 13 August 1901 p5339). On 2 January 1903, Walter was promoted to captain and immediately seconded for service with the Chinese Regiment of Infantry (London Gazette 23 January 1903 p468). He was seconded for service as adjutant of the 4th (Hunts) Volunteer Battalion, The Bedfordshire Regiment on 12 February 1906 (London Gazette 2 March 1906 p1521) and transferred to be adjutant of the 5th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment on 1 April 1908 (London Gazette 21 August 1908 p6150). Walter retired on retired pay on 25 February 1911 (London Gazette 24 February 1911 p1467) but was recalled from the Reserve of Officers to be adjutant of the 9th Battalion, The Lincolnshire Regiment, on 6 November 1914 (London Gazette 24 November 1914 p9692). On 9 July 1915, while still ranked as a captain, Walter was given command of the 14th Battalion (2nd Barnsley) of the York and Lancaster Regiment, and made a temporary lieutenant-colonel (London Gazette 27 July 1915 p7440). He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order on 1 January 1917 (Edinburgh Gazette 1 January 1917 p23) and brevetted major on 1 June 1917 (London Gazette 1 June 1917 p5466). In December 1917 Walter was finally promoted to major in the Lincolnshire Regiment, with seniority from 16 April 1915 (London Gazette 18 December 1917 p13327), then on 15 April 1918 he was appointed a brigade commander, attached to headquarters units, and given the rank of brigadier-general while so employed (London Gazette 21 May 1918 p6085). Walter was severely wounded and invalided home in August 1918 (Daily Express 15 February 1922 p6). He relinquished the temporary rank on ceasing to command the brigade on 30 November 1918, but was granted the honorary rank of brigadier general on ceasing to be employed on 18 April 1919 (London Gazette 29 April 1919 p5468). In the Reserve of Officers, Walter was promoted to colonel (retaining his honorary rank of brigadier-general) on 1 March 1922 (London Gazette 1 March 1922 p1797).

Back in civilian life, Walter managed the Cinema Artists' club in Great Newport street, London early in 1922 but the fate of the club is unclear, and later that year Walter is found running a coffee shop near Oxford Circus.
The Daily Express 15 February 1922 p6
PARADE . . . ’SHUN!
  As one honourably splashed with the mud of many staff-cars, I often ponder the civilian fate of our generals. Some, I fear (and in one case hope) have had to scratch vigorously for a livelihood. But I see that the new Cinema Artists’ Club—you will find an account of it on another page—has done itself proud by selecting Brigadier-General W. B. Hulke, D.S.O., to be its manager. General Hulke commanded the 14th service battalion of the York and Lancasters in Egypt and France, and later commanded the 115th Infantry Brigade of the 38th (Welsh) Division, in France. He was severely wounded and invalided home in August 1918.
DISTINCTION.
  Then, with the easy grace that always marks a brigadier in process of post-war transistion, he accepted a staff appointment as a “walker-on” at Stoll's Cricklewood film studio. I am told (and well believe) that he walked on with distinction. I never saw a brigadier stepping out of a Vauxhall or addressing the ranks on parade without feeling that there was a market somewhere for so much . . . yes, aplomb is  the word; it fits the emergency like a plug.
 And now the film artists have persuaded General Hulke to take command of their social H.Q. They are in luck's way. The indents will be all right in the hands of a brigadier. Had it been a quartermaster-sergeant I knew once . . . but this is delicate ground.

The Daily Express 15 February 1922 p8
FILM STARS FORM THEIR OWN CLUB.
D.S.O. BRIGADIER TAKES COMMAND.
“Daily Express” Cinema Correspondent.
  British cinema artists have given a lead in organisation to their disorganised employers, the film magnates. They have formed a club with a membership of 500, rapidly growing, and strongly occupy a large building in Great Newport-street, complete with restaurant, billiard-room, smoking lounge, card-room, and bar.
  The ladies have a floor to themselves, but they share in the restaurant. “Everything is found,” as they say in the property room.
  You can see all the stars in Great Newport-street. Incidentally, you can hear more “shop talk” than at any other rendezvous within the four-mile radius.
  Film magnates must be suffering badly from inflammation of the ear.
    OBJECTS.
  The most interesting item among the “objects” of the club is the following: “To promote he production of one motion picture annually, the whole proceeds of which shall be devoted to the welfare of the club.” That should be a film with an all-star cast.
  It is  a splendid thing that the pluckiest class of the community—the acting profession—which has faced the hardships of these lean days with a stouter heart than any other, should have this excellent club in which to meet.
  The term “god-send” is often lightly used, but it is strictly applicable to a rendezvous of cheer for these men and women of genius whose prosperity depends almost entirely on flush times in industry as a whole.
  The film artists have shown real genius in their choice of a club manager. They have selected from many candidates Brigadier-General W. B. Hulke, D.S.O., who has lately been paying minor roles—“super,” in fact—in some Stoll productions.
  It gives a ??? qualm to introduce a full-blown brigadier to the public in this disguise. Such a possibility was never contemplated during my short and extinguished military career.
    SHADES OF THE PAST.
  A certain smartness is noticeable just now in the air of our film actors. Their shoulders are better set. When the producer howls “Camera!” they “jump to it” with a celerity which is vaguely reminiscent of something or other.
  Their heels quiver as they pass General Hulke's office and their right hands wander absent-mindedly to their hat-brims as the brigadier looks them up and down and inspects their membership cards in a manner which suggests that the document might or might not be A.B. ???.
  One of these days I expect to see them spring to attention when he strides into the messroom—I mean restaurant—and to hear the general say with a kindly rasp in his voice “Carry on with your lunch!”  

The Daily Express 22 November 1922 p8
SAUSAGE SHOP GENERAL.
“NOTHING LEFT FOR ME TO DO”
  From commanding an infantry brigade in Flanders to running a coffee shop successfully in the vicinity of Oxford-circus is the proud record of Brigadier-General W. B. Hulke, D.S.O., who claims to be the only general, past or present, who can serve up sausage and mash or steak and onions with the same facility as bayonets.
  “There was nothing left for me to do but to try my hand at catering” said General Hulke last night to a “Daily Express” representative.
“I walked in here with my wife, and we took over the business without having done anything before in the catering line.
   WIFE AS COOK
 
“Next day I assumed active proprietorship. My wife cooks and superintends in the kitchen. I take the money and generally perform all the social functions of a host. If the men customers want a beer, I run and fetch it from the public house up the street. Curiously enough, the first chap who wanted beer was a one-time private in my own brigade.
  “Catering here is real good fun, and means honest, hard-earned money.” said the general. “I manage to rise to all occasions, even to throwing out an undesirable customer, if it becomes necessary.”

Death: 9 January 1923, in Watford district, Hertfordshire, England, aged 50

Census & Addresses:
1881: Admiralty House, Queen St, Deal, Kent
1901: Holland Road, Kensington, London
1911: Section 19&20 R3, Comiaken district, Nanaimo, British Columbia
1923: 1 Marlborough Court, Carnaby Street, London   (London Gazette 8 June 1923 p4099)

Sources:

William Hulke

Birth: 1583

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Mary

Sources:

William Hulke

Father: Robert Hulke

Married: Ellen Whale

Children:

William Hulke

Birth: 1666

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Safrey) Hulke

Notes: William is mentioned in the will of his mother, Elizabeth (Safrey) Hulke. "I give and bequeath unto my sonne William Hulke his executors admins and assignes in satisfaction of what is soe allothed unto him out of his said fathers personall estate All that tenement or dwelling house the ground and appurtences thereunto belong. Situtate and being upon the Beach in Deale being leasehold under Mr Richard Gookin and now in the tenure or occupation of Arthur Wallenger or his assignes  Also I give and bequeath unto him my said sonne William the sume of Thirty three pounds six shillings and eight pence to be paid unto him within six months next after my decease  Also I go give unto him seaven peeces of broad gold three silver spoones a gold ring marked E.H. all that bedsteede in the low roome in the house where I now dwell with all the bedding and furniture thereunto belonging as it now stands three paire of sheetes a diaper tablecloth a dozen of diaper napkins a paire of Holland pillow coats three pewter dishes a pewter Tanker a case of drawers standing in the Chamber in the messuage where I now dwell, and my part of a boate belonging to Deale beach."

Sources:

William Hulke

Birth: 1672

Father: George Hulke

Mother: Susan (_____) Hulke

Sources:

William Hulke

Birth: 1673

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ellen (Whale) Hulke

Married: Anne

Children:

William Hulke

Birth: 1688

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Jopton) Hulke

Married: Eleanor

Children: Death: 1739

Sources:

William Hulke

Birth: 1709

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth (Scodden) Hulke

Death:  1732


William Hulke

Birth: 1713

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Anne (_____) Hulke


William Hulke

Baptism: 11 July 1714, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: John Hulke

Mother: Sarah (Eastes) Hulke

Married: Mary Brame on 7 April 1736, in Great Mongeham, Kent, England
Mary was born in 1719. She was buried on 9 November 1774, in the parish church in Deal, Kent. It is possible that Mary's surname was Breame. The transcription of her marriage record shows "Brame" but the transcription of the baptism record for her son Ford shows his middle name as "Breame".

Children: Occupation: Pilot

Notes: William was mayor of Deal in 1777 and 1778 (The History of Deal p322).

Death: 1781

Buried: St. George's, Deal, Kent, England

Will: proved on 28 November 1781

Addresses:
1740: Richd Mibbourns, King Row, Deptford, Kent   (burial record of son Ford at FreeReg)

Sources:

William John Hulke

Birth: 1724

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Eleanor (_____) Hulke

Sources:

William Hulke

William Hulke
William Hulke
image from Claire Freestone
Birth: 26 November 1756

Baptism: 11 December 1756, in the parish church, Deal, Kent, England

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Frances (Manley) Hulke

Married: Ann Read on 25 March 1786 in St Nicholas, Rochester, Kent, England

Children: Occupation: William was a surgeon, and for more than thirty years before his death was the appointed physician to the commanders of the Cinque Ports, at Walmer Castle. He was also a banker, and Mayor of Deal in 1782 and 1783.
William was published in what passed for medical journals of the day, and these excerpts give an interesting view of the state of medical science at the time.
The London Medical Journal 1784 volume 5 pp389-392 (Samuel Foart Simmons)
  II. An account of a remarkable spasmodic affection. Communicated in two letters to Dr. Simmons, by Mr. William Hulke, Surgeon at Deal, in Kent.
M.B. a maiden lady, aged 40, of a healthy complexion, in the beginning of the year 1782, began to be troubled with a singular complaint, which she described in the following manner: Every night, soon after she had fallen asleep in bed, she was suddenly awakened, she said, by a sensation of cold and numbness in the outer side of her right foot, which numbness gradually extended up her leg and thigh to her stomach, unless she prevented it, by rising from her bed instantly, and placing her foot on the floor; as she always found that this gave her relief, and prevented the progress of the disorder to her stomach. Supposing her complaint to be the cramp, she took no notice of it, till after a fit of the gout, which attacked her in both feet, in March 1783, and lasted near three months, during which time she passed her nights comfortably; but when the gouty paroxysm went off, her former complaint returned with increased violence, and obliged her to have recourse to medicine. All the remedies usually given in nervous cases were tried, and, among others (by the advice of a neighbouring physician) the application of blisters to the leg and foot, but without mitigating the complaint in the slightest degree. The numbness and stoppage of circulation (as she expresses it) spread now with great quickness from the foot upwards, and if not timely prevented from reaching the stomach, impede respiration, and bring on slight spasms. To prevent or remove this degree of the paroxysm, a person is constantly with her, that she may, as soon as she is attacked, be got out of bed, and place her foot on the floor, as this alone gives her immediate relief. She was once affected in the day-time, when she had fallen asleep in her chair. During each paroxysm, she sweats violently; and when the fit has been severe, constantly throws up a quantity of tasteless, viscid phlegm. Her menses have hitherto been regular; her appetite is good, and till attacked with this disorder, she enjoyed an uninterrupted state of good health.
     Deal,
Sept.
16. 1784.

  To the account of the case I communicated to you in September last, I now beg leave to add, that the patient, after trying a variety of remedies, without success, has lately applied to an Empiric, who happened to be in this part of the world. He has given her some fœtid pills, which she takes at night; an emetic mixture, which she takes in the morning, and an ointment with which she rubs her foot.—This method (whether from the force of imagination or not, I will not pretend to determine) has relieved her; her paroxysms being now both more slight and less frequent than before.
    Deal,
Nov.
21 1784.   


Death: 20 July 1838, in Eastry district, Kent, England

Burial: 24 July 1838, in Deal, Kent, England

Will:
This is the last Will and Testament of me William Hulke of the Town and Borough of Deal in the County of Kent Doctor of Medicine and Banker Whereby I direct my debts funeral and testamentary expenses to be paid out of my Real and personal estate and direct my Executors hereinafter named with all convenient speed after my decease to invest a sufficient sum of money in the purchase of Eight thousand pounds three per cent consolidated Bank annuities in the name and pay the interest dividends and annual produce of the same to my dear Wife Ann Hulke and from and immediately after the decease of my said Wife the said sum of Eight thousand pounds three per cent consolidated Bank annuities and the interest and dividends thereof shall be and remain In trust for such persons or person and with such ??? and in such manner as my said Wife shall by her last Will and Testament in writing or any Codicil thereto from time to time direct or appoint and as to all the Rest and Residue of my Real and Personal estates whatsoever and wheresoever (except such part thereof as may be vested in me in Trust) I give devise and bequeath the same unto and to the use of my said Wife Ann Hulke her heirs Executors Administrators and assigns absolutely according to the nature and quality thereof respectively and I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint my said Wife Ann Hulke Executrix and my Nephew George Stevens? of the East India House London the Executor of this my Will and Testament hereby revoking all former and other Wills by me at any time heretofore made I do declare this only to be and contain my last Will and Testament In Witness whereof I the said William Hulke the Testator have to this my last Will and Testament contained in this sheet of paper set my hand this twenty second day of April in the year of our Lord One Thousand eight hundred and thirty eight— Wm Hulke — Signed by the above named William Hulke the Testator in the presence of us present at the same time who have hereunto signed our names as Witnesses thereto in the presence of the said William Hulke and in the presence of each other — J. Doner?? 7 Duke St Deal J A Marken Clerk to Mr B. Hulke Solicitor Deal
Proved at London 28th August 1838 before the Judge by the oath of Ann Hulke Widow the Relict and George Stevens? the Nephew the Executors to whom admon was granted having been first sworn by Commission duly to administer

Sources:

William Manley Hulke

Birth: 7 August 1784, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: Benjamin Hulke

Mother: Jane (_____) Hulke

Married: Lucy Smith on 7 February 1816

Lucy was born in 1796/7, in Farnham, Surrey. She was a saleswoman.
Census:
1861: 8 Love's Yard, Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding
1871: Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding

Children: Occupation: Sailor, wood-turner and newspaper correspondent

Notes:
As noted in his obituary below, William was a fervent supporter of Richard Oastler and his campaign to end child labour in England. When Oastler was imprisoned in Fleet debtor's prison as part of the reaction to his campaign, William was involved in efforts to raise the money needed to free him.

Fleet Papers, 24 April 1841 volume 1 number 17 pp133-4 (Richard Oastler)
  Then, from my Huddersfield Tory friends, I received 5l., which were forwarded to me by my faithful friend, the veteran Champion of his Country, who knows what danger is, but never learned to fear, in battle or in breeze. Read, Sir, the gallant Sailor's letter to your prisoner.
  “My dear Mr. Oastler,                                                   
Huddersfield, March 16 1841.
       
It is with feelings of the greatest pleasure, I now inclose you 5l., which I have collected for you among our Tory friends; and for your sake, most sincerely do I wish it were twenty times the sum. I am, you are well aware, but in a very humble sphere of life; but ‘where there is a will, there is a way;’ and I am decidedly of opinion, that here is no man so poor or so humble, but may find the way to do some good, if he possesses the will. That the inclosed will do you some good, I sincerely hope—in fact, situated as you, are it must. I have often pondered on your words, that you were probably destined by an inscrutable and overruling Providence to perform some good work, for the benefit of your brethrenthe human race. And I verily believe and hope that such will eventually be the case. At present, you are certainly not in the position to gratify your hearers by the convincing arguments of your eloquence; nevertheless, as you possess the will, so have you discovered the way to be heard. Scarcely three months have you been incarcerated, yet, through the medium of your little Fleeters,’ have your opinions been heard from one extremity of the Kingdom to the otherfrom the Land's End to the Orkneys; and I very much question, that had you been suffered to remain unmolested in your quiet and pleasant little retreat at Chelsea, if you could, by any possibility, have obtained a finer opportunity of doing good, than you now have. This opportunity, even in the Cell of a prison, have you eagerly embraced. Go on and prosper convince the world that you are neither madman, rogue, nor incendiary, but that the welfare of your country, and the happiness of all classes of your countrymen, is the object nearest and dearest to your heart. I cannot, however, deny, that you may be an enthusiast; but, in such a cause, how glorious, how noble is the enthusiasm! How many great, good, and virtuous men have been vilified, slandered, or despised as visionaries or enthusiasts! Yet, now, their names are venerated by posterity, as the disinterested benefactors of mankind. The names of a Howard, a Wesley, a Wilberforce, a Sadler, purified from the errors of those mists east round them by prejudice, are now universally respected, and statues are erected to perpetuate their memories; and the day will come (may it be long first) that a similar honour will be done to the memory of Richard Oastler! That, that honoured name, will yet be rescued from the load of obloquy which factious men, for their own ends, have heaped upon it, I cannot, for one moment, permit myself to doubt. I say again, go on and prosper. Mrs. Hulke unites with me, in desiring our best regards to Mrs. Oastler and your dear adopted Maria; and believe me to be, dear Sir,
                   
Your faithful (tho' humble) friend, W. HULKE.”
  What say you, Mr Thornhill? Is not that good, from an old, gallant Jack Tar? The same day, a much greater (I do not mean bigger) man than yourself, gave me five sovereigns, as he said,
for a few extra comforts here.

Fleet Papers, 5 June 1841 volume 1 number 23 pp2-3 (Richard Oastler)
  This Letter from my faithful friend, Mr Hulke, will please many of my Yorkshire friends.
                    
Huddersfield, Thursday, May 26th, 1841.
  “Well, my dear Mr Oastler, how is Mrs. Oastler and Maria? and how are you, my dear Sir,—how is your health? I need not ask how are your spirits; knowing your temperament, I doubt not they are as buoyant as ever. How are your finances, not be-Whigged, I hope?—how do your Fleeters get on? Here is a whole string of questions for you, which you can reply when convenience suits you. However, I most heartily wish everything is going on with you ‘as well as can be expected.’ Indeed the Squire made a sad mistake when he issued his mandate for your incarceration—he little knew the spirit he had to contend with, and that from the walls of the Fleet prison should issue a voice that should be heard through the length and breadth of the land, denouncing oppression in every shape it can possibly assume. Yes, yes he mistook his forte entirely when he thought to impose the silent system on Richard Oastler, or to break that spirit, or unhinge that mind, which have braved worse storms than any he can conjure up. Does he read your Papers?—can he read them, and not hear the ‘still small voice’ of conscience whispering to his soul, ‘You have acted wrong, tyrannically wrong?’—can the victory of his race-horses console him for one moment, when he reflects on the inhumanity of his conduct towards you?—will it soothe his soul in his dying moments (for DIE HE MUST) to reflect, that after so many years of faithful services of father and son, all gratitude has been obliterated from his heart, and that the son's reward for all his fidelity is imprisonment for life? Well, let his horses win—let him add a few more hundreds or thousands to his already enormous wealth, at his period of life what will it advantage him? Richard Oastler can, aye is, and will be happier in prison's cell than Thomas Thornhill in a palace drawing-room, surrounded with all the luxuries of life. Let his horses win for him, say I.
     ‘Yet more true joy imprisoned Oastler feels
      Than Thornhill with his racers at his heels.’
Will you excuse my alteration of Pope?
  “There are but two sentiments on your case here (always excepting the Whigs, you know)—indignation for your persecution mingled with contempt; and sorrow mingled with admiration for yourself. Should you be in want, let me or some friend here know, and we will again set something afloat for your assistance—you shall not follow poor Edwards.
  “I almost forgot to mention, that my sale of your Fleeters continues pretty steady as yet—five dozen weekly. There would have been more, but for my dangerous illness. Perhaps it will please you to know that your portrait, which you so kindly presented me with when at Chelsea last year, is framed and glazed, and hung up in my bed-room; and it reminds me, never to lay my head down to rest till I have offered some petitions to the throne of Grace for the original. How complacently it seems to look at me at this moment while writing to you. May the God of all mercy bless you, my dear friend, and turn the hearts of your enemies towards you.
  “Should a dissolution or resignation take place, have you the power to send me a Times or Standard, according to the time of day, announcing the event, so as to let me have the earliest intelligence?
  “I had proposed to myself to have attended one of your levees this summer, but my finances will not admit of it; and long ere the year resolves do I hope to see you once more among us in Yorkshire.
  “Well, God bless and preserve you and yours; and, when you write to Mrs. O., pray do not omit to give mine and Mrs Hulke and son's best and most cordial respects to her and Maria. With every wish for your health and happiness, I remain, dear Sir, yours ever faithfully,
                    “W. HULKE.”


Death: January 1864, at Greenwich Hospital, Greenwich, Kent, England

Obituary:
Huddersfield Chronicle 23 January 1864 (transcribed by Keith Rothery)
A NAVAL HERO AND AN OLD TOWNSMAN. - There are many in Huddersfield who will remember the late Mr. Wm. Hulke, whose death we recorded in our obituary of the 9th inst., as having occurred at Greenwich Hospital a few days previously, in the 80th year of his age. A few words about the old veteran, who both fought and bled for the honour of his country, will not be uninteresting. The late Mr. Hulke was born at Deal, in Kent, on the 7th August, 1784, being the second son of Benjamin Hulke, Esq., post captain in the Royal Navy, whose brother marred the sister to the then Admiral, “Billy Douglas.” The uncle of Mr. Hulke was the late William Hulke, Esq., physician and banker, of Deal, who for more than thirty years before his death was the appointed physician to the commanders of the Cinque Ports, at Walmer Castle. The son of the last named gentleman was also a physician in attendance during the last illness of the illustrious Duke of Wellington. Mr. Hulke, following the example at his ancestors for gener­ations, entered, at an early age, the Royal Navy, and first smelt powder under Lord Nelson, in the ever memorable battle of the Nile. For his services in that engagement he received the silver medal during his sojourn in Greenwich Hospital — that noble institution for decayed or wounded British tars. Subsequent to the above battle, he took part in several attacks and engagements; among them being the battle of Algiers, under Lord Exmouth, where the tremendous roaring of the cannon, and the bursting of some large guns broke the drums of his ears, rendering him totally deaf. From this period till death, he never heard the sound of a human voice. The same cause also affected his speech rendering him at times unintelligible to his best friend. He also took part in the boat attack upon New Orleans, under the gal­lant Captain Lockhart. In this attack he received a, severe sword wound, aimed at the head, but which being warded off, took effect on the shoulder, carrying away with it the whole of the flesh down to the bone. In this state he, with many others, had to remain for thirty-six hours before their wounds could be attended to, the surgeons being left in the ships. Mr. Hulke during his career received many other wounds, including a thrust from a boarding pike in the abdomen, a musket ball through the leg, and a wound from a splinter which took away a piece of bone from the back of the head. This was afterwards “trepanned,” and the aperture covered with a thin silver plate, but it left him periodically subject to fits. At the conclusion of the general peace, he, in 1816, settled in London, where he remained, passing through many vicissitudes, till about 1830, when, by the advice of some friends in this town, he left the metropolis, and took up his residence in Huddersfield. Here his mental abilities soon brought him into notice, and he became correspondent for the Halifax Guardian and other newspapers, which position he retained for many years. In principle he was a thorough old Tory, firmly and strenuously fighting its battles by the side of his beloved Oastler, who he did not hesitate to acknowledge as his “King,” more especially in the hearty and determined support he gave to the Ten-hours’ Factory Bill and in his opposition to the abominable new Poor-Law, which he always denounced both as unconstitutional and unchristian. While thus engaged be commenced news-agency, in which be obtained the appellation of a “Old Halifax Guardian,” from the fact of his being the first person to introduce its sale into Huddersfield. Among his numerous friends he numbered Mr, R. Perring, editor and proprietor of the Leeds Intelligencer; Mr. Spencer, many years proprietor of the Halifax Guardian; Mr. Wm. Dearden, author of the “Star Seer;”  besides many other well-known West Riding gentlemen. His perseverance and determination was such that no diffi­culty could turn him aside from a settled purpose. After the loss of his hearing, he took a passion for reading and study; and such was his indomitable courage, that, without any other assistance than books, he mastered both the French, German, and Italian languages—he was proficient in Latin in youth—all of which he could read and translate with ease. In his progress through his life he learnt the wood-turning business, a good deal of carpentering, as well as the trunk-making, which he carried on till within a few years of his leaving Huddersfield, which he did—totally unknown to his family—on Saturday, the 27th August, 1853. He entered Greenwich Hospital the 1st of Sep­tember following, and became there equally esteemed and respected by all who had the privilege of conversing with him till his demise, which took place, as above stated, at the ripe old age of nearly four score years.

Census & Addresses:
1837: 9 New Street, Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding   (White's Directory 1837)
1841: Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding: Wm Hulke is aged 55 (rounded down to nearest 5 years)

Sources:

William Hulke

William Hulke
William Hulke
image from Claire Freestone
William Hulke
William Hulke
On the reverse of this photo is written "Wm. Hulke, Surgn."
photograph by W. H. Franklin, Deal provided courtesy of Claire Freestone
William Hulke
William Hulke
photo from Claire Freestone
Birth: 10 September 1791, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Ann (Read) Hulke

Married: Elizabeth Pollard King on 1 November 1819, in Deal, Kent, England

Children: Occupation: William was a medical practitioner in Deal. He was also physician to Walmer Castle in which capacity he attended Queen Victoria and her children, as well as the Duke of Wellington.

The Annual Register or a View of the History and Politics of the Year 1842 p183
21. [November 1842] FIRST ANECDOTE OF THE PRINCESS ROYAL. -  During Her Majesty's stay at Walmer Castle, Mr. William Hulke, a surgeon of Deal, was daily employed in attendance on the Royal infants.  The wife of that gentleman during the same period was confined of a son, and the Queen graciously commanded that the child should be named Victor, after the Princess Royal, whose name is Victoria.  To day upon visiting, professionally, the Princess Royal, as usual, Her Royal Highness, in a most graceful and artless manner, presented Mr. Hulke with an elegant gold pencil-case set with precious stones, and containing beautiful medallion portraits, in bas-relief, of her Majesty and His Royal Highness Prince Albert, entwined with the Garter.  The Princess rose from her chair, (being at breakfast at the time,) and addressing Mr. Hulke, said, "I have something to present to you, Mr. Hulke, (handing the pencil-case) - I beg you will give this to Victor as a present from me."

At the time of this anecdote, Princess Victoria was exactly two years old, and the words ascribed to her above seem a little overdone. Another, somewhat more credible version of the incident (despite claiming incorrectly that Victoria was one, not two) is given in Popular Royalty by Arthur Henry Beaven (S. Low, Marston and co., 1904):
page 83, writing of the Princess Victoria...
   Most intelligent and precocious must she have been, as the following proves. In 1842 she was taken with her baby-brother to Walmer Castle, which marine residence the Duke of Wellington had placed at the Queen's disposal after the birth of the Prince of Wales. Mr. Hulke, of Deal, attended the Royal infants in a medical capacity during their visit to Walmer; and his wife, who had presented him with a son on the first anniversary of the Princess Royal's birthday, was honoured by a communication from the Queen expressing a desire that the infant should be named Victor. A few days afterwards Mr. Hulke paid his usual visit to the little Princess, when, in the most graceful manner, she held out to him a gold pencil-case set with jewels, and containing medallion portraits of Her Majesty and the Prince Consort, at the same time asking him in very infantile, but perfectly distinct, accents to "give it to Victor as a present from me."

Death of the Duke of Wellington
Illustration of the "Last Moments of the Duke" from The Life of Field Marshal the Duke of Wellington by J. H. Stocqueler
In attendance at the Duke's death were Lord and Lady Charles Wellesley, Mr. Collins, the house-steward, and Kendall, his Grace's valet, and the three medical gentlemen, Dr. M'Arthur, Mr. William Hulke and Mr. Hulke, junior. William Hulke is on the left, standing behind Lady Charles Wellesley who is kneeling beside the dying Duke (explanation of positions from Taranaki Herald 5 November 1908)
In 1852, William Hulke was the attending physician at the death of the Duke of Wellington. The scene is recounted on page 261 of The Life of Field Marshal the Duke of Wellington by J. H. (Joachim Hayward) Stocqueler (published by Ingram, Cooke, and Co., 1853):
It had been customary for the Duke's valet, Kendall, to call his Grace about six o'clock every morning. On Tuesday morning, Kendall, on knocking at his Grace's door a quarter of an hour after the usual time, did not receive the customary response.  After waiting a few moments, he fancied he heard a strange kind of noise in the Duke's apartment.  On opening the door, the Duke appeared to recognise him as usual, and did not complain of illness. Kendall, however, soon observed that his Grace was restless and uncomfortable ; and, in a few moments, the fact of  the noble Duke's illness was made apparent by his Grace exclaiming, somewhat abruptly, "Send for Mr. Hulke." A messenger was instantly despatched to the residence of Mr. Hulke, a medical resident in the town of Deal, who has been accustomed to attend the Duke when at Walmer.  Mr. Hulke arrived at the castle at twenty minutes to eight o'clock.  The Duke was then reclining on his bed, and on his introduction, his Grace entered into conversation with him in a perfectly calm and collected manner, observing that he was suffering from an affection of the chest and stomach.  The doctor prescribed forthwith, and informed Lord Charles Wellesley that he did not consider there were any dangerous symptoms in his Grace's condition; adding, that he had seen him much worse on former occasions.  Mr. Hulke was then alluding to an attack of a similar description years since.
   Mr. Hulke left the castle for Deal at eight o'clock, and he had not been home more than a quarter of an hour, when a second messenger arrived with the information that the Duke had been seized with what was described as an epileptic fit. On this occasion Mr. Hulke was accompanied by Dr. M'Arthur of Walmer, and Mr. Hulke, jun.  They found that the Duke had been seized with a fit of the nature described, and that his servants had already adopted some remedial measures, by the application of mustard poultices.  The medical gentlemen adopted every remedy that science could suggest, but the attack failed to yield to their professional skill.  His Grace, from the moment he was seized with the fit, became speechless; but by gestures he appeared to desire a removal to a bed-chair, in which he was placed in a sitting posture, and so he continued until twenty minutes past three o'clock, when he expired as quietly as if falling into a slumber.  There was present at this solemn moment Lord and Lady Charles Wellesley, the three medical gentlemen, Mr. Collins, the house-steward, and Kendall, his Grace's valet.


(The Mr. Hulke, jun. referred to was John Whitaker Hulke, who also wrote an account of the day in Medical Times 25 September 1852 p301).

London Express 20 October 1853 p2
     ACCIDENT TO EARL CLANWILLIAM.—On Wednesday afternoon, between three and four o'clock, as Earl Clanwilliam and another gentleman were riding on horseback through the fair at Deal, the earl's horse suddenly became restive, kicking and rearing in a most frightful manner, and at last threw his lordship and struck him violently on the breast. The other gentleman immediately dismounted, and both horses started off at a full gallop; fortunately no injury was done by them, although the road was literally thronged with children. The earl was taken into the shop of Mr. Clarabut, chemist, and from thence to Deal Castle. Wm. Hulke, Esq., surgeon, was quickly in attendance, and we are glad to learn that no material injury was sustained—South Eastern Gazette.

Pigot's Directory for Deal & Kent in 1840 lists:
Surgeons: HULKE William, 155 Lower Street
(Note: Lower Street in 1840 is the street now, confusingly, called High Street! We see William's daughters living at 155 High Street in the 1881 and 1891 censuses)

Notes: In 1816 William was prosecuted for criminal conduct with Lady Owen, wife of Commodore Sir Edward Owen.
Bells Weekly Messenger 16 June 1816 p189
     SHERIFF'S COURT, JUNE 14.
  CRIM. CON.—SIR E. W. C. R. OWEN, K. B. v. ——HULKE.
  Mr. GURNEY opened the pleadings. The declaration stated, that the Defendant had seduced, and criminally known, the wife of the Plaintiff. For this injury he had laid his damages at 10,000l. The Defendant had suffered judgement to go by default, and the Jury were now to inquire into, and assess the damages.
  Mr. Serjeant BEST stated the case. He had the honour of attending the Court this day, on behalf of Sir Edward Owen, better known to the Jury and tot he public by the title of Commodore Owen. One of the most enterprising, gallant, and judicious officers that belonged to that most valuable service, the navy. This excellent officer came before the Court to complain of one of the most grievous injuries that could be conceived—he meant the seduction of his wife's affections. They must recollect him commanding a squadron off Boulogne—and, when his services were no longer required there, he was called to an equally honourable and arduous duty, on the Lakes of Canada. Whilst the Plaintiff was on this last station, the Defendant, who acted as apothecary to the family, availed himself of the opportunity which Sir Edward Owen's absence afforded, to seduce the affections of his hitherto virtuous and honourable wife. Sir Edward Owen commanded a squadron off Boulogne, in the year 1802. He was in the habit of coming to Dover and Deal. The lady was the daughter of a respectable member of the legal profession, who had, in 1802, retired and was living privately at Deal. In the course of Sir Edward Owen' svisits to that town, he became acquainted with the lady and her father. She was extremely beautiful, and was possessed of every accomplishment. Sir E. Owen paid his addresses to her, and a marriage was the consequence. Sir Edward was then thirty-one years of age, and his bride was just turned of thirty-one—so that no disparity of age could be alledged as a cause for unhappiness. They lived together, down to the moment when the seduction took place, in the most affectionate manner. The attentions of the plaintiff to the lady were marked by the utmost kindness, and she returned them affectionately. The Jury would find that while Sir Edward Owen was absent, in the service of his country, Lady Owen manifested the most anxious desire for his return—that species of feeling which a beloved wife might be expected to shew, when the object of her affections was abroad, exposed to every description of peril. When the Boulogne flotilla was put an end to, Sir Edward was sent to serve his country on the Lakes of Canada; Lady Owen was inconsolable on that occasion. During the period of Sir Edward's absence, Lady Owen's state of health was exceedingly bad. She was attended, in the first place, by the father of the defendant, who was an apothecary in the neighbourhood of Deal, and afterwards by the defendant himself. The visits of the defendant were extremely frequent, so much so, as to excite a suspicion, that he was not attending the lady for the purpose of re-establishing her health, but he was engaged in warping her mind, and seducing her affections from her husband. No doubt could rest on the minds of the Jury, and the Under Sheriff would state to them, from the circumstances of judgment having gone by default, that the act of adultery was committed. But in order to shew the atrocity of the case, he would clearly prove that the crime was effected whiule Sir Edward was absent on the Lakes of Canada. On his return he was informed by some friends that his lady had conducted herself improperlywith the defendant during his absence. Sir Edward behaved like a man of firmness on this trying occasion. He selected two friends, who were relatives of his lady, and directed them to enter into an investigation of the circumstances. After they had looked into all the information which they had been able to collect, they reported that the rumour of Lady Owen's improper conduct was without foundation. There was not a happier man in the world than Sir Edward, when the innocence of his lady was communicated to him. He returned with redoubled pleasure to his wife. He found her in an ill state of health.—and, imagining that her indisposition arose from the calumnious reports which had occasioned the inquiry, having made a deep impression on her mind, he felt extremely anxious for her situation, and immediately took the best means for the restoration of her health. He proceeded with her to London, and placed her under the care of Dr. Pemberton, a Gentleman eminent for his skill. That respectable Gentleman he would this day call on as a witness, and the Jury would learn from him the manner in which Sir Edward Owen conducted himself towards his wife, while he was attending her for the illness. While the plaintiff was thus exerting himself for the recovery of his wife, this Deal Apothecary had left his business, and was haunting the lodgings of the Lady in London. Her health being restored, Lady Owen returned to Deal, and then, for the first time, Sir Edward eas informed by his servant of the criminal connexion. The moment this communication was made, Sir Edward determined to investigate the business closely—but the Lady, hearing that an inquiry was about to take place, eloped from her husband's house with the defendant. Sir Edward Owen, though as a man of honour he could never live with this Lady again, was anxious to rescue her from that ruin which the defendant was preparing for her. He sent an old servant after her, for the purpose of directing her steps to a place where she might be saved from the misery which her connection with the defendant was likely to produce. This servant found her—and he exerted all his zeal to induce her to return. Anxious to get her away from the seducer, he said to him, "Sir, you had better leave this lady, for Sir Edward Owen will soon be here." He begged the Jury to pay particular attention to the answer of the defendant—"I don't care," said he, "for Sir Edward—I have pistols about me, and, if he comes, I will shoot him." So that, after he had seduced this gallant officer's wife—after he had assassinated his peace—he was ready, if the injured husband came to rescue this lady from his adulterous embrace, to become the assassin of his person. The parties, from that period to the present, had not separated. The defendant continues to live with this unfortunate woman, as husbands did with their wives. After animadverting with much severity on the conduct of the defendant, who had taken the opportunity, when, as a medical man, he was employed in attendance on this lady, to debauch her mind, and seduce her affections from her husband, he proceeded to call his witnesses.
  Admiral Sir Geo. Campbell, Admiral Lord Keith, Rear-Admiral Scott, Admiral Sir W. Young, and Admiral Sir Richard Lee, spoke in the most decided terms of the affectionate attachment which seemed to subsist between Sir Edward and Lady Owen.
  A series of witnesses proved the mode adopted by the defendant and Lady Owen, in carrying on their correspondence through the medium of a female servant.
  The elopement was proved by a post-boy—and the fact of their having slept together at the inn at Sandwich, was deposed to by a female servant.
  Here the plaintiff's case was closed.
  Mr. BROUGHAM then addressed the Jury on the part of the defendant, in an eloquent speech, in which he commented, with great force and ingenuity, upon the disparity of years between the parties (the Lady being between 30 and 40 years of age. the defendant only 23); and thence inferred that the seduction must have been, in point of fact, committed by the elder. He then impressed upon the Jury, that no breach of medical confidence had been committed, as the father of the youth was, in reality, the professional attendant, and not his son, who was the unfortunate victim of this attachment, being now a beggar, the partnership with his father dissolved, and his own prospects in life ruined and undone.
  The DEPUTY SHERIFF then summed up the evidence to the Jury, who retired for 20 minutes and brought in a verdict of Fifteen Hundred Pounds damages for the plaintiff.

Much of this business, complete with the almost farcical servants spying through keyholes, was rehashed in the House of Lords the following year when Sir Edward Owen applied for a divorce from Elizabeth.
Journals of the House of Lords vol 51 pp53-57
  The Order of the Day being read for the Second Reading of the Bill intituled “An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Sir Edward William Campbell Rich Owen Knight, with Dame Elizabeth Owen his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned;” and for hearing Counsel for and against the same; and for the Lords to be summoned;
    Counsel were accordingly called in:
  And Mr. Warren appearing as Counsel for the Petitioner; and no Counsel appearing for Dame Elizabeth Owen;
  Mr. Warren was heard to open the Allegations of the Bill.
Then Mr. Thomas Poynter was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:
  (By Counsel.) “What are you?”
  “A Proctor.”
  “Have you served any Order for the Second Reading of this Bill on Lady Owen?”
  “The Order for the Second Reading I served on Lady Owen on the 11th of February instant, at No. 3, Upper Eaton Street, Pimlico.”
  “Did you serve a Copy of the Bill?”
  “I served a Copy of the Bill on the 7th of February.”
  “Did you give her Notice that the Second Reading was put off?”
  “I served the Notice of the Second Reading on the 11th of February.”
  (By a Lord.) “Did you know Lady Owen?”
  “Perfectly.”
  (By Counsel.) “You were concerned as Proctor in the Ecclesiastical Court?”
  “I Was.”
      The Witness was directed to withdraw.
Then John May was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:
  (By Counsel.) “What are you?”
  “I am a Solicitor in Deal.”
  “Have you got a Copy of the Register of Marriage of Sir Edward Owen and Lady Owen?”
  “I have.”
  “From whence do you bring it?”
  “From Deal.”
  “Where did you take it from?”
  “From the Clergyman of the Parish.”
  “Have you compared it with the Original?”
  “I have.”
  “Is it an exact Copy?”
  “It is.”
      The same was read and is as follows:
    “The Year 1802.
    Edwd Wm Campbell Rich Owen, of the Parish of Langerig, in the County of Montgomery, North Wales. and Elizabeth Cannon of this Parish, were married in this Church, by Licence, this Nineteenth Day of Dec in the Year One thousand eight hundred and two,
            By me, John Davis Clk.
This Marriage was solemnized between us {E. W. C. R. Owen, Elizath Cannon.}
In the Presence of {Fra May, John Cannon.}”
    The Witness was directed to withdraw.
Then The Reverend John Davis was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:
  (By Counsel.) “You are a Clergyman?”
  “I am.”
  “Did you celebrate the Marriage between Sir Edward Owen and Lady Owen—Mr. and Mrs. Owen, as they were then?”
  “I did.”
  “When?”
  “On the 19th of December 1802.”
  “Are you acquainted with the Parties?”
  “I am.”
      The Witness was directed to withdraw.
Then William Augustus Oclebar was called in; and being sworn, was examined as follows:
  (By Counsel.) “What are you?”
  “A Solicitor.”
  “What is that you have in your Hand?”
  “A Copy of the Judgment in an Action between Owen and Hulke.”
  “You have compared that with the original Judgment?”
  “I have.”
  “At the Treasury Chamber?”
  “Yes.”
  “It is an exact Copy?”
  “It is.”
  The Witness then delivered in the Office Copy of a Record of the Court of King’s Bench, of a Judgment given in that Court in Easter Term Fifty-fifth of His present Majesty, against William Hulke the younger, in an Action for Criminal Conversation with Elizabeth Owen, the Wife of Sir Edward William Campbell Rich Owen, for £1,500 Damages, besides Costs of Suit.
          The same was read.
  (By a Lord.) “Have you levied the Damages?”
  “No.”
  (By Counsel.) “What is the Reason you have not levied them?
  “A Writ of Error has been brought.”
  “When was that brought?”
  “Last Trinity Term.”
  “And is it still pending?”
  “Yes, it is still pending; they have assigned the general Errors last Trinity Term.”
  “What Steps have you taken upon this?”
  “Three Rules have been served.”
  “Where is the Writ of Error brought?”
  “In the Exchequer Chamber.”
  (By a Lord.) “How long has it been there?”
  “Last Term we gave a Rule to assign Errors, and they assigned the general Errors, which we have every Reason to believe is for the Purpose of Delay.”
  The Counsel was informed, That it was necessary, before the House could act upon the Writ of Error, to have the Transcript of the Record regularly before them; but that, in the mean time, he might proceed with the Evidence de bene esse.
          The Witness was directed to withdraw.
Then Mary Rigden was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:
  (By Counsel.) “You were Housemaid in the Service of Sir Edward and Lady Owen?”
  “Yes.”
  “Were you living there in the beginning of the Year 1815?”
  “Yes.”
  “Where are you living now?”
  “At Sir Edward Owen’s.”
  “You have been living there ever since?”
  “Yes.”
  “When did you come into that Service?”
  “Two Years ago last Month.”
  “That was the beginning of the Year 1815?”
  “Yes.”
  “Are you acquainted with a Person of the Name of William Hulke the younger?”
  “Yes.”
  “Where did he live?”
  “In Deal.”
  “Sir Edward and Lady Owen lived in Deal?”
  “Yes.”
  “What was Mr Hulke’s Profession?”
  “A Surgeon.”
  “Practising with his Father?”
  “Yes.”
  “Was he in the Habit of visiting at Sir Edward Owen’s House?”
  “Yes.”
  “Where was Sir Edward Owen at this Time?”
  “In America.”
  “Did young Mr. Hulke visit often at your House?”
  “Yes.”
  “At what Time of Day?”
  “Sometimes at Noon; sometimes in the Morning; and sometimes in the Evening.”
  “Did he ever stay long?”
  “Yes, sometimes Two or Three Hours.”
  “How late in the Evening?”
  “I have known him to be there as late as Half-past Three in the Morning.”
  “In what Room were he and Lady Owen at the Time when he staid so late as Half-past Three in the Morning?”
  “In the Drawing-room.”
  “Was there a Sofa in that Drawing-room?”
  “Yes, there was.”
  “Do you recollect his ever supping with her?”
  “Yes.”
  “In what Room?”
  “The Bed-room.”
  “About what Time was that?”
  “Between Ten and Eleven, as nigh as I can recollect.”
  “About what Time in the Year 1815?”
  “I cannot tell what Time in the Year.”
  “Was it early in the Year?”
  “Yes, I believe it was early.”
  “How long did he stay in the Bedchamber at that Time that he supped there?”
  “Three Hours, I believe; Two or Three Hours I know he did.”
  “Who carried up the Supper and attended upon them?”
  “I did.”
  “Then you saw William Hulke the younger and Lady Owen supping in that Bed-room?”
  “Yes, I did.”
  “Was this during Sir Edward Owen’s Absence, or after his Return?”
  “During his Absence.”
  “Do you remember Sir Edward Owen returning?”
  “Yes.”
  “To the best of your Recollection, at what did he come back from America?”
  “A Twelvemonth ago last Christmas.”
  “About Christmas 1815?”
  “Yes.”
  “Were you at any Time employed to carry Letters, directed by Lady Owen, to any Person?”
  “To Mr. Hulke.”
  “Was that Hulke the younger, or Hulke the elder?”
  “Hulke the younger.”
  “Did you do that frequently?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you bring back Letters from him?”
  “Yes.”
  “Where were those Letters carried by you?”
  “To Places appointed; sometimes in the Lower Street, and sometimes in the Chapel Walk.”
  “Who appointed those Places?”
  “Mr. Hulke.”
  “Do you mean to say that he appointed the Places where you should bring the Letters to him from Lady Owen?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you carry them to those Places?”
  “Yes.”
  “Not to his House?”
  “No.”
  “Did you carry any Answer back?”
  “Yes.”
  “Was this frequently, or only once or twice?”
  “Frequently.”
  “Did you ever observe Mr. Hulke taking Liberties with Lady Owen?”
  “No.”
  “Sir Edward Owen went to Town some Time in March 1816?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you go with him?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did another Maid Servant go with him?”
  “Yes.”
  “Was her Name Banks?”
  “Yes.”
  “Where did he live in Town?”
  “In Cockspur Street.”
  “He took Lodgings there?”
  “Yes.”
  “Was Lady Owen with him?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you see Mr. Hulke there?”
  “Yes, he came to London.”
  “Did he visit Lady Owen in London?”
  “He came once to the House.”
  “Did Lady Owen give you any Letter to carry to any Person in London?”
  “Yes, to Mr. Hulke once.”
  “Was any Answer carried back?”
  “Yes.”
  “From Mr. Hulke?”
  “Yes.”
  “To whom did you deliver it?”
  “To Lady Owen.”
  “Had you any Direction from any Person where you were to carry this Letter?”
  “Lady Owen told me to go and enquire for a Man of the Name of Wilson at the Spring Garden Coffee House.”
  “Did you go there and make that Enquiry?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you see any Person who answered to that Name?”
  “Mr. Hulke.”
  “On your enquiring for a Person of the Name of Wilson, you saw Mr. Hulke?”
  “Yes.”
  “What passed?”
  “He asked me, whether I had brought any Letter for him, and I gave him the Letter Lady Owen given me.”
          The Witness was directed to withdraw.
Then Elizabeth Banks was called in; and having sworn, was examined as follows:
  (By Counsel.) “Were you a Servant living in House of Sir Edward and Lady Owen?”
  “Yes.”
  “At Deal?”
  “Yes.”
  “During his Absence?”
  “Yes.”
  “Are you acquainted with Mr. Hulke the younger?”
  “Yes.”
  “Were you employed by Lady Owen to carry Letter to him?”
  “No, never.”
  “Did you ever see him at Lady Owen’s House?”
  “Yes.”
  “Was that during Sir Edward Owen’s Absence afterwards?”
  “During Sir Edward’s Absence.”
  “Where did you see him—in what Room?”
  “In the Parlour.”
  “At what Time of the Day?”
  “Sometimes in the Noon Time of the Day, and sometimes in the Evening.”
  “Did he visit frequently?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did he stay late sometimes?”
  “Yes.”
  “Do you remember any thing particular in the Month of September?”
  “Yes, at the Time Lady Owen was ill.”
  “What was her Complaint?”
  “She was confined with the Nettle Rash?”
  “Who visited her in consequence of her being so confined with the Nettle Rash?”
  “Mr William Hulke.”
  “That was in September 1815?”
  “Yes.”
  “In what Room was she?”
  “In her Bed-room.”
  “How long did he stay in her Bed-room?”
  “He was there, I believe, about Two Hours.”
  “What Time did he come first?”
  “Between Eleven and Twelve?”
  “In the Day-time?”
  “Yes.”
  “And he staid in her Bed-room Two Hours?”
  “Yes.”
  “Was she there?”
  “Yes, in Bed.”
  “Perhaps you had the Curiosity to endeavour to look through the Key Hole?”
  “Yes.”
  “Were you able to see through it?”
  “No, I could see nothing.”
  “What was the Reason you could see nothing?”
  “There was a Handkerchief hanging on the Key inside the Door.”
  “Before the Key-Hole?”
  “Yes.”
  “So that you could see nothing?”
  “No.”
  “He staid there about Two Hours, and then went away?”
  “He did.”
  “Was the Door locked or not?”
  “It was.”
  “How do you know that?”
  “Because I was sent to the Door, and found it fast.”
  “You tried the Door and found it locked?”
  “Yes, I did.”
          The Witness was directed to withdraw.
Then Ann Perry was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:
  (By Counsel.) “Your Name was Ann Pratt?”
  “Yes it was.”
  “You were examined in the Ecclesiastical Court by the Name of Pratt?”
  “Yes I was.”
  “Where were you living in April 1816?”
  “At the Bell Inn at Sandwich, In Kent?”
  “Yes.”
  “Do you recollect a Canterbury Chaise coming there some Time in the Month of April?”
  “Yes.”
  “About what Time?”
  “Ten o'Clock.”
  “Night or Morning?”
  “At Night.”
  “Who were in that Chaise?”
  “A Lady and Gentleman.”
  “Did they get out?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you know either that Lady or Gentleman?”
  “The Gentleman I knew; not the Lady.”
  “What was the Gentleman's Name?”
  “Mr. Hulke.”
  “Where did Mr. Hulke use to live?”
  “At Deal.”
  “Do you know what his Profession was?”
  “A Doctor.”
  “There was another Person of the same Name,—his Father?”
  “Yes.”
  “The Lady you did not know?”
  “No.”
  “Where any Orders given by either of them after they came into that House?”
  “Yes, a little while afterwards?”
  “What were those Orders?”
  “For some Sandwiches?”
  “Were there any Orders about a Bed?”
  “Yes.”
  “What Orders were given?”
  “A Bed wanting.”
  “Who gave the Orders about the Bed?”
  “Mistress.”
  “Your Mistress to you?”
  “Yes.”
  “You did not receive any Orders from either of them yourself?”
  “No.”
  “Your Mistress is Miss Mead?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you prepare the Bed?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you afterwards shew any Persons to that Bed you had so prepared?”
  “Yes.”
  “Who were the Persons you conducted to that Bed?”
  “Mr. Hulke and the Lady.”
  “You lighted them into the Bed-room?”
  “Yes.”
  “Was it a double-bedded Room, or a single-bedded one?”
  “A double-bedded Room.”
  “Did you make up One Bed or Two?”
  “One.”
  “Did you leave them there.”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you see any thing more of them that Night after you had conducted them into the Room?”
  “No, I left the Room.”
  “With those Two Persons in it?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you go into the Room the next Morning?”
  “Yes.”
  “Whom did you see in that Room the next Morning?”
  “The Lady and Gentleman.”
  “Were they in Bed at that Time?”
  “No; the Gentleman was dressed.”
  “Quite dressed?”
  “Yes.”
  “Where was the Lady?”
  “She was dressing.”
  “Both of them out of Bed; he dressed, and she dressing?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did they pass the Night in that Room?”
  “Yes.”
  “You made the Bed the next Morning?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did it appear as if Two Persons had slept in it?”
  “Yes, it did.”
  “Did they give any Orders when they got up next Morning?”
  “They gave Orders for Breakfast.”
  “They breakfasted together?”
  “Yes.”
  “How did they go away?”
  “The Lady went away in a Post Chaise?”
  “How did the Gentleman go?”
  “He went away on Horseback?”
  “Have you seen the Lady since?”
  “I have not.”
  “The Gentleman you are well acquainted with?”
  “Yes.”
         The Witness was directed to withdraw.
Then George Rigden was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:
  (By Counsel.) “You were the Waiter at the Bell Inn at Sandwich in the Month of April 1816?”
  “Yes.”
  “Do you recollect a Lady and Gentleman coming there in that Month?”
  “Yes.”
  “Who was the Gentleman?”
  “Mr Hulke.”
  “Are you acquainted with his Person?”
  “I have seen him several Times.”
  “Who was the Lady?”
  “Lady Owen.”
  “Did you know her before that Time?”
  “Yes.”
  “Have you any Doubt at all about her Person?”
  “No, none at all.”
  “Do you happen to know in what Room they slept?”
  “Yes.”
  “In the same or different Rooms?”
  “In the same Room.”
  “Perhaps you were sent there in the Morning to bring away a Trunk?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you see them in the Room?”
  “They were come out of the Room before I went in.”
  “The Lady was Lady Owen, and the Gentleman Mr. Hulke; and they staid in that Room that Night?”
  “Yes.”
  “Did you see them go into the Room?”
  “No.”
  “How did they go away?”
  “In a Post Chaise.”
  “Do you know that those are the Persons that Ann Pratt waited upon?”
  “Yes, they are.”
          The Witness was directed to withdraw.
          The Counsel was directed to withdraw.
   ORDERED, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be adjourned sine Die.
 

Death: 1866, in Eastry district, Kent, aged 74

The grave monument of William Hulke and Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke
The grave monument of William Hulke and Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke in St Leonard's church cemetery, Deal, Kent
photograph by Steve Lockwood at gravestonephotos.com
Buried: 17 January 1866, in St. Leonard church cemetery, Deal, Kent, England

Census:
1841: Lower Street, Deal, Kent
1851: Farrier Street, Deal, Kent
1861: Deal, Kent: William Hulke is aged 70, born in Deal, Kent

Sources:

William Manley Hulke

Birth: 18 November 1816 in Southwark, Surrey, England

Baptism: 12 January 1817, in St Savior, Southwark, Surrey, England

Father: William Manley Hulke

Mother: Lucy (Smith) Hulke

Married: Elizabeth Broughton on 3 April 1865, in Kirkheaton, Yorkshire West Riding, England
William Manley Hulke is recorded as aged 48, the son of William Hulke. Elizabeth Broughton is recorded as aged 55, the daughter of Henry.

Elizabeth was born in 1809/10, in Leeds, Yorkshire, the daughter of Henry. She died in 1882, in Huddersfield district, Yorkshire West Riding, England, aged 72.
Census:
1871: Bradford Road Cottage, Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding
1881: 77 Raglan Road, Leeds, Yorkshire West Riding

Occupation: Reporter

Notes:
Huddersfield Chronicle 4 January 1851 (transcribed by Keith Rothery)
ROBBERY OF A HUDDERSFIELD NEWSPAPER CORREPONDENT.
HANNAH WATSON and ELIZABETH ADAMS, on being brought into the dock, were charged with having stolen, on the 1st of January, at the parish of Wakefield, one silk handkerchief, value 2s., and one silver watch, the property of William Hulke, of Huddersfield, newspaper correspondent, value £2.
The prisoners, who appeared to be about seven and twenty years of age, are women of loose character of the very lowest class, and whose personal attractions are considerably below par, being coarse vulgar-looking women, and extremely jaded.
Mr. West appeared on behalf of the prosecution; the prisoners were undefended.
Mr. West, in opening the ease addressed the bench as follows, — May it please your worships and gentlemen of the jury, it appears that on Wednesday evening last, the prosecutor in this case, William Hulke, went to a public house called the Spotted Leopard, in the Kirkgate of this town, and was there met by the prisoner Adams. After having some conversation with her he proceeded to her house, which is next door to the public house. After having been there for some time, the other prisoner, Watson, came in. After a still further lapse of time, during which no one else had joined them, the prosecutor missed his pocket handkerchief, and charged the two prisoners with stealing it. They both denied it; and after some wrangling the prosecutor offered them five shillings if they would return it. One of the prisoners then went up stairs – I believe the prisoner Adams – with a light, and the prosecutor followed with the prisoner Watson. Adams then removed a trunk from the floor, and Watson took up the handkerchief, which prosecutor claimed as his. They refused, however, to give it him, he proceeded to the door to call for the watch. This was about four o'clock in the morning. The prosecutor then called for the watch, and while he was doing so the prisoner Watson came up to him, and placing her arm round his neck, removed his watch, which was hung with a black ribbon. He continued to call “Watch,” and immediately a policeman, named Slack, came up. Prosecutor again charged the prisoner with stealing his watch and handker­chief, which they both denied. The policeman then went up stairs to an upper room to see what he could find, but having searched for a short time he found nothing. On returning be observed the pocket handkerchief under the grate, near to where Watson was sitting. Both the pri­soners were then taken into custody. The prisoner Watson continued to deny knowing anything of the missing articles, but on being examined by the matron at the police office the watch was found on her person. I cannot suppose any defence on the part of Adams. Watson will probably state that she got the watch from the prosecutor during the evening. He will admit that he gave it her during one part of the evening, but he will also positively state that it was afterwards returned. Now, if you think Adams assisted Watson, though she did not steal the article, the Chairman will tell you that it is your duty to find her guilty as well as the other prisoner who actually took the watch from the prosecutor. I shall now examine the prosecutor.
William Hulke, the prosecutor, then entered the witness box, and on being sworn said – I am a newspaper reporter. [We are very happy to state for the honour of the profession that this gentleman has no higher claim to so honour­able a title than the simple fact that he is a district correspondent, and depending on other sources for his support.] I was at the Spotted Leopard Inn, in Wakefield, on Wednesday night, and was waiting for a glass of ale. I went in about a quarter past eleven. I found the prisoner Adams there, and entered into conversation with her. We went out together to her house, which is two doors from the public-house, up a yard. I went into the house with her. There are two rooms in the house that I saw; one upstairs and one down. There is a fire-place in the one down stairs and a set pot. After I had been there some time the pri­soner Watson came. That was about a Quarter past twelve. There was nobody in the house besides us three. After we had all been there sometime, some conversation took place between me and the prisoners. I charged them with stealing a silk handkerchief. They both denied it. It being a favourite handkerchief, I then offered to give them five shillings if they would produce it. Still they did not produce it. After that I went into the upper room. I followed Adams up with the light. Prisoner Watson followed. I thought I would go and see for myself. When I got to the top of the stairs, I saw the prisoner Adams lift one end of a trunk off the floor, and the other prisoner took up the silk handkerchief and se­creted it underneath her gown. Previously to this, after the prisoner Watson came in, neither of the prisoners had left the room. Before this Adams had left the room and brought Watson back with her. After being up-stairs to look for the handkerchief I came down and went to the front door, to prevent egress by that door. I called "Watch,” and whilst doing so, the prisoner Watson came up to me and put her arm round my neck – I thought to pull me away from the door – but she removed my watch from my left hand pocket. A police constable named Slack came up immediately afterwards. I charged them with stealing the handkerchief and watch. I saw the handkerchief when it was found. It was found under the copper set pot near the fire-place, close to where Watson was sitting.
By the Chairman:- Adams was sitting on the hearth when the watch was taken from me. This straggling took place at the door that leads into the house.
Examination by Mr. West resumed:- During the evening I had given my watch to Adams. I took it off my neck and placed it in her hand, until I came down stairs, for safety. When I came down stain I got the watch back again, and I am quite sure 1 never gave it up again after that.
The two prisoners cross-examined the prosecutor a short time, during which it appeared that he had sent out in the early part of his visit for a shilling's worth of gin. The other facts elicited are unfit for publication.
Re-examined by Mr. West:- When Adams went out she brought Watson back with her. I did not give the watch to Watson at all, or make any promise of it. I left the house about four o'clock.
Thomas Slack, policeman, No. 17, was next called, and on being sworn, said: I was on my beat on Thursday morning about four o'clock. I was in Kirkgate in Wakefield. 1 heard a cry of “Watchman,” and I went to the house where the prosecutor was. The house belongs to [occu­pied by] Adams. I did not know her, as she has only been there about eight or ten days. I charged the prisoners with stealing his watch and handkerchief. I searched the house, but found nothing. Adams went up stairs with a light, and I searched the upper room, but found nothing. When 1 came down stairs again I observed the handker­chief thrown under the “pot hoile,” in the grate, near where Watson was sitting. I found nothing else. I then took the prisoners into custody to the police-office. On our way I charged them with the robbery, but they both denied having anything to do with either the handkerchief or the watch. The prosecutor charged Watson with stealing the watch, which she plumply denied. I took them to Mrs. Chipstead.
Ursula Chipstead was then called, and on being sworn said, — I am the wife of the Superintendent Constable. On Thursday morning the two prisoners were brought to me.
I searched Adams first but found nothing upon her. I then searched Watson, but before doing so she said she had not seen the watch.    When I searched her, after unloosing her dress, I found the watch under her left arm, close under her shoulder. This was the case for the prosecution.
On being asked if they had anything to say in defence, Adams declared her innocence - and Watson, in making a similar statement, entered into an account as to the circumstances under which the watch had been given her. She said that after receiving it she placed it in her bosom, and that it afterwards slid down under her arm, where it was found. After stating that the prosecutor was the worse for liquor, Watson continued in her statement, but it was of a nature we cannot transcribe.
The Policeman Slack was recalled, and in answer to the Chairman said that the prosecutor did not appear to be ailing anything so far as regarded drink.
The Chairman then summed up, and after recapitulating leading points of the evidence above given – during which he intimated that he thought the house was not a very reputable place for any gentleman to be at from a quarter past eleven to four in the morning – he concluded by informing the jury that if they were satisfied that the parties were in collusion, no matter by which of the two the articles had been stolen – they must find them both equally guilty.
The jury then consulted for a few minutes, and re­turned a verdict of Not Guilty in reference to both prisoners.


Huddersfield Chronicle 9 August 1851 (transcribed by Keith Rothery)
ASSAULTING THE POLICE.—William Hulke was charged with having on the night of the 28th ult. unlawfully assaulted Police-constable White, whilst in the execution of his duty. Mr. J. I. Freeman appeared for the de­fendant, and, before the case was gone into, he submitted that as the defendant had already pleaded guilty to a charge of being drunk and disorderly the justice of the present charge, which arose out of the previous one, would be fully met by the defendant paying expenses. – The bench replied that if the first charge had been brought by the police there would have been some force in Mr. Freeman's remark, but as they were from different parties, the case must proceed. – The complainant was then sworn. He said that on the night of the 28th ult. he was on duty in New-street, when he heard someone call “Watch” and proceeding in the direction whence the sound came, he found the defendant and Mr. Richardson at the foot of Chancery-lane, the former in a state of intoxica­tion. He asked if they had called “Watch,” when Mr. Richardson replied “Yes,” and gave the defendant into his charge. Under the circumstances he declined taking him into custody, but ordered him away. The defendant refused to go, and upon his (the officer) taking hold of him he seized him (the officer) by the coat and began kicking his legs very violently, and they both fell to the ground. On recovering himself the officer proceeded to remove the defendant to the Police office, and when opposite the Boot and Shoe Inn he obtained the assistance of Woollen inspector Kaye, to whom, at his request, he gave up the defendant, on his promising to go home quietly.   They left him and crossed the top of King-street, when the defendant turned stupid and would go no further, upon which he (the officer) went back again, and, with great difficulty, suc­ceeded in taking the defendant to the police-office, but the injuries he received from the defendant's violence were such as to render him unable to go on his beat for two nights. – Cross-examined: – He wished the defendant several times to go away peaceably, but he would not.  He did not strike him with his stick, nor did he seize him by the throat and drag him.  He did not begin thrashing him when they got into the street. The people about did not cry out “Shame,” on the contrary, if he had allowed them to have their full fling they would have torn the defendant to pieces. He did not tear the defendant's coat: it was torn when his mother and a prostitute attempted to rescue him.  – Woollen-inspector Kaye said, that about ten o'clock on Monday night, hearing a great noise in the streets he came out of the Boot and Shoe, when he saw the officer taking the defendant into custody. The defendant said they were taking him to prison, but, if the officer would allow him, he would go home with him (Kaye). The officer consented, and witness and defendant crossed the street, when the latter refused to go any further, and the officer returned and again took him into custody. The crowd was very in­dignant and said that if it had been any of them the officer would not have allowed them an opportunity to go home. The defendant resisted the officer. – Cross-examined:- He first saw the parties near the Boot and Shoe: Hulke was on his back and White was dragging him along. He never saw White use a stick. The defendant was taken into cus­tody a second time because he would not go any further than Henshall’s corner. The coat was torn when he (Kaye) got hold of him, but he believed it was torn at the top of King-street. He had frequently seen the defendant during the week, and he complained of suffering from pain. – The com­plainant was proceeding to call another policeman, when the Chairman said he thought it was unnecessary to call further evidence of that character, observing that it would be much better if the police in bringing such charges could obtain evidence apart from their own body. – Mr Freeman then addressed the bench, observing that a great deal more had been made of this case than it called for, in con­sequence of the public position which the defendant held. There was no doubt, he said, that had the defendant been a private individual, the justice of the case would have been fully answered by the first conviction. He should call evidence for the defence to prove that the officer had used undue violence, and that the defendant had been most shamefully treated. – Joseph Armitage said he had been to a lodge supper, at the Plough Inn, and was going home about ten o'clock, when he met the defendant at the Vic­toria. He stopped there about five minutes, after which he came out again, and on passing Mr. Hardy's shop, he saw the policeman having hold of the defendant at the bottom of Chancery-lane. The defendant would not go with the officer, when the latter took his stick and struck him a blow over the head.   The policeman dragged him along the streets, and struck him several times. He went and told the defendant’s mother that they were taking “William” to the lock-up. There were complaints from the crowd both ways. – In cross- examination this witness contradicted the whole of his previous statement, and was severely rebuked by the bench. After making several con­fused statements, he ultimately said that he only saw the officer strike the defendant once. – Adam Bottomley, a milkman, stated that he saw the officer and defendant near to the Boot and Shoe Inn. The policeman had Hulke down. Hulke would not go with the officer, and kept throwing out his hands to get bold of someone in the crowd. The officer then rapped him over the knuckles. He rapped him several times pretty sharply. The crowd cried out “Shame” on the policeman. He (witness) was going to take hold of defendant and try to take him home when the officer threatened to strike him if he inter­fered. He did not see the officer strike the defendant on the head. He did not see the coat torn. – Cross-examined: He did see the officer strike the defendant over the knuckles. – Louisa Turner said she saw the parties in King-street. The policeman was dragging the defendant very violently, and she saw him strike the latter over the knuckles. Many parties said it was a great shame. She saw the officer strike defendant over the head with great force. The officer dragged him shamefully down King-street. She followed them to the Police-office, where the officer tore his coat. She was certain the coat was tore near to the Police-office. – The witness was cross-examined but her evidence remained unshaken. – Mr. William Moore, postmaster, was then called by the complainant to prove that unnecessary violence had not been exercised, but he did not appear to have witnessed the proceedings in King-street. Woollen-inspector Kaye was also re-called, and in answer to the bench, said that the defendant’s coat was torn in King-street. This was the case, and after a short consulta­tion, the bench inflicted a penalty of 10s., and expenses 15s.

ATTEMPT TO RESCUE. – Adam Bottomley, one of the witnesses in the above case, was then charged with attempt­ing to rescue William Hulke from the custody of the police, on the night of Monday the 28th. The bench re­commended the case to be withdrawn, and it was ac­cordingly done so.

Huddersfield Chronicle 13 September 1851 (transcribed by Keith Rothery)
“TAKING, NOTES” ON A LAND CRUISE.—William Hulke, a soi disant “reporter,” was brought up, charged with, on the 2nd instant, assaulting Policeman Ramsden White.  Mr J. I. Freeman was for the defendant. The case had been adjourned from the previous Tuesday, and it appeared that the defendant had accompanied his brother Benjamin on his celebrated land cruise, for the purpose, we presume, of taking observations, and, as old Cap'n Cuttle says “making a note of it.” We are not enlightened as to the contents of “Jack's log,” or the mysterious hieroglyphics of the “Note-book,” but we understand that after beating to windward for several hours, and tacking from one point of the “licensed victuallers” compass to another, Jack and his companion finally “broke off,” and “falling to leaward,” succeeded in making about midnight Lockwood's Yard, three sheets in the wind. The weather was only squally, and meeting with some land craft who had never touched salt water, they soon “jouled,” and in “running out” they ran down upon a, party of “blues,” when the squalls rose to a perfect hurricane. There is no doubt the “reporter” observed Cap'n Cuttle’s advice, and “made a note of it,” but as the notes are likely to remain “untranscribed,” the public will not be afforded “a graphic narrative by an eye witness.” The fortunes of war were unfavourable, and Jack having dropped anchor unwillingly at “Chokey,” his companion took up arms against this sea of troubles, and by opposing – found himself ignominiously within the grasp of an old enemy. He struggled and kicked in vain, for the grip of a “blue” is inflexible, and it was not until “a full note” had been taken of him that he was liberated. The simple facts of the case were to the effect that the officer, whilst on duty on the night of the 2nd instant, heard a noise in Lockwood’s Yard, and proceeding thither, he found the defendant and his family creating a disturbance. The officer requested him to be quiet, but the defendant refused and retaliated by the most violent abuse and threats. In the end he was taken into custody, and on being removed to the station-house they both fell, when the defendant attempted to kick the officer over the head. The evidence in support of the charge proved the use of very abusive language, but failed in fully corroborating the assault. In reply to the charge, Mr. Freeman submitted that it was not proved, and referring to a previous charge preferred against the defendant by the same officer, con­tended that the latter was actuated solely by ill-feeling in bringing this charge. The bench were not satisfied with the proof, and the summons was discharged on payment of expenses.

Death: 1878, in Huddersfield district, Yorkshire West Riding, England, aged 61

Census:
1841: Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding: William Hulke is aged 20 (rounded down to nearest 5 years)
1851: William M. Hulke, son, is aged 34, born in Southwark, Surrey
1861: 8 Love's Yard, Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding
1871: Bradford Road Cottage, Huddersfield, Yorkshire West Riding


Sources:

William King Hulke

William King Hulke
William King Hulke
Birth: August 1819, in Deal, Kent, England

Baptism: 15 September 1820, in Deal, Kent, England

Father: William Hulke

Mother: Elizabeth Pollard (King) Hulke

William King Hulke and Ann (Street) Hulke
William King Hulke and Ann (Street) Hulke (1903)
photo by W. A. Collis published in the Supplement to the Auckland Weekly News 25 June 1903 p4, posted at Auckland Libraries
Married: Ann Street in 1854

Ann was born on 21 August 1830, in Boyton, Cornwall, England, and baptised on 26 December 1830, in Boyton, the daughter of Joseph Street and Mary Samells. When she was twelve, she emigrated to New Zealand with her parents and 5 siblings, leaving from Plymouth on 22 June 1841 and arriving in New Plymouth in steerage aboard the Oriental on 7 November 1841. A sister of Ann's was born on the voyage, and named Caroline Oriental Street. Ann died on 22 July 1916, in New Plymouth, New Zealand, and probate of her will was granted on 4 August 1916 to Henry Pote.
Will dated 30 November 1908 with codicil dated 27 September 1909:
THIS IS THE LAST WILL and Testament of me ANN HULKE of the Corbett Road near New Plymouth in New Zealand Widow I APPOINT HENRY POTE of Bell Block near New Plymouth aforesaid Storekeeper sole Executor of this my Will I GIVE DEVISE AND BEQUEATH all my real and personal property of whatsoever nature and wheresoever situate unto the said Henry Pote UPON TRUST to sell call in and convert into money the same or such part thereof as shall not consist of money and with and out of my ready money and the proceeds of such sale calling in and conversion to pay my debts and funeral and testamentary expenses (including legacy or death duty) and the costs and expenses of such sale calling in and conversion AND upon further trust to pay the following legacies namely to ELLEN P. HULKE and FANNY CHARLOTTE HULKE of Deal in the County of Kent in England sisters of my late husband William King Hulke equally between them the sum of Eight hundred pounds or if only one of them shall survive me then to pay the said sum of Eight hundred pounds to such survivor to my sister CAROLINE HOSKIN of Bell Block Widow the sum of One hundred and fifty pounds or if she shall not survive me to pay the same to Gertrude Lee the wife of Thomas Herbert Lee of Urenui to the said GERTRUDE LEE the sum of Three hundred and fifty pounds to MABEL JANE WALKER the wife of Arthur D. Walker of Hgaire the sum of Three hundred pounds to FREDERICK FRY HOSKIN of Onaero the sum of One hundred and ten pounds to EMMA HALL the wife of Harold Hall of Fitzroy near New Plymouth the sum of fifty pounds to GLADYS LEE the daughter of the said Gertrude Lee the sum of Fifty pounds to DOROTHY WALKER daughter of the said Mabel Jane Walker the sum of Fifty pounds and to the Trustees of Pukekura Park at New Plymouth the sum of One hundred pounds AND I authorise and direct the said Henry Pote if he shall undertake the execution of this my will to retain the sum of Forty pounds as a recompense for his trouble as such executor AND I DECLARE that if after payment of the foregoing legacies any surplus shall remain such surplus shall be divided between the beficiaries hereinbefore named in proportion to the amounts bequeathed to such beneficiaries respectively AND I hereby revoke all former testamentary dispositions made by me IN WITNESS whereof I have hereto subscribed my name this thirtieth day of November One thousand nine hundred and eight.
      ANN HULKE.
SIGNED by the said Ann Hulke as and for her las Will and testament in the presence of us both present at the same time who at her request in her sight and presence and in the sight and presence of each other have hereto subscribed our names as attesting witnesses.
    J. E. Wilson  Solicitor New Plymouth
    Wilfred D. Webster  Law Clerk  New Plymouth

THIS IS A CODICIL to the last Will and Testament of me ANN HULKE formerly of the Corbett Road near New Plymouth in New Zealand but now of New Plymouth aforesaid Widow which Will bears date the thirtieth day of November 1908 I REVOKE the legacy of Eight hundred pounds bequeathed to Ellen P. Hulke and Fanny Charlotte Hulke by my said Will and in lieu thereof bequeath to them or the survivor of them the sum of Six hundred pounds and direct that my will shall be read as if the sum of Six hundred pounds had been mentioned in the bequest to the said ELLEN P. HULKE and FANNY CHARLOTTE HULKE instead of the sum of Eight hundred pounds I GIVE to IDA POTE the daughter of Henry Pote the sum of Fifty pounds I GIVE to the New Plymouth Borough Council the sum of Fifty pounds to be expended in improving the Esplanade between New Plymouth and Moturoa I GIVE to the Taranaki Hospital and Charitable Aid Board the sum of One hundred pounds AND in all other respects I hereby confirm my said Will IN WITNESS whereof I have hereto signed my name this twenty seventh day of September One thousand nine hundred and nin.
      ANN HULKE.
SIGNED by the said Ann Hulke as a Codicil to her last Will and Testament in the presence of us both present at the same time who at her request in her sight and presence and in the sight and presence of each other have hereto signed our names as attesting witnesses.
    J. E. Wilson  Solicitor New Plymouth
    F. K. Turnbull  Law Clerk  New Plymouth  


Children: William and Ann brought up a niece, Mabel Ann Street, "as their own child". Mary Ann born in 1876, one of the ten children of Ann's youngest brother, Romulus and Jane Barribal.

Occupation: Dairy Farmer
William started as an apprentice in the East India Company but disliked the sea life, and moved to a farm in Pembrokeshire. After emigrating to New Zealand in 1840, William was briefly a store-keeper in Wanganui, returning to Wellington in 1841 where he sailed to Sydney to purchase a herd of dairy cows as well as horses and sheep, and he started dairy and vegetable farming on the Miramar Peninsula, but in late 1842 he moved back to Wanagnui to establish a flour mill with machinery he had recently imported from England. This mill was destroyed by the natives on the outbreak of the
Queen Street in New Plymouth
Queen Street in New Plymouth c1870. The Union Mill is the building on the Mangaotuki stream which would turn the waterwheel.
war of 1845 and in 1847 he moved the mill machinery to New Plymouth to build the Union mill on Queen Street.

In the 1850's a section of land was purchased from the Maoris, and William bought farm land at Bell Block, a couple of miles north of New Plymouth, and lived there in a cottage "Hawetaone" with his new wife. The Land wars starting in the 1860s drove the Hulkes back to New Plymouth for safety. William served as a signalman at the Hua Fort, better known as the Bell Block stockade. At this centre all messages were received from surrounding districts and forwarded to headquarters at Marsland Hill, New Plymouth. William kept diaries include the wording of signals that Hulke received and sent and also contains his own remarks about the day-to-day operation of the war. These diaries are now kept at the Puke Ariki Heritage Collection in New Plymouth.

Back in New Plymouth, William turned his attention to nurseries, laying out a nursery for the growth and cultivation of New Zealand flax in Pendarves Street, soon to be leased to the New Zealand government and known as the New Zealand Flax Gardens. William grew specimens for the Botanic Gardens in Wellington, examples of which can still be seen there, and records from this nursery are held at the Puke Ariki Heritage Collection in New Plymouth.
Egmont Mill in New Plymouth
Photograph of a watercolour of the Egmont Steam Flour Mill, New Plymouth late 1860s
In 1866, William, along with F. and W. Webster, built a new flour mill known as the Egmont Steam Flour Mill on Currie Street.
Taranaki Herald 22 September 1866 p3
THE EGMONT STEAM FLOUR MILL.
A building of a more pretentious character than is usually to be met with in small colonial towns has lately been erected in New Plymouth ; and has attracted a good deal of notice both from inhabitants and visitors. We allude to the Egmont Steam Flour Mill, whose existence is due to the enterprise of Mr. Hulke. As this is the first steam flour mill which has been erected in Taranaki, a brief description of it may be interesting to our readers, and will also serve to show to our well-wishers in other parts of the world that we have by no means been crushed by our misfortunes.
  The building, which occupies a conspicuous position at the Carrington road end of Currie-street, is 78 feet long by 31 feet wide, with an altitude of about 50 feet. The foundation walls are of stone, being 9 feet in the ground and 4 feet in thickness. The basement story is also of stone, and is 13 feet in height, with walls 2 feet 6 inches thick. The stone used was the ordinary beach stone. The upper part of the building is of wood, with battened sides ; and the whole is roofed with corrugated iron. Red pine and kauri were the timbers used in the construction of the building, the scantling being of the former and the flooring of the latter. The principal scantling is very heavy, being 10 inches square. Indeed, the whole building is built in a very massive style, and we question whether another building of the same size could be found in New Zealand to compare with it in that respect. For examplo, the flooring joists of the second story are 14 x 9 inches ; and the flooring throughout is 3 inches thick, and tougued with iron.
  The chief room in the basement will be occupied as an engine-room. The machinery is now being fitted up by Mr. Gibson, brother of Capt. Gibson, Harbor Master. Part of tho second story is occupied as an agricultural agency office, for the negotiation of sales and purchase of farm produce and stock. Every facility is afforded for the dry storage of large quantities of goods. We must not forget to mention that registers are kept of houses or land for sale or to let, stock to be sold, &c., an inspection of which would, in many cases, save much loss of time. An agency of this kind has long been wanted, and will no doubt meet with ample support. In the other part of this story two pairs of French millstones will be worked. Although it is only intended to use two pairs at present, arrangements have been made for the reception of four pairs. Close at hand we see bean, corn, and oat-crushing machines. Ascending to the next floor, we see a fine silk-dressing flour machine. On each side of the room is a row of stout uprights, placed there, we presume, to resist the vibration of the machinery. The same thing has been done in the room below. A fourth story and a fine loft offer storage accommodation for an immense quantity of goods. Ample precautions have been taken against fire by placing a 400 gallon iron tank, fitted with pipes, &c, on each of the floors, and as the Huatoki river is hard by, a plentiful supply of water could be readily obtained in case of need. We may here be permitted to remark that some of our storekeepers might wisely follow the example of the proprietors of the Egmont .Mill, and place water tanks in their premises to serve in case of fire.
  The contract for the masonry was executed in a most workmanlike manner by Mr. N. Hooker, and the carpenter's work was performed no less satisfactorily by Messrs. Bull & Bond. The whole establishment is highly creditable to colonial enterprise, and shows that we have still capitalists amongst us who have a firm belief in the future prosperity of Taranaki.

As well as milling grain, the mill dealt in bones and grass seed. A sign outside in 1872 proclaimed:
Bones! Bones! Bones!
We will buy your bones.
Or anyone else's bones.

Tawhiti Flour Mill
The Tawhiti Flour Mill near Hawera, New Zealand

In 1881 William, then returned to farming, also built a flour mill at Tawhiti, near Hawera.

In 1876, William sold his flax gardens to Mr. Courtney and returned to farm at Bell Block and began a pure-bred Jersey "model farm" on the Corbett Road, promoting the dairy industry. Famously he bought a prize Jersey cow "Jenny"  from Edith Halcombe in Marton, and, with no way to transport her, he put a rope halter round her neck and walked her the 250km to his Bell Block farm. The small caramel coloured Jenny turned out to be a fine milk producer and usually won the champion ribbon in the show rings. In 1883, William won a prestigious national prize for his herd of Jerseys milkers, which was made up of Jenny and her calves. At this time the English shorthorn made up most dairy herds, but William's success led other farmers to take a closer look at the Jersey breed and soon Jersey herds outranked all others in the district. William Hulke was one of the first to see the benefit of the dairy factory system, supplying dairy products to Europe rather than just for the local market. To do this William believed that industrial factory procedures needed to be applied to dairy farming and between June and September 1880 the Taranaki Herald ran a series of thirteen articles ‘On Dairy Farming’ by William Hulke in which William detailed his ideas of a thoroughly modernised, professional approach to dairying. He dealt with dairy breeds, herd management, and the details of quality milking shed and dairy equipment and its use. These articles were published on these dates: 4 June 1880, 1 July 1880, 8 July 1880, 16 July 1880, 22 July 1880, 29 July 1880, 5 August 1880, 12 August 1880, 19 August 1880, 26 August 1880, 3 September 1880 and 9 September 1880, and were followed up in 1882 with a booklet titled "Golden Rules for Butter Making". Readers were advised that they could see all the modern methods demonstrated at Hulke's experimental dairy on Corbett Road. William's contribution to the development of a modern dairy industry in Taranaki was widely recognised, and in 1903 the local agricultural society made a presentation to Willam and Ann, noting the value of their contribution.
Taranaki Herald 13 June 1903 p5
The Dairy Industry.
  PRESENTATION TO MR W. K. HULKE.
  As an appreciation of his services in connection with the advancement of the dairy industry Mr W. K. Hulke, of Bell Block, was this (Saturday) afternoon, presented with a handsomely illuminated address ; and Mrs Hulke was also presented with a handsome clock. The presentation took place at 2 o'clock in the Town Hiall. Most of the subscribers to the address were present, and several ladies were also among the company.
  Mr Mayor, Mr K. Cock, presided, and after explaining the object of the meeting, he called on Mr Newton King, the President of the Agricultural Society, to make the presentation.
DESCRIPTION OF THE ADDRESS.
The address, which was executed at Messrs Hooker and Scott's, is enclosed in a massive oak frame, gilt edged. It is beautifully illuminated, and along each border is a series of pictures emblematic of the dairying industry. The top picture shows a dairy maid skimming milk and a barrel churn ; and the next one the maid making butter in rolls. These are the old styles. The left side pictures represent the modern churn, and the separator. The right hand border has representations of testers etc., that are now used in the industry. The whole bottom border is taken up with a picture of a Taranaki dairy farm, showing Mt. Egmont in the background, and a herd of Jersey cows, Mr Hulke's favourite breed, in a paddock in front of the typical fasmhouse. The front cow represented in the herd is taken from a photograph of Mr Hulke's favourite Jersey cow Jennie.
    THE ADDRESS.
  The address reads "William King Hulke. Esq.—Dear Sir,—As one of the earliest and most persistent advocates of the necessity for improving the dairy products of Taranaki we, a few of those who have cause to remember your labours in this connection, desire to convey to you our hearty thanks. It must be most gratifying to you to see the development that has taken place during the past 15 years, in which period the old system of individual production by old fashioned methods has given place to united efforts and the employment of modern forms of manufacture by mechanical means. That in such a few years the value of farm land has more than trebled and our herds improved in quality and number until the value of our output for one seasion has aggregated nearly half a million sterling must give you great satisfaction, for it is largely owing to your enthusiasm that the pioneers of this important industry were induced to make their initial effort. We congratulate you, sir, on having urged on a system that has produced such magnificent results, and we trust you and Mrs Hulke may long be spared to enjoy the pleasure of witnessing around you the steadily improving results of' your efforts. We are, dear sir, yours faithfully.—R. Cock, T. Kelly, Walter Bewley, H. King, W. Peattie, J. C. Davies, H. Okey, James Wade, J. B. Connett, F. J. Morris, R. C. Clemow, A. J. Hoskin, T. Western, O. Samuel, A. Drake, W. D. Webster, J. C. Honeyfield, Captain Cornwall, J. Rendall, J. B. Veale, W. Rowe, Chew Chong, W. J. Honeyfield, G. V. Tate, Newton King, J. C. George, B. Honeyfield, H. B. Lepper, T. Brash, W. L. Newman, R. Street, H. H. Olson, J. H. Armstrong Capt. Mace, H. Faull, S. Knucky, T. Wright, J. Brown, H. Rattenbury." The number of subscribers was limited to 40.

Notes: William emigrated to New Zealand arriving in Wellington aboard the London on 12 December 1840.
Hulke Crescent
Hulke Crescent in Bell Block, New Plymouth is named for William King Hulke.
photo from Kete New Plymouth

Hulke Crescent in Bell Block, New Plymouth is named for William King Hulke.

William related his memories of his early days in New Zealand to W. H. Skinner, and these were printed in the Taranaki Herald shortly after William's death:
Taranaki Herald 24 October 1908 p3
    EARLY REMINISCENCES.
[Related by the late Mr W. K. Hulke to Mr. W. H. Skinner.]
  When we landed at Wellington (on December 12, 1840) the temporary town or settlement, which had been established at Petone, was in the act of removal to the foreshore along Lambton harbour, the permanent and present site of Wellington City. We of the London were amongst the No. 2 selectors of orders of choice from the New Zealand Land Company, and we found upon arrival that the whole of the available rural and suburban land at the Hutt and in and around Wellington had been absorbed, by the selectors of No. 1 order of choice, and that there was nothing in the shape of Company's lands available nearer than 100 to 120 miles distance from Wellington. As we were all most anxious to see our future holdings and to get into occupation with as little delay as possible, a party was organised to walk overland to the Wanganui river, where the No. 2 selectors were to be located. Accordingly on December 19, 1840, we set out, twelve or fourteen in all. Mr E. Dorset was one of the number and we had a young Englishwoman, an emigrant by the London, who had run away with the "Chips" of that vessel, who was also one of the party. Our track lay along the old Maori pathway through what is now Johnsonville and Tawa Flat, coming out on to Cook's Straits at the entrance to Porirua harbour. It was our intention to stay the night here at the Maori pa, but we altered our plans somewhat hurriedly. Just prior to our arrival at this settlement a small war party had returned from worrying and harrying the original tribes of the Sounds across the Strait, and a considerable amount of excitement prevailed amongst the Natives. My attention was attracted to a fine war canoe drawn up on the beach, and I was greatly struck with its size and beauty of line and ornament. Within the canoe lay many articles belonging to the returned war party, and amongst these was a red gin case, an article very common in the early colonial days. Prompted by curiosity I raised the lid and found that the case was full of the fine white feathers and down of sea birds. Pushing my hand in I felt something solid but damp, and upon withdrawing it I noticed blood on my fingers. Brushing aside the feathers I then saw lying at the bottom of the box, to my horror, a fully tattooed human head but recently severed from the trunk. I immediately closed the box and hurriedly got our party together and told them of what I had just seen. We at once decided to move on, and our party spent the night somewhere about Paekakariki.
  At the Porirua pa we had met a Mr Walpole, who had come around from Port Nicholson by boat. Mr Walpole and the boat's crew had been engaged by a Mrs Howell to go in search of her husband, who had been reported to have been killed by the Natives at Rangitikei. Mr Howell had chartered a small schooner to take up stores for the surveyors who were about to start work at Wanganui for the New Zealand Company. Mr Walpole and his crew sailed on as far as Otaki, where they left the boat with the resident Natives and joined forces with our party, and we journed on together from this point. Before leaving Wellington we had engaged a Portuguese as a guide and interpreter at the rate of ten shillings a day. He had a Maori wife. Before we had gone very far we discovered that this man had never been to Wanganui and knew no more than we did of the route. However, we could not very well dispense with him as his services and those of his wife were required as interpreters.
 Leaving Otaki we kept along the beautiful beach which runs for miles almost due north and was delightfully firm and smooth for walking. Passing Waikanae we were greeted by a large party of Natives, quite 100, who were gathering shell-fish at low water. They stopped us to enquire our errand and to gaze for the first time in their lives upon a white woman. They were intensely curious and interested in the woman of our party, and this was the case all along our journey, wherever we encountered the Maori inhabitants. By the time we arrived at the Manawatu river our provisions were quite exhausted. Hearing from some Natives there that white men were living a few miles up the river two of us secured a small canoe and started off up stream in search of pakeha food. We were not long in coming to a small settlement, where we found two Americans, brothers, called Lewis, who were building a smallcraft for the coasting trade. They were very kind and hospitable, but were only able to spare one small kit of potatoes, and as our party numbered thirteen we were in a decidedly awkward fix. We decided there and then to push on as fast as we could to Rangitikei, the next Maori settlement, where, it was thought, we could obtain supplies of potatoes and pork. A short distance before coming to the Rangitikei we discovered on the beach the remains of Howell's missing schooner, partly burnt. Our suspicions were aroused, as we suspected foul play by the Natives. No one was to be seen near the wreck; no sign of the crew or of any living thing connected with the ship was observed; but as we approached a dead dog was seen lying about high water mark, which Mr Walpole recognised as the pet of Mr Howell, the owner and one of the ship's company. As the Rangitikei village was a little further on we decided to stop where we were and reconnoitre. Accordingly we camped down in the flax above high water, and after dark the Portuguese guide and his Maori wife were sent forward towards the pa to pick up information. About midnight they returned and told us that they had listened at a safe distance to the conversation of the Rangitikei Natives and they were not at all favourably impressed with the tone of these people. The greater part of the plunder of Howell's vessel was in the hands of these Natives, and our guides said we should get past whilst it was dark, as it was hard to say what they would do with us if they discovered our party on the morrow so close to the settlement. We immediately acted upon this advice, and, keeping well down towards the tide, marched silently past, forded the river in single file, and kept on till daylight, when we drew up into the flax and rested a while.
  Moving on again, we came to the most formidable obstruction of our journey, the Wangaehu river, which we reached about the top of high water. Several of the party could not swim, myself amongst the number. We dared not stay for the tide to run out, as we were all the time expecting the Rangitikei Maoris to follow us up, and the difficulties of trying to ford the river inland were too great to be attempted. The Maori woman told us how to make a moki, or raft, and soon the whole party were at work gathering flax sticks, which we rapidly bound together in fair sized bundles, two or more of which were bound side by side. Upon these we laid our clothes, blankets, etc. Those who could swim then towed them across, the non-swimmers, hanging on behind the moki in twos or threes, supported themselves above the water, and in the course of a very short time the whole party with our belongings were safely over this dangerous river. That night we slept near the mouth of the Turakina river; and the following evening, December 30, 1840, we arrived at the Wanganui river, and found that the New Zealand Company's surveyor had come into the river a few hours before us by cutter direct from Wellington.
(To be Continued.)
Taranaki Herald 26 October 1908 p7
  EARLY REMINISCENCES.
[Related by the late Mr W. K. Hulke to Mr. W. H. Skinner.]
(Continued from Saturday)
   The surveyors were camped at the Putiki pa, of which Hori Kingi was the chief. We also received a hearty welcome from these people to stay here a few days. Then we crossed over to the north bank of the river where it was understood the new town would be laid out. Here, on the site of the present town of Wanganui, were two large raupo whares, or more properly, houses, which had been built by a Native called Rangi Taura. This man lived a short distance up the river, where the railway bridge now crosses, and had been induced to build these houses upon the recommendation of Colonel Wakefield in expectation of the arrival of pakeha settlers and the prospect of their sale at his own figure. We, that is, Mr. Dorset, myself, and two others were fortunate enough to secure one of the raupo buildings, which stood close to Churton's Creek, near the sand hills, and of course near to the river bank. We offered Rangi £40 in trade for the place, but he insisted on having moni koura (money gold), and nothing else would satisfy him. He asked two sovereigns for the whare, which we readily gave. At the end of a week Rangi returned, looking very downcast, and told us he had been porangi, or mad to ask for the gold, which he quickly spent, and now requested that we go back to our original offer of £40 in trade. We could not agree to this, but as we got a bargain we decided to give him £20 worth of trade, for which Rangi was profoundly thankful, and from that time until I finally left Wanganui he was one of the best friends I had there. He never forgot our liberal dealing with him and always did me a good turn if it lay in his power. In this building was opened the first store in Wanganui. Messrs. Dorset, Keith, Barley Bros, (of Bristol), and myself each put or were supposed to £100 into the business. Soon after these events the schooner Elizabeth and the cutter Harriett brought a number of settlers and their effects, amongst whom were Messrs. Nixon, Wicksteed, Popham King, and Churton.
  Mr. Hulke did not remain long in Wanganui, but returned to Wellington by the schooner Harriett. He found life too fast in the embryo settlement for his taste, and an attempt having been made to burn down the store by the rowdy and drinking element of the place, because he would not join in the nightly debauch, he sold out his interest in the store to his partners for £30, thus losing heavily on his first business venture in New Zealand. A fortnight after returning to Wellington he was again on the move. This time he went to Sydney at the instance of Mr. Revans, proprietor of the New Zealand Gazette, the first newspaper published in the colony, and Captain Smith, Surveyor-General. His business was to purchase a herd of dairy cows, which he did, selecting the animals from the Cow Pass district of New South Wales and paying £7 per head all round. He also purchased three or four horses, about 100 sheep, and six working bullocks. With great good luck and management, this cargo was landed in New Zealand without the loss of a single head, except one bullock which perished in the attempt; to swim ashore from the ship, which discharged near to Oriental Bay. It was one of the first shipments of stock to Wellington, and at this time and for some time afterwards all stock was landed on the harbour foreshore near the junction of Kent and Cambridge Terraces with Courtney Place. Near by, the deep sluggish swampy outlet to the large morass, or bog, now known as the Basin Reserve, ran into the harbour. This creek and bog claimed a large number of victims amongst the stock of the early Wellington settlers. Quite 150, to Mr. Hulke's knowledge, must have perished in this death trap. The earthquake of 1853 changed the contour of this part of Wellington, the land rising bodily some feet above sea level. The commotion in the bog during the time of the great shock was terrifying, hundreds of tons of liquid mud being hurled bodily out of the morass on to the adjoining slopes.
—  The dairy cows brought over by Mr. Hulke were run on the land at the head of Evan's Bay, near to the present suburb of Kilbirnie, and partly on the Miramar Peninsula. Here Mr. Hulke started a small dairy farm and market garden, taking his produce into the town by means of a light cart drawn by a bull in shafts. On one occasion Mr Hulke had taken in a load of vegetables on market day—Saturday—and, having disposed of his wares, drove his steed to Barrett's Hotel, where it was his intention to dine. Leaving the bull and cart outside he had only just entered when the twelve o'clock, gun boomed out close at hand. This so startled the bull that it rushed straight ahead into the harbour—near the site of the present Government Railway passenger station—which at this part ran out shallow for some distance. The animal turned neither to the right nor to the left, but kept straight on, and getting into deep water at last essayed to swim, but being harnessed to the cart it was greatly handicapped and eventually drowned. The carcass was secured by aid of a boat and brought ashore and sold for £10 to an enterprising butcher. Beef in those days was scarce and dear, so the tradesman secured a bargain and doubtless made a big profit out of the drowned bull.
   In the latter part of 1842 Mr Hulke returned to Wanganui, and turned his attention to milling, erecting a flour mill—windmill—with part of the machinery he had recently imported from England. This mill was destroyed by the natives on the outbreak of the war of 1845.
(To be continued.)
Taranaki Herald 27 October 1908 p3
    EARLY REMINISCENCES.
[Related by the late Mr W. K. Hulke to Mr. W. H. Skinner.]
(Continued from yesterday)
  The reason for Mr Hulke's leaving Wanganui in 1841 and sacrificing his business was stated by him thus.—Soon after the establishment of the settlement at Wellington the colony was inundated by a class of undesirables from Sydney and Hobart, the social state of which places at this time was notorious, they being the penal settlements for the British Islands. These undesirables were gradually hunted out of Wellington by the police and many of them drifted to Wanganui, where the strong arm of the law was as yet unknown, and where a lawless state of minor crimes and drunkenness was rampant. Drinking and rioting were engaged in day and night and property was not safe unless one was armed and constantly on the watch. Mr Hulke, on account of his absolute refusal to participate in these drunken sprees, was marked by this "push" for abuse and insult. On one occasion a messenger was sent to him from Mr — that he wished to see him at once at the Company's house or store. Going there and being shown into the room he found a considerable company sitting round a large kind of counter or bar, with — as chairman. He was shown a seat and was informed that all who came there were compelled to obey the rules of the "Club." The first rule was that he was to drink round for round with the president and company, failing which the gin or rum was to be thrown in his face. Mr Hulke was in a trap, the only outlet being by the door, at which a sentry had been placed with a drawn cutlass, with instructions to cut down anyone who attempted to leave without the permission of the president. A pannikin of gin was handed to him in his turn, which he refused to take, and the gin was promptly dashed in his face. Round after round this was repeated, until all the company were showing signs of decided intoxication. Mr Hulke had been watching closely the sentry at the door, who, nobly taking his rum as his turn came round, found it somewhat difficult to stand steadily on his feet. Watching his opportunity Mr Hulke jumped from his seat, pushed over the sentry, who was too far gone to offer any decent resistance, and made his escape. That night a mob of drunken and half-drunken men attempted to raid and burn, Mr. Hulke's store. He was awakened by their noise and, fearing their errand, he hurriedly rose and partly dressed before they reached the store. Arming himself with a heavy manuka canoe paddle, he stood inside the doorway and struck down the first man who entered. The others, seeing what had befallen their leader, hesitated to come on and suggested burning out the "rat," but better counsels prevailed and they withdrew. After this Mr. Hulke decided to leave the place. He left his share of the business in the hands of his partners, but he never received his share of the money put into the venture. Mr — was a prominent figure at these drink socials, but on the occasion just mentioned Mr Hulke noticed, that he was not at the table with the others. After a while he noticed a man stowed away on one of the top shelves of the store, sleeping heavily, and was informed by one of the company that this was —, who got drunk early in the day and had been placed up there on the shelf for safety.
(continued)
     MR. HULKE COMES TO NEW PLYMOUTH.
  In 1847, at the invitation of Mr Flight and other Taranaki settlers, Mr Hulke visited New Plymouth, and after conferring with its people decided to bring on the machinery of his flour mill standing at Wanganui, which had been at a standstill for some time on account of the Maori troubles. A site was fixed upon in Queen Street for the establishment of a water-power flour mill, and a substantial structure was erected, the motor power being provided by the Mangaotuku stream. This mill was called the Union Mill, and was owned for a short time by a company, but eventually passed into the hands of Mr Sam Oliver, who worked it for many years. At his death it passed into the possession of Messrs Honeyfield and Read, and quite recently the old structure was reconstructed by the Crown Dairy Company, which had purchased the property. At the opening of the Union Mill in 1848 a grand fancy dress ball was given, in which the late Sir Francis Dillon Bell and other prominent settlers took a leading part. It was one of the great functions of early New Plymouth and the first fancy dress ball held on the West Coast of New Zealand.
  Upon the opening of the "Bell Block" for settlement in the early fifties, Mr Hulke purchased land there and farmed it. This he continued to do until the outbreak of the Maori war in 1860, when he, with all the other settlers, was driven off and had eventually to seek protection in New Plymouth. About this time he laid out his beautiful gardens in Pendarves Street and for a while carried on the business of nurseryman. His magnificent exhibit of growing flax, covering all the principal varieties of the phormium tenax, is still well remembered.
  About 1866, in conjunction with Messrs F. L. and W. D. Webster, he built the fine steam flour mill in Currie Street, now occupied by Messrs L. D. Nathan and Co. as a warehouse. He also built a mill at Tawhiti, near Hawera. In the early eighties, he returned to Bell Block and started his celebrated model farm on the Corbett Road and set about the forming of that herd of pure-bred Jersey cattle, whose fame has travelled throughout New Zealand. Here for many years he experimented in dairying, and he was one of the first to see and strongly advocate the advantages of the present dairy system. The results of his labour and experiments were widely published and freely given to all inquirers. Many years before the dairy industry was thoroughly established in Taranaki he was a frequent contributor to the columns of the Taranaki Herald on dairying matters. In fact, he may be regarded as the father of the industry in this province, and he was the greatest benefactor to the dairy farmer that Taranaki has seen. Whatever knowledge he gained by slow and solid labour the results were freely and unselfishly given to his follow settlers.
    (To be continued.)
Taranaki Herald 28 October 1908 p3
    EARLY REMINISCENCES.
[Related by the late Mr W. K. Hulke to Mr. W. H. Skinner.]
 MR HULKE AND THE PUKETAPU FEUD
    (Continued from yesterday) 
  Mr Hulke, who had recently married Miss Street, of Bell Block, was living at this time—1854—at the cottage on Devon Line near to the Connett Bros. farms, and called "Hawetaone." He was on very good terms with Rawiri Waiaua, the leader of that part of the Puketapu hapu who wore amicably disposed towards the Europeans and had recently sold a block of land immediately inland of the Bell District to the Government. Very early on the morning of August 3, 1851, Rawiri visited the Hulkes and informed them that he was then on his way with his party up the Wills or Corbett Road to start cutting the boundaries of the block to be sold to the Government, but that he was not satisfied with the behaviour of —, who had been seen loading his gun, and that he had come to say goodbye in case anything should happen by the interference of Katatoro and his party. An hour had scarcely elapsed when the settlers in the block were startled by tho sound of rapid musketry fire. Mounting his pony, Mr Hulke galloped up the Corbett Road to just beyond his late residence, where a distressing sight met his view. The dead bodies of four of the Hua Natives lay in the track, whilst scattered round were twelve others of the people wounded more or less severely. Amongst these lay mortally wounded Rawiri, the staunch ally and genial friend of the pakeha. Dismounting hurriedly, Mr Hulke immediately went to the assistance of the wounded chief, who informed him that the bullet had entered his side and that he was afraid he should not live; then, drawing Mr Hulke's head down, he whispered in his ear that he had
Whakaae-whenua
This is the actual greenstone mere, or weapon, referred to by William Hulke in this story. The mere is named Whakaae-whenua and is held in the Museum of New Zealand
concealed the greenstone mere, a tribal one of great beauty and value in the Maori eye, between his legs, and told him to draw it away from there and carry it away immediately and conceal it in a place of absolute security, for Katatore's people would not rest or be content until they had secured it. Whilst in the act of drawing the mere from its place of concealment Mr Hulke was suddenly seized from behind and rolled over in the dirt, and soundly beaten and kicked until the dying chief's remonstrances satisfied the attacking party that Mr Hulke was his friend. The party to attack Mr Hulke was a stalwart Maori woman, who, seeing him tumbling about the apparently dead body of her chief, thought he was robbing the corpse; hence the onslaught. Securing the mere and hiding it within his shirt, he mounted his horse and galloped at top speed to his house. In a rapid consultation with Mrs Hulke it was decided to hide the mere within the feather mattress. This was done and the opening sewn up again. They had barely time to straighten things up when a party of Katatore's people appeared and accused Mr Hulke of having the precious heirloom of the tribe. No excuses were taken, and these Maoris searched every corner of the house and turned the furniture upside down and inside out in their search. It was a time of anxiety and suspense for Mr and Mrs Hulke, for had the mere been found in their possession their house would have been assuredly burnt. However, their search was fruitless, and reluctantly they withdrew, and the mere remained in its safe hiding-place for some considerable time after this. In the meantime, Rawiri Waiaua and others of the wounded Natives were passing away, Rawiri dying on August 6. In proof of the murderous nature of Katatore's ambush, out of twenty-six persons comprising party sixteen were hit, six of whom died.
  At a great meeting of the Puketapu hapu held at the Hua some four or five years later, to meet Donald McLean, the Chief Protector of Natives, Mr Hulke came forward and handed over to Mr McLean, before all the Natives present, the precious mere. He told him the manner in which it had come into his possession, and requested that it now might be handed over to its rightful owner, the young son of Rawiri, who was present. Mr McLean, addressing the meeting, told the story again to the Natives, and commended Mr Hulke for his courageous action, to which all the Natives assented. Then, calling forward the young chief, little more than a lad, he placed the mere in his hands and bade him be like unto his father, a wise and trusted rangatira, one fit to lead his people in the councils of the tribes.
  [Note. — This mere, I understand, later came into the possession of the late Major Parris in his official capacity of Native Commissioner.]
  The death of Rawiri Waiaua, in August, 1854. started into flame a long smouldering feud within the Puketapu tribe, and a state of open warfare existed amongst these people and their respective allies from this year up to 1860, when the great bulk of them buried their mutual animosities and took up arms against the common foe on the outbreak of the Waitara war in March, 1860.
  The immediate result of Rawiri's death was to plunge the Natives into a civil war, and the eastern part of the Bell Block was in a chronic state of turmoil, this and the adjoining lands, now occupied by Messrs Connett and Hoskin, being the battleground between the two factions, the land-sellers, or followers of the late Rawiri, and the anti-land-sellers, or the adherents of Katatore. The sympathies of the Europeans were entirely with Rawiri's followers, and they secretly gave assistance in many ways to these people. When Ihaia, who had assumed the leadership of the late Rawiri's party, was closely pressed and besieged in the Mamaku pa, on the west bank of the Waitara River, and later in his stronghold on the high ground on the east bank of the same river, overlooking the karaka flat and ford, parties of Europeans used to ride out from Bell Block and New Plymouth, ostensibly to pay a friendly visit to Ihaia's people, but in reality to convey or smuggle to them munitions of war in the shape of gunpowder and caps, stowed away in their knee-boots, or comforts for the wounded, such as bread for poultices and old linen for bandages, carried more openly. Mr Hulke. often rode down to Ihaia's pa taking bread for poulticing one of the besieged, an old friend, who had been desperately wounded by slug shot. The inmates of the pa were very short of ammunition, and their position was becoming desperate.
  At this time it was generally known that a man called Smith was regularly smuggling powder through to the besiegers of Ihaia's pa. This man had a wooden leg, which had been carefully hollowed out; this he filled with the powder, and, quite unsuspected, passed through the country with this contraband of war. Knowing how short of ammunition Ihaia and his people were and how serious their position, Mr Hulke arranged a visit to the besieged, and a party of twelve, consisting amongst others of Mr and Mrs Hulke and Miss Street, started off from Bell Block. It was in reality a big smuggling party, and great pains had been taken to conceal about their persons gunpowder and other munitions of war, amounting in the aggregate to a considerable quantity. The bustles of the women were laden with powder, and Mr Hulke was wearing his wife's stays next his skin, heavily padded with the same material. Mr Hulke stated that on reaching Mahoetahi two armed Natives sprang out on to the road in front of the party, and after looking at them closely disappeared again into the fern. This occurred several times until they reached Big Jim's Hill (quarry), where a considerable number of armed Natives in a very excited state came suddenly out of the scrub and stopped tho party. In reply to their questions as to what they were doing there, and where they were going, Mr Hulke replied that their intention was to pay a friendly visit to Ihaia and then to William King. Coming closer they said: "Are you taking anything to Ihaia?" (The questioners were enemies of Ihaia.) He replied: "No." The Maoris were not content with the answer, and, taking hold of the party, made a general search, feeling their long boots and generally overhauling Mr Hulke in particular, and in a lesser degree the women of the party. Not finding anything, they reluctantly allowed the party to proceed. They crossed the river at the old karaka ford. The morning had been wet, and heavy rain appeared to be still falling inland, but the river was fordable, although indications of an approaching fresh were not wanting, and things generally had an ugly look, the river flats and country around being apparently full of armed Natives. As they rode up the eastern bank of the river some Hua Natives came down to meet them. They wore old friends and neighbours and trustworthy. Those people scolded the party for venturing over the ford, and said they had done a most foolish thing coming to them that day, as the enemy were on the move and in a dangerous temper. They advised them to re-cross the river at once, before the flood came down and prevented a return. They accordingly got the womenfolk and others to re-cross at once. Mr Hulke then attempted to go on to Ihaia's pa, a short distance beyond, but the Hua Natives would not permit him to take such dangerous risks, so he reluctantly turned his horse towards the ford to rejoin the main party on the western bank. Just before entering the river, which was now rapidly rising in flood, he was stopped by armed Natives of Wi Kingi's tribe, who again searched him. The position was very critical. He put on a bold face, and, throwing open his coat, waistcoat, and shirt, told them to look for themselves. This boldness probably saved his life, for they were in such an excited state that had they discovered what he was wearing next his skin they would probably have shot him on the spot. At this stage of the affair a volley was fired over their heads from Ihaia's pa above, so the Natives scattered, and Mr Hulke took the opportunity of plunging into the Waitara and joining his anxious friends on the other side. They lost no time in getting away from the embarrassing situation in which they found themselves, returning with all their contraband of war intact. They discovered later that the man Smith, who, as before stated, had been regularly supplying Wi Kingi's people with gunpowder, had informed them that he (Hulke) was doing the same for Ihaia. and to expect the party on that particular day.

Death: 22 October 1908, at 6pm, at Corbett Road, New Plymouth, New Zealand, aged 89
Taranaki Herald 23 October 1908 p2
DEATH.
HULKE.—On October 22, 1908, at his residence, Corbett Road, Bell Block, William King Hulke; aged 89 years.


Grave of William King Hulke
The grave of William King Hulke and Ann (Street) Hulke in the former St Luke's Church Cemetery, Murray St, Bell Block, New Plymouth, New Zealand
photo by Ron posted at Kete New Plymouth
Burial: 25 October 1908, at St Luke's Anglican Church cemetery, Bell Block, New Plymouth, New Zealand
Taranaki Herald 24 October 1908 p2
FUNERAL NOTICE.
   The funeral of the late W. K. Hulke will leave his late residence, Corbett Road, on SUNDAY, October 25, at 1:30 p.m., arriving at the Bell Block Church of England Cemetery at 2:30 p.m.
  Friends will kindly accept this intimation.
    W. F. BROOKING,
        Undertaker.

The gravestone reads:
In Loving Memory
of
William King Hulke
Who died 22nd October 1908
Aged 89 Years
Also Ann
His beloved wife
Who died 22 July 1916
Aged 86 Years
At Rest


Nearly 50 years after his death, William King Hulke was honoured by Associated Taranaki Jersey Cattle Clubs who erected a memorial stone at the foot of his grave. Mr Moreland, President of the New Zealand Cattle Breeders Association gave the address.
"It is difficult to pay full justice to Mr Hulke, who had the pioneering spirit so essential in the early days of this country."
The plaque reads:
In Memory of
W.K. Hulke
Taranaki's Pioneer Jersey Breeder
Who, in the year 1876
Established the breed in
The provence when he led
The first Jersey cow, Jenny,
From Marton to Bell Block
A distance of 130 miles
Associated Taranaki
Jersey Cattle Clubs
1958

Will: dated 3 August 1903
THIS IS THE LAST WILL and Testament of me WILLIAM KING HULKE of Corbett Road near New Plymouth Farmer I GIVE DEVISE AND BEQUEATH unto my dear wife ANN HULKE absolutely all the real and personal property of or to which I shall be seized possessed or entitled at the time of my decease (including in particular all moneys that may become payable in respect of any insurance policies effected on my life which moneys I specially direct shall be paid to her) I APPOINT my said wife sole Executrix of this my Will I REVOKE all wills by me at any time heretofore made and declare this to be my last Will and Testament IN WITNESS whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name this third day of August One thousand nine hundred and three.
   W. K. Hulke
SIGNED by the said William King Hulke as and for his last Will and Testamant in the presence of us present together at the same time who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as attesting witnesses.
    Oliver Samuel  Solicitor  New Plymouth
    R. D. Stuart  New Plymouth  Law Clerk


Probate: granted 7 November 1908 to Ann Hulke

Obituary:
Taranaki Herald 23 October 1908 p5
OBITUARY.
WILLIAM KING HULKE: AETAT 89.
  There passed away at his residence at Corbett Road at six o'clock yesterday evening, in the person of Mr William King Hulke, one of the very earliest settlers of New Zealand, of a type which is fast disappearing. He was born at Deal, England, in August 1819, the son of Dr. Hulke, who, by the way, attended the great Duke of Wellington in his last illness at Walmer Castle, in fact the Duke died in his arms. His ancestors came from Flanders, whence, with thousands of other refugees, they fled to escape the butcheries of Alva in the war of extermination this ruthless zealot was prosecuting over the Low Countries. Most of these exiles settled in one or other of the Cinque Ports. Mr Hulke's forbears eventually making Deal their home, and there they have lived since the last quarter of the sixteenth century.
  The subject of this notice was sent, when quite a boy, as an apprentice in the East India Company's service, but he relinquished it after one voyage, and was then sent to a farm in Pembrokeshire. About this time Edward Gibbon Wakefield's colonisation scheme was attracting attention, and young Hulke determined to emigrate to New Zealand. He landed in Wellington on December 12, 1840, from the ship London, among his fellow-passengers being Messrs F. A. Carrington, with Mrs Carrington and family, Wieksteed, Nixon (late of Wanganui), E. Dorset, De B. Brandon, John Rogan, and many other well-known pioneer settlers. Mr Hulke accompanied a party of about a dozen who set out the following week to walk to the Wanganui River. Here they arrived on December 30. Mr Hulke, in partnership with Messrs Dorset, Keith, and Barley Brothers (Bristol men), established the first store in Wanganui. He did not, however, remain long, returning to Wellington, whence he undertook a journey to Sydney to purchase a herd of dairy cows. With these he established a small dairy farm near the present Wellington suburb of Kilbirnie and partly on the Miramar peninsula, supplying the people of Wellington with milk and vegetables. In the latter part of 1842 he went again to Wanganui, and there erected a flourmill—windmill, with machinery he had imported from England. This will was destroyed by the natives in 1845, and in 1847 Mr Hulke visited New Plymouth and decided to remove the machinery to this town, where he established a mill in Queen Street, using a water-wheel for power. This was called the Union mill, and stands now in the occupation of the Crown Dairy Company. In the early fifties Mr Hulke purchased a farm at Bell Block, where he remained until the outbreak of war in 1860, when he was obliged to come to New Plymouth for safety. Here he for a time carried on the business of a nurseryman, and laid out beautiful grounds in Pendarves street (now occupied by Mr W. Courtney). About 1866, in conjunction with Messrs F. L. and W. B. Webster, he built the fine steam flour mill in Currie Street now occupied by Messrs L. D. Nathan and Co. as a warehouse. Some twenty years later he went back to Bell Block and established a model dairy farm on the Corbett Road and set about forming that herd of pure-bred Jersey cattle whose fame travelled throughout New Zealand. Here for many years he experimented in dairying, and he was one of the first to see and strongly advocate the benefit of the dairy factory system now general throughout the Dominion. Of late years he has suffered from a very distressing malady, which has kept him most a prisoner, but in spite of his great age his mental powers remained strong until the last. In the early fifties he married Miss Street, of Bell Block, who survives him. He had no family, but two of his sisters are still living in Deal.

Taranaki Daily News 24 October 1908 p2
OBITUARY
      AN OLD SETTLER.
  A very old settler, and one with interesting associations, in the person of Mr. William King Hulke, died at Corbett Road on Thursday evening. Deceased, who had reached the great age of 89 years, was born at Deal, England, being the son of Dr. Hulke, who was medical adviser to the Duke of Wellington, the Duke, as a matter of fact, dying in his arms. William Hulke started in life as an apprentice in the East India Company, but look a dislike to the sea, and was sent by his people to a farm in Pembrokeshire. Later he was attracted by Gibbon Wakefield's New Zealand colonisation scheme, and emigrated here, landing in Wellington on 12th December, 1840, his fellow-passengers on the ship London including Messrs. F. A. Carrington, with his wife and family, Wicksteed, Nixon, E. Dorset, De B. Brandon, John Regan, etc. Mr. Hulke accompanied a party of about a dozen who set out the following week to walk to the Wanganui river. Here they arrived on 30th December. Mr. Hulke, in partnership with Messrs. Dorset, Keith, and Barley Brothers (Bristol men), established the first store in Wanganui. He did not, however, remain long, returning to Wellington, whence he undertook a journey to Sydney to purchase a herd of dairy cows. With these he established a small dairy farm near the present Wellington suburb of Kilbirnie and partly on the Miramar peninsula, supplying the people of Wellington with milk and vegetables. In the latter part of 1842 he went again to Wanganui, and there erected a flourmill—windmill, with machinery he had imported from England. This will was destroyed by the natives in 1845, and in 1847 Mr. Hulke visited New Plymouth and decided to remove the machinery to this town, where he established a mill in Queen-street, using a water-wheel for power. This was called the Union mill, and stands now in the occupation of the Crown Dairy Company. In the early fifties Mr. Hulke purchased a farm at Bell Block, where he remained until the outbreak of war in 1860, when he was obliged to come to New Plymouth for safety. Here he for a time carried on the business of a nurseryman, and laid out beautiful grounds in Pendarves street (now occupied by Mr. W. Courtney). About 1866, in conjunction with Messrs. F. L. and W. B. Webster, he built the fine steam flour mill in Currie-street now occupied by Messrs. L. D. Nathan and Co. as a warehouse. Some twenty years later he went back to Bell Block and established a model dairy farm on the Corbett Road, and set about forming that herd of purebred Jersey cattle whose fame travelled throughout New Zealand. Here for many years he experimented in dairying, and he was one of the first to see and strongly advocated the benefit of the dairy factory system now general throughout the Dominion. Of late years he has suffered from a very distressing malady, which has kept him most a prisoner, but in spite of his great age his mental powers remained strong until the last. In the early fifties he married Miss Street, of Bell Block, who survives him. He had no family, but two of his sisters are still living in Deal.
  The funeral will take place to-morrow (Sunday).

Sources:
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