The Kilroy Family

Kilroy crest
Agendo et Fereno

Abraham Kilroy

Birth: 1817, in Turin, parish of Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Sources:

Adeline Kilroy

Birth: 1905/6, in Massachusetts, United States

Father: Richard Thomas Joseph Kilroy

Mother: Cora Evelyn (Terry) Kilroy
Census:
1920: Abington Town, Plymouth county, Massachusetts

Sources:

Agnes Wilhelmina Kilroy

Birth: 12 July 1893, in Middleborough, Plymouth county, Massachusetts, United States

Father: Richard Thomas Joseph Kilroy

Mother: Bridget A. (Devine) Kilroy
Census:
1900: Middleboro Town, Plymouth county, Massachusetts

Sources:

Alan James Minchin Kilroy

Alan James Minchin Kilroy and Annie Kathleen (Kilroy) Gosnell
Alan James Minchin Kilroy (right) with his sister Annie Kathleen (Kilroy) Gosnell
(Darjeeling 1942)
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Birth: 24 October 1897, at Moat View, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
Alan James Minchin Kilroy is recorded as born on Twenty Fourth October 1897 at Moat View, Oldcastle, the son of William W. Kilroy, grazier, of Moat View, Oldcastle and Annie Maxwell Kilroy formerly Groome.

Father: William Wesley Kilroy

Mother: Annie Catherine Maxwell (Groome) Kilroy

Occupation: Army Officer in the Indian Army, reaching the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.
Alan was admitted to the Indian Army as Second Lieutenant on 7 February 1917, and attached to the 120th Rajputana Infantry (London Gazette 4 September 1917 p9156). He was promoted to Lieutenant on 30 January 1918 (London Gazette 1 October 1918 p11567) and made an acting captain in the 13th Rajputs from 19 May 1918 until 1 July 1918 (London Gazette 12 August 1919 p10228). Alan was promoted to captain on 30 January 1921 (London Gazette 21 June 1921 p4917). On 11 December 1931 Alan, then of the 4/11 Sikh Regiment, was appointed S.S.O., 1st Class (London Gazette 4 March 1932 p1502), and promoted to Major on 30 January 1935 (London Gazette 8 March 1935 p1636). He was transferred to the Special Unemployed list on 22 June 1936 (London Gazette 10 July 1936 p4422). Alan, a major in the 11th Sikhs, was awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE) on 1 January 1943 (London Gazette 29 December 1942 p10) and promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel on 12 April 1946 (London Gazette 28 June 1946 p3300).

Death: 26 December 1974, in county Meath, Ireland, aged 78

Buried: Killeagh cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
In loving memory of Lt. Colonel Alan James Minchin Kilroy OBE of Castlecor (Late 36th Sikh Regt. I.A.) died 26th Dec. 1974 in his 78th Year

Census:
1901: Moat, Oldcastle, county Meath
1911: Mountjoy School, Mountjoy Square, St Peters, Dublin, county Dublin

Sources:

Albert Gibson Kilroy

Birth: 13 February 1886, at Derrysheridan, Killeagh parish, county Meath, Ireland
Albert Gibson was born on Thirteenth February 1886 at Derrysheridan, the daughter of James Kilroy, farmer, of Derrysheridan, and Maria Kilroy formerly Gibson.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Maria (Gibson) Kilroy

Married: Ruth Hall on 11 October 1911, in Ladysmith, Natal, South Africa
Albert Gibson Kilroy is recorded as a bachelor, of full age. He is a farmer, resident in Ladysmith. Ruth Hall is recorded as a spinster, of full age, resident in Ladysmith. The marriage was witnessed by E. B. Woolman and G. K. Eaton.

Headstone of Albert Gibson Kilroy
Headstone of Albert Gibson Kilroy in Ladysmith Main cemetery, Natal, South Africa
photograph by Chris and Petra Lombard posted at eGGSA
Death: 25 December 1920

Buried: Ladysmith Main cemetery, Natal, South Africa
The headstone reads:
In Loving Memory of | My Beloved Husband | Albert G. Kilroy | who died 25th Dec 1920 | Aged 36 years | "Until The Day Dawns"

Sources:

Alexander Kilroy

of Omard, county Cavan

Birth: 1806

Father:
Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Married: Maria Lucinda Fry on 17 January 1833, in St Luke, Old Charlton, Kent, England. Maria was born in 1807/8, in Guernsey, Channel Islands. Her father, Captain Fry, served in the Royal Navy. She died in 1892, in Fulham district, London, aged 84.
Census:
1881: 122 Edith Road, London, Middlesex

Children: Occupation: Staff Surgeon in the Royal Navy. Member Royal College Surgeons England, 1827. Alexander joined the British Navy on 7 February 1828. On 20 May 1835 he was posted to the Edinburgh serving in the Mediterranean, as assistant surgeon (Navy List 1836). Alexander was promoted to surgeon on 15 April 1838. The Navy Lists for 1840, 1841 and 1842 show him serving as surgeon on the Favourite in the East Indies. Alexander then became part of the Transport Service of the Navy, serving as surgeon superintendent on at least four convict ships, the China in 1845 (United Service Magazine vol 47 p634), the Mayda in 1846, the female convict ship Australasia in 1849, and the Mermaid in 1850-51. The Australasia sailed from Dublin on 26 June 1849, at the height of the Great Famine, taking 95 days to arrive at Hobart, Tasmania on 29 September 1849. The following general remarks in his surgeon's journal have been transcribed at the Family Tree of Trudy Mae Cowley
When the convicts were embarked at Kingstown they seemed to be in excellent health, although in reality they were not so for most of them had suffered from insufficient and bad food before their convictions and in Grange Gorman Depot had been fed a good deal on Bread and Milk which gave them a healthy appearance, but very soon after the change from that diet to the salt provisions of the ship they suffered considerably in health, labouring under obstipation with ma? and gastric ?ation This change was felt the more suddenly from want of the usual supply of potatoes which are generally given to fresh convict ships and which could not be procured at the time the Australasia sailed from Kingstown.
The cases at first were not very severe in the Fever cases which occurred during the warm weather principally within the tropics. The head was generally very much affected but in only two of them required b?section. These two cases 3 and 4 of this Journal, their convalescence was very slow and frequently interrupted and complicated by local congestions, dysentry and dysuria. The other cases of fever were generally relived by purging with a cold application to the head and in some of them b?tis which in hard cases had to be repeated.
The convicts remained in pretty good health until we got into cold and damp weather after passing the Cape of Good Hope. When dysentery became prevalent amongst them the cases were not very severe at first although some of them proved tedious but after a time the cases became more or less complicated with Scarbulic (?) Symptoms and then became very troublesome and difficult to manage ...
Those sent sick on board the Anson were generally slight cases but still requiring medical treatment and there was not room for them in the Hospital.
... whenever they went on deck their feet soon became damp and cold in consequence of the thinness of their shoes which are very little use as a means of keeping the feet dry and warm and I think it would be a great improvement in female convict ships to send thicker and stronger shoes and in that case one pair per convict should be sufficient for the voyage.

The Mermaid sailed from Woolwich on 20 December 1850 bound for Fremantle, Western Australia, with 208 convicts aboard. It arrived on 13 May 1851. On 10 March 1854, Alexander joined, as surgeon, the Ajax, a screw steam guard ship based in the Baltic in the 1855 list and in Devonport, Devon in the 1857 list. On 1 February 1858, he joined the Exmouth, also a screw steam guard ship based in Devonport (Navy List 1858). Alexander retired on 13 May 1859.

Death: 22 December 1872, at 6 Shaftesbury Terrace, Kensington, Middlesex, England, aged 66

Buried: Brompton cemetery, London, England

Census:
28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan

Sources:

Alexander Robert Kilroy

Birth: 1833/4, in Omard, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Alexander Kilroy

Mother: Maria Lucinda (Fry) Kilroy

Married: Jacintha "Jessie" Sophia Bayntun on 5 September 1863, in Sattara, Bombay Presidency, India
The Times of India, 1863
KILROY - BAYNTUN - Sept 5th at Sattara, Bombay Presidency by the Rev A Onslow, Alexander Robert Kilroy, 33rd Regiment, son of Alexander Kilroy, Esq., RN to Jessie, daughter of Captain Bayntun, late of the 14th Light Dragoons. - No cards

Jessie was born in 1835/6, in Belfast, Ireland, the daughter of Laurence Charles Bayntun and Sophia Bathurst Cooper. She died in 1890 in Staines district, Middlesex, aged 54, and was buried on 24 July 1890, in St Marys, Staines.
1881: 5 Cromwell Terrace, London, Middlesex

Occupation: Army surgeon. Member Royal College Surgeons England, 1855. Alexander was made assistant surgeon on 12 April 1855 and surgeon on 11 April 1868. He was in the 33rd Foot, stationed in Bombay in 1861, then appointed to the Royal Artillery in 1869.

Death: 2 May 1879, at Nainital, Uttarakhand, India
The Times of India, 1879
May 2 at Naini Tal Alexander Robert Kilroy Surgeon Major AMD Royal Artillery aged 45 years

Sources:

Angela Bernadine Mary (Kilroy) Rendle

Birth: 11 November 1905, in Sheppey district, Kent, England

Baptism: 30 December 1905, in St Barnabas, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Father: Lancelot Kilroy

Mother: Hester Mary (Dowson) Kilroy

Married: Edward J. Rendell in 1937 in Hampstead district, London, England

Notes: Known as "Tota"

Census:
1911: Kingsbridge district, Devon: Angela Bermaine Kilroy is aged 5

Sources:

Anne (Kilroy) Fry

Birth: 1804, in Turin, parish of Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Married: John Fry

Children:
Sources:

Anne Evelyn (Kilroy) Tinkler

Arthur Abraham Tinkler and Annie Evelyn (Kilroy) Tinkler
Arthur Abraham Tinkler and Annie Evelyn (Kilroy) Tinkler
Birth: 25 September 1880, at Ballahanna, Kilnaleck parish, county Cavan, Ireland
Anne was born on Twenty fifth September at Ballahanna, the daughter of James Kilroy, farmer, of Ballahanna, and Maria Kilroy formerly Gibbson.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Maria (Gibson) Kilroy

Married: Arthur Abraham Tinkler on 3 July 1907 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Canadian Union Messenger 23 August 1967 p374
    Diamond Anniversary
  Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Tinkler celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on July 3, the Centennial year of Canada. Both were born in Ireland, he in Dublin and she in County Meath. They came to Canada in 1907. They were married that year in Winnipeg. Brother Tinkler was employed by the T. Eaton Co. In 1909, Mrs. Tinkler's sister and her family also came out from Ireland, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Large, Louis, Jack and Sheila. That year the two families took up homesteads in the Goose Lake area near Vanscoy in Saskatchewan.
  In 1936, the family moved to British Columbia. They lived on Vancouver Island, in the Fraser Valley and in 1959 moved to the Okanagan Valley. While in Saskatchewan the Tinkler family embraced the Third Angel's Message and were baptized by Elder Luther Long. Their daughter, Kathleen, attended Battleford Academy. Their son, Desmond, is a minister and is now president of the Maritime Conference. Kathleen Bayliss and Hubert, her husband, live near her parents on the Joe Rich Road overlooking beautiful Lake Okanagan. Evelyn Abbey and her husband live at Creston, British Columbia. The Tinklers have five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. They are strong in faith and look forward eagerly to the coming of Jesus and a home in heaven.
  (MRS.) AMY S. WAGNER, Press Sec. Rutland SDA Church

Children:
Occupation: Drapers Clerk (1907)

Notes: Annie emigrated to Canada aboard the Tunisian which sailed from Liverpool on 2 May 1907, arriving in Quebec on 11 May 1907. Annie Kilroy is recorded as single, aged 25, a draper's clerk, listed as born in England. Her destination is Winnipeg. Also on board the Tunisian was Arthur Tinkler, who was to marry Anne in Winnipeg less than two months later. Although they are not listed together in the manifest, it seems likely that they knew each other in Ireland and booked passage together - the two travelled using tickets with consecutive numbers, 27329 and 27330.

Death: 22 January 1976, in Kelowna General Hospital, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada, of pneumonia, aged 95
Canadian Union Messenger 15 November 1976 p421
    OBITUARIES
TINKLER—Annie Evelyn Kilroy was born at Graddenston House, County Meeth, Ireland, September 25, 1881. She came to Canada in 1907 and married Arthur A. Tinkler the same year. She was a brave pioneer, a wonderful mother, a friend and midwife to the early settlers in Saskatchewan where they homesteaded near Saskatoon. Her first child, Desmond, was dedicated to God for the ministry, and her prayers were answered. Sister Tinkler embraced the third angel's message in 1930 and was an active and faithful member of the church. She passed to her rest on January 22, 1976 at the age of 95 years, in the Kelowna General Hospital and awaits the call of Jesus on that Great Day. In every community where Sister Tinkler lived she organized and conducted a Branch Sabbath School in her home which she called Sunbeam Classes. Many youth today look back to these classes as the beginning of their Christian Life. Sister Tinkler leaves to mourn, her husband, Arthur A. Tinkler of Kelowna, B.C., one son Elder Desmond Tinkler of Armstrong, B.C., two daughters Kathleen May Bayliss of Kelowna and Evelyn Vera Abbey of Creston, five grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren, and a host of those who loved her.
      British Columbia Conference of SDA

 
Gravestone of Annie Evelyn (Kilroy) Tinkler
Gravestone of Annie Evelyn (Kilroy) Tinkler in Kelowna Memorial Park cemetery, Kelowna, British Columbia
photograph from findagrave.com
Buried: 27 January 1976, in Kelowna Memorial Park cemetery, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada. Annie is buried in plot C 3 99 79.

Census & Addresses:
1911: Saskatoon district, Saskatchewan
1916: Saskatoon district, Saskatchewan
1964: Kelowna, British Columbia   (Canadian Union Messenger 7 October 1964 p363)
1976: 2268 Pandosy Street, Kelowna, British Columbia   (British Columbia Death Registrations #76-09-002475)

Sources:

Annie Kathleen Maxwell (Kilroy) Gosnell

Annie Kathleen Maxwell Kilroy
Annie Kathleen (Kilroy) Gosnell
(1923, Dublin)
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
known as "Kathleen" and "Kay"

Birth: 5 August 1896, at Moat View, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
Annie Kathleen Maxwell is recorded as born on August fifth 1896 at Moat View, Oldcastle, the daughter of William Westley Kilroy, gentleman, of Moat View, Oldcastle and Annie Kathleen Maxwell Kilroy formerly Groome.

Baptism: 20 September 1896, in Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland

Father: William Wesley Kilroy

Mother: Annie Catherine Maxwell (Groome) Kilroy

Married: Kenneth Arthur Gosnell on 31 October 1922, in St. Paul's Church, Nasirabad, Rajputana, India

Notes: Annie's driver's license from 1919 lists her height as 5ft 6 3/4 in, her build as "slight" and her hair as fair.

Death: 28 February 1984, in Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa

Buried: Ashes interred in the Garden of Remembrance, White River, Transvaal, South Africa

Photographs:

Annie Kathleen Kilroy   Ken Gosnell & Kay Kilroy wedding   Riding Jenny 1934   Kay (Kilroy) Gosnell Bexhill 1935   Kilroys fishing Lough Sheelin   Jalapahar 1941   Tonglu 1942   Poona 1943   White River 1965   White River 1978

Childhood
photo from Chris Gosnell

Wedding
(1922, Nasirabad)
photo from Jerry Gosnell

Riding Jenny
(1934)
photo from Jerry Gosnell

At Bexhill-on-Sea
(March 1935)
photo from Jerry Gosnell

Fishing with Ken Gosnell and Tony Kilroy
(Lough Sheelin, May 1935)
photo from Jerry Gosnell

In Jalapahar, near Darjeeling, 1941
photo from Jerry Gosnell

Phalut Trek - snowstorm near Tonglu (May 1942)
photo from Jerry Gosnell

Backyard Cricket
(1943, Poona)
photo from Jerry Gosnell

White River
(1965)
photo from Jerry Gosnell

with Ken Gosnell
(White River, 1978)
photo from Jerry Gosnell
Left Arrrow scroll with your mouse to see more pictures; click on an image for enlargement Right Arrrow

Census & Addresses:

1901: Moat, Oldcastle, county Meath
1911: Ladies College, 12 Haddington Terrace, Kingstown, county Dublin
1919: Moat View, Oldcastle, county Meath (driver's license)

Sources:

Anthony Kilroy

Birth: 1776, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: _____ Kilroy

Married: Elizabeth _____

Children: Death: 1825. Annie Kathleen Kilroy writes that "Great grandfather Kilroy" was killed coming home from a hunt in his red coat. He was walking his horse with Lord Farnham when his horse slipped and threw him. The date of this event is not entirely clear. Kathleen notes that he left a son aged 19, (making this event about 1825) but also that "Grandfather married at 21", a marriage we know happened in 1834, so this death could conceivably have been two years earlier, in 1832. Either way, Lord Farnham would have been the 5th Baron, John Barry Maxwell (1767 - 1838).

Sources:

Anthony Kilroy

Omard Villa
Omard Villa, Omard, county Cavan
painting by Finola Sweeney
of  "Omard Villa", Omard, county Cavan

Birth: 1804/5

Father:
Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Married: Catherine Burrow on 21 February 1832 in St Peters, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland. The marriage was witnessed by Thomas Burrow and Henry Lamange. Catherine's address is recorded as  44 Harcourt Street, St Peter, and Anthony's address is recorded as Omard, Ballymoore, county Cavan.

Children: Death: 15 July 1877 at 38 Leinster road, Rathmines, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 73
Cavan Weekly News, 10 August 1877
DEATH.
KILROY
- On the 15th inst., at 38 Leinster road, Rathmines, Anthony Kilroy, Esq., late of Omard, County Cavan, in his 73rd year.


Notes: Kitty Bourke-Wright, Anthony's grand-daughter writes that Anthony sold Omard about 1876, and went to live in England. The house fell into disrepair and was demolished in the 1980s. Only some of the farm's stone outbuildings remain. Kitty writes that she "used to hear as a child what a good man Grandfather Anthony Kilroy was and how he - the eldest - had brought up a large family of brothers and sisters when their father (or their parents) had died at an early age". A later resident of the house, after the Kilroys had sold up, was told as a child that if she did not behave well "the ghost of Anthony Kilroy will get you".

W.W. Kilroy wrote in 1926 that all of Anthony's children were then dead.

Census:
28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan

Sources:

Anthony Kilroy

Birth: 1820, in Turin, parish of Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Sources:

Anthony Kilroy

Birth: 1 January 1840, in Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Notes:
Kilroy Court, a street in Cranbrook, Townsville, Queensland, is named after Anthony.
Highways and Byways - The Origin of Townsville Street Names p72 (John Mathew, 2008)
Kilroy Court, Cranbrook. In 1865, Anthony Kilroy signed the petition to have a municipality established at Cleveland Bay.


Death: 20 January 1869, in Queensland
Anthony is recorded as the son of James Kilroy. He was born in Ireland and died aged about 27 years.

Notes: Anthony went to Australia and New Zealand with his brother George. It seems the took separate paths fairly early - George is recorded in Melbourne as early as 1862, and Anthony is recorded in Townsville, Queensland in 1865.

Sources:

Beryl Lila Kilroy

Birth: 1907, in Hendon district, Middlesex, England

Father: Willie Dickson Kilroy

Mother: Edith Mary (Maclaran) Kilroy

Death: 1914, in Hendon district, Middlesex, England, aged 7

Census:
1911: Hendon district, Middlesex: Beryl Kilroy is aged 3

Sources:

Catherine Jane (Kilroy) Wright

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Catherine (_____) Kilroy

Married: William Bourke Wright in 1866, in Cavan district, county Cavan, Ireland

Children: Death: 1872/3. Catherine died when her daughter Kitty, was only 2 years old.

Sources:

Cecil Montague Godfrey Kilroy

Cecil Montague Godfrey Kilroy
Cecil Montague Godfrey Kilroy
photograph from Chris Gosnell
Kilroy picnic at Lough Sheelin
Kilroy family picnic at Lough Sheelin in May 1935. Cecil is standing on the right. Others featured are William Ernest Kilroy (left), Ken Gosnell (standing left), Richard Tony Kilroy (front) and Louise (Waldron) Kilroy
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Birth: 8 February 1890, at Moat View, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland

Father: William Wesley Kilroy

Mother: Annie Catherine Maxwell (Groome) Kilroy

Gertrude Anna Phair (Knight) Kilroy
Gertrude Anna Phair (Knight) Kilroy at Moat View, Oldcastle, in 1934
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Castlecor 1935
Photograph taken at Castlecor, Oldcastle, in June 1935. Gertrude is pictured center.
From left to right are Miss Mannin, Nurse, Gertrude, Louise (Waldron) Kilroy and Kay (Kilroy) Gosnell
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Married: Gertrude Anna Phair Knight on 29 March 1934 in St Catherine's Church, Tullamore, King's County, Ireland
Cecil Montague Godfrey Kilroy is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of William W. Kilroy, a farmer and land agent. Cecil's occupation is listed as Bank Official and he is resident in Kilbeggan, county Westmeath. Gertrude Anna Phair Knight is listed as a spinster, 19 years old, resident at Bank House, Kilbeggan, Westmeath.

Gertrude was born on 23 April 1914, in Sacramento, California, United States, the daughter of Albert Cowles Knight and Matilda Maude Phair. She married, secondly, Glenn August Moore on 6 April 1956. Gertrude died on 13 April 1994 in Kent, King county, Washington, United States.

Occupation: Clerk, Author and Dramatist (1911); Bank Official (1934)

Notes: On his marriage certificate, Cecil signed his name as Godfrey, so he may have sometimes used his middle name.

Death: 22 February 1961, in Dublin, Ireland, aged 71

Buried: 24 February 1961, in Deansgrange Cemetery, Dublin, Ireland
The Headstone reads:
CECIL GODFREY KILROY | died 22nd Feb. 1961 aged 71 | "Abide with Me"

Census:
1901: Moat, Oldcastle, county Meath
1911: 36 Chelmsford Road, St Peters, county Dublin

Sources:

Daisy Kilroy

Birth: 1880, in Winchester, Hampshire, England

Father: Philip Lefeuvre Kilroy

Mother: Louisa Susan (Le Feuvre) Kilroy

Census:
1881: Plymstock, Devon
1891: 72 Chaucer Road, Bedford St Paul, Bedfordshire
1901: Ryde, Isle of Wight: Daisy Kilroy is aged 20, born in Winchester, Hampshire

Sources:

Desmond Albert Frederick Kilroy

Birth: 19 May 1915, at High Street, Tullamore, King's County, Ireland
Desmond Albert Frederick was born on Nineteenth May 1915 at High St., Tullamore, the son of James A Kilroy, merchant, of High St., Tullamore, and Lucy Kilroy formerly Hutchinson.

Father: James Arthur Kilroy

Mother: Lucy Hannah (Hutchinson) Kilroy

Death: 1991

Grave of Desmond Albert Frederick Kilroy
Headstone of Desmond Albert Frederick Kilroy in Deansgrange cemetery, Dublin, county Dublin
photograph by Joyce Tunstead Posted at Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives: Dublin Headstones
Buried: Deansgrange cemetery graveyard, Rathdown, county Dublin, Ireland.
The headstone reads:
In Loving Memory | of | DESMOND KILROY | 1915 - 1991

Sources:

Dorothy Kilroy

Birth: 1909/10, in Massachusetts, United States

Father: Richard Thomas Joseph Kilroy

Mother: Cora Evelyn (Terry) Kilroy
Census:
1920: Abington Town, Plymouth county, Massachusetts

Sources:

Edith Kilroy

Birth: 1907/8, in Massachusetts, United States

Father: Richard Thomas Joseph Kilroy

Mother: Cora Evelyn (Terry) Kilroy
Census:
1920: Abington Town, Plymouth county, Massachusetts

Sources:

Eileen Maude Margaret (Kilroy) Mason

Birth: 12 November 1892 at Derrysheridan, Killeagh parish, county Meath, Ireland
Maude Margaret was born on Twelfth November 1892 at Derrysheridan, the daughter of James W. Kilroy, gentleman, of Derry Sheridan, and Mary Elizabeth Kilroy formerly Armstrong.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth Mary (Armstrong) Kilroy

Married: Ernest V. Mason in 1922 in Croydon district, Surrey, England

Occupation: Drapers Assistant (1911)

Census:
1901: Derrysheridan, Killeagh, county Meath
1911: 18 Cannon Street, Kells, county Meath

Sources:

Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Birth: 1780, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Married: Anthony Kilroy

Children: Sources:

Elizabeth Kilroy

Kilroy gravestone Detail of Kilroy gravestone
Gravestone of Richard and Elizabeth Kilroy, and their daughters Hannah and Elizabeth, in the churchyard at Ballymachugh Parish Church. It is probably part of the old church wall.
Detail of the gravestone:
Here Until the Resurrection are
deposited the Remains of Richd
Kilroy Esq of Omard and of
Elizabeth his beloved Wife the
Former Depd this life on the 18th
April 1823 aged 43 Years the Latter
on the 19th August 1830 aged 45 Years
also the Remains of Hannah their
Eldest daughter who Depd this
life the 7th of Sept 1827 aged 19 Years
and of Elizabeth their Fourth
Daughter who Depd this life on
the 28 of Aug. 1827 aged 13 Years
This tribute to the memory of
Richd and Elizabeth Kilroy has
been Raised by their affectionate
Daughters Maria Maxwell
and Frances Fearns
Birth: 1813/4

Father: Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Death: 28 August 1827

Buried: Ballymachugh Parish Church, county Cavan, Ireland

Census:
28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan

Sources:

Elizabeth (Kilroy) Whiteside

Birth: 1834, in Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Catherine (_____) Kilroy

Married: James Arthur Whiteside on 13 February 1857, in St. Anne's Church, Dublin South disrict, county Dublin, Ireland. James was born in 1823/4, in Ireland (the marriage announcement states that he was from Crumlin, county Antrim). He was a clergyman, educated at Trinity College Dublin, and was rector of Penhow, Monmouthshire in 1881, and vicar of Queen Charlotte in Bath in 1889. He died on 20 June 1910, in Bath, Somerset, aged 86.
Cavan Weekly News, 19 February 1857
MARRIED.
On the 13th instant, in Anne's Church, by the Rev. Eugene O'MEARA, the Rev. James WHITESIDE, of Crumlin, county Antrim, to Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Anthony KILROY, of Omard, county Cavan, Esq.


Death: 1912, in Bath district, Somerset, England

Census & Addresses:
1881: Penhow, Monmouth, Wales
1889: 12 Burlington Street, Bath, Somerset  (Kelly's Directory of Somerset, 1889)

Sources:

Elizabeth Frances (Kilroy) Porter

Birth: 15 May 1836, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Married: George Porter on 11 April 1860, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Children: Death: 20 July 1907, at Beabeg, St. Mary's, county Meath, Ireland, aged 72. The cause of death is recorded as acute bronchitis, of 14 days duration.

Census:
1901: Bey Beg, St. Mary's, county Meath (listed as Frances Elizabeth)

Sources:

Emma Martha (Kilroy) Carson

Birth: 12 March 1850, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Married: Samuel Crawford Carson on 25 May 1886, in the parish church of Dublin St Peter, county Dublin, Ireland
Samuel Crawford Carson is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of John Carson, farmer. Samuel is a farmer, resident at Corcreeghy, county Monaghan. Emma Martha Kilroy is recorded as a spinster, of full age, the daughter of James Kilroy, farmer. Emma is resident at 6 Harcourt Street and Moate House, Oldcastle. The marriage was witnessed by Wm. W. Kilroy and R. J. Parker.

Children: Death: 21 September 1933 at 11 Clarinda Park N, Dun Laoghaire, county Dublin, Irleand, aged 83. The cause of death is listed as hemiplegia.

Census & Addresses:
1886: 6 Harcourt Street, Dublin and Moate House, Oldcastle, county Meath   (Ireland civil records Marriages 1886 Dublin St Peter #191)
1901: Corcreeghy, Bellanode, county Monaghan
1911: 11 Clarinda Park North, Kingstown, county Dublin

Sources:

Ethel Essie (Kilroy) Ferguson

Birth: 16 October 1893 at Derrysheridan, Killeagh parish, county Meath, Ireland
Ethel Essie was born on Sixteenth October 1893 at Derry-Sheridan, the daughter of James Watkins Kilroy, gentleman, of Derry-Sheridan, and Elizabeth Mary Kilroy formerly Armstrong.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth Mary (Armstrong) Kilroy

Married: Sherard Freeman Statham Ferguson on 7 April 1915, in the parish church, Munterconnaught, county Cavan, Ireland
Sherard F. S. Ferguson is recorded as a bachelor, aged 21 years, the son of James Ferguson, clerk in holy orders. Sherard is a bank clerk, resident in Virginia, Virginia parish, county Cavan. Ethel E. Kilroy is recorded as a spinster, aged 21 years. She is resident at Ryefield House, Munterconnaught parish. The marriage was witnessed by Percival J. Porter and Eileen M. Kilroy.

Children: Occupation: Dressmaker's apprentice (1911)

Death: 1967, in Exeter district, Devon, England, aged 73

Buried: 29 December 1967, in Kilnasoolagh churchyard, county Clare, Ireland. The parish register states her to be of Dublin.

Census:
1901: Derrysheridan, Killeagh, county Meath
1911: 97 Clanbrassil Street, Dundalk, county Louth

Sources:

Fanny Kilroy

Birth: 1813, in Turin, parish of Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Sources:

Frances (Kilroy) Fearns

Ballymachugh Parish Church
Ballymachugh Parish Church
Birth: 1812/3

Father:
Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Married: _____ Fearns

Buried:
Ballymachugh

Census:
28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan

Sources:

Franklin Arthur Moore Kilroy

Birth: 22 September 1910, at High Street, Tullamore, King's County, Ireland
Franklin Arthur Moore was born on Twenty second September 1910 at High St., Tullamore, the son of Arthur Kilroy, merchant of High St., Tullamore, and Lucy Kilroy formerly Hutchinson.

Father: James Arthur Kilroy

Mother: Lucy Hannah (Hutchinson) Kilroy

Occupation: Dress Designer

Notes: It seems that Frank emigrated to Canada. He is listed on the manifest of the Megantic, arriving in Quebec on 30 October 1926. Frank A. M. Kilroy is aged 15, of Irish nationality.

Later, Frank is found on a Northern Arrival Manifest at Niagara Falls, New York, on 30 March 1930. In this document Frank A. M. Kilroy is listed as aged 19 years and 6 months old, a dress designer, born in Tullamore, Irish F.S. His last permanent address is 432 Kennedy St, Wpg, Man., and he is going to join the American Fashion Co. at 4951 W. 36th St., New York City. He is described as being 5 ft 6 in tall, of fair complexion with brown hair and blue eyes. His nearest relative is listed as his father, Arthur, of High St. Tullamore, I.F.S. Frank's seaport of landing was Quebec, in October 1926, on the Megantic, of the White Star Line.

Frank may be the Frank Kilroy who married Olga Rickert in Winnipeg in 1930 (Manitoba Marriages 1930-033177)

Census & Addresses:
1911: High Street, Tullamore, Kilbride parish, King's county
1930: 432 Kennedy Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba   (Northern Arrival Manifest at Niagara Falls)

Sources:

George Thomas Kilroy

Birth: 24 May 1838, in Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Occupation: Gardener
A number of articles in Melbourne newspapers between 1875 and 1879 note George's prize-winning pears and apples. He is described as gardener to Mr. A. P. Blake and later gardener to Mr. James Grice. A sample of these notices is:
The Argus 11 March 1875 p5 (Melbourne, Victoria)
THE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY'S SHOW.
...On the present occasion, however, two new exhibitors, Mr. Chas. May, from Sunbury, and Mr. G. Kilroy, gardener to Mr. P. Blake, of Caulfield, showed excellent specimens of well grown fruit, and won a fair share of the honours.

The Argus 30 March 1876 p6 (Melbourne, Victoria)
THE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY OF VICTORIA.
...In the Amateur section, Mr. George Kilroy, gardener to Mr. A. P. Blake, and Mr. A. A. Stuart closely contested the apple and pear sections, each in turn being the winner.
Weekly Times 10 March 1877 p7 (Melbourne, Victoria)
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY OF VICTORIA.
...From Mr. George Kilroy, gardener to Mr. Black, came fifteen kinds of apples, several of them well-grown; the first among them were Cox's Pomona, Adams's Pearmain, Mere de Menage, and King of the Pippins ; also four kinds of pears, Williams's Bon Chretien and Beurre Clairgeau were fine-grown specimens.
The Australasian 9 August 1879 p26 (Melbourne, Victoria)
Report of Fruit Committee—Mr. George Kilroy, gardener to Mr. James Grice, Caulfield, exhibited samples of pear, beurre Bretonneau, a late winter dessert kind, well grown, also samples of Uvedale's St. Germain.

Death: 15 June 1884, at Wellington street, Windsor, Victoria, of acute hepatitis
The Age 19 June 1884 p1 (Melbourne, Victoria)
KILROY.—On the 15th June, at Wellington street, Windsor, of acute hepatitis, George Kilroy, native of Cavan, Ireland.

Buried: St Kilda cemetery, Melbourne, Victoria. The grave is in the Wesleyan section, compartment D, grave 37

Notes: George went to Australia with his brother Anthony. It seems the took separate paths fairly early - George is recorded in Melbourne as early as 1862, and Anthony is recorded in Townsville, Queensland in 1865.

Sources:

George Kilroy

Father: Mark Moore Kilroy

Mother: Mary Ellen (Moore) Kilroy

Occupation: Clergyman

Sources:

Guy Philip Kilroy

Birth: 1909, in Hendon district, Middlesex, England

Father: Willie Dickson Kilroy

Mother: Edith Mary (Maclaran) Kilroy

Occupation: Navy Officer, reaching the rank of Lieutenant-Commander in the Royal Navy.
Acting Cub-Lieutenant G. P. Kilroy was promoted to Sub-Lieutenant on 1 November 1930 (London Gazette 8 April 1932 p2292), and Lieutenant on 1 November 1932 (London Gazette 9 December 1932 p7832). In October 1939 Guy was involved in the Minesweeping Section trials of the 'Skid', an early type of electro-magnetic mine sweep towed by the drifter Feaco, and in the subsequent development of the electric 'AA' sweep strung between two trawlers. Guy was stationed on the Clyde in 1947. Lieutenant-Commander G. P. Kilroy retired on 15 March 1954 (London Gazette 23 March 1954 p1748).

Census & Addresses:
1911: Hendon district, Middlesex: Guy Philip Kilroy is aged 2
1957: Craigside Cottage, Leckhampton Hill, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire (London Gazette 23 November 1956 p6693)

Sources:

Hannah Kilroy

Birth: 1802, in Turin, Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Sources:

Hannah Kilroy

Kilroy gravestone Detail of Kilroy gravestone
Gravestone of Richard and Elizabeth Kilroy, and their daughters Hannah and Elizabeth, in the churchyard at Ballymachugh Parish Church. It is probably part of the old church wall.
Detail of the gravestone:
Here Until the Resurrection are
deposited the Remains of Richd
Kilroy Esq of Omard and of
Elizabeth his beloved Wife the
Former Depd this life on the 18th
April 1823 aged 43 Years the Latter
on the 19th August 1830 aged 45 Years
also the Remains of Hannah their
Eldest daughter who Depd this
life the 7th of Sept 1827 aged 19 Years
and of Elizabeth their Fourth
Daughter who Depd this life on
the 28 of Aug. 1827 aged 13 Years
This tribute to the memory of
Richd and Elizabeth Kilroy has
been Raised by their affectionate
Daughters Maria Maxwell
and Frances Fearns
Birth: 1808

Father: Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Death: 7 September 1827, aged 19

Buried: Ballymachugh Parish Church, county Cavan, Ireland

Census:
28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan

Sources:

Hannah Selina (Kilroy) Purdon

Birth: 27 March 1844, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Catherine (_____) Kilroy

Married: John Edward Blakeney Purdon in 1866, in Cavan district, county Cavan, Ireland

Children:
Death: 22 April 1907 in Mendocino county, California, United States, aged 63 years and 27 days

Census:
1900: Turlock, Stanislaus county, California

Sources:

Henrietta Kilroy

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Catherine (_____) Kilroy

Death: in India

Sources:

Isabella Mabel (Kilroy) Large

Birth: 4 May 1879, at Ballahanna, Kilnaleck parish, county Cavan, Ireland
Isabella was born on fourth May 1879 at Ballahanna, the daughter of James Kilroy, farmer, of Ballahanna, and Maria Kilroy formerly Gibbson.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Maria (Gibson) Kilroy

Married: Robert Metcalf Large on 28 September 1898 in the parish church, Foyran, county Westmeath, Ireland
Robert Medcalf Large is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of John H. Large, gent. farmer. Robert is a gent-farmer, of Rheban Castle, parish of Athy. Isabel Mabel Kilroy is recorded as a spinster, aged 19 years, the daughter of James Kilroy, gent farmer. Isabel is resident Derry, parish of Foyran. The wedding was witnessed by James Kilroy, John H. Large and Henry S. Large.

Children:
Notes: Isabel and her husband Robert and children Louis, John and Sheila Annie, sailed to Canada on the Lake Manitoba which departed Liverpool on 21 July 1909, via Belfast, arriving in Quebec on 3 August 1909 onward bound to Montreal. Their destination is listed as Winnipeg to Robert's brother-in-law (likely Isabel's brother, Percy, who had earlier emigrated to Canada).

Isabella appears to have used her middle name, Mabel, sometimes shortened to Mae.

Death: 1 September 1964
Canadian Union Messenger 7 October 1964 p363
    OBITUARIES
LARGE—Isabel Mabel Large was born on May 5, 1879, to James and Maria Kilroy, in the county of Meath, Ireland. She was married to Robert Large, Rheban Castle, Athy, Ireland, on September 28, 1897, and came with her husband to Canada in July of 1906. They lived on a homestead in the Rosetown District until retiring in 1950 when she with her husband made their home in Saskatoon.
  Mrs. Large was a member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Her husband and their three children are also members. She was baptized in 1926 at camp meeting in Saskatoon. On the morning of September 1, 1964 she fell asleep in Jesus and awaits the resurrection when Christ will awake her to everlasting life.
  Left to mourn their loss are her husband; one daughter, Mrs. Foulston of Eyebrow, Saskatchewan; a son, Louis, of McGee, Saskatchewan; a son, Jack, of Kelowna, B.C.; one sister, Mrs. Annie Tinkler of Kelowna, B.C.; nine grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren.
  We are confident that Mrs. Large will answer to the call of the righteous saints on the great resurrection morning.
         D. R. WATTS

Buried: Woodlawn cemetery, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Isabella is buried in plot 31A-L115-SH.

Census & Addresses:
1898: Derry, Foyran parish, county Westmeath   (marriage record)
1901: Castlereban North, Churchtown, county Kildare
1916: Township 29 & 30, Range 16 W 3, Kindersley district, Saskatchewan

Sources:

Isaiah Kilroy

Birth: 16 February 1817, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Sources:

James Kilroy

Ballymachugh Parish Church
Ballymachugh Parish Church
Birth: 1806, in county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Married: Anne Moore on 25 February 1834

Children: Occupation: Farmer

Notes: James lived at Turin, Ballymachugh parish, county Cavan, and then came to Moat View near Oldcastle, county Meath, about 1869. In a letter in 1926, his son William writes that he was "of Fortland Co. Cavan". Fortland is another townland in Ballymachugh. In the same letter in 1926, William notes that all five of his brothers were dead.

Death: 2 April 1880, in Moate, Killeagh, county Meath, aged 74

Buried: Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Will: proved 19 October 1880, by George Porter
Ireland Calendar of Wills 1880 p380
KILROY or KILRUY James. 19 October. The Will of James Kilroy late of Moate County Meath Farmer deceased who died 2 April 1880 at same place was proved at the Principal Registry by the oath of George Porter of Oldcastle in said County Gentleman one of the Executors. Effects under £800.

Sources:

James Kilroy

Birth: 1818/9

Father:
Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Married: Sarah Wigelsworth on 23 June 1859, in St Andrew, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland. The marriage was winessed by John Heacock, for the husband, and Thomas Russell, for the bride. James is listed a bachelor, of full age, of Church Park, Athleague parish, county Roscommon, the son of Richard Kilroy, deceased. Sarah is listed as a spinster, of full age, of 49 Dame Street, the daughter of Joseph Wigelsworth, deceased.
Sarah was born in 1824/5 in Ireland, the daughter of Joseph Wigelsworth and Anne Martin and was the sister of Catherine Wilhelmina Wigelsworth, who married James's brother, John, in 1862.
Census:
1881: 2 Cumbria Villa, St Peter Port, Guernsey, Channel Islands

Census & Addresses:
28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan
1859: Church Park, Athleague, county Roscommon (marriage record)

Sources:

James Watkin Kilroy

Derrysheridan House
Derrysheridan House in 2000, before a recent renovation
Birth: 21 April 1848, in Turin, Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Married (1st): Maria Gibson on 24 April 1877, in the Wesleyan Church, Stephens Green, Dublin, Ireland
Cavan Weekly News 27 April 1877
MARRIAGES.
KILROY and GIBSON - April 24, in the Wesleyan Church, Stephens'-green, Dublin, by the Rev. James Nixon, brother-in-law of the bride, assisted by the Rev. William Gorman, James Kilroy, Esq., of Ballycan House, Mountnugent, to Maria, third daughter of James Gibson, Esq., of Craddenstown, county Westmeath.

Maria was born in 1852/3, the third daughter of James Gibson, Esq., of Craddenstown, county Westmeath. She died on 10 December 1888 in Oldcastle district, county Meath, aged 35, on the same day that her daughter Maria was born, so presumably she died in childbirth. Maria is buried in Ballymachugh, county Cavan.

Children:
Married (2nd): Elizabeth Mary Armstrong on 24 September 1891, in St Columba, Moybolgue, county Meath, Ireland
James Watkin Kilroy is recorded as a widower, of full age, the son of James Kilroy, farmer. The groom is a farmer, resident at Derrysheridan, parish of Foyran. Elizabeth Mary Armstrong is recorded as a spinster, of full age, the daughter of William Armstrong, farmer. Elizabeth is resident at Moyle, parish of Moybologue. The wedding was witnessed by Richard Edward Gill and Ana C.  ??? Latimer.

Elizabeth was born in 1853/4, in county Meath, the daughter of William Armstrong. In 1901, after the death of her husband, Elizabeth is listed as a farmer in Derrysheridan townland. She died on 15 August 1907 at Ryefield, Virginia, county Cavan, aged 53, from chronic pneumonia of duration 8 months leading to cardiac failure of duration 1 week. The informant is her sister, Matilda Porter, of Ryefield. Elizabeth is buried in Ballymachugh, county Cavan. Probate of her will was granted on 20 January 1908 to Matilda Porter.
Ireland Calendar of Wills 1908 p291
KILROY Elizabeth Mary  20 January  Probate of the Will of Elizabeth Mary Kilroy late of Ryefield House County Cavan Widow who died 15 August 1907 granted at Cavan to Matilda Porter Married Woman. Effects £1,610 9s. 0d.
Census & Addresses:
1901: Derrysheridan, Killeagh, county Meath
1907: Ryefield House, Virginia, county Cavan   (Ireland Calendar of Wills 1908 p291)

Children:
Occupation: Farmer

Death: 3 October 1899, at Derrysheridan, Killeagh parish, county Meath, Ireland, aged 51
James W. Kilroy died on Third October 1899 at Derrysheridan. He is recorded as a farmer, married and aged 51 years. The informant is Elizabeth Mary Kilroy, wife, of Derrysheridan.The cause of death is cancer of the spine, of duration 1 year and abcess of duration 4 months, asthenia.

Buried: Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Probate: granted 21 December 1899, to Elizabeth M. Kilroy
Ireland Calendar of Wills 1899 p244
KILROY James Watkin.  21 December   Probate of the Will of James Watkin Kilroy late of Derrysheridan Mountnugent County Meath Farmer who died 3 October 1899 granted at Dublin to Elizabeth M. Kilroy of Derrysheridan Widow. Effects £1,555 2s.

Sources:

James Arthur Kilroy

Birth: 7 February 1878, at Ballyean, Kilnaleck parish, county Cavan, Ireland
James Arthur was born on Seventh February 1878 at Ballyean, the son of James W. Kilroy, farmer of Ballyean, and Maria Kilroy formerly Gibson.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Maria (Gibson) Kilroy

Married: Lucy Hannah Hutchinson on 2 September 1908 in Christ Church, Gorey, county Wexford, Ireland
James Arthur Kilroy is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of James Watkin Kilroy, farmer. James Arthur is a merchant, of High Street, Tullamore. Lucy Hannah Hutchinson is recorded as a spinster, of full age, the daughter of Isaac Hutchinson, merchant. Lucy is resident at ???, Gorey. The wedding was witnessed by Isaac Hutchinson, J. H. Johnston and Anna Eileen Warren.

Lucy Hannah Hutchinson was born on 7 August 1884, in Gorey, county Wexford, the daughter of Isaac Hutchinson, merchant of Gorey and Margaret Hutchinson, formerly Armstrong.
Census:
1901: Main Street, Gorey, county Wexford
1911: High Street, Tullamore, Kilbride parish, King's county

Children:
Occupation: Ironmonger, hardware merchant
Kilroys, High Street, Tullamore
After more than a century in business, J.A. Kilroy's store on High Street, Tullamore, county Offaly was sold in 2016 to be turned into an arts centre.
James bought a hardware store in High Street, Tullamore in 1908, and built "J.A. Kilroy & Sons Ltd" into a large business, well-known in the region and operated by three generations of the Kilroy family. In 2009, the firm went through a restructuring resulting in the loss of 50 jobs at their three stores in Tulamore, Mullingar and Athlone. That article notes that "For generations Kilroys was the first choice when it came to purchasing a variety of goods. While the range of products had been somewhat narrowed in recent decades, at one time the shop sold motorcycles, petrol, prams, buckets and general hardware.The Kilroy family took over the business in 1908 from a gentleman called Hannegan." In 2016, the store's building on High Street, Tullamore, was purchased by the Offaly County Council for €405,000 to be converted into an arts centre for the town.

Death: 8 March 1960, at Hildon Park Nursing Home, 62 Terenure Road, Terenure, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 82
James Arthur Kilroy died on Eighth March 1960 at Hildon Park Nursing Home, 62 Terenure Road. He was a retired hardware merchant, married, and aged 82 years. The cause of death was congestive cardiac failure of duration 5 days, a result of bronchopneumonia of duration 10 days. The informant was ? Kilroy, grandson, of "Lynwood" Thorncliffe Park, Rathgar, Dublin.
Irish Independent 9 March 1960 p2
Obituary
MR. J. A. KILROY Mr. James Arthur Kilroy, High Street, Tullamore, who has died aged 82 was a native of Co. Cavan and has lived for over 50 years in Tullamore where he had established an extensive mail order business. He took a keen interest in local affairs. He is survived by his wife. Lucy, and his sons Noel, Frank, Percy, Desmond, Dermot and George.


Census & Addresses:
1901: West Steet, Drogheda, county Louth
1908: High Street, Tullamore, King's county   (marriage record)
1911: High Street, Tullamore, Kilbride parish, King's county
1960: Hildon Park Nursing Home, 62 Terenure Road, Terenure, county Dublin   (death record)

Sources:

James Kilroy

Birth: 23 February 1899, in Middleborough, Plymouth county, Massachusetts, United States

Father: Richard Thomas Joseph Kilroy

Mother: Bridget A. (Devine) Kilroy

Death: 7 November 1899

Sources:

Jane Kilroy

Birth: 1809, in Turin, parish of Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Sources:

John Kilroy

Birth: 1796, in Turin, Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Sources:

John Kilroy

Catherine Wilhelmina Wiglesworth
Catherine Wilhelmina Wigelsworth
photo from Joe Lineberger
Birth: 1819/20

Father: Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Married: Catherine Wilhelmina Wigelsworth on 19 September 1862, in Dublin North, county Dublin, Ireland

Known as "Kate", Catherine was of Church Park, near Roscommon. She was the daughter of Joseph Wigelsworth and Anne Martin, and was the sister of Sarah Wigelsworth, who married John's brother, James in 1859. She also had a brother, Joseph Wigelsworth (who was born 21 March, 1827 in Church Park, and died near Clyattville, Lowndes County, Georgia, United States) and two other sisters: Abigail Wigelsworth, who is listed as a retired farmer, single, aged 69, living in Tromaun, Athleague, county Roscommon in the 1911 census, and Anne who appears in the 1901 census living in Tromaun with Abbie, also a single famer.

Children:
Census:
28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan

Sources:

John James Kilroy

Birth: 12 May 1845, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Notes: Kathleen remarks that she thinks John died young.

Sources:

Lancelot Kilroy

Birth: 8 May 1870, in Oudh, India

Baptism: 30 May 1870, in Sitapur, Oudh, West Bengal, India

Father: Philip Lefeuvre Kilroy

Mother: Louisa Susan (Le Feuvre) Kilroy

Married: Hester Mary A. Dowson.

Hester was born in 1867, in Basford, Nottinghamshire, the daughter of Benjamin Dowson, a solicitor, and Alice (Greg) Dowson. Hester was a nurse at the Arthur Road Hospital, Bombay, and the letters extracted in the privately printed "Bombay during the Plague" describe her voyage to India, her experiences during the plague of 1897-8, and the death from plague of her friend Harriett McDougall. Hester's eldest brother, William Enfield Dowson, was one of the earliest motor car owners in Nottingham and is recreated as the Will Renshaw in D.H. Lawrence's story "The Overtone" who "drove to all kinds of unexpected places, in his motor car, bathed where he liked, said what he liked, did what he liked".
Census:
1871: Ropewal Rd., Nottingham Castle and Standard Hill, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, aged 3, born Basford, Nottingham
1881: 4 Clumber Road, Standard Hill, Nottinghamshire
1891: Clumber Rd., Standard Hill, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, aged 23, born Nottingham, Nottinghamshire
1911: Kingsbridge district, Devon: Hester Mary A. Kilroy is aged 41

Children:
Occupation: Naval Surgeon, Royal Navy. In 1908, Lancelot is listed as the staff surgeon aboard the Brilliant, attached to the fourth Cruiser Squadron.

Publications:
1905: An Inquiry into the Existence of Typhoid Fever in Bermuda (British Medical Journal 22 April 1905; 1(2312): 878-880 by Lancelot Kilroy and F.W. Hooper)

Notes:
On 17 November 1904, Hester and her children Maud and Robert (but not Alix?), along with Evelyn Roebuck, their nurse and governess, entered the United States on the Majestic (manifest), from Liverpool. Their final destination is given as Bermuda with the intention of joining Lancelot Kilroy at the Royal Naval Hospital, Bermuda. They are accompanied by Hester's father, Benjamin Dowson, who gives his occupation as lawyer and residence as Nottingham. He states his purpose as being to accompanhy his daughter as far as New York (crossed out and replaced with Montreal, Canada). Curiously, the same party (Benjamin Dowson, Hester, Maud, Robert but this time including Alix, appear on the mainfest of the Teutonic which arrived in New York on 20 October 1904, but their names are all crossed out. I surmise that perhaps Alix fell ill, the family did not board the Teutonic, and they then proceeded on the Majestic a month later, leaving Alix behind to recover)
On 22 March 1905, Lancelot, his wife Hester and children Maud Winifred and Robert, and Evelyn Roebuck, returned to the United States aboard the Bermudian (manifest) sailing from Hamilton, Bermuda. They were en route to London, and they give their last residence as Bermuda.

In 1934, Lancelot, his brother Willie and F. Wheatley applied for a patent for "A new or improved device for holding fish hooks, artificial flies or baits"

Death: 1947

Census & Addresses:
1881: Junior School of The United Services College, Westward Ho!, Abbotsham, Devon
1901, 1904: "The Park", Nottingham, Nottinghamshire (baptism records of children Maud and Robert)
1905: Bermuda (Ellis Island ship manifest)
1907: Cromwell Street, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire (baptism records of daughter Mona)
1934: Barn Elms Farm, Bradfield, Berkshire (patent application)

Sources:

Louise Maria Kilroy

Birth: 7 June 1874, in Freshwater, Isle of Wight, Hampshire, England

Baptised: 5 July 1874, in Yarmouth, Isle of Wight, Hampshire, England

Father: Philip Lefeuvre Kilroy

Mother: Louisa Susan (Le Feuvre) Kilroy

Census:
1881: Plymstock, Devon
1891: 72 Chaucer Road, Bedford St Paul, Bedfordshire

Sources:

Lucy Kilroy

Birth: 1852, in Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Sources:

Margaret Anne (Kilroy) Gill

known as "Maggie"

Birth: 2 Jan 1842, in county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Married: Benjamin Gill on 13 August 1863, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Children: Occupation: Farmer

Notes: I believe that there is some error here with Margaret's children. The 1911 census shows that she only ever had seven children, all still living in 1911.

Death: 18 September 1920, at Cloney Grange, Athboy, county Meath, Ireland, aged 80. The cause of death is listed as acute bronchitis of duration 1 month and pulmonary congestion for 7 days.

Burial: 21 September 1920, in Killaconnigan cemetery, Ballivor, Killaconnigan, county Meath, Ireland

Census:
1901: Clonygrange, Killaconnigan, county Meath
1911: Clonygrange, Killaconnigan, county Meath

Sources:

Maria (Kilroy) Maxwell

Birth: 1810/1, in Ireland

Father:
Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Married: Henry Maxwell on 23 June 1831, in the presence of her brother, Anthony.

Children: Death: 9 February 1891, at 404 Garden Street, Hoboken, New Jersey, United States, aged 80
The New York Herald 10 February 1891
        DIED.
  MAXWELL. - At her residence, No. 404 Garden st., Hoboken, on Monday, February 9, 1891, MARIA, widow of Henry Maxwell, formerly of Crover, county Cavan, Ireland, and daughter of the late Richard Kilroy, Esq., of Omard House, same county, Ireland, in the 81st year of her age.
  The relatives and friends of the family are invited to attend her funeral, on Thursday, February 12, at two P. M., from St. Paul's Church, Hoboken, N. J. Please omit flowers.


Census & Addresses:
1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan
1860: Hoboken, Hudson county, New Jersey: Maria Maxwell is aged 48, born in Ireland (film 803693 p64 family 497)
1870: Hoboken, Hudson county, New Jersey
1885: Hoboken, Hudson county, New Jersey: Maria Maxwell is aged over 60.
1891: 404 Garden Street, Hoboken, New Jersey   (The New York Herald 10 February 1891)

Sources:

Maria Kilroy

Birth: 1835/6, in Plymouth, Devon, England

Father: Alexander Kilroy

Mother: Maria Lucinda (Fry) Kilroy

Death: 21 June 1911, in  Tetbury district, Gloucestershire, England, aged 75

Census & Addresses:
1881: 122 Edith Road, London, Middlesex
1901: Ryde, Isle of Wight: Maria Kilroy is aged 63, born in Stoke, Devon
1911: Tetbury district, Gloucestershire: Maria Kilroy is aged 73
1911: Leighterton Rectory, near Tetbury, Gloucestershire (London Gazette 1 September 1911 p6500) which also notes that she was "formerly of Omard, Harrow, Weald, Middlesex"

Sources:

Maria Gibson (Kilroy) Marshall

Birth: 10 December 1888, at Derrysheridan, Killeagh parish, county Meath, Ireland
Maria was born on Tenth December 1888 at Derry Sheridan, the daughter of James W. Kilroy, gentleman, of Derry Sheridan, and Maria Kilroy formerly Gibson.

Maria's mother died on 10 December 1888, the day of Maria's birth, presumably in childbirth.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Maria (Gibson) Kilroy

Married: Thomas M. Marshall on 30 September 1913 in St. Matthew's church, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
The Winnipeg Tribune 27 September 1913 p6
  Church Felicitates.—A number of young people of St. Matthew's church, Mrs. McElheran, and also some personal friends of Miss Myra Gibson Kilroy (numbering about 100) met in the basement of the new church on Thursday evening, and presented her with a shower of presents on the occasion of her marriage on Oct. 30 to the Rev. Thomas Marshall, vicar of St. Thomas' church, Weston. J. S. Spence, as chairman, paid a high tribute to the excellent work which Miss Kilroy had been doing in Sunday school, and Mr. Hargreaves referred to her successful efforts in other directions of the work of the church. Mrs. Kilroy, who is a native of Ireland, came to Winnipeg some years ago, when she early associated herself with St. Matthew's church.

The Winnipeg Tribune 1 October 1913 p7
    MARSHALL—KILROY
  A pretty wedding took place at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon in St. Matthew's church, when Miss Myra Kilroy was joined in holy matrimony to Rev. T. Marshall, rector of St. Thomas church. Rev. R. D. McEtheran officiated. The bride, who was given away by her brother, wore a gown of white crepe de chine with a Limerick lace veil and carried a shower bouquet of lilies; Miss Sybil Mastell was bridesmaid, and was gowned in pale pink charmeuse. Rev. Mr. Morris, rector of St. Alban's, acted as best man.
  After the ceremony a reception was held at the residence of Rev. R. D. McElheran, 158 Maryland street.

Children: Notes: Maria used the name Myra. She emigrated to Canada on the Lake Manitoba with her sister, Isabel Mabel Large, in 1909, aged 20. Her destination is listed as Winnipeg, Manitoba and her occupation is shop assistant.

Death: 18 December 1956, at 4323 Coronation Drive, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, aged 68
The Winnipeg Evening Tribune 20 December 1956 p27
MARSHALL — On December 18, 1956 at the residence of her daughter, Mrs Basil Mainman, 4323 Coronation Drive, Calgary, Alberta, Mrs. Myra Gibson Marshall, aged 68 years, widow of the Rev. Thomas Marshall, formerly of Winnipeg. Funeral service 2.15 p.m. Friday in St. Andrew's Anglican Church, Woodhaven and Portage Ave. Interment in Chapel Lawn Memorial Gardens. Arrangements by the Clark Leatherdale Funeral Home, Ph. 93-5494

The Winnipeg Evening Tribune 20 December 1956 p31
    MRS THOMAS MARSHALL
  Mrs. Myra Gibson Marshall, 68, formerly of Winnipeg, died Tuesday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Basil Mainman, 4323 Coronation Drive, Calgary, Alta.
  Mrs. Marshall was born in Ireland and came to Winnipeg in 1909. She was the widow of Rev. Thomas Marshall.
  She is survived by a son, Hedley; a daughter, Mrs. Basil Mainman; two brothers, Percy and Arthur Kilroy; two sisters, Mrs. K. Large and Mrs. A. Tinkler; five grandchildren.
  Funeral service will be held at 2.15 p.m. Friday in St. Andrew's Anglican Church, Dean J. Burton Thomas officiating, assisted by Rev. A. Wilcox. Burial will be in Chapel Lawn Memorial Gardens. Clark Leatherdale Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Burial: 21 December 1956, in Chapel Lawn Memorial Gardens, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Census & Addresses:
1901: Derrysheridan, Killeagh, county Meath
1916: 1458 Ross Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba
1917: 1458 Ross Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba   (attestation papers of brother Percy)


Sources:

Mark Anthony Kilroy

Birth: 1841/2

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Catherine (_____) Kilroy

Occupation: Army Surgeon. Mark was registered as a doctor on 5 March 1866. His qualifications at the time are given as "Mem. R. Coll. Surg. Eng. 1865. Lic. K. Q. Coll. Phys. Irel. 1865.". Mark became Staff Assistant-Surgeon on 1 April 1867. Hart's Army list for 1870 shows him as an assistant-surgeon with the rank of lieutenant, stationed in the West Indies and the 1871 and 1872 lists show him with the same rank now stationed in Chatham, Kent. The 1873 list shows Mark still an assistant-surgeon with the rank of lieutenant, now stationed in Bengal. Mark retired on 4 November 1873, with the rank of surgeon. This retirement, after only 6 years, was likely a result of illness, and Mark died the following year.

Death: 1874, in Croydon district, Surrey, England, aged 32

Addresses: 1865: 10 Upper Gloucester Street, Dublin (admission to King and Queen's College of Physicians in Ireland)
1866: Ogmard, Virginia, county Cavan (The Medical Register (1878) p278)

Sources:

Mark Moore Kilroy

Birth: 19 March 1854, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Married: Mary Ellen Moore in 1880 in New Zealand

Mary was the daughter of Thomas Charles Moore and Ellen Dunbar. She was probably born in county Clare, Ireland. In her husband's obituary (Evening Star 15 September 1919 p6) it is stated that Mark came out to New Zealand 40 years prior (i.e. 1878/9), and that Mary Ellen, his fiancee, came out a year later. Likely she is the Miss Moore who arrived on the Arawata on 4 October 1880, from Melbourne, bound for Dunedin, in the company of a Miss Kilroy (Press 5 October 1880 p2). After the death of her husband in 1919, it appears that Mary Ellen sold up and returned to England or Ireland. Her household goods were put up for auction (Evening Star 17 July 1920 p9) and she sailed on the Arawa for Southampton and London on 31 July 1920 (New Zealand Times 30 July 1920 p2).

This description of Mary Ellen's household goods for auction gives a good glimpse into her liefstyle.
Evening Star 17 July 1920 p9
      TUESDAY, 20th JULY,
        At 2 o'clock.
    On the Premises, No. 5 Neidpath road (off Eglinton road).
  Instructed by Mrs M. M. Kilroy (who is leaving for England).
  SUPERIOR HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE.
RICH AXMINSTER CARPET, WALNUT AND TAPESTRY SUITE (9 Pieces), MAHOGANY EXTENDING DINING TABLE, SADDLEBAG CHESTERFIELD SETTEE, MAHOGANY BOOKCASE AND CHIFFONIER. PEDESTAL WRITING DESK, LARGE RED PINE PEDESTAL DUCHESSE PAIR, LARGE MIRROR-DOOR WARDROBE WALNUT OVERMANTEL.
ALEX. HARRIS AND CO have received instructions to sell by auction,
  Household Furniture, including—Rich Axminster carpet, mahogany bookcase and chiffonier, walnut and tapestry suite, leather couch, pedestal writing desk, opossum rug, vases and ornaments, dinner service (84 pieces), red pine hall stand, fenders and irons, rattan chairs, wicker chairs, 4 fur hearthrugs, spring rockers, bamboo tables, tapestry settee, seagrass rocker, mahogany extending dining table, wall mirrors, photogravures and pictures, folding chairs, 1½ pairs heavy tapestry curtains, portiere curtain and rods, walnut overmantel, saddlebag Chesterfield settee, marble timepiece, velvet pile table cover, 6 leather dining chairs, coal vases, linoleum, Austrian chairs, crockery, folding bed chair and cushion, double and single iron bedsteads, wire mattresses, kapok and flock mattresses, blankets, handsome red pine duchess pair, large duchesse chest, toiletware, 2 sewing machines, large mirror-door wardrobe, blankets, kitchen table, kitchen utensils, tool chest and tools, quantity garden tools, grindstone.

Children: Occupation: Draper
In Ireland, Mark was apprenticed to the drapery business under Thomas C. Moore, part owner of the great Limerick warehouse, whose daughter subsequently became his wife. After emigrating to New Zealand around 1879, he found employment with the firm of Brown, Ewing, of Dunedin. In 1900, Mark, then manager of a department in Brown, Ewing’s, founded the drapery firm of Kilroy and Sutherland, in association with Mr Robert Sutherland.

Otago Daily Times 16 August 1912 p6
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP
  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Partnership heretofore existing betweei the Undersigned, MARK MOORE KILROY and ROBERT DUNNET SUTHERLAND, as Drapers at Numbers 192 to 200 Princes street, Dunedin. under the style of "KILROY & SUTHERLAND," has been this day Dissolved by mutual consent. Any Outstanding Debts should be paid to the said Mark Moore Kilroy, by whom the Business will be carried on under the same style as before, and who will Discharge all the Liabilities of the former partnership.
  Dated at Dunedin this first day of August, One Thousand Nine Hundred and Twelve.
    MARK MOORE KILROY.
    ROBERT DUNNET SUTHERLAND.
   Witness to both Signatures:
    EDMUND J. SMITH, Solicitor, Dunedin

Notes: Mark emigrated to New Zealand in about 1879. The Otago Witness 5 April 1905 p27 mentions a theft from Mark's shop.
THE CHARGE AGAINST OSBORNE.
A PECULIAR DEVELOPMENT
...
A third information was here prepared and put in, charging Osborne with having, in December last, broken and entered the shop of Mark Moore Kilroy and stolen therefrom seven silk handkerchiefs, valued at £1 6s 3d.


Mark and his family returned to England for a visit in 1913.
Otago Daily Times 12 February 1913 p8
   Before leaving for an extended holiday in Great Britain, Mr and Mrs M. M. Kilroy and their son wore entertained at tea at the Dominion Tea Rooms on Monday evening by the staff of Kilroy and Sutherland. Members of the staff to the number of 34 assembled. During the evening Mr S. Lawn expressed the sentiments of the gathering towards the voyagers by wishing them a pleasant journey, an enjoyable stay, and a safe return; and, on behalf of the staff, presented Mr Kilroy with a Kaiapoi rug. Mr Kilroy briefly and feelingly thanked those present for their kind wishes toward himself and his family and for the rug, which he would prize highly.

The Dominion 3 June 1913 p5 (Wellington, New Zealand)
Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Kilroy, of Dunedin, and their son arrived in England a fortnight ago, and intend to stay till next October. They will stay at Verwood, with Dr. Moore, Mrs. Kilroy's brother, and then in Ireland with Mr. Kilroy's people in County Meath..


Otago Daily Times 10 November 1913 p3
      PROSPEROUS BRITAIN
    A RETURNED TRAVELLER.
  CHAT WITH MR M. M. KILROY.
  Mr M. M. Kilroy, of the firm of Kilroy and Sutherland, who with Mrs Kilroy, and Mr Brian Kilroy, left Dunedin last February on a visit to the Old Land, returned again to this city last Thursday. During his absence Mr Kilroy travelled extensively both in England, Ireland, and Scotland, and was a keen and interested observer of commercial and industrial developments in these lands, which he had not visited for 30 years.
  Mr Kilroy has come back strongly impressed with the sound prosperity of England, and could find no ground for the pessimistic predictions sometimes made about her decadence. On the contrary, he found her factories running full time and, he told a reporter, so busily employed that it was often very difficult to get an order executed. Mr Kilroy considers the British leaders in business to be quite up to date and wide awake in their methods, and says that they compel the respect and admiration even of their American rivals.
  When questioned on the subject of Home Rule, Mr Kilroy said that personally he thought the subject was largely a political one. Undoubtedly Ireland had never been so prosperous or so contented as she was at tho present moment, and in his travels there he had been unable to discover any desire for a change. The people were getting splendid prices for their produce, and the deposits in the Irish savings banks were abnormal. An illustration of the prices prevailing was afforded by the fact that Mr Kilroy's nephew, with whom he was staying, disposed of 26 bullocks for £24 each, and of 100 sheep of an ordinary cross at no less than £3 5s per head. These, he added, were not stall fed, but were just taken off the grass. A system which was having excellent results among the agricultural labouring classes was the compulsory purchase of single acres from farmers and landowners and the erection on each of these thousands of allotments of four or five-roomed cottages, with slate roofs, at a contract price of £300. These were let to agricultural labourers at from 1s to 1s 6d a week—cottages for which the weekly rent in Dunedin would be quite 15s. The Government also encouraged the labourers to take a pride in their sections by giving annual prizes for the best kept gardens in each county. The old Irish log cabin and the pig were now only a memory of the past. Mr Kilroy was much impressed with Belfast, a city of 375,000 inhabitants, and spoke enthusiastically of its magnificent town hall, and of Messrs Harland and Wolff's vast ship-building yards, which he had the. privilege of visiting. While in the neighbourhood he enjoyed a few days' grouse shooting, in the hills of Antrim. He thoroughly believes in the determination of the people of Ulster, and does not doubt that they will use the arms they are now preparing if they are forced to do so. The Ulstermen have good reason to believe that they have many sympathisers among the British regular troops, and this, no doubt, strengthens them in their attitude.
  Mr Kilroy found London still growing enormously. To his mind the London policeman is a marvel, and his control over the traffic simply phenomenal. He was a witness of the amusing, but always impressive sight of the whole of the Strand traffic held up while a policeman led two little tots of two and four years of age across the thoroughfare. The metropolitan policeman he found very tactful and obliging, and a perfect encyclopædia of information. In the House of Commons Mr Kilroy heard Mr Lloyd George, Mr A. Bonar Law, Sir John Simon, the Solicitor-general, and other less widely known politicians. He was not greatly impressed with their speaking, and said that personally he did not think that any of them could equal the late Mr Scobie Mackenzie. Mr Lloyd George was making a debating speech, and was more forcible than eloquent. London has been transformed by the twopenny tubes and the motor buses. Horse traffic is gradually dying out, and the motor conveyances have been brought to such perfection that they are entering into competition with the railways over distances extending 200 miles from London. Almost the only unfavourable criticism Mr Kilroy had to make was directed against the railway management. The Home trains he had found to be frequently unpunctual, and often very far behind time-table time. He mentioned a curious side effect of the Balkan war that had come under his notice. Kid gloves were extremely scarce and difficult to purchase just now, largely owing to the fact that the cultivation of kids in the Balkan States had been much neglected of late, and many of the animals have been shot or otherwise destroyed.
  Mr Kilroy both went and returned by the Suez route, and owned to feeling a certain satisfaction in seeing the British flag flying at almost every port. On the return journey he paid a brief visit to Queensland, and was much impressed with the possibilities of that State, which, as he points out, is five times the size of England. The dairying industry he found to be making immense strides in Queensland and along all the railway routes could bo seen smiling homesteads and the evidences of great activity in building and settlement. "If the Australasian colonies are properly advertised, the future is theirs," said Mr Kilroy, "I believe that during the next 10 or 12 years the emigration to them will greatly increase."

Death: 14 September 1919, aged 65, at his residence, 5 Neidpath Road, Mornington, Dunedin, New Zealand
Otago Daily Times 15 September 1919 p4
DEATHS.
  KILROY.—On September 14, 1919, at his residence, 5 Neidpath road, Mornington, Mark Moore, the beloved husband of Mary Ellen Kilroy. Private interment—Frapwell and Holgate, undertakers.

Evening Star 15 September 1919 p6
OBITUARY
      MR M. M. KILROY.
  Mr Mark Moore Kilroy, senior partner in the drapery firm of Kilroy and Sutherland, died at his residence, Mornington, yesterday, aged 65 years. Though he took no active part in public affairs, Mr Kilroy was one of those men of sterling worth whose characters make impact upon their generation. He was a zealous adherent of the Presbyterian Church, an elder at St. Andrew's. This office and his long vice-presidency of the Dunedin Cricket Club, represented his nearest approach to public life. He was also one of the original shareholders in the Kaltuna green, though he never took part in the game, his chosen recreation being chess, and one of the keenest players at the Athenaeum. Mr Kilroy was bom in County Cavan, and apprenticed to the drapery business under Mr Moore, part owner of the great Limerick warehouse, whose daughter subsequently became his wife. At one stage of his career the deceased gentleman had serious intentions of taking orders in the Church of Ireland, and actually commenced his studies; but he soon returned to his earlier choice, and landing in New Zealand 40 years ago, he found employment with the firm of Brown, Ewing, of this City. His fiancee, Mis Mary Ellen Moore (County Clare) came out a year later, and the marriage took place here. In 1900 Mr Kilroy, then manager of a department in Brown, Ewing’s, founded the present firm of Kilroy and Sutherland, in association with Mr Robert Sutherland. He is survived by his wife and three sons—Mr R. J. Kilroy, of the firm; Mr W. E. Kilroy, Auckland; and Mr A. B. Kilroy, M.A., a student at Knox College.

Addresses:
1883: Neidpath Road, Mornington, Dunedin   (Stone's commercial, municipal and general directory of Dunedin 1883 p104)
1919: 5 Neidpath Road, Mornington, Dunedin

Sources:

Mary Kilroy

Birth: 1800, in Turin, Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Sources:

Mary Jane (Kilroy, Hannon) Lowry

Birth: 7 January 1835, in Turin, Ballymachugh parish, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Married (1st): Thomas Hannon on 13 September 1855, in Turin, Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Children: Married (2nd): Joseph Lowry on 19 February 1861, in St Thomas, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland. The marriage was witnessed by Joseph Trevor and James Trevor. Joseph is recorded as a bachelor, a minor, of 97 Amicus Street, a commercial traveller, the son of John Lowry, a farmer. Mary Jane Hannon is recorded as a widow, of full age, of 1 Upper Derrel Street, the daughter of James Kilroy.

Children: The 1911 census notes that this marriage had 10 children of whom 6 were living in 1911.

Death: 1913, in Navan district, county Meath, Ireland

Census & Addresses:
1861: 1 Upper Derrel Street; Dublin, county Dublin  (marriage record)
1901: Scallanstown, Ardbraccan, county Meath
1911: Scallanstown, Ardbraccan, county Meath

Sources:

Mary Ruth Kilroy

Birth: 1894, in Middleborough, Plymouth county, Massachusetts, United States
The birth record has Mary's birth date as 18 September 1894, which is incompatible with the death date of 8 September 1894.

Father: Richard Thomas Joseph Kilroy

Mother: Bridget A. (Devine) Kilroy

Death: 8 September 1894, in Middleborough, Plymouth county, United States

Sources:

Mary Alix Hester (Kilroy) Meynell

Title: Dame Alix Kilroy, Lady Meynell, DBE.
Alix was Lady Meynell after her marriage to Sir Francis Meynell in 1946 until this was superceded by her own DBE received in 1949.

Birth: 2 February 1903, in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Baptism: 9 February 1903, in St Barnabas, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Father: Lancelot Kilroy

Mother: Hester Mary (Dowson) Kilroy

Education: Malvern Girls' Schools and Somerville College, Oxford

Married: Francis Meredith Wilfrid Meynell in 1946. Francis was born in 1895, the son of writer Alice Meynell. He was imprisoned as a conscientious objector in the First World War, but later became well known as a a poet, book designer and founder of the Nonesuch Press, and was knighted in 1946. Sir Francis died in 1975.

Occupation: Civil Servant. Alix was noted for having been, in 1925, one of the first two women to enter the administrative grade of the Civil Service by examination. She had a distinguished career at the Board of Trade, serving as Under Secretary from 1946 until her retirement in 1955. Alix also served as Secretary of the newly formed Monopolies Commission from 1949 until 1952.

Publications: 1953: The task and methods of the Monopolies Commission
1979: Francis Meynell of the Nonesuch Press
1988: Public Servant, Private Woman (autobiography)
1998: What Grandmother Said (extracts of letters from her grandmother)

Death: 31 August 1999, in Brent Eleigh, Suffolk, England

Obituary: The Independent (London) 2 September 1999, by John Commander

Notes: Mary always used her second name, Alix, but both her birth certificate and baptism record show her first name as Mary. Alix was known as "A.K." to her colleagues and "Bay" to her friends.

Census & Addresses:
1911: Kingsbridge district, Devon: Alix M. Hester Kilroy is aged 8
1958: 19 Clevedon Place, London SW1  (notes by Kathleen Kilroy)

Sources:

Matilda (Kilroy) Elliott

Birth: 13 February 1844, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Married: John David Elliott on 22 May 1867, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Children: Notes: Matilda emigrated to the United States in 1888 with her children, following her husband who had emigrated the year previously.

Death: 23 August 1922, in Chicago, Cook county, Illinois, United States
Matilda Elliott is recorded as widowed, aged 78, born in Ireland the daughter of James Kilroy. Her spouse is John David Elliott. Matilda is resident at 1433 Leland Ave, Ward 2. The informant is Ernest J. Elliott.

Burial: 25 August 1922 at Graceland cemetery, Chicago, Illinois, United States.
Matilda is buried in Maplewood section, sub lot 18N.W.P grave 6

Census & Addresses:
1900: Sheridan Road, Chicago, Illinois
1907: 220 Winthrop Avenue, Chicago, Illinois   (Chicago Daily Tribune 28 August 1907 p9)
1910: 4921 - 4923 Kenmore Avenue, Chicago, Illinois
1918: 1433 Leland Av, Chicago, Cook county, Illinois   (WWI draft registration card of son Ernest)
1920: 1433 Leland Ave, Chicago, Illinois
1922: 1433 Leland Ave, Chicago, Illinois   (Illinois Cook County Deaths #20740)

Sources:

Maud Winifred Mary Greg (Kilroy) Milne

Title: Lady Milne

Birth: 24 November 1901, in Nottingham district, Nottinghamshire, England

Baptism: 30 December 1901, in St Barnabas, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England. Maud was baptised as "Marida Winifred Mary Kilroy"

Father: Lancelot Kilroy

Mother: Hester Mary (Dowson) Kilroy

Education: Malvern Girls' School. Maud entered Bedford College, University of London in 1920 and received a B.Sc. Hons (Chem) (London) 1924. In the same year she became a Fellow of the Chemical Society, nominated by G.A.R. Kon, M.A. Whiteley and Arnold Stevenson. After graduation, Maud acquired a Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR) grant to work at Imperial College with Professor Thorpe. In 1926 she applied for a position of assistant librarian in the Science Library. There is no indication as to whether she was successful.

Married: David Milne on 23 August 1928 in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England. David was born in 1895/6. Sir David Milne was appointed Permanent Under Secretary of State for Scotland in 1946. In 1960, David joined the Board of the BBC as Scottish Governor, aged 64. In 1964, David was appointed as Chairman of the Committee of Inquiry into an outbreak of typhoid in Aberdeen.

Notes: Maud was generally called Winifred, and known as "Bimbi" to her family and friends.
On 17 November 1904, Hester and her children Maud and Robert (but not Alix), along with Evelyn Roebuck, their nurse and governess, entered the United States on The Majestic (manifest), from Liverpool. Their final destination is given as Bermuda with the intention of joining Surgeon Kilroy at the Royal Naval Hospital, Bermuda.
On 22 March 1905, Lancelot, his wife Hester and children Maud Winifred and Robert, and Evelyn Roebuck, returned to the United States aboard the Bermudian (manifest) sailing from Hamilton, Bermuda. They were en route to London, and they give their last residence as Bermuda.

Addresses:
1924: Brooklyn Hotel, Earl's Court Square, London (nomination to Chemical Society)
1958: 34 Greenhill Gardens, Edinburgh, Scotland (notes by Kathleen Kilroy)

Sources:

Mona Gabrielle (Kilroy) Middleton

Birth: 21 December 1906, in Nottingham district, Nottinghamshire, England

Baptism: 21 February 1907, in St Barnabas, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Father: Lancelot Kilroy

Mother: Hester Mary (Dowson) Kilroy

Married: Geoffrey D. Middleton in 1938, in Wokingham district, Berkshire, England

Sources:

Noel James Isaac Kilroy

Birth: 22 July 1909, at High Street, Tullamore, King's County, Ireland
Noel James Isaac was born on Twenty second July 1909 at High St., Tullamore, the son of James Arthur Kilroy, hardware merchant of High St., Tullamore, and Lucy Kilroy formerly Hutchinson.

Father: James Arthur Kilroy

Mother: Lucy Hannah (Hutchinson) Kilroy

Married: Kathleen Henrietta Hoskin on 16 December 1933 in the parish church, Fermoy, county Cork, Ireland
Noel James Isaac Kilroy is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of James Arthur Kilroy, in the hardware business. Noel is a bank official, of Fermoy. Kathleen Henrietta Hoskin is recorded as a spinster, of full age, the daughter of Henry Hoskin, chemist. Kathleen is resident in Fermoy. The wedding was witnessed by Henry Hoskin and Herbert Carrier Ross.

Kathleen Henrietta Hoskin was born 7 March 1903, at Sovereign Street, Clonakilty, county Cork, the daughter of Henry Hoskin, pharmaceutical chemist of Sovereign Street, Clonakilty, and Ellen Hoskin, formerly Reid. In the 1930's, Kathleen was a teacher at the Adair School in Fermoy, county Cork.
Fermoy Adair National School Blog
In the 1930's Miss Hoskin took over the reins. She married Mr. Noel Kilroy from the bank and of course was known to her pupils as Mrs. Kilroy. Rosalie Eagar's family came back from what was then Rhodesia and settled down to live in Ileclash House by the banks of the Blackwater. Rosalie was packed off to school in Adair. She remembers Mrs. Kilroy as a "pleasant, good looking woman who was good to me".
Grave of Kathleen Henrietta (Hoskin) Kilroy
Headstone of Kathleen Henrietta Kilroy in Mt Jerome cemetery, Dublin, county Dublin
photograph by Yvonne Russell posted at Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives: Dublin Headstones
Kathleen died on 31 May 1959, and is buried in Mt Jerome cemetery, Dublin.
The headstone reads:
KATHLEEN HENRIETTA KILROY | née HOSKIN | Died 31st May 1959 | Lovingly remembered by | her husband NOEL, | son DESMOND | and many friends. | Her sister | WILHELMINA SARAH ORGAN | Died 25th April 1968 | "Death where is thy victory"

Occupation: Bank Official

Death: 26 October 1965, at the Royal City of Dublin Hospital, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 56
Noel Kilroy, of The Avenue, Gorey, Co. Wexford, died on October Twenty sixth March 1965 at Royal City of Dublin Hosp. He was a retired bank manager, married, and aged 56 years. The cause of death was carcinomatosis, carcinoma of bronchus.

Grave of Noel James Isaac Kilroy
Headstone where Noel James Isaac Kilroy is buried in Christ Church graveyard, Gorey, county Wexford
Buried: Christ Church graveyard, Gorey, county Wexford, Ireland. Noel is buried in the family grave of his grandfather, Isaac Hutchinson.
The headstone reads:
In Memory of | ISAAC HUTCHINSON | Also his wife MARGARET | his daughter ELEANOR | and son JOHN | also his daughter | ETHEL | and his grandson| NOEL KILROY. | At Rest

Census & Addresses:
1911: High Street, Tullamore, Kilbride parish, King's county
1933: Fermoy, county Cork   (marriage record)
1965: The Avenue, Gorey, county Wexford   (death record)

Sources:

Percy Joseph Kilroy

Fort Garry
Percy "Pat" Kilroy (right) with Fort Garry, the winner of the Western Canada handicap in 1948. Mrs. J. S. McDiarmid, wife of Hon. J. S. McDiarmid, minister of mines and public works, decorates the winner in the enclosure. In the saddle is Jockey Paul Bailey with Max Freed, Frank Kilroy and Pat Kilroy beside the horse.
Birth: 18 September 1887, at Derrysheridan, Killeagh parish, county Meath, Ireland
Unnamed male was born on Eighteenth September 1887 at Derry Sheridan, the son of James Kilroy, gentleman, of Derry Sheridan, and Maria Kilroy formerly Gibson.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Maria (Gibson) Kilroy

Married: Dorothy Frank Cottrell on 5 March 1932 in St James, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Notes:
Percy attended Vaughan Charter School in Tubbrid, Drumkeeran, county Fermanagh, where he was admitted on 10 March 1900. The school records show that he was baptised in Castlepollard, county Westmeath. Percy was apprenticed to a shop in Ballyboy in October 1904. This didn't last long, and Percy sailed to Canada on the Bavarian which departed Liverpool on 4 May 1905, via Moville, Ireland, arriving in Halifax in April 1905. His destination is listed as Winnipeg. In the 1906 census, Percy is listed as a hired man on the John Morrow farm in Selkirk district, Manitoba. He later moved to Kenora, Ontario where he found work with the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Percy volunteered for the Canadian Expeditionary Force in World War I on 30 January 1917. His attestation papers list his trade as a locomotive engineer and his address as the Y.M.C.A. in Kenora, Ontario. He is single, born on 19 December 1899, in Oldcastle, Ireland. His next of kin is his sister, Mrs. T. Marshall of 1458 Ross Avenue, Winnipeg, Man. Percy is described as being 5 ft 7 ins. tall, of fair complexion with blue eyes and brown eyes.
Kenora Miner and News 31 January 1917 (Kenora, Ontario)
20 ENGINEERS AND FIREMEN ENLIST
LOCAL C. P. R. MEN OFFER FOR RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATIVE SERVICE IN FRANCE—WILL LEAVE SHORTLY
  In regard to the number of men enlisting from Kenora for overseas service, this week has been the best since the early months of the war, no less than twenty C.P.R. engineersand firemen enlisting in the Railway Construction and Operating Battalions now being mobilized to go to France. Their work will be particularly in connection with th egreat offensive movement in the spring. They will operate trains in constructing the railway lines as the enemy is pushed back, and also trains for bringing up troops and supplies to the front, and it is pleasing to note that the number of Kenora men already at the front will be considerably augmented in a very short time. Following are the names of this very important service:
  Engineers—
    H. Britton
    M. Harris
    G. Banks
    A. Alterton
    S. Towns
    A. McKay.
    R. Pollock
    J. McLennan
    P. Kilroy
    A. McKee
    J. A. Love
    J. A. Hutchinson
  Firemen—
    N. Smith
    A. Fordes
    T. Thorpe
    G. Bateson
    G. McClatchie
    M. Brown
    A. Reynolds
    I. Hawkins

Kenora Miner and News 7 February 1917 (Kenora, Ontario)
32 KENORA MEN LEAVE FOR FRONT
WERE GIVEN A SPLENDID SEND-OFF AT THE STATION THIS AFTERNOON
  A large crowd gathered at the station shortly after noon today to say good-bye to thirty-two local C. P. R. men who enlisted for overseas service in Section No. 1 Skilled Railway Operators, and who passed through for the east. They were as fine a body of men as ever left Kenora, and their skilled service will be of great value to the allied cause in the operation of military trains. They are all well-known local young men, and they had a very busy time during the 10-minute stop of the train saying good-bye to relatives and their many friends, all of whom wished them a safe return. Following are the names of those who left today:
  H. Britton, M. Harris, G. Banks, A. Alterton, S. Towns, A. McKay, R. Pollock, G. McClatchie, J.McLennan, P. Kilroy, A. McKee, J.A. Hutchinson, F. Fullford, R. Mableson, W. J. Hawkins, N. Smith, A. Forbes, T. Thorpe, M. Brown, A. Reynolds, M. Blight, W. McVeigh, O. Sigurdson, A. Cripps, C. Husband, I. Hawkins, A. Barclay, G. Miles, H. Dawson, Thos. Huchinson, J. H. McKay, R. Redding.

Judy Stockham provides further details of Percy's war service at the Kenora Great War Project :
  Organized in December of 1916 with recruitment amongst railway men in all military districts east of Winnipeg, the No 1 Section, Skilled Railway Employees had a number of enlistments from CPR employees from Kenora. A local newspaper article of the 31st of January 1917 published the names of some 20 men who had enlisted, and another article of the 7th of February spoke of the men passing through Kenora by train, heading east on the first leg of their journey to the front. As a Private with the No 1 Section, Percy embarked from Halifax on 4 March 1917 aboard the Ausonia.
  Once in England Percy was promoted to Acting 2nd Corporal on the 23rd of March. The next month, on April 11th, he was admitted to the Military Isolation Hospital at Aldershot suffering from parotitis, the mumps. He was discharged on the 26th of June and posted to the No 85 Canadian Engine Crew Company at Purfleet on the 13th of November, reverting to rank of Sapper at his own request. By the 12th of December Percy was in France.
  From January until June of 1918 Percy was attached to the No 58 Broad Gauge Railway Operating Company, rejoining the No 85 Canadian Engine Crew Company on the 6th. In early November of 1918 he was admitted to the No 35 General Hospital in Calais with inflamed adenoids and tonsils, discharged by the end of the month. In January of 1919 he was granted a fourteen day leave to the UK and by mid April he proceeded back to England. After a series of transfers, Percy was discharged in July with his intended residence given as High Street in Tullamore, Kings County, Ireland where his brother James Arthur had been living in the 1911 Ireland census.
  At some point Percy returned to Canada and continued working for the Canadian Pacific Railway in Kenora and Winnipeg. On the side while in Kenora he also sold radios for General Electric. On 5 March 1932, in St James, Winnipeg, Percy married Dorothy Frank Cottrell. The couple were found on a 1935 Kenora Voters list as residing at the Kenricia Hotel. To his friends Percy was known as Captain Pat of Devil's Gap Lodge on Lake of the Woods. Retiring from the CPR as an engineer in 1945, Percy then became the building superintendent of the Hart Building in Winnipeg. He was a long time member of the Winnipeg Game and Fish Association, of the Hook and Slice Club, and the Carleton Club. In April of 1958 Percy returned to Ireland for a three month holiday, intended destination given as Rheban Castle in Athy on the passenger list of the Empress of France that arrived in Liverpool on the 22nd. His marital status was given as single.

(Note: Rheban Castle was the family farm of the Large's - Percy's elder sister, Isabella, had married Robert Large of Rheban Castle before they emigrated to Canada in 1909.)

Death: 3 October 1960 at his home at 155 Mayfair Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Kenora Miner and News 4 October 1960 (Kenora, Ontario)
Long-Time Member Of Game And Fish Association Dies
  Percy (Pat) Kilroy, of 155 Mayfair Avenue, died Monday in Winnipeg. Born in Ireland in 1887, Mr. Kilroy came to Canada as a young man, served with the Canadian forces in France from 1914 until 1919 and was know to his friends as Captain Pat of Devil's Gap Lodge.
  He retired from the Canadian Pacific Railway as engineer in 1945 and had been the building superindendent of the Hart Building. He was a long time member of the Winnipeg Game and Fish Association and was a member of the Hook and Slice Club and a former member of the Carleton Club.
  He is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Mae Large and Mrs. A. Tinkler: a grand nephew, Frank Kilroy and several nieces and nephews in Ireland, Canada and the United States. Funeral services will be at 1:30 p.m. Thursday in St. Andrews Anglican Church, Rev. J. S. Whitehouse officiating. Burial will be in the Chapel Lawn Memorial Gardens. Mordue Brothers Funeral Home is in charge.
  Honorary pallbearers will be Dr. Vernon Smith, Gerhard Kennedy, Nate Shuckett, Duke Campbell, Harry Jeffries and Fred Prest. Active bearers will be Frank Kilroy, Matt Mann, Dr. Norman Anderson, Dunc Sproat, John Donovan and Gerry Dennehy.

Buried: 6 October 1960, in Chapel Lawn Memorial Gardens, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. His grave is in Old Rugged Cross Lot 13 Grave 0001.

Census & Addresses:
1901: Vaughan Charter School, Tubbrid, Drumkeeran, county Fermanagh
1906: Selkirk district, Manitoba
1960: 155 Mayfair Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba   (Kenora Miner and News 4 October 1960)

Sources:

Percy Gibson Kilroy

Birth: 12 February 1912, at High Street, Tullamore, King's County, Ireland
Percy Gibson was born on Twelfth February 1912 at High St., Tullamore, the son of James A Kilroy, merchant, of High St., Tullamore, and Lucy Kilroy formerly Hutchinson.

Father: James Arthur Kilroy

Mother: Lucy Hannah (Hutchinson) Kilroy

Married: Kathleen Howard on 8 January 1935 in the parish church, Clontarf, Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland
Percy Gibson Kilroy is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of James Arthur Kilroy, shopkeeper. Percy is a clerk, resident at 5 Waverley Av. Kathleen Howard is recorded as a spinster, of full age, the daughter of John Edward Howard, whose profession is described as "retired business". Kathleen is resident at 5 Waverley Av. The wedding was witnessed by Desmond A. Kilroy and John Edward Howard.

Kathleen was the daughter of John Edward Howard. She died on 19 December 1975, and is buried in Deansgrange cemetery graveyard, Rathdown, county Dublin.

Occupation: Clerk

Death: 9 November 1989

Grave of Percy Gibson Kilroy and Kathleen (Howard) Kilroy
Headstone of Percy Gibson Kilroy and Kathleen (Howard) Kilroy in Deansgrange cemetery, Dublin, county Dublin
photograph by Joyce Tunstead Posted at Ireland Genealogy Projects Archives: Dublin Headstones
Buried: Deansgrange cemetery graveyard, Rathdown, county Dublin, Ireland.
The headstone reads:
In Treasured Memory | of | ENA KILROY | a devoted wife and loved | and loving mother and grandmother | died 19th December 1975 | and her dearly beloved husband | PERCY GIBSON KILROY | who joined her | on the 9th November 1989 | Always in their childrens hearts | "I know that my Redeemer liveth".

Census & Addresses:
1935: 5 Waverley Avenue, Dublin, county Dublin   (marriage record)
1965: The Avenue, Gorey, county Wexford   (death record)

Sources:

Philip Lefeuvre Kilroy

Title: Lt-Colonel

Birth: 1844, in Plymouth, Devon, England

Father: Alexander Kilroy

Mother: Maria Lucinda (Fry) Kilroy

Married: Louisa Susan Le Feuvre in 1867 in South Stoneham district, Hampshire, England. Louisa was born in 1839/40, in Southampton, Hampshire, England, and died in 1919, on the Isle of Wight, aged 79.
1881: Plymstock,Devon
1891: 72 Chaucer Road, Bedford St Paul, Bedfordshire
1901: Ryde, Isle of Wight: Louisa S. Kilroy is aged 61, born in Southampton, Hampshire

Children: Occupation: Army Surgeon. Philip joined the Royal Army Medical Corps as an assistant surgeon on 2 October 1865. He is listed in the Regimental Chronicle of the 60th, or King's Royal Rifle Corps, as an assistant surgeon from 1867 to 1873. He was promoted to surgeon on 1 March 1873 and in 1875 was stationed in West Forts. Philip was made Surgeon Major on 2 October 1877. Hart's Army List for 1882 shows Philip as a Surgeon Major, stationed in Bengal. Philip was then promoted to Surgeon Lt. Col. on 10 March 1892, and he retired on 15 May 1895.

Death: 1905

Census:
1881: Plymstock, Devon
1901: Ryde, Isle of Wight: Philip Le F. Kilroy is aged 56, born in Plymouth, Devon and St Colonel R C M C Retired

Sources:

Reggie Kilroy

Father: Mark Moore Kilroy

Mother: Mary Ellen (Moore) Kilroy

Notes: Reggie fought with Anzaca in World War I

Sources:

Richard Kilroy

Kilroy gravestone Detail of Kilroy gravestone
Gravestone of Richard and Elizabeth Kilroy, and their daughters Hannah and Elizabeth, in the churchyard at Ballymachugh Parish Church. It is probably part of the old church wall.
Detail of the gravestone:
Here Until the Resurrection are
deposited the Remains of Richd
Kilroy Esq of Omard and of
Elizabeth his beloved Wife the
Former Depd this life on the 18th
April 1823 aged 43 Years the Latter
on the 19th August 1830 aged 45 Years
also the Remains of Hannah their
Eldest daughter who Depd this
life the 7th of Sept 1827 aged 19 Years
and of Elizabeth their Fourth
Daughter who Depd this life on
the 28 of Aug. 1827 aged 13 Years
This tribute to the memory of
Richd and Elizabeth Kilroy has
been Raised by their affectionate
Daughters Maria Maxwell
and Frances Fearns
Birth: 1779/80, in Ireland

Father: _____ Kilroy

Married: Elizabeth _____

Elizabeth was born in 1784/6, in Ireland. She died on 19 August 1850, aged 45, and is buried at the Ballymachugh parish church, county Cavan.
Census:
28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan

Children: Occupation: Farmer. In the 1821 census, Richard is recorded as owning 109 acres in the townland of Omard, an extremely large area for this time and place, and indicates he was a very wealthy man.

Death:
18 April 1823, aged 43. Alan Hutchinson has his date of death as 20 April 1843, and his age at death as 44.

Buried: Ballymachugh Parish Church, county Cavan, Ireland

Census:
28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan

Sources:

Richard Kilroy

Birth: 1816/7

Father:
Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Census:

28 May 1821: Omard, Ballymachugh, county Cavan

Sources:

Richard Thomas Joseph Kilroy

Birth: 1863, in Dublin, county Dublin, Ireland

Father: John Kilroy

Mother: Catherine Wilhelmina (Wigelsworth) Kilroy

Married (1st): Bridget A. Devine on 15 August 1892, in Middleborough, Plymouth county, Massachusetts, United States. Richard is listed as aged 31, born in Dublin, Ireland, single, the son of John Kilroy and Catherine Wigglesworth. Bridget A. Devine is listed as aged 27, born in Dublin, Ireland, single, the daughter of Thomas Devine and Mary Renigon (or Kerrigan). Bridget, who used the nickname Delia, died on 6 March 1902, in Middleborough.

Children: Married (2nd): Cora Evelyn Terry on 26 August 1905, in Central Falls, Rhode Island, United States. Richard is listed as aged 41, born in Ireland, widowed, the son of John Kilroy and Kate Wigelsworth. Cora is listed as aged 27, born in Fall River, Massachusetts, the daughter of Benjamin Terry and Isabel Manchester.
Cora was born on 15 February 1878, in Fall River, Bristol county, Massachusetts.
1880: Fall River, Bristol county, Massachusetts

Children: Census:
1900: Middleboro Town, Plymouth county, Massachusetts
1920: Abington Town, Plymouth county, Massachusetts

Notes: Richard emigrated to the United States in 1890

Sources:

Richard Anthony Kilroy

Richard Anthony Kilroy
Richard Anthony Kilroy
(May 1935)
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Richard Anthony Kilroy
Richard Anthony Kilroy
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Birth: 27 February 1895, in Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland

Father: William Wesley Kilroy

Mother: Annie Catherine Maxwell (Groome) Kilroy

Married: Martha Jane Webb on 15 June 1927 in the parish church, Kilbixy, county Westmeath, Ireland
Richard Anthony Kilroy is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of Wm. W. Kilroy, a gentleman farmer. Richard is a gentleman farmer, resident at Clongill, Wilkinstown, county Meath. Martha Jane Webb is recorded as a spinster, of full age, the daughter of Matthew William Webb, a gentleman farmer. Martha is resident at Kilbixy rectory, Ballynacargy. The marriage was witnessed by W. W. Kilroy, A. Kilroy and Percival J. L. Webb.

Martha was born on 29 August 1885, at Bracklagh, Drumlumman, county Cavan, the daughter of Matthew William Webb and Elizabeth Jane Syndon. Martha died on 13 April 1968, and was buried on 15 April 1968 in Killeagh cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath.

Notes: Richard usually used the name "Tony". He served in World War I, enlisting in the 12th Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles in Calgary on 18 June 1915 (Trooper 117338)

Gravestone of Richard Anthony Kilroy and Martha Jane Webb
Gravestone of Richard Anthony Kilroy and Martha Jane (Webb) Kilroy in Killeagh Cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Death: 8 July 1971

Buried: Killeagh cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
The headstone reads:
In loving memory of Richard Anthony Kilroy born 27th Feb 1895 died 8th July 1971 and of his beloved wife Martha Jane died 13th April 1968

Census:
1901: Moat, Oldcastle, county Meath
1911: Mountjoy School, Mountjoy Square, St Peters, Dublin, county Dublin

Sources:

Robert Alexander Kilroy

Commander R. A. Kilroy
Commander R. A. Kilroy (1949)
photo from bolehproject.com
known as "Robin"

Title: Commander Robert Alexander Kilroy, D.S.C.

Birth: 27 June 1904, in Nottingham district, Nottinghamshire, England

Baptism: 8 July 1904, in St Barnabas, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Father: Lancelot Kilroy

Mother: Hester Mary (Dowson) Kilroy

Occupation: Officer in the Royal Navy, with a temporary commission in the Royal Air Force.
Robert joined the Royal Navy as a midshipman on 15 May 1922 on the battleship Queen Elizabeth and promoted to acting sub-lieutenant on 15 September 1924, then sub-lieutenant on 15 June 1926. On 4 January 1927, Robert was granted a temporary commission as Flying Officer on attachment for 4 years' duty with the R.A.F. (London Gazette 14 January 1927 p289). He was promoted to Lieutenant on 17 December 1927 (London Gazette 23 December 1927 p8244).

In June 1929, Robert, a lieutenant on board the Eagle, was involved in the rescue of Ramón Franco, a famed Spanish pioneer aviator (and brother of future Spanish dictator Francisco Franco), for which he was awarded the Cross of the First Class of the Order of Naval Merit by the King of Spain on 2 December 1929 "in recognition of valuable services rendered by him" (London Gazette 3 December 1929 p7863).
Flight 4 July 1929:
Spanish Atlantic Airmen Found
  H.M.S. "EAGLE," the aircraft carrier, found the missing Spanish Dornier-Wal flying-boat on June 29, after the machine had been missing for a week. It will be remembered that Major R. Franco and his companions, left Spain for the Azores on June 21 on the first stage of an attempt to fly to America. They were first reported to have landed safely, but later that was denied. Then an extensive search by aircraft and surface craft, in which H.M.S. Eagle was ordered to take part, was waged for a week. The Admiralty received the following message from H.M.S. Eagle, which contains Major Franco's story of the flight. "We left Los Alcazares (Cartagena) at 17.00 hours, June 21, passing Cape St. Vincent at 21.00 hours. From the Cape we were forced to gain height owing to excessive air disturbances. From Cape St. Vincent to the Azores was an interrupted layer of cloud, above which we had to fly. Later another cloud layer formed above us. The intended time of our arrival at the Azores was 09.00 G.M.T. on June 22, but a strong north-east wind which we were unable to foresee or check in flight, caused us to pass over the Azores during the dark. At dawn we took our longitude by the sun, which showed that we were to the south-west of the Azores.
  "We therefore flew through the clouds and alighted to economise fuel and examine the situation more closely. We checked our position and took off, shaping a course to Fayal, but, owing to strong headwinds, ran out of petrol about 40 miles from that point. Strong north-easterly winds drifted us to the south, and on the following day, June 23, we were about 100 miles from Fayal. The wind shifted to the south-west, reaching gale force, and drifted us to the island of Santa Maria. From June 24 to 27 winds of varying force and direction drifted us about. On the morning of the 27th the situation was extremely dangerous on account of the wind and sea conditions. At dawn on June 29 the aircraft-carrier Eagle found us in the vicinity of Santa Maria and took us on board. The behaviour of the aircraft and engines (Hispano-Suizas) was magnificent."
  The aircraft-carrier reached Gibraltar on July 2 and the crew and the Spanish airmen received a great welcome. The Governor of Algeciras conveyed the Spanish Government's thanks to Capt. Lawrence of H.M.S. Eagle, whilst Spanish aircraft flew over the British warship. Flt.-Lieut. Lewin, who flew the machine from which the airmen were sighted has been singled out for special praise, and it is understood that the Spanish Government intends to award decorations to Capt. Lawrence and Lieut. R. A. Kilroy, who sighted the machine when on duty in the aircraft-carrier.

The Auburn Citizen (Auburn, New York) 2 July 1929:
Rescue of Spanish Trans-Atlantic Fliers Described by Airplane Carrier Chief
  Gibraltar, July 2.-(AP) - How he clung to a forlorn hope and followed a fantastic light gleam near the Azores Saturday morning to save the lives of the Spanish trans-Atlantic aviators was told by Lieutenant R. A. Kilroy of H. M. S. Eagle today.
  Lieutenant Kilroy was on watch before dawn Saturday morning of last week. The weather had been rough the day before and neither he nor his fellow officers believed there was a chance the Dornier-Wal plane of Major Ramon Franco still floated
  At 4 a. m. there was a queer weird beam from the surface of the sea far to the South of him. It might have been most anything but Lieutenant Kilroy turned the Eagle about and in a few minutes was able to make out the plane. With the four Spaniards aboard, waving and gesticulating to him.
  Lieutenant Kilroy was reticent but Major Franco was more voluble. He [line unreadable] after that came down south-east of the Azores. These gave their position, but apparently they were not picked up. Day after day they drifted with the wind, and on their fifth and sixth day afloat, Thursday and Friday, June 27 and June 28, a heavy sea made them fear that would be their last.
  On the morning of Saturday, June 29, Maj. Gonzales Gallarza saw a vessel's lights, probably 20 miles away. The aviators flashed their own Bengal lights and sent up some rockets, then spent anxious moments wondering if they were seen. They were overjoyed a little later to see the craft turn In their direction and make way rapidly toward them.
  The fliers were taken aboard, and at 6 o'clock, two hours after they were sighted, their plane was lifted up by the carrier's hoists and lodged on one of the decks. Lieutenant Kilroy said Major Franco and his three companions were exceedingly cheerful despite their danger.
  Although they still had plenty of food aboard their drinking water was running short and they had been using the fluid from the engine and radio tanks. They were visited aboard the Dornier by Lieutenant Stevenson of the Eagle before they came aboard. He shook hands with them and they thanked him earnestly.
  Major Franco told the story of their landing early Saturday morning, June 22, just a week before they were picked up. He said conditions were bad on the journey with visibility greatly impaired by layers of clouds. There was dense fog over the Azores in which they could find no break. They knew they were over the islands but if they attempted to fly low and get their exact bearings they probably would crash. Therefore they flew around until they were sure they were over the sea and then came down upon the water.
  Their fuel was exhausted because of having flown so long through the fog. After landing on the water they saw no ships for more than six days. They took turns sleeping, one of the four always on the lookout. They had considerable rough stormy weather and bad seas with their plane pitching heavily. They were not seasick, however, and did not suffer.
  Each night they used some of their signal rockets, firing the last of them when the Eagle's lights finally were sighted.

Robert also served in the Hermes and the Glorious. He was promoted from Flying Officer to Flight Lieutenant on 1 January 1934 (London Gazette 29 December 1933 p17) and to Squadron Leader on 31 December 1937 (London Gazette 31 December 1937 p8194). When the war began in 1939, Kilroy commanded the Fleet Air Arm's 778 Squadron, a service trials unit, and in 1940 was Commanding Officer of 815 Squadron embarked in the Illustrious. On 24 April 1940 he led that that squadron to to join RAF Coastal Command in minelaying operations in the English Channel. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, a naval medal awarded for 'gallantry during active operations against the enemy', for minelaying operations in a Swordfish when in command of 815 Squadron  In May 1940 he provided support during the Dunkirk evacuation and was promoted to Commander on 30 June 1940 (London Gazette 2 July 1940 p4016). In 1941 Robert was appointed Commander (Flying) at Lee on Solent, Fleet Air Arm Headquarters in Southern England. He was sent to Colombo in 1942 as a member of the Air Staff, and held that appointment until joining the Indefatigable.

Evening Post (Wellington, New Zealand) 28 November 1945 p8:
NAVAL CAREERS
CARRIER'S OFFICERS EXPERIENCE IN SERVICE
MINELAYING IN SWORDFISH
  The Commander (Flying) in the ship [Indefatigable] is Commander Robert Alexander Kilroy, D.S.C, R.N., of London. Aged 41, he began to specialise in flying in 1927, served in H.M. Ships Eagle, Hermes, Glorious, and Illustrious, before, and during the early days of the war. Of these, the Eagle was sunk by torpedoes in the Mediterranean, the Hermes was bombed to the bottom by the Japanese off Ceylon, the Glorious was sunk by the Scharnhorst off Norway, and the Illustrious survived many hazardous operations in the Mediterranean. Later, she helped open the British Pacific Fleet's offensive against the Japanese off the Sakishima Gunto.
  When the war began in 1939, Commander Kilroy commanded the Fleet Air Arm's 778 Squadron, a service trials unit, and in 1940 was Commanding Officer of 815 Squadron embarked in the Illustrious. In that year he was promoted Commander, and in 1941 was appointed Commander (Flying) at Lee on Solent, Fleet Air Arm Headquarters in Southern England. He was sent to Colombo in 1942 as a member of the Air Staff, and held that appointment until joining the Indefatigable.
  Commander Kilroy was awarded the D S C. for minelaying operationsin a Swordfish ("Stringbag*') when in command of 815 Squadron.

After the war Robert was appointed Boom Defence Officer in Singapore. Boom defences laid steel nets around harbours and individual ships to protect them from submarines and torpedos. Robert retired on 27 June 1954 (London Gazette 29 June 1954 p3829).

Notes:
On 17 November 1904, Hester and her children Maud and Robert (but not Alix?), along with Evelyn Roebuck, their nurse and governess, entered the United States on The Majestic (manifest), from Liverpool. Their final destination is given as Bermuda with the intention of joining Lancelot Kilroy at the Royal Naval Hospital, Bermuda.
On 22 March 1905, Lancelot, his wife Hester and children Maud Winifred and Robert, and Evelyn Roebuck, returned to the United States aboard the Bermudian (manifest) sailing from Hamilton, Bermuda. They were en route to London, and they give their last residence as Bermuda.

The Boleh
The Boleh
photo from bolehproject.com
In 1949, Robert "Robin" Kilroy designed and built a Malay junk yacht Boleh and then sailed it in an epic 15,000 mile journey from Singapore to Salcombe, Devon with a crew of five. The "jhow" left Singapore on 18 January 1950 (The Straits Times 18 January 1950 p4) and arriving in Salcome on 1 September 1950 (The Sunday Herald (Sydney, Australia) 3 September 1950 p5). The  voyage, with stops in Sabang, Colombo, Minikoi, Seychelles, Mauritius, Port Elizabeth, Simonstown, St. Helena, Ascension and Cape Verde was the subject of a book, Boleh, Kilroy wrote in 1951.

Robin gave a series of lectures in England about his journey, and a series of photos, technical drawings and illustrations about the voyage and the wildlife he encountered are published at the bolehproject website.

The Boleh was severely damaged by fire in 1978, but was rebuilt and was later purchased by a Kilroy family trust. It is now a registered National Historic Ship and is in Portsmouth, Hampshire being restored to be used for sail training for disadvantaged young people.

The Straits Times 14 August 1949 p7
THE BOLEH WILL SAIL TO U.K.
5-month trip in 20-ton 'jhow'
      Sunday Times Staff Reporter
THREE Royal Navy Officers, a Royal Naval Dockyard civilian and possibly two Malay youths intend to sail a small Singapore-built craft to England in January next year - a 12,000-mile voyage which will take about five months.
  Commander Robin Kilroy, D.S.C., R.N., is at present supervising the building of this vessel of his at the Boom Depot, Loyang. He calls his little craft - she less then 20 tons displacement - a "jhow." That is because she is a mixture of Chinese junk and Arab dhow in design, with the high stern typical of Eastern vessels.
  He has named her the Boleh, partly as a tribute to the two Trengganu Malays who are building her. These shipwrights, Embong bin Salleh and Ali bin Ngah, have just returned to work on the Boleh, after spending the Hari Raya festival at home in Trengganu.
  They do not mean to sail in her to England, but two youngsters who are helping Commander Kilroy with the construction, may sign on as crew.
  Their names are Ahmad bin Samin, of Batu Pahat, and Omar bin Saleh, of Siglap, each aged 18. Their keenness, as they work on the Boleh, is a pleasure to watch, whether they are planning or caulking or dyeing sail.
  The boat will have a great brown sail like a junk, half slatted, and has a hull of stout chengai wood.
  Now that work is nearing completion, the boat is hoisted on an iron trolley in the open. Commander Kilroy wants her ready for trials in October, "as," he says, "we must leave Singapore for England in January."
  The Boleh's course will be from Malaya to Ceylon, across to the Seychelles and through the Mozambique Channel to Durban. Then she will round the Cape of Good Hope to St. Helena, Ascension, the Azores and so to Salcombe, Devon.
  Salcombe is the home of many sailing men, and Mr. George Jarvis, of the R. N. Dockyard, Singapore Naval Base, who is one of Commander Kilroy's crew, hails from there.
  The other two, so far chosen, are Lt,-Cdr. John Rusher and Lt.-Cdr. Peter Aplin. The ideal fifth Englishman has not yet turned up, but the Commander has his ideas on the subject of what type of man he would best like.
  On holidays, stripped to the waist, the Boleh's skipper toils on his craft. He has even enlisted feminine help in the person of the wife of a friend.
  The Boleh will not voyage entirely by sail, as there is a 9 h.p. engine. Two water tanks capable of carrying 120 gallons will be fitted fore and aft, but there will be no system of refrigeration.
  And this lack of means of keeping food supplies cool is worrying the skipper. "Of course, we could trail stores in the water at night." he said with a puzzled expression.

The Sunday Herald (Sydney, Australia) 3 September 1950 p5
:
Halfway Round The World In 16-Ton "Dream" Boat
          From Our Staff Correspondent
  LONDON Sept. 2. - The Boleh, 16 tons, a craft which is a cross between a Chinese junk and an Arab dhow, reached Salcombe Harbour, Devon, yesterday after sailing 12,000 miles from Singapore.
  Malaya shipping men had laughed at her and said she would not last an hour in bad weather. 
  "Boleh" is Malay for "can do".
  The Boleh, 38ft long, rode out half a dozen storms during her 194 days at sea.
  Her master is Commander Robin Kilroy, R.N., who designed her.
  Kilroy, who was boom defence officer in Singapore at the end of the war, decided to build his "dream ship" and sail to his home town of Salcombe. He persuaded three other Royal Navy men to get long leave and join him.
  He enlisted a Chinese cook, Chang Hai-kun.
  Four Malay workmen built the vessel in a Singapore shipyard in 16 months. It cost £3,000.
     TINS AND TUNNY
  "For weeks we saw nothing but sea, sky, waves, and stars, but we were never bored," said the electrician and odd jobs man, Lieutenant-Commander J. S. Rusher.
  The crew played chess, worked out more than 1,000 crossword puzzles, and kept in touch with news by radio.
  They ate 38 different kinds of tinned meat, and Chang Hai-kun discovered seven ways of cooking tunny.

Publications:
1951: Boleh

The Straits Times 21 January 1952 p8
Singapore To U.K. Before The Wind
BOLEH. By Robin Kilroy. (Hodder and Syoughton, 15s)
   -By -
BRUCE FRASER
MOST people with a love for the sea and boats have a dream at the back of their minds that one day they will cut loose from the worries of the shore, and make a deep-sea voyage in their own small craft. They hanker after the right to call themselves blue-water sailors, to know the flying fish and boisterous draught of the trade winds as their familiar friends.
Back to earth
AND then, like most of us they go back to their stuffy offices, and realise sadly that the money and the time are lacking: to wake up some years later and find that neither money nor time are lacking, but that there are other things such as family ties that have swallowed the anchor for them almost unnoticed.
  But for some people, the Alain Gerbaults, the Joshua Slocums and the Irving Johnsons, the dream comes true. For Robin Kilroy the dream came true too, perhaps even better than for most, for he designed and built his own ship in Singapore, with restricted funds and from local resources, and then sailed it round the Cape of Good Hope to England, was a feat that only those who have struggled with the archaic methods and startling prices of local boatbuilders can appreciate.
Advantages
AS a naval officer Kilroy had some advantages: he was incharge of the Boom Defence Depot at Loyang, with the facilities of a slipway at his disposal. he had a band of helpers whose enthusiasm made up much for their lack of experience. Best of all he was able to enlist the help of some skilled naval shipwrights and engineers, who spent many week-ends of their spare time to aid him, and one of whom, George Jarvis, joined his crew for the homeward voyage.
  His disadvantages were that his artist's eye (he was an amateur painter of some worth) had given him a liking for the exotic in naval architecture: and that he preferred to rediscover for himself what many generations of seaman had already found out in the hard school of the ocean sailing ship routes.
  So he designed his ship Boleh with a high poop owing something to the junks of China and the dhows of the Indian Ocean: with a quadruped mast of horrible weight and windage aloft, tried and rejected by deep-water sailors many years ago: and a mainsail stiffened by "wishbones" which were in theory aerodynamically splendid, but a perfect nightmare to live with at sea.
  From the crew's point of view his nastiest innovation was the propeller drive, a curious Heath Robinson device which enabled the propeller to be removed when the engine was not in use, saving drag. Unfortunately it was so unsound mechanically that power was seldom available, and when it was the noise made life a misery.
  But in spite of all this, in spite of his admission that most of what he had considered his excellent ideas were failures, he took Boleh home. His book is a record of solid achievement, although with its likeness to a ship's log, its steady record of the trivia of shipboard life, it is no literary masterpiece.
The crew
HE took with him a crew of four - Peter Aplin and John  Rusher, both naval officers, George Jarvis, a civilian employed in the Naval Dockyards, and Chang, his cook. From his book only two characters come to life: Peter Aplin, whose diary forms a large part of the book, who, as sailing master and navigator, probably did most towards the voyage's successful conclusion: and Chang, a paragon of all sea-cooks, never weary, never complaining.
  Scant justice is done to the vivid personality of John Rusher. One gets the impression that as caterer he never managed to turn up a meal antone liked: in fact his humour was probably a saving grace in the irritation which always ensues when too many people are confined too long in a small ship.
  Kilroy is now stationed in the West of England, and gets down to Boleh whenever he can. She has descended from an ocean voyager to a quiet yacht for coastal cruising. Though no greyhound of the seas, perhaps as the ocean racers storm past her bound for then Fastnet Rock or Santander, she chuckles quietly and a little proudly to herself what her Malay shipwrights from Trengganu said as she took the water at Loyang: boleh!

The Straits Times 23 March 1952 p14
'BOLEH' - AND THE MEN WHO SAILED HER
  - By Our Literary Critic
DURING 1949 there was built at the Boom Defence depot at Loyang in Singapore a yacht, which its owner, Commander Kilroy, R.N., describes as a Malay junk yacht: "It is, as the White Knight said 'my own invention'."
  On completion of this craft, which Cdr. Kilroy built in his spare time and at his own expense, he was granted six months' half-pay leave, and, having signed on a four-man crew consisting of a caterer-maitre d'hotel-electrician a navigator-boatswain-diarist, a shipwright-engineer and a cook, he set sail from Singapore for home, and after 170 saiing days across 15,000 miles of ocean, reached Salcombe harbour, Devon, in September, 1950.
  "Boleh" is Cdr. Kilroy's story of this great voyage, and is a most readable book from every point of view. There is much technical detail, both of the building of the boat, and of the voyage itself, but there is plenty of humour and general interest, and plenty of illustrations, thought the photographic reproduction is not of a very high order.
AS with all great ventures there were many setbacks, great and small, to be overcome. Cdr. Kilroy, for example, had spent three tedious weeks tracing and inking in the first set of construction drawings, for printing. Finally, all was finished, except for the rubbing out of the old pencil marks.
  "I had to attend a meeting at the dockyard at 9 o'clock, and had first to go to the office, which left me with very little time. Whilst drinking my coffee I began on the rubbing out, with Lim Fok Gnow, my most intelligent Chinese steward of those days, standing watching me and simply itching to help in some way. It was a rather slow process ... some care to prevent the dry ink from coming off in places with the pencil marks. At last I could delay no longer, so I explained the difficulty of the ink to Lim and left him to carry on while I dashed down to the office.
  "As usual I was detained there a little longer than I had meant to be. When I returned to the bungalow some twenty minutes later to collect the drawing, Lim presented me proudly with a completely clean sheet. The ink-lines that he could not get off by heavy application of the rubber he had erased with one of my safety-razor blades.
  I was fond of Lim."

Death: 1 February 1961, in Salcombe, Devon, England

Census:
1911: Kingsbridge district, Devon: Robert Alex Kilroy is aged 6

Sources:

Sarah Anne (Kilroy) Russell

known as "Sallie"

Father: Richard Kilroy

Mother: Elizabeth (_____) Kilroy

Married: Thomas Samuel Russell on 22 January 1852, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland. Thomas is listed as single, the son of Eleas Russell. Sarah is listed as single, the daughter of Richard Kilroy.

Children: Notes: Sallie is listed in the Kilroy family notes as a member of this family. She does not appear with the family in the 1821 census, and was probably born after the census but before her father's death in 1823.

Sources:

Susan Kilroy

Gravestone of William Wesley Kilroy, Annie Groome and Susan Kilroy
Gravestone of William Wesley Kilroy, Annie Catherine Maxwell (Groome) Kilroy and Susan Kilroy in Killeagh Cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Birth: 30 June 1846, in county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Notes: Known as "Lily"

Death: 26 December 1921, at Moat View, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
Susan Kilroy died on Twenty-Sixth December 1921, at Moat-View, Oldcastle. She is recorded as a spinster, aged 75 years and her occupation is housekeeper. The cause of death is listed as cerebral haemorrage resulting from gangrene of foot. The informant was Wm W. Kilroy, of Moat View, Oldcastle.

Buried: Killeagh cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
The headstone reads:
In loving memory of William Wesley Kilroy died 6th May 1931 aged 75 his wife Annie Catherine Maxwell died 25th July 1924 and his sister Susan Kilroy died 27th January 1922

Census:
1901: Castlereban North, Churchtown, county Kildare (Susan is visiting her niece, Isabel (Kilroy) Large
1911: Scallanstown, Ardbraccan, county Meath

Sources:

Susan Kilroy

Birth: 28 May 1882, at Derrysheridan, Killeagh parish, county Meath, Ireland
Susan was born on Twenty Eighth May 1882 at Derrysheridan, the daughter of James Kilroy, farmer, of Derrysheridan, and Maria Kilroy formerly Gibson.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Maria (Gibson) Kilroy

Sources:

Virginia Catherine Kilroy

Birth: 23 January 1897, in Middleborough, Plymouth county, Massachusetts, United States

Father: Richard Thomas Joseph Kilroy

Mother: Bridget A. (Devine) Kilroy
Census:
1900: Middleboro Town, Plymouth county, Massachusetts
1920: Abington Town, Plymouth county, Massachusetts

Sources:

William Kilroy

Birth: 11 June 1837, in Ballymachugh, county Cavan, Ireland

Father: Anthony Kilroy

Mother: Catherine (_____) Kilroy

Death: 15 April 1865 in Dublin South district, county Dublin, Ireland, aged 26

Sources:

William James Kilroy

Birth: 1848, in Plymouth, Devon, England

Father: Alexander Kilroy

Mother: Maria Lucinda (Fry) Kilroy

Occupation: William was Fleet Paymaster in the Royal Navy. William was made assistant paymaster with seniority from 11 December 1869. On 2 March 1871, William joined the Scout, a corvette in the Pacific, as assistant paymaster (1872 Navy List), and he was still aboard the Scout in the Pacific in 1873 and when it was ordered home in 1874.  On 5 August 1875, William joined the Excellent, a Gunnery ship stationed in Portsmouth (1876 list). On 10 January 1877, William joined the Seagull, a Gun-Vessel, as assistant paymaster in charge. In the 1878 Navy List, the Seagull had been stationed in the Cape of Good Hope and the West Coast of Africa, but was ordered back to Devonport. On 30 July 1880, William joined the Euphrates, an Indian Troop Ship (1881 list) where we still find him in the 1881 census. On 11 August 1881, William joined the Malabar, an iron troop ship, stationed in Porstmouth (1882 list) and on 1 October 1882 he joined the Crocodile, also a troop ship based in Portsmouth (1883 list). On 20 July 1883 William joined the Sultan, attached to the Channel Squadron (1885 list). On 13 January 1886, William was promoted to paymaster, and on 3 April 1886, he joined the Kingfisher, a Composite Sloop based in the East Indies, as paymaster (1887 Navy list). On 1 February 1889 William joined, as paymaster, the Hyacinth, a Screw Cruiser 3rd Class which was in China at the time of the 1891 Navy List. William retired as Fleet Paymaster on 30 April 1900.

Death: 1901, in the Isle of Wight district, Hampshire, England, aged 53

Census:
1881: Euphrates, Royal Navy, England
1901: Ryde, Isle of Wight: William J. Kilroy is aged 52, born in Plymouth, Devon and Retired Fleet Pagemaster RI Retired

Sources:

William Wesley Kilroy

William Wesley Kilroy
William Wesley Kilroy
scan by Chris Gosnell
Gravestone of William Wesley Kilroy, Annie Groome and Susan Kilroy
Gravestone of William Wesley Kilroy, Annie Catherine Maxwell (Groome) Kilroy and Susan Kilroy in Killeagh Cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Birth: 27 April 1856 in county Cavan, Ireland

Father: James Kilroy

Mother: Anne Moore

Married: Annie Catherine Maxwell Groome on 20 September 1888, in the parish church, St Peters, Drogheda, county Louth, Ireland
William Wesley Kilroy is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of James Kilroy, gentleman. William's occupation is listed as gentleman, and he is resident at Moatview, Oldcastle, county Meath. Annie Katherine Maxwell Groome is recorded as a spinster, of full age, the daughter of Edward Groome, clerk in holy orders. Annie is resident in St Peters, Drogheda.

Children: Occupation: Farmer and Land Agent. This is how William describes himself in the 1901 census and in 1911 as Assessor, Surveyor and Farmer. On 9 February 1889, William was appointed as a magistrate in Meath county, and is described at the time as a land agent and landowner. William was an executor of the will of his wife's aunt, Catherine Dalzell Carpendale in 1917, at which time he is listed as a Surveyor. In 1926, he writes a letter from Moat View, and notes that he is "Assessor for Honr. Mr. Justice Wylie Land Judge" and that he valued land all over Ireland "for him & others". In the same letter he notes that previously he had had a large stud farm, but reduced its size in 1914, because his work took him away from home so much.

Death: 6 May 1931, in Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland, aged 75
William Wesley Kilroy is recorded as a widower and gentleman farmer, aged 76. The cause of death is listed as septic pneumonia and heart failure.

Buried: Killeagh cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
The headstone reads:
In loving memory of William Wesley Kilroy died 6th May 1931 aged 75 his wife Annie Catherine Maxwell died 25th July 1924 and his sister Susan Kilroy died 27th January 1922

Notes:
William was Master of the Ballymacad fox hounds.

Census & Addresses:
1896: Moat View, Oldcastle, county Meath (birth certificate of daughter Annie Kathleen)
1901: Moat, Oldcastle, county Meath
1911: Moat, Oldcastle, county Meath
1926: Moat View, Oldcastle, county Meath (letter in possession of Chris Gosnell)

Sources:

Willie Dickson Kilroy

Birth: 1876, in Southampton Highfield, Hampshire, England

Father: Philip Lefeuvre Kilroy

Mother: Louisa Susan (Le Feuvre) Kilroy

Married: Edith Mary Maclaran in 1906 in Farnham district (Hampshire and Surrey), England. Edith was born on 10 August 1874 in the Bombay Presidency, India, and was baptised on 22 September 1874 in Tanna, Bombay, India, the daughter of Francis Blayney Maclaran and Mary Beckwith Armstrong. Edith died on 15 December 1954, at "Dolphins", Everton, near Lymington, Hampshire.
Census:
1881: 59 West St, Chichester St Peter The Great, Sussex
1891: West Pallant St., Chichester All Saints, West Sussex
1901: Frimley, Surrey: Edith M. Maclaran, daughter, is aged 26, born in India
1911: Harrow on the Hill, Middlesex: Edith Kilroy is aged 36, born in Bombay Presidency

Children:
Occupation: Electrical Engineer.
Willie was elected an Associate of the Institute of Electrical Engineers in January 1899.

Notes:
Willie served during World War I in the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserves. He was made temporary Lieutenant on 16 November 1915 (London Gazette 23 November 1915 p11592) and appointed Assistant to the Director of Naval Ordnance. The Royal Navy adopted several of his inventions, including Kilroy's Danger Signal and the Mechanical Aid-to-Spotter

Willie was awarded an O.B.E. on 1 April 1919 "for valuable services in connection with the design and improvement of fire control instruments." (London Gazette 28 March 1919 p4197)

Willie was a prolific inventor, and secured numerous patents including, in 1907, a Means for Automatically Indicating Certain Relative Positions of Guns or the like to Each Other, in 1909 an application "For Improvements Relating to Electro-motors and to the Production of Sound Waves for Signalling to a Distance, in 1910, a patent "for Improvements in and Relating to Danger and Like Signal Devices, in 1916 a Sound Emitter with fellow inventor Sydney Evershard and, in 1928, one for "Improvements in or connected with lamps for vehicles". In 1934, Willie, his brother Lancelot and F. Wheatley received for a patent for "A new or improved device for holding fish hooks, artificial flies or baits" and in 1955  he patented "Improvements in and relating to blocks for yachts, boats and the like"

Death: 9 November 1956 at "Dolphins", Everton, near Lymington, Hampshire, England, aged 81

Census:
1881: Plymstock, Devon
1891: 72 Chaucer Road, Bedford St Paul, Bedfordshire
1901: Fulham, London: Willie Kilroy, visitor, is aged 25, born in Southampton, Hampshire. He is an Electrical Engineer
1911: Harrow On The Hill, Middlesex: Willie Kilroy is aged 35, born in Southampton, Hampshire
1934: Lane End, Everton, Lymington, Hampshire (patent application)
1954:
"Dolphins", Everton, near Lymington, Hampshire (London Gazette 7 January 1955 p207)
1956: "Dolphins", Everton, near Lymington, Hampshire (London Gazette 23 November 1956 p6693)

Sources:

William Ernest Edward Kilroy

William Ernest Kilroy
William Ernest Kilroy
photograph from Chris Gosnell
Kilroy picnic at Lough Sheelin
Kilroy family picnic at Lough Sheelin in May 1935. William Ernest is seated far left. Others pictured are Ken Gosnell (standing left), Richard Tony Kilroy (front) and Louise (Waldron) Kilroy and Cecil Kilroy (standing right)
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
known as "Ernest"

Birth: 12 September 1892, at Moat View, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland

Father: William Wesley Kilroy

Mother: Annie Catherine Maxwell (Groome) Kilroy

Louise Emily Madeline Waldron
Louise Emily Madeline Waldron
(May 1935)
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Married: Louise Emily Madeleine Waldron on 13 April 1927 in St James, Athboy, county Meath, Ireland
William Ernest Edward Kilroy is recorded as a bachelor, of full age, the son of Thomas Richard Kilroy, farmer. William is a gentleman farmer, resident at Moat View, Oldcastle. Louise Emily Madeleine Waldron is recorded as a spinster, of full age, the daughter of William Waldron, farmer. Louise is resident at Ballyfallon, Athboy. The marriage was witnessed by Alan J. M. Kilroy, M.G. Waldron, W. Waldron and Louise Smith.

[William's father is incorrectly stated on the marriage record - William is really the son of William Wesley Kilroy as seen in the census records and on the gravestone.]

Louise was born on 10 January 1904, at 63 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin, the daughter of William Waldron and Madeleine Smith. She was baptised in 1908, in St James Church, Athboy, county Meath. Louise died on 3 July 1985, in Sandycove, county Dublin and  was buried in Killeagh Cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath.
Census:
1911: Ballyfallon or Newtown, Athboy, county Meath

Gravestone of William Ernest Kilroy and Louise Waldron
Gravestone of William Ernest Kilroy and Louise (Waldron) Kilroy in Killeagh Cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland
photograph from Jerry Gosnell
Death: 23 August 1973, at Moat View, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland

Buried: Killeagh Cemetery, Oldcastle, county Meath, Ireland

Census:
1901: Moat, Oldcastle, county Meath
1911: Moat, Oldcastle, county Meath

Sources:

William George Kilroy

Birth: 19 April 1914, at High Street, Tullamore, King's County, Ireland
William George was born on Nineteenth April 1914 at High St., Tullamore, the son of James A. Kilroy, iron monger, of High St., Tullamore, and Lucy Kilroy formerly Hutchinson.

Father: James Arthur Kilroy

Mother: Lucy Hannah (Hutchinson) Kilroy

Sources:

_____ Kilroy

Children: Sources:

_____ Kilroy

Birth: 1 March 1884, at Derrysheridan, Killeagh parish, county Meath, Ireland
Unnamed male was born on First of March 1884 at Derrysheridan, the daughter of James W. Kilroy, farmer, of Derrysheridan, and Maria Kilroy formerly Gibson.

Father: James Watkin Kilroy

Mother: Maria (Gibson) Kilroy

Sources:
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